College football

(Redirected from College Football) A college football game between Colorado State University and the Air Force Academy.

College football was the venue through which American football first gained popularity in the United States. College football remains extremely popular today among students, alumni, and other fans of the sport.

History

A college football game between Texas Tech University and the U.S. Naval Academy.

The first game played between teams representing different colleges or universities was played on November 6, 1869 between Rutgers University and Princeton University, at College Field (now the site of the College Avenue Gymnasium), New Brunswick, New Jersey. Rutgers won, by a score of 6 to 4. As the score would seemingly indicate, the game bore little resemblance to the game of today. The rules of that game were the 1863 rules of the English Football Association, the basis of the modern form of soccer.

The development of the American game can be traced to a meeting between the Harvard University and McGill University football teams in 1874. The two teams were used to playing different brands of football — the McGill team played a rugby-style game, while Harvard played a soccer-style game. The teams agreed to play under compromise rules, and from this meeting the game of football began to evolve in both the United States and Canada.

The game increased in popularity through the remainder of the 19th century. It also became increasingly violent. President Theodore Roosevelt threatened, in 1906, to ban the sport following a series of player deaths from injuries suffered during games. The response to this was the formation of what became the National Collegiate Athletic Association, which set rules governing the sport. One of the rules changes to emerge from this attempt at alleviating the violence of the sport was the introduction of the forward pass. Another was the banning of "mass momentum" plays (many of which, like the infamous "flying wedge", were sometimes literally deadly).

Prior to the founding of the National Football League, and for a few decades thereafter, college football was the predominant venue for American football. Innovations in strategy and style of play originated in college football and spread to the pro game gradually. It was not until the post-World War II era that the pro game achieved ascendancy in the eyes of the average American sports fan.

The season schedule

Division 1A college football begins two to three weeks earlier than the NFL, towards the end of August. Until 2003, the regular season was officially ushered in by the Kickoff Classic, held in recent years in New Jersey (although other pre-season games such as the Eddie Robinson Classic and the Pigskin Classic have also been played), but recent NCAA policy changes have eliminated some of these games, and so the season now largely starts out with regular games. The regular season then continues through early December (generally ending with the annual Army-Navy Game).

The college post-season is ushered in by the annual presentation of the Heisman Trophy Award, considered the most prestigious award in all of college football, given to the top player of the year as determined by a panel consisting of media voters and former winners of the award. This is then followed by a series of bowl games that showcase (usually) the top college team in a particular conference, as well as the consensus "national champion", which is determined not by a true playoff, but by a controversial confederation of voters, broadcast networks, bowls and conferences known as the Bowl Championship Series. A series of all-star bowl games round out the season for the balance of January, including the East-West Shrine Game, the Senior Bowl (for many decades the official final game of the season), the Hula Bowl, and the Gridiron Classic (in recent years, the Hula and Gridiron have alternated as the final game of the season).

In spring 2005, the NCAA ruled that teams could schedule 12 regular-season games beginning in the 2006 season. This decision was met with some criticism, as some teams, such as Alabama and Auburn, who traditionally have a bye week on Thanksgiving weekend, will have to play eight games consecutively some seasons.

National championships

  • NCAA Division I-A national football champions
  • NCAA Division I-AA national football championship
  • NCAA Division II national football championship
  • NCAA Division III national football championship
  • NAIA national football championship

NCAA divisions and conferences

NCAA Division I-A

  • Atlantic Coast Conference
  • Big East Conference
  • Big Ten Conference
  • Big Twelve Conference
  • Conference USA
  • Mid-American Conference
  • Mountain West Conference
  • Pacific Ten Conference
  • Southeastern Conference
  • Sun Belt Conference
  • Western Athletic Conference
  • NCAA Division I-A Independent Schools

NCAA Division I-AA

  • Atlantic Ten Conference
  • Big Sky Conference
  • Big South Conference
  • Gateway Football Conference
  • Great West Football Conference
  • Ivy League
  • Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference
  • Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference
  • Northeast Conference
  • Ohio Valley Conference
  • Patriot League
  • Pioneer Football League
  • Southern Conference
  • Southland Conference
  • Southwestern Athletic Conference
  • NCAA Division I-AA Independent Schools

