College football

(Redirected from College Football) A college football game between Colorado State University and the Air Force Academy.

College football was the venue through which American football first gained popularity in the United States. College football remains extremely popular today among students, alumni, and other fans of the sport.

History

A college football game between Texas Tech University and the U.S. Naval Academy.

The first game played between teams representing different colleges or universities was played on November 6, 1869 between Rutgers University and Princeton University, at College Field (now the site of the College Avenue Gymnasium), New Brunswick, New Jersey. Rutgers won, by a score of 6 to 4. As the score would seemingly indicate, the game bore little resemblance to the game of today. The rules of that game were the 1863 rules of the English Football Association, the basis of the modern form of soccer.

The development of the American game can be traced to a meeting between the Harvard University and McGill University football teams in 1874. The two teams were used to playing different brands of football — the McGill team played a rugby-style game, while Harvard played a soccer-style game. The teams agreed to play under compromise rules, and from this meeting the game of football began to evolve in both the United States and Canada.

The game increased in popularity through the remainder of the 19th century. It also became increasingly violent. President Theodore Roosevelt threatened, in 1906, to ban the sport following a series of player deaths from injuries suffered during games. The response to this was the formation of what became the National Collegiate Athletic Association, which set rules governing the sport. One of the rules changes to emerge from this attempt at alleviating the violence of the sport was the introduction of the forward pass. Another was the banning of "mass momentum" plays (many of which, like the infamous "flying wedge", were sometimes literally deadly).

Prior to the founding of the National Football League, and for a few decades thereafter, college football was the predominant venue for American football. Innovations in strategy and style of play originated in college football and spread to the pro game gradually. It was not until the post-World War II era that the pro game achieved ascendancy in the eyes of the average American sports fan.

The season schedule

Division 1A college football begins two to three weeks earlier than the NFL, towards the end of August. Until 2003, the regular season was officially ushered in by the Kickoff Classic, held in recent years in New Jersey (although other pre-season games such as the Eddie Robinson Classic and the Pigskin Classic have also been played), but recent NCAA policy changes have eliminated some of these games, and so the season now largely starts out with regular games. The regular season then continues through early December (generally ending with the annual Army-Navy Game).

The college post-season is ushered in by the annual presentation of the Heisman Trophy Award, considered the most prestigious award in all of college football, given to the top player of the year as determined by a panel consisting of media voters and former winners of the award. This is then followed by a series of bowl games that showcase (usually) the top college team in a particular conference, as well as the consensus "national champion", which is determined not by a true playoff, but by a controversial confederation of voters, broadcast networks, bowls and conferences known as the Bowl Championship Series. A series of all-star bowl games round out the season for the balance of January, including the East-West Shrine Game, the Senior Bowl (for many decades the official final game of the season), the Hula Bowl, and the Gridiron Classic (in recent years, the Hula and Gridiron have alternated as the final game of the season).

In spring 2005, the NCAA ruled that teams could schedule 12 regular-season games beginning in the 2006 season. This decision was met with some criticism, as some teams, such as Alabama and Auburn, who traditionally have a bye week on Thanksgiving weekend, will have to play eight games consecutively some seasons.

National championships

  • NCAA Division I-A national football champions
  • NCAA Division I-AA national football championship
  • NCAA Division II national football championship
  • NCAA Division III national football championship
  • NAIA national football championship

NCAA divisions and conferences

NCAA Division I-A

  • Atlantic Coast Conference
  • Big East Conference
  • Big Ten Conference
  • Big Twelve Conference
  • Conference USA
  • Mid-American Conference
  • Mountain West Conference
  • Pacific Ten Conference
  • Southeastern Conference
  • Sun Belt Conference
  • Western Athletic Conference
  • NCAA Division I-A Independent Schools

NCAA Division I-AA

  • Atlantic Ten Conference
  • Big Sky Conference
  • Big South Conference
  • Gateway Football Conference
  • Great West Football Conference
  • Ivy League
  • Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference
  • Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference
  • Northeast Conference
  • Ohio Valley Conference
  • Patriot League
  • Pioneer Football League
  • Southern Conference
  • Southland Conference
  • Southwestern Athletic Conference
  • NCAA Division I-AA Independent Schools

