Christian Louboutin

Christian Louboutin (born 1976) is a well known French shoe designer. Louboutin is black. He includes Princess Caroline of Monaco and Catherine Deneuve among his friends.

Biography

Christian Louboutin was interested in women's fashion since he was a small child. In 1979, as he was walking alongside the streets of Paris, he noticed a billboard that instructed women tourists not to scratch the wooden floor in front of the Museum of Oceanic Art.

Louboutin felt personally bothered by this sign, and, as a consequence, he would draw shoes with compressed buckles and with soles. He admits to having spent a lot of time as a teenager drawing these types of shoes in his school notebooks. These shoes would become the base of Louboutin's sales as a designer.

Later on, Louboutin began attending parties and dance halls in Paris, offering his shoes to women at these events and venues. Most of the ladies rejected his shoes, claiming to have no money.

Louboutin then decided to attend various designing schools, such as Chanel's and Saint Laurent's.

Louboutin later opened a boutique shop in Paris; his store became distinguished not only because of his clientele, but also because he offered free coffee to shoppers. Such other sellers such as American company Neiman Marcus began to sell Louboutin's designs. Louboutin shoes also have a trademark red leather sole, making them instantly recognizable.

Louboutin, who has been interviewed by fashion reporters such as Jacques Brunel, has seen his celebrity expand to such places like Monte Carlo, Singapore and the United States, among others.


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Louboutin, who has been interviewed by fashion reporters such as Jacques Brunel, has seen his celebrity expand to such places like Monte Carlo, Singapore and the United States, among others.
. Louboutin shoes also have a trademark red leather sole, making them instantly recognizable. Costumes are often worn with make-up or wigs to enhance the illusion. Such other sellers such as American company Neiman Marcus began to sell Louboutin's designs. The comsumer identifies with the character and this helps tie all of the adverising campaign together. Louboutin later opened a boutique shop in Paris; his store became distinguished not only because of his clientele, but also because he offered free coffee to shoppers. Think of the Kool Aid Man or the Fruit of the Loom Guys.

Louboutin then decided to attend various designing schools, such as Chanel's and Saint Laurent's. Corporations and charities create brand identities by including a mascot costume in with their advertising campaigns. Most of the ladies rejected his shoes, claiming to have no money. These team mascots hep the club or team rally around their own teams cause. Later on, Louboutin began attending parties and dance halls in Paris, offering his shoes to women at these events and venues. Another very popular place for costumes is sporting events and college games Those costumes are called mascots. These shoes would become the base of Louboutin's sales as a designer. One of the more prominent places people see costumes is in theatre, film and TV.

He admits to having spent a lot of time as a teenager drawing these types of shoes in his school notebooks. Costumes may serve to portray various other character themes during secular holidays, such as an Uncle Sam costume worn on the Independence day for example. Louboutin felt personally bothered by this sign, and, as a consequence, he would draw shoes with compressed buckles and with soles. Christmas and Easter costumes typically portray mythical holiday characters, such as Santa Claus by donning a santa suit and beard or play the Easter Bunny by putting on a furry costume and head. In 1979, as he was walking alongside the streets of Paris, he noticed a billboard that instructed women tourists not to scratch the wooden floor in front of the Museum of Oceanic Art. Mardi Gras costumes are usually jesters and other fantasy characters, while Halloween costumes traditionally take the form of supernatural creatures such as ghosts, vampires, and angels. Christian Louboutin was interested in women's fashion since he was a small child. The wearing of costumes has become an important part of Mardi Gras and Halloween celebrations, and (to a lesser extent) people may also wear costumes in conjunction with other holiday celebrations, such as Christmas and Easter.

He includes Princess Caroline of Monaco and Catherine Deneuve among his friends. Think Scotsman in a kilt or Japanese in a kimono. Louboutin is black. It is often a source of one's National pride. Christian Louboutin (born 1976) is a well known French shoe designer. National costume or regional costume can express local (or exiled) identity and emphasise uniqueness. Costuming, truly is as important as the set and the script, yet most audiences take it for granted.

Without theatrical costumers, the audience would be left wondering who is related to whom, and which person is which. On the other hand, often stylized theatrical costumes can exaggerate some aspect of a character. Sometimes theatrical costumes literally mimic what the costume designer thinks the character would wear if the character actually existed.
Theatrical costumes, in combination with other aspects, serve to portray characters' age, gender role, profession, social class, personality, and can even reveal information about the historical period/era, geographic location, time of day, as well as the season or weather of the theatrical performance.

It can also refer to the artistic arrangement of accessories in a picture, statue, poem, or play, appropriate to the time, place, or other circumstances represented or described, or to a particular style of clothing worn to portray the wearer as a character or type of character other than their regular persona at a social event such as a masquerade, a fancy dress party or in an artistic theatrical performance. The term costume can refer to wardrobe and dress in general, or to the distinctive style of dress of a particular people, class, or period.

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