NCAA Division II

  • Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association
  • Eastern Conference
  • Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
  • Great Northwest Athletic Conference
  • Gulf South Conference
  • Lone Star Conference
  • Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletic Association
  • North Central Conference
  • Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference
  • Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference
  • Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference
  • South Atlantic Conference
  • Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
  • West Virginia Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
  • NCAA Division II independent schools

NCAA Division III

  • American Southwest Conference
  • Atlantic Central Football Conference
  • College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin
  • Centennial Conference
  • Freedom Football Conference
  • Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference
  • Illini-Badger Football Conference
  • Iowa Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
  • Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association
  • Middle Atlantic Corporation
  • Midwest Conference
  • Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
  • New England Football Conference
  • New England Small College Athletic Conference
  • New Jersey Athletic Conference
  • North Coast Athletic Conference
  • Northwest Athletic Conference
  • Ohio Athletic Conference
  • Old Dominion Athletic Conference
  • Presidents' Athletic Conference
  • Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
  • Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference
  • University Athletic Association
  • Upstate Collegiate Athletic Association
  • USA South Athletic Conference
  • Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
  • NCAA Division III independent schools

NAIA Conferences

  • Central States Football League
  • Dakota Athletic Conference
  • Frontier Conference
  • Great Plains Athletic Conference
  • Heart of America Athletic Conference
  • Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference
  • Mid-South Conference
  • Mid-States Football Association
  • Upper Midwest Athletic Conference
  • NAIA independent schools

Conferences that formerly sponsored football

  • Big Six Conference
  • Big Seven Conference
  • Big Eight Conference
  • Big West Conference
  • Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association
  • Indiana Collegiate Athletic Conference
  • Missouri Valley Conference
  • Nebraska Intercollegiate Athletic Conference
  • Nebraska-Iowa Athletic Conference
  • Pacific Coast Athletic Association
  • Skyline Conference
  • Southwest Conference
  • Wisconsin State University Conference
  • Yankee Conference

Division I colleges that no longer play football

Last season played in parentheses

  • American University (unknown)
  • Birmingham-Southern College (c. 1941)
  • Boston University (1997)
  • Bradley University (1970)
  • University of California, Riverside (1975)
  • University of California, Santa Barbara (1991)
  • California State University, Fullerton (1992)
  • California State University, Long Beach (1991)
  • California State University, Northridge (2001)
  • Campbell University (c. 1953)
  • Canisius College (2002)
  • Centenary College of Louisiana (1947)
  • College of Charleston (1938)
  • Creighton University (1942)
  • University of Denver (1960)
  • DePaul University (c. 1938)
  • University of Detroit Mercy (1964)
  • Drexel University (1973)
  • East Tennessee State University (2003)
  • University of Evansville (1997)
  • Fairfield University (2002)
  • George Washington University (1966)
  • Gonzaga University (1941)
  • High Point University (1950)
  • University of Illinois, Chicago (1973)
  • Lamar University (1989)
  • Long Island University (1940)
  • Loyola College in Maryland (1933)
  • Loyola Marymount University (1951)
  • Loyola University Chicago (c. 1930)
  • Manhattan College (1942)
  • Marquette University (1960)
  • University of Maryland Eastern Shore (1979)
  • Mercer University (unknown)
  • Mount Saint Mary's University (1950)
  • Niagara University (1950)
  • Old Dominion University (1941)
    • At that time, Old Dominion was a two-year division of The College of William and Mary. The school has never sponsored football since becoming an independent institution in 1962.
  • University of the Pacific (1995)
  • Pepperdine University (1961)
  • University of Portland (1949)
  • Providence College (1941)
  • Rider University (1951)
  • St. Bonaventure University (1951)
  • St. Francis College (New York) (1935)
  • St. John's University, New York (2002)
  • St. Joseph's University (1939)
  • Saint Louis University (1949)
  • St. Mary's College of California (2003)
  • University of San Francisco (1971)
  • Santa Clara University (1992)
  • Seton Hall University (1981)
  • Siena College (2003)
  • Stetson University (1956)
  • Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi (1966)
  • University of Texas at Arlington (1985)
  • University of Vermont (1974)
  • Wichita State University (1986)
  • University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (1974)
  • Xavier University (Cincinnati) (1973)