NCAA Division II

  • Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association
  • Eastern Conference
  • Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
  • Great Northwest Athletic Conference
  • Gulf South Conference
  • Lone Star Conference
  • Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletic Association
  • North Central Conference
  • Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference
  • Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference
  • Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference
  • South Atlantic Conference
  • Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
  • West Virginia Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
  • NCAA Division II independent schools

NCAA Division III

  • American Southwest Conference
  • Atlantic Central Football Conference
  • College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin
  • Centennial Conference
  • Freedom Football Conference
  • Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference
  • Illini-Badger Football Conference
  • Iowa Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
  • Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association
  • Middle Atlantic Corporation
  • Midwest Conference
  • Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
  • New England Football Conference
  • New England Small College Athletic Conference
  • New Jersey Athletic Conference
  • North Coast Athletic Conference
  • Northwest Athletic Conference
  • Ohio Athletic Conference
  • Old Dominion Athletic Conference
  • Presidents' Athletic Conference
  • Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
  • Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference
  • University Athletic Association
  • Upstate Collegiate Athletic Association
  • USA South Athletic Conference
  • Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
  • NCAA Division III independent schools

NAIA Conferences

  • Central States Football League
  • Dakota Athletic Conference
  • Frontier Conference
  • Great Plains Athletic Conference
  • Heart of America Athletic Conference
  • Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference
  • Mid-South Conference
  • Mid-States Football Association
  • Upper Midwest Athletic Conference
  • NAIA independent schools

Conferences that formerly sponsored football

  • Big Six Conference
  • Big Seven Conference
  • Big Eight Conference
  • Big West Conference
  • Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association
  • Indiana Collegiate Athletic Conference
  • Missouri Valley Conference
  • Nebraska Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
  • Nebraska-Iowa Athletic Conference
  • Pacific Coast Athletic Association
  • Skyline Conference
  • Southwest Conference
  • Wisconsin State University Conference
  • Yankee Conference

Division I colleges that no longer play football

Last season played in parentheses

  • American University (unknown)
  • Birmingham-Southern College (c. 1941)
  • Boston University (1997)
  • Bradley University (1970)
  • University of California, Riverside (1975)
  • University of California, Santa Barbara (1991)
  • California State University, Fullerton (1992)
  • California State University, Long Beach (1991)
  • California State University, Northridge (2001)
  • Campbell University (c. 1953)
  • Canisius College (2002)
  • Centenary College of Louisiana (1947)
  • College of Charleston (1938)
  • Creighton University (1942)
  • University of Denver (1960)
  • DePaul University (c. 1938)
  • University of Detroit Mercy (1964)
  • Drexel University (1973)
  • East Tennessee State University (2003)
  • University of Evansville (1997)
  • Fairfield University (2002)
  • George Washington University (1966)
  • Gonzaga University (1941)
  • High Point University (1950)
  • University of Illinois, Chicago (1973)
  • Lamar University (1989)
  • Long Island University (1940)
  • Loyola College in Maryland (1933)
  • Loyola Marymount University (1951)
  • Loyola University Chicago (c. 1930)
  • Manhattan College (1942)
  • Marquette University (1960)
  • University of Maryland Eastern Shore (1979)
  • Mercer University (unknown)
  • Mount Saint Mary's University (1950)
  • Niagara University (1950)
  • Old Dominion University (1941)
    • At that time, Old Dominion was a two-year division of The College of William and Mary. The school has never sponsored football since becoming an independent institution in 1962.
  • University of the Pacific (1995)
  • Pepperdine University (1961)
  • University of Portland (1949)
  • Providence College (1941)
  • Rider University (1951)
  • St. Bonaventure University (1951)
  • St. Francis College (New York) (1935)
  • St. John's University, New York (2002)
  • St. Joseph's University (1939)
  • Saint Louis University (1949)
  • St. Mary's College of California (2003)
  • University of San Francisco (1971)
  • Santa Clara University (1992)
  • Seton Hall University (1981)
  • Siena College (2003)
  • Stetson University (1956)
  • Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi (1966)
  • University of Texas at Arlington (1985)
  • University of Vermont (1974)
  • Wichita State University (1986)
  • University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (1974)
  • Xavier University (Cincinnati) (1973)

College football bowl games for 2004-2005

Please see NCAA football bowl games, 2004-05

College football bowl games played for 2004-2005

  • Alamo Bowl - San Antonio, Texas, (since 1993)
  • Blue-Gray Football Classic - Montgomery, Alabama (1938-2001), Troy, Alabama (since 2003)
  • Capital One Bowl - Orlando, Florida, (since 1947) (was Tangerine Bowl and Florida Citrus Bowl)
  • Champs Sports Bowl - Orlando, Florida, (since 1990)
  • Continental Tire Bowl - Charlotte, North Carolina, (since 2002)
  • Cotton Bowl - Dallas, Texas, (since 1937)
  • East-West Shrine Game - Stanford, California (1925-2000), San Francisco, California (since 2001)
  • Emerald Bowl - San Francisco, California, (since 2002) (was San Francisco Bowl)
  • Fiesta Bowl - Tempe, Arizona, (since 1971)
  • Fort Worth Bowl - Fort Worth, Texas, (since 2003)
  • Gator Bowl - Jacksonville, Florida, (since 1946)
  • GMAC Bowl - Mobile, Alabama, (since 1999)
  • Hawaii Bowl- Honolulu, Hawaii, (since 2002)
  • Houston Bowl- Houston, Texas, (since 2000)
  • Holiday Bowl - San Diego, California, (since 1978)
  • Hula Bowl - Hawaii (different cities since 1946)
  • Independence Bowl - Shreveport, Louisiana, (since 1976)
  • Insight Bowl - Phoenix, Arizona, (since 1989) (was Copper Bowl)
  • Las Vegas Bowl - Las Vegas, Nevada, (since 1992)
  • Liberty Bowl - Memphis, Tennessee, (since 1959)
  • Motor City Bowl - Detroit, Michigan, (since 1997)
  • MPC Computers Bowl - Boise, Idaho, (since 1997) (was Humanitarian Bowl)
  • Music City Bowl - Nashville, Tennessee, (since 1998)
  • New Orleans Bowl - New Orleans, Louisiana, (since 2001)
  • Orange Bowl - Miami, Florida, (since 1946)
  • Outback Bowl - Tampa, Florida, (since 1986) (was Hall of Fame Bowl)
  • Peach Bowl - Atlanta, Georgia, (since 1968)
  • Rose Bowl - Pasadena, California, (1902, continuously since 1916)
  • Senior Bowl - Jacksonville, Florida (1950), Mobile, Alabama (since 1951)
  • Silicon Valley Football Classic - San Jose, California, (since 2000)
  • Sugar Bowl - New Orleans, Louisiana, (since 1935)
  • Sun Bowl - El Paso, Texas, (since 1936) (originally Sun Bowl, later John Hancock Bowl)


Bowls no longer played

College football awards

See Also


This page about College Football includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about College Football
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. Never buy Viagra from a internet pharmacy advertised by unsolicited email. Please see NCAA football bowl games, 2004-05. Consult your physician before taking Viagra. Last season played in parentheses. Without attention, permament damage may occur to the penis, including the inability to obtain an erection or curvature. This decision was met with some criticism, as some teams, such as Alabama and Auburn, who traditionally have a bye week on Thanksgiving weekend, will have to play eight games consecutively some seasons. An erection lasting for more than four hours is called a priapism, which requires immediate medical attention.