College football bowl games for 2004-2005

Please see NCAA football bowl games, 2004-05

College football bowl games played for 2004-2005

  • Alamo Bowl - San Antonio, Texas, (since 1993)
  • Blue-Gray Football Classic - Montgomery, Alabama (1938-2001), Troy, Alabama (since 2003)
  • Capital One Bowl - Orlando, Florida, (since 1947) (was Tangerine Bowl and Florida Citrus Bowl)
  • Champs Sports Bowl - Orlando, Florida, (since 1990)
  • Continental Tire Bowl - Charlotte, North Carolina, (since 2002)
  • Cotton Bowl - Dallas, Texas, (since 1937)
  • East-West Shrine Game - Stanford, California (1925-2000), San Francisco, California (since 2001)
  • Emerald Bowl - San Francisco, California, (since 2002) (was San Francisco Bowl)
  • Fiesta Bowl - Tempe, Arizona, (since 1971)
  • Fort Worth Bowl - Fort Worth, Texas, (since 2003)
  • Gator Bowl - Jacksonville, Florida, (since 1946)
  • GMAC Bowl - Mobile, Alabama, (since 1999)
  • Hawaii Bowl- Honolulu, Hawaii, (since 2002)
  • Houston Bowl- Houston, Texas, (since 2000)
  • Holiday Bowl - San Diego, California, (since 1978)
  • Hula Bowl - Hawaii (different cities since 1946)
  • Independence Bowl - Shreveport, Louisiana, (since 1976)
  • Insight Bowl - Phoenix, Arizona, (since 1989) (was Copper Bowl)
  • Las Vegas Bowl - Las Vegas, Nevada, (since 1992)
  • Liberty Bowl - Memphis, Tennessee, (since 1959)
  • Motor City Bowl - Detroit, Michigan, (since 1997)
  • MPC Computers Bowl - Boise, Idaho, (since 1997) (was Humanitarian Bowl)
  • Music City Bowl - Nashville, Tennessee, (since 1998)
  • New Orleans Bowl - New Orleans, Louisiana, (since 2001)
  • Orange Bowl - Miami, Florida, (since 1946)
  • Outback Bowl - Tampa, Florida, (since 1986) (was Hall of Fame Bowl)
  • Peach Bowl - Atlanta, Georgia, (since 1968)
  • Rose Bowl - Pasadena, California, (1902, continuously since 1916)
  • Senior Bowl - Jacksonville, Florida (1950), Mobile, Alabama (since 1951)
  • Silicon Valley Football Classic - San Jose, California, (since 2000)
  • Sugar Bowl - New Orleans, Louisiana, (since 1935)
  • Sun Bowl - El Paso, Texas, (since 1936) (originally Sun Bowl, later John Hancock Bowl)


Bowls no longer played

College football awards

See Also


This page about College Football includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about College Football
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. The baby girl was named Mackenzie Jean Rowling Murray. Please see NCAA football bowl games, 2004-05. On January 23, 2005, Rowling's second child with Dr. Murray was born, fulfilling Rowling's lifelong wish to have three children. Last season played in parentheses. On March 23, 2003, Rowling gave birth to her second child, a boy called David Gordon Rowling Murray, at the Simpson Centre for Reproductive Health at the New Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh. This decision was met with some criticism, as some teams, such as Alabama and Auburn, who traditionally have a bye week on Thanksgiving weekend, will have to play eight games consecutively some seasons. Neil Murray (an anaesthetist) in a private ceremony at her home in the Perthshire village of Aberfeldy.