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The regular season then continues through early December (generally ending with the annual Army-Navy Game). The dose of Viagra is 25mg to 100mg taken once per day between 0.5 to 4 hours before sexual intercourse. Until 2003, the regular season was officially ushered in by the Kickoff Classic, held in recent years in New Jersey (although other pre-season games such as the Eddie Robinson Classic and the Pigskin Classic have also been played), but recent NCAA policy changes have eliminated some of these games, and so the season now largely starts out with regular games. As with all prescription drugs, proper dosage is at the discretion of a licensed medical doctor. Division 1A college football begins two to three weeks earlier than the NFL, towards the end of August. It appears that there is a hereditary condition described as a "cup" in the retina that is the constant among all cases. It was not until the post-World War II era that the pro game achieved ascendancy in the eyes of the average American sports fan. Some users complained of blurriness and some a loss of peripheral vision.

Innovations in strategy and style of play originated in college football and spread to the pro game gradually. "NAION is a much more serious condition because it can lead to permanent vision loss.". Prior to the founding of the National Football League, and for a few decades thereafter, college football was the predominant venue for American football. Pomeranz, from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, said in a statement. Another was the banning of "mass momentum" plays (many of which, like the infamous "flying wedge", were sometimes literally deadly). Howard D. One of the rules changes to emerge from this attempt at alleviating the violence of the sport was the introduction of the forward pass. "For years, we've known that some men who take Viagra will experience temporary color changes in their vision and see things as blue or green," study co-author Dr.

The response to this was the formation of what became the National Collegiate Athletic Association, which set rules governing the sport. Combined with past reports, this study brings the total number of sildenafil-related NAION cases to 14. President Theodore Roosevelt threatened, in 1906, to ban the sport following a series of player deaths from injuries suffered during games. Some patients developed nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION), an eye problem that can result in permanent vision loss. It also became increasingly violent. An investigation is currently undergoing. The game increased in popularity through the remainder of the 19th century. Food and Drug Administration found that Viagra could lead to vision impairment.

The teams agreed to play under compromise rules, and from this meeting the game of football began to evolve in both the United States and Canada. In May of 2005, the U.S. The two teams were used to playing different brands of football — the McGill team played a rugby-style game, while Harvard played a soccer-style game. Visual changes including blurring of vision and a curious bluish tinge have also been reported. The development of the American game can be traced to a meeting between the Harvard University and McGill University football teams in 1874. Common side effects include sneezing, headache, flushing, dyspepsia, prolonged erections, palpitations and photophobia. The rules of that game were the 1863 rules of the English Football Association, the basis of the modern form of soccer. Amongst Viagra's serious adverse effects are: priapism, severe hypotension, myocardial infarction, ventricular arrhythmias, sudden death, stroke and increased intraocular pressure.

As the score would seemingly indicate, the game bore little resemblance to the game of today. Contraindications include:. Rutgers won, by a score of 6 to 4. Some reports have claimed that Viagra causes enhanced sexual pleasure for women by increasing blood flow to the sexual organs. The first game played between teams representing different colleges or universities was played on November 6, 1869 between Rutgers University and Princeton University, at College Field (now the site of the College Avenue Gymnasium), New Brunswick, New Jersey. If taken with a high fat meal, there may be a delay in absorption of Viagra and the net effect might be muted slightly as the plasma concentration will be lowered. College football remains extremely popular today among students, alumni, and other fans of the sport. Viagra is metabolised by hepatic enzymes and excreted by both the liver and kidneys.

College football was the venue through which American football first gained popularity in the United States. Other drugs that operate by the same mechanism include Cialis and Levitra. NCAA football bowl games, 2004-05. Without sexual stimulation and no activation of the NO/cGMP system, Viagra should not cause an erection. Bowl Championship Series. This means that, with Viagra on board, normal sexual stimulation leads to increased levels of cGMP in the corpus cavernosum which leads to better erections. Doak Walker Award. Sildenafil is a potent and selective inhibitor of cGMP specific phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) which is responsible for degradation of cGMP in the corpus cavernosum.

Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award. This then activates the enzyme guanylate cyclase which results in increased levels of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), leading to smooth muscle relaxation in the corpus cavernosum, resulting in increased inflow of blood and an erection. Jim Thorpe Award. Part of the physiological process of erection involves the release of nitric oxide (NO) in the corpus cavernosum. Mosi Tatupu Award. The sound of the word also suggests the words "vigor" and "virile". Dave Rimington Trophy. The word rhymes with "Niagara" (Niagara Falls is a popular honeymoon destination and Niagara, being such an impressive cataract, evokes a sense of incredible erectile and ejaculatory strength).

Walter Payton Award. It was possibly inspired by the Sanskrit word "vyāghra", which means "tiger". Outland Trophy. The name "Viagra" is a marketing invention. Davey O'Brien Award. Viagra is also informally known as "Vitamin V". Bronko Nagurski Trophy. A mixture of Viagra and ecstasy, called sextasy, has become popular among rave partygoers.

Maxwell Award. The UK patent held by Pfizer on the use of PDE5 inhibitors (see below) as treatment of impotence has been invalidated in 2000 because of obviousness; this decision was upheld on appeal in 2002. Manning Award. Pfizer's worldwide patents on sildenafil citrate will expire in 2011–2013. Lombardi Award. The "Viagra" name has become so well known that many fake aphrodisiacs now call themselves "herbal Viagra" or are presented as blue tablets imitating the shape and colour of Pfizer's product. Harlon Hill Trophy. Further, since Viagra has not been shown to possess aphrodisiac properties, it is unclear that the natural remedies would compete with this new clinical drug.

Heisman Trophy. Rhinoceros horns, for example, are used as a treatment for high fever. Lou Groza Award. However, this is unlikely in that these parts of endangered species are not only used to treat impotence. Grantland Rice Award. It has been suggested that Viagra would lead to a marked drop in the demand for certain traditional remedies, such as tiger penises and rhinoceros horns and that the drug may therefore help to preserve these endangered species. Gagliardi Trophy. Annual sales of Viagra in the period 1999–2001 exceeded $1 billion.

Dick Butkus Award. It is likely that many men (and some women) experiment with the drug to increase sexual prowess or pleasure. Buck Buchanan Award. Even though Viagra is only available by prescription from a doctor, it was advertised directly to consumers on TV (famously being endorsed by Bob Dole). Numerous sites on the Internet offer Viagra for sale after an "online consultation," a mere web questionnaire. Fred Biletnikoff Award. It soon became a great success. Chuck Bednarik Award. The drug was patented in 1996, approved by the FDA on March 27, 1998 (becoming the first pill approved to treat erectile dysfunction in the United States) and offered for sale in the United States later that year.

College Football All-America Teams: originally selected by Walter Camp. In trial studies, the penile erection enhancing effects were noticed. Shrine Bowl - Little Rock, Arkansas (1948). Viagra was initially developed to treat heart disease (angina). Seattle Bowl - Seattle, Washington (2001 -2002). The pills are blue with the words "Pfizer" on one side and "VGR xx" (with xx being either 25, 50 or 100 as the dose of that pill in milligrams) on the other. San Diego East-West Christmas Classic - San Diego, California (1921 - 1922). Sildenafil citrate, sold under the name Viagra, is a drug used to treat male erectile dysfunction (impotence), developed by the pharmaceutical company Pfizer.

Salad Bowl - Phoenix, Arizona (1948 - 1952). Hereditary degenerative retinal disorders (including genetic disorders of retinal phosphodiesterases). Raisin Bowl - Fresno, California (1946 - 1949). Recent stroke or heart attack (myocardial infarct). Presidential Cup Bowl - College Park, Maryland (1950). Hypotension. Pasadena Bowl - Pasadena, California (1967 - 1971). Severe impairment in renal function.

Oil Bowl - Houston, Texas (1946 - 1947). Severe hepatic impairment. Oahu Classic - Honolulu, Hawaii (1998 - 2000). In men for whom sexual intercourse is inadvisable due to cardiovascular risk factors. Mercy Bowl - Los Angeles, California (1961; 1971). When taking other nitric oxide donors, organic nitrites and nitrates (which includes glyceryl trinitrate, sodium nitroprusside, amyl nitrite). Los Angeles Christmas Festival - Los Angeles, California (1924).