In spring 2005, the NCAA ruled that teams could schedule 12 regular-season games beginning in the 2006 season. On December 26, 2001, Rowling married Dr. A series of all-star bowl games round out the season for the balance of January, including the East-West Shrine Game, the Senior Bowl (for many decades the official final game of the season), the Hula Bowl, and the Gridiron Classic (in recent years, the Hula and Gridiron have alternated as the final game of the season). The man claimed he was unaware he was supposed to wait until that Saturday. This is then followed by a series of bowl games that showcase (usually) the top college team in a particular conference, as well as the consensus "national champion", which is determined not by a true playoff, but by a controversial confederation of voters, broadcast networks, bowls and conferences known as the Bowl Championship Series. However, the story complicated futher when it was revealed that the paper had purchased the book from a health store whose owner recieved the novels wholesale and decided to place them in the window. The college post-season is ushered in by the annual presentation of the Heisman Trophy Award, considered the most prestigious award in all of college football, given to the top player of the year as determined by a panel consisting of media voters and former winners of the award. An accompanying image even reveled two pages from the book with legible text.

The regular season then continues through early December (generally ending with the annual Army-Navy Game). The novel was due for release on Saturday, June 21st, but the newspaper published a plot summary and short quotes on the previous wednesday (the 18th). Until 2003, the regular season was officially ushered in by the Kickoff Classic, held in recent years in New Jersey (although other pre-season games such as the Eddie Robinson Classic and the Pigskin Classic have also been played), but recent NCAA policy changes have eliminated some of these games, and so the season now largely starts out with regular games. On June 19th, 2003, Rowling and her publisher Scholastic announced that they would sue the New York Daily News for $100 million because the newspaper had printed information on her work Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix before the book's official release date. Division 1A college football begins two to three weeks earlier than the NFL, towards the end of August. STOUFFER (http://www.eyrie.org/~robotech/stouffer.htm). It was not until the post-World War II era that the pro game achieved ascendancy in the eyes of the average American sports fan. The 2002 judgement can be found here: ROWLING v.

Innovations in strategy and style of play originated in college football and spread to the pro game gradually. A report of the judgement can be found at Entertainment Law Digest (http://www.entlawdigest.com/story.cfm?storyID=3094). Prior to the founding of the National Football League, and for a few decades thereafter, college football was the predominant venue for American football. Stouffer was also ordered to pay the costs of the appeal. Another was the banning of "mass momentum" plays (many of which, like the infamous "flying wedge", were sometimes literally deadly). Accordingly, the District Court correctly dismissed Stouffer's trademark claims.. One of the rules changes to emerge from this attempt at alleviating the violence of the sport was the introduction of the forward pass. Further, the Harry Potter books are novel-length works and whose primary customers are older children and adults whereas Stouffer's booklets appeal to young children.

The response to this was the formation of what became the National Collegiate Athletic Association, which set rules governing the sport. Rowling's use of the term "Muggles" describes ordinary humans with no magical powers while Stouffer's "Muggles" are tiny, hairless creatures with elongated heads. President Theodore Roosevelt threatened, in 1906, to ban the sport following a series of player deaths from injuries suffered during games. Stouffer's and Plaintiffs' marks are used in two very different ways. It also became increasingly violent. The Court explained:. The game increased in popularity through the remainder of the 19th century. The appeals court agreed that Stouffer's claims were properly dismissed because "no reasonable juror could find a likelihood of confusion as to the source of the two parties' works".

The teams agreed to play under compromise rules, and from this meeting the game of football began to evolve in both the United States and Canada. In January 2004, it was reported that Stouffer's appeal against the judgement had been rejected. The two teams were used to playing different brands of football — the McGill team played a rugby-style game, while Harvard played a soccer-style game. Stouffer was fined US$50,000 and ordered to pay part (but not all) of the plaintiffs' costs. The development of the American game can be traced to a meeting between the Harvard University and McGill University football teams in 1874. In September 2002, the court found in Rowling's favour, stating that Stouffer had lied to the court and falsified and forged documents to support her case. The rules of that game were the 1863 rules of the English Football Association, the basis of the modern form of soccer. Rowling and her colitigants argued that much of the evidence that Stouffer presented was fraudulent, and asked for sanctions and attorneys' fees as punishment.