Harbor Bowl - San Diego, California (1947 - 1949). Great Lakes Bowl - Cleveland, Ohio (1947). Gotham Bowl - New York, New York (1961 - 1962). Garden State Bowl - East Rutherford, New Jersey (1978 - 1981).

Freedom Bowl - Anaheim, California (1984 - 1994). Fort Worth Classic - Fort Worth, Texas (1921). Dixie Classic - Dallas, Texas (1922, 1925, 1934). Dixie Bowl - Birmingham, Alabama (1948 - 1949).

Delta Bowl - Memphis, Tennessee (1948 - 1949). Cherry Bowl - Pontiac, Michigan (1984 - 1985). Camellia Bowl - Lafayette, Louisiana (1948). California Bowl - Fresno, California (1981 - 1991).

Bluegrass Bowl - Louisville, Kentucky (1958). Bluebonnet Bowl - Houston, Texas (1959 - 1987). Bacardi Bowl - Havana, Cuba (1937). Aviation Bowl - Dayton, Ohio (1961).

Aloha Classic - Honolulu, Hawaii (1982 – 2000). All-American Bowl - Birmingham, Alabama (1977 - 1990) (formerly Hall of Fame Classic). Sun Bowl - El Paso, Texas, (since 1936) (originally Sun Bowl, later John Hancock Bowl). Sugar Bowl - New Orleans, Louisiana, (since 1935).

Silicon Valley Football Classic - San Jose, California, (since 2000). Senior Bowl - Jacksonville, Florida (1950), Mobile, Alabama (since 1951). Rose Bowl - Pasadena, California, (1902, continuously since 1916). Peach Bowl - Atlanta, Georgia, (since 1968).

Outback Bowl - Tampa, Florida, (since 1986) (was Hall of Fame Bowl). Orange Bowl - Miami, Florida, (since 1946). New Orleans Bowl - New Orleans, Louisiana, (since 2001). Music City Bowl - Nashville, Tennessee, (since 1998).

MPC Computers Bowl - Boise, Idaho, (since 1997) (was Humanitarian Bowl). Motor City Bowl - Detroit, Michigan, (since 1997). Liberty Bowl - Memphis, Tennessee, (since 1959). Las Vegas Bowl - Las Vegas, Nevada, (since 1992).

Insight Bowl - Phoenix, Arizona, (since 1989) (was Copper Bowl). Independence Bowl - Shreveport, Louisiana, (since 1976). Hula Bowl - Hawaii (different cities since 1946). Holiday Bowl - San Diego, California, (since 1978).

Houston Bowl- Houston, Texas, (since 2000). Hawaii Bowl- Honolulu, Hawaii, (since 2002). GMAC Bowl - Mobile, Alabama, (since 1999). Gator Bowl - Jacksonville, Florida, (since 1946).

Fort Worth Bowl - Fort Worth, Texas, (since 2003). Fiesta Bowl - Tempe, Arizona, (since 1971). Emerald Bowl - San Francisco, California, (since 2002) (was San Francisco Bowl). East-West Shrine Game - Stanford, California (1925-2000), San Francisco, California (since 2001).

Cotton Bowl - Dallas, Texas, (since 1937). Continental Tire Bowl - Charlotte, North Carolina, (since 2002). Champs Sports Bowl - Orlando, Florida, (since 1990). Capital One Bowl - Orlando, Florida, (since 1947) (was Tangerine Bowl and Florida Citrus Bowl).

Blue-Gray Football Classic - Montgomery, Alabama (1938-2001), Troy, Alabama (since 2003). Alamo Bowl - San Antonio, Texas, (since 1993). Xavier University (Cincinnati) (1973). University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (1974).

Wichita State University (1986). University of Vermont (1974). University of Texas at Arlington (1985). Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi (1966).

Stetson University (1956). Siena College (2003). Seton Hall University (1981). Santa Clara University (1992).

University of San Francisco (1971). Mary's College of California (2003). St. Saint Louis University (1949).

Joseph's University (1939). St. John's University, New York (2002). St.

Francis College (New York) (1935). St. Bonaventure University (1951). St.

Rider University (1951). Providence College (1941). University of Portland (1949). Pepperdine University (1961).

University of the Pacific (1995). The school has never sponsored football since becoming an independent institution in 1962. At that time, Old Dominion was a two-year division of The College of William and Mary. Old Dominion University (1941)

    .

    Niagara University (1950). Mount Saint Mary's University (1950). Mercer University (unknown). University of Maryland Eastern Shore (1979).

    Marquette University (1960). Manhattan College (1942). 1930). Loyola University Chicago (c.

    Loyola Marymount University (1951). Loyola College in Maryland (1933). Long Island University (1940). Lamar University (1989).

    University of Illinois, Chicago (1973). High Point University (1950). Gonzaga University (1941). George Washington University (1966).

    Fairfield University (2002). University of Evansville (1997). East Tennessee State University (2003). Drexel University (1973).

    University of Detroit Mercy (1964). 1938). DePaul University (c. University of Denver (1960).

    Creighton University (1942). College of Charleston (1938). Centenary College of Louisiana (1947). Canisius College (2002).

    1953). Campbell University (c. California State University, Northridge (2001). California State University, Long Beach (1991).

    California State University, Fullerton (1992). University of California, Santa Barbara (1991). University of California, Riverside (1975). Bradley University (1970).

    Boston University (1997). Birmingham-Southern College (c. 1941). American University (unknown). Yankee Conference.

    Wisconsin State University Conference. Southwest Conference. Skyline Conference. Pacific Coast Athletic Association.

    Nebraska-Iowa Athletic Conference. Nebraska Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. Missouri Valley Conference. Indiana Collegiate Athletic Conference.

    Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association. Big West Conference. Big Eight Conference. Big Seven Conference.

    Big Six Conference. NAIA independent schools. Upper Midwest Athletic Conference. Mid-States Football Association.

    Mid-South Conference. Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference. Heart of America Athletic Conference. Great Plains Athletic Conference.

    Frontier Conference. Dakota Athletic Conference. Central States Football League. NCAA Division III independent schools.

    Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. USA South Athletic Conference. Upstate Collegiate Athletic Association. University Athletic Association.

    Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference. Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. Presidents' Athletic Conference. Old Dominion Athletic Conference.

    Ohio Athletic Conference. Northwest Athletic Conference. North Coast Athletic Conference. New Jersey Athletic Conference.

    New England Small College Athletic Conference. New England Football Conference. Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. Midwest Conference.

    Middle Atlantic Corporation. Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association. Iowa Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. Illini-Badger Football Conference.

    Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference. Freedom Football Conference. Centennial Conference. College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin.

    Atlantic Central Football Conference. American Southwest Conference. NCAA Division II independent schools. West Virginia Intercollegiate Athletic Conference.

    Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. South Atlantic Conference. Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference. Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference.

    Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference. North Central Conference. Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletic Association. Lone Star Conference.

    Gulf South Conference. Great Northwest Athletic Conference. Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. Eastern Conference.

    Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association. NCAA Division I-AA Independent Schools. Southwestern Athletic Conference. Southland Conference.

    Southern Conference. Pioneer Football League. Patriot League. Ohio Valley Conference.

    Northeast Conference. Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference. Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference. Ivy League.

    Great West Football Conference. Gateway Football Conference. Big South Conference. Big Sky Conference.

    Atlantic Ten Conference. NCAA Division I-A Independent Schools. Western Athletic Conference. Sun Belt Conference.

    Southeastern Conference. Pacific Ten Conference. Mountain West Conference. Mid-American Conference.

    Conference USA. Big Twelve Conference. Big Ten Conference. Big East Conference.

    Atlantic Coast Conference. NAIA national football championship. NCAA Division III national football championship. NCAA Division II national football championship.

    NCAA Division I-AA national football championship. NCAA Division I-A national football champions.

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