As the score would seemingly indicate, the game bore little resemblance to the game of today. Stouffer, who had not previously sued, then filed counterclaims alleging such infringement. Rutgers won, by a score of 6 to 4. (the producer of the film adaptations) sued Stouffer, asking the court to judge that there was no infringement of Stouffer's trademarks or copyright. The first game played between teams representing different colleges or universities was played on November 6, 1869 between Rutgers University and Princeton University, at College Field (now the site of the College Avenue Gymnasium), New Brunswick, New Jersey. In 2001, Rowling, Scholastic Press (the American publisher of her books), and Warner Bros. College football remains extremely popular today among students, alumni, and other fans of the sport. In the late 1990s, Nancy Stouffer, an author of children's books published in the 1980s, began to publicly charge that Rowling's books were based on her books, including The Legend of Rah and the Muggles, and Larry Potter and His Best Friend Lilly.

College football was the venue through which American football first gained popularity in the United States. Rowling has been involved in a lawsuit over the Harry Potter series, and other litigation has been suggested or rumoured. NCAA football bowl games, 2004-05. She has also said that she has told Alan Rickman and Robbie Coltrane certain secrets about their characters that are not yet revealed. Bowl Championship Series. She says she has told him more about the later books than anybody else, but not everything. Doak Walker Award. Rowling assists Steve Kloves in writing the scripts for the films, ensuring that his scripts do not contradict future books in the series.

Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award. Rowling's insistence on British actors for the main roles resulted in Steven Spielberg passing on the opportunity to direct the series. Jim Thorpe Award. only. Mosi Tatupu Award. She only reluctantly went along with changing Philosopher's Stone to Sorcerer's Stone, and limited it to the U.S. Dave Rimington Trophy. Rowling resisted suggestions by the filmmakers that the movies should be filmed in the United States or cast with American actors (only one American appears in the first film).

Walter Payton Award. Rowling, who was a fan of Cuarón's work prior to the third film, has stated that the third film is her personal favorite. Outland Trophy. A darker atmosphere was adopted in the film version of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, attributed to the new director, Alfonso Cuarón. Davey O'Brien Award. A film version of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone was released in late 2001 and Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets in 2002. Bronko Nagurski Trophy. This death has heavily affected her writing, according to Rowling.

Maxwell Award. She has contributed money and support to many other charitable causes, especially research and treatment of multiple sclerosis, from which her mother died in 1990. Manning Award. All proceeds from them go to the UK Comic Relief charity. Lombardi Award. They are complete with handwritten annotations and scribblings in the margins, and include introductions by Albus Dumbledore. Harlon Hill Trophy. The last two purport to be facsimiles of books mentioned in the novels. Fantastic Beasts is a textbook, while Quidditch is probably the most popular book in the Hogwarts library.

Heisman Trophy. Rowling has also made a guest appearance as herself on the American cartoon show The Simpsons, on a special British-themed episode entitled "The Regina Monologues". Lou Groza Award. On December 20, 2004, she announced that the sixth Harry Potter book would be released on July 16, 2005. Grantland Rice Award. Although she was "amused by the suggestion", she turned the offer down, as she was busy working on the next novel in the Potter series. Gagliardi Trophy. Davies to contribute an episode to the British television science-fiction series Doctor Who.

Dick Butkus Award. In late 2003, she was approached by television producer Russell T. Buck Buchanan Award. The fifth book was released on June 21, 2003. Fred Biletnikoff Award. After forcing her publishers to drop her deadline, she enjoyed three years of quiet writing, commenting that she spent some time working on something else that she might return to when she is finished with the Harry Potter series. Chuck Bednarik Award. She said that at one point, she had considered breaking her arm to get out of writing, because the pressure on her was too much.

College Football All-America Teams: originally selected by Walter Camp. Rowling took some time off from writing at this point, because during the process of writing the fourth book, she felt her workload was too heavy. Shrine Bowl - Little Rock, Arkansas (1948). The fifth book, titled Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, was delayed by an unsuccessful plagiarism suit directed towards her by rival author Nancy Stouffer (see below). Seattle Bowl - Seattle, Washington (2001 -2002). Five of these have already been published. San Diego East-West Christmas Classic - San Diego, California (1921 - 1922). The Harry Potter series is expected to run to seven volumes, one for each year Harry spends in school.

Salad Bowl - Phoenix, Arizona (1948 - 1952). Neil Murray, on December 26, 2001. Raisin Bowl - Fresno, California (1946 - 1949). The sales made her a multi-millionaire, and in 2001, she purchased a luxurious 19th century mansion, Killiechassie House, on the banks of the River Tay in Perthshire, Scotland, where she married her second husband, Dr. Presidential Cup Bowl - College Park, Maryland (1950). Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone was a huge success, and she has thus far published four sequels. Pasadena Bowl - Pasadena, California (1967 - 1971). Rowling chose to adopt her grandmother's middle name, Kathleen.

Oil Bowl - Houston, Texas (1946 - 1947). Rowling's publisher, Bloomsbury, wanted to use initials on the cover of the Harry Potter books, suggesting that if they used an obviously female name, the target group of young boys might be reluctant to buy them. Oahu Classic - Honolulu, Hawaii (1998 - 2000). Unemployed and living on welfare, she completed the novel, doing some of the work in an Edinburgh cafe as there was no heating in her home. Mercy Bowl - Los Angeles, California (1961; 1971). On her divorce she came to Edinburgh with her daughter, planning to live near her sister. Los Angeles Christmas Festival - Los Angeles, California (1924). They had one child, a daughter named Jessica Rowling Arantes (born July 27, 1993), before their divorce in 1995.

Harbor Bowl - San Diego, California (1947 - 1949). While there she married Portuguese TV journalist Jorge Arantes on October 16, 1992. Great Lakes Bowl - Cleveland, Ohio (1947). Rowling then moved to Oporto, Portugal to teach English as a foreign language. Gotham Bowl - New York, New York (1961 - 1962). She began working on the story during her lunch hours. Garden State Bowl - East Rutherford, New Jersey (1978 - 1981). According to her, by the time she reached her destination, she had the characters and a good part of the plot for Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone in her head.

Freedom Bowl - Anaheim, California (1984 - 1994). It was during this period that she had the idea for a story about a young boy who attends a school of wizardry, during a four-hour train trip between King's Cross, London and Scotland. Fort Worth Classic - Fort Worth, Texas (1921). After college she moved to London to work for Amnesty International as a researcher and bilingual secretary. Dixie Classic - Dallas, Texas (1922, 1925, 1934). She studied French at Exeter University, spending a year in Paris as part of her studies. Dixie Bowl - Birmingham, Alabama (1948 - 1949). She attended secondary school at Wyedean Comprehensive, where she told stories to her fellow students.

Delta Bowl - Memphis, Tennessee (1948 - 1949). Joanne's family moved twice as she was growing up, first to Winterbourne in Bristol and then to Tutshill near Chepstow. Cherry Bowl - Pontiac, Michigan (1984 - 1985). Rowling also has a sister, Di, two years younger than she, who is now a lawyer. Camellia Bowl - Lafayette, Louisiana (1948). Her mother was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis when Rowling was 15; she died in the early 1990s. California Bowl - Fresno, California (1981 - 1991). Rowling's parents met on a train, coincidentally from King's Cross station to Scotland.

Bluegrass Bowl - Louisville, Kentucky (1958). dollars, by writing books; Rowling is also the wealthiest woman in the United Kingdom, well ahead of even Queen Elizabeth II [1] (http://www.forbes.com/2004/02/26/cx_jw_0226rowlingbill04.html) [2] (http://www.forbes.com/lists/results.jhtml?passListId=10&passYear=2004&passListType=Person&searchParameter1=unset&searchParameter2=unset&resultsHowMany=25&resultsSortProperties=%2Bstringfield11%2C-numberfield3&resultsSortCategoryName=Country&fromColumnClick=&bktDisplayField=&bktDisplayFieldLength=&category1=category&category2=category&passKeyword=&resultsStart=301). Bluebonnet Bowl - Houston, Texas (1959 - 1987). In February 2004, Forbes magazine estimated her fortune as £576 million, making her the first person to become a billionaire, in terms of U.S. Bacardi Bowl - Havana, Cuba (1937). Rowling's books have gained international attention and have won multiple awards. Aviation Bowl - Dayton, Ohio (1961). Rowling is most famous for being the author of the Harry Potter fantasy series.

Aloha Classic - Honolulu, Hawaii (1982 – 2000). Rowling (pronunciation: role-ing as in rolling stone), is a British fiction writer. All-American Bowl - Birmingham, Alabama (1977 - 1990) (formerly Hall of Fame Classic). Joanne Rowling, OBE, (born July 31, 1965 in Yate), commonly known as J.K. Sun Bowl - El Paso, Texas, (since 1936) (originally Sun Bowl, later John Hancock Bowl). Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2001). Sugar Bowl - New Orleans, Louisiana, (since 1935). Quidditch Through the Ages (2001).

Silicon Valley Football Classic - San Jose, California, (since 2000). Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (July 16, 2005). Senior Bowl - Jacksonville, Florida (1950), Mobile, Alabama (since 1951). Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2003). Rose Bowl - Pasadena, California, (1902, continuously since 1916). Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2000). Peach Bowl - Atlanta, Georgia, (since 1968). Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (1999).

Outback Bowl - Tampa, Florida, (since 1986) (was Hall of Fame Bowl). Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (1998). Orange Bowl - Miami, Florida, (since 1946). Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (1997) (titled Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone in the United States). New Orleans Bowl - New Orleans, Louisiana, (since 2001). Music City Bowl - Nashville, Tennessee, (since 1998).

MPC Computers Bowl - Boise, Idaho, (since 1997) (was Humanitarian Bowl). Motor City Bowl - Detroit, Michigan, (since 1997). Liberty Bowl - Memphis, Tennessee, (since 1959). Las Vegas Bowl - Las Vegas, Nevada, (since 1992).

Insight Bowl - Phoenix, Arizona, (since 1989) (was Copper Bowl). Independence Bowl - Shreveport, Louisiana, (since 1976). Hula Bowl - Hawaii (different cities since 1946). Holiday Bowl - San Diego, California, (since 1978).

Houston Bowl- Houston, Texas, (since 2000). Hawaii Bowl- Honolulu, Hawaii, (since 2002). GMAC Bowl - Mobile, Alabama, (since 1999). Gator Bowl - Jacksonville, Florida, (since 1946).

Fort Worth Bowl - Fort Worth, Texas, (since 2003). Fiesta Bowl - Tempe, Arizona, (since 1971). Emerald Bowl - San Francisco, California, (since 2002) (was San Francisco Bowl). East-West Shrine Game - Stanford, California (1925-2000), San Francisco, California (since 2001).

Cotton Bowl - Dallas, Texas, (since 1937). Continental Tire Bowl - Charlotte, North Carolina, (since 2002). Champs Sports Bowl - Orlando, Florida, (since 1990). Capital One Bowl - Orlando, Florida, (since 1947) (was Tangerine Bowl and Florida Citrus Bowl).

Blue-Gray Football Classic - Montgomery, Alabama (1938-2001), Troy, Alabama (since 2003). Alamo Bowl - San Antonio, Texas, (since 1993). Xavier University (Cincinnati) (1973). University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (1974).

Wichita State University (1986). University of Vermont (1974). University of Texas at Arlington (1985). Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi (1966).

Stetson University (1956). Siena College (2003). Seton Hall University (1981). Santa Clara University (1992).

University of San Francisco (1971). Mary's College of California (2003). St. Saint Louis University (1949).

Joseph's University (1939). St. John's University, New York (2002). St.

Francis College (New York) (1935). St. Bonaventure University (1951). St.

Rider University (1951). Providence College (1941). University of Portland (1949). Pepperdine University (1961).

University of the Pacific (1995). The school has never sponsored football since becoming an independent institution in 1962. At that time, Old Dominion was a two-year division of The College of William and Mary. Old Dominion University (1941)

    .

    Niagara University (1950). Mount Saint Mary's University (1950). Mercer University (unknown). University of Maryland Eastern Shore (1979).

    Marquette University (1960). Manhattan College (1942). 1930). Loyola University Chicago (c.

    Loyola Marymount University (1951). Loyola College in Maryland (1933). Long Island University (1940). Lamar University (1989).

    University of Illinois, Chicago (1973). High Point University (1950). Gonzaga University (1941). George Washington University (1966).

    Fairfield University (2002). University of Evansville (1997). East Tennessee State University (2003). Drexel University (1973).

    University of Detroit Mercy (1964). 1938). DePaul University (c. University of Denver (1960).

    Creighton University (1942). College of Charleston (1938). Centenary College of Louisiana (1947). Canisius College (2002).

    1953). Campbell University (c. California State University, Northridge (2001). California State University, Long Beach (1991).

    California State University, Fullerton (1992). University of California, Santa Barbara (1991). University of California, Riverside (1975). Bradley University (1970).

    Boston University (1997). Birmingham-Southern College (c. 1941). American University (unknown). Yankee Conference.

    Wisconsin State University Conference. Southwest Conference. Skyline Conference. Pacific Coast Athletic Association.

    Nebraska-Iowa Athletic Conference. Nebraska Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. Missouri Valley Conference. Indiana Collegiate Athletic Conference.

    Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association. Big West Conference. Big Eight Conference. Big Seven Conference.

    Big Six Conference. NAIA independent schools. Upper Midwest Athletic Conference. Mid-States Football Association.

    Mid-South Conference. Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference. Heart of America Athletic Conference. Great Plains Athletic Conference.

    Frontier Conference. Dakota Athletic Conference. Central States Football League. NCAA Division III independent schools.

    Wisconsin Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. USA South Athletic Conference. Upstate Collegiate Athletic Association. University Athletic Association.

    Southern Collegiate Athletic Conference. Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. Presidents' Athletic Conference. Old Dominion Athletic Conference.

    Ohio Athletic Conference. Northwest Athletic Conference. North Coast Athletic Conference. New Jersey Athletic Conference.

    New England Small College Athletic Conference. New England Football Conference. Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. Midwest Conference.

    Middle Atlantic Corporation. Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association. Iowa Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. Illini-Badger Football Conference.

    Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference. Freedom Football Conference. Centennial Conference. College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin.

    Atlantic Central Football Conference. American Southwest Conference. NCAA Division II independent schools. West Virginia Intercollegiate Athletic Conference.

    Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. South Atlantic Conference. Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference. Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference.

    Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference. North Central Conference. Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletic Association. Lone Star Conference.

    Gulf South Conference. Great Northwest Athletic Conference. Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. Eastern Conference.

    Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association. NCAA Division I-AA Independent Schools. Southwestern Athletic Conference. Southland Conference.

    Southern Conference. Pioneer Football League. Patriot League. Ohio Valley Conference.

    Northeast Conference. Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference. Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference. Ivy League.

    Great West Football Conference. Gateway Football Conference. Big South Conference. Big Sky Conference.

    Atlantic Ten Conference. NCAA Division I-A Independent Schools. Western Athletic Conference. Sun Belt Conference.

    Southeastern Conference. Pacific Ten Conference. Mountain West Conference. Mid-American Conference.

    Conference USA. Big Twelve Conference. Big Ten Conference. Big East Conference.

    Atlantic Coast Conference. NAIA national football championship. NCAA Division III national football championship. NCAA Division II national football championship.

    NCAA Division I-AA national football championship. NCAA Division I-A national football champions.

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