Camille (movie)

Camille is the name of several films based on the 1852 novel and play La Dame aux Camélias by Alexandre Dumas, fils. The novel was also the basis for Giuseppe Verdi's opera La Traviata. Like the novel, the films tell the story of gay romance in Paris in the 1840s, and one young woman who wins the heart of a wealthy young man, but gives him up for his own good.

The first movie based on the work was a Danish silent film version in 1907 called Kameliadamen. Directed by Viggo Larsen, it stars Oda Alstrup, Larsen, Gustave Lund and Robert Storm Petersen.

In 1910, a French language silent film was made, directed by André Calmettes and Henri Pouctal. It stars Sarah Bernhardt.

In 1915, an English language film, the first one to use the name Camille, was made. It was adapted by Frances Marion and directed by Albert Capellani, and stars Clara Kimball Young, Paul Capellani, Lillian Cook and Robert Cummings. An Italian language film was also made in the same year, called La Signora delle camelie. It was directed by Baldassarre Negroni and Gustavo Serena. It stars Hesperia, Alberto Collo and Ida Carloni Talli.

In 1917 an American film was made, adapted by Adrian Johnson and directed by J. Gordon Edwards. It stars Theda Bara, Alan Roscoe, Walter Law, Glen White, Alice Gale, Claire Whitney and Richard Barthelmess.

A 1921 version was adapted by June Mathis and directed by Ray C. Smallwood. It stars Alla Nazimova and Rudolph Valentino.

A 1925 Swedish film called Damen med kameliorna was adapted and directed by Olof Molander. It stars Uno Henning and Tora Teje.

A 1926 version was adapted by Fred De Gresac, George Marion Jr., Olga Printzlau and Chandler Sprague. It was directed by Fred Niblo. It stars Norma Talmadge and Gilbert Roland. There are no known copies of this film extant.

The first sound version was made in French in 1934, called La Dame aux camélias. It was adapted by Abel Gance and directed by Gance and Fernand Rivers. It stars Yvonne Printemps and Pierre Fresnay.

Arguably the most famous version was the 1936 Hollywood version. It was adapted by Zoe Akins, Frances Marion and James Hilton, and directed by George Cukor. It stars Greta Garbo, Robert Taylor and Lionel Barrymore. The movie was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress (Greta Garbo). The movie inspired Milton Benjamin to write and publish a song called "I'll Love Like Robert Taylor, Be My Greta Garbo".

A 1944 Spanish language version was produced in Mexico. It was adapted by Roberto Tasker and directed by Gabriel Soria, and stars Lina Montes and Emilio Tuero.

A 1953 French version called La Dame aux camélias was adapted by Bernard Natanson and directed by Raymond Bernard. It stars Gino Cervi, Micheline Presle and Roland Alexandre.

A 1954 Mexican version, called Camelia was adapted by José Arenas, Edmundo Báez, Roberto Gavaldón and Gregorio Walerstein. It was directed by Gavaldón, and stars María Félix. In the same year, La Mujer de las camelias, an Argentine version was adapted by Alexis de Arancibia (as Wassen Eisen) and Ernesto Arancibia, and directed by Ernesto Arancibia. It stars Mona Maris.

In 1969, a drug-laced Italian language version called Camille 2000 was produced. It was adapted by Michael DeForrest and directed by Radley Metzger. It stars Danièle Gaubert and Nino Castelnuovo.

A 1980 version, La Dame aux camélias, in French, was produced. It was adapted by Jean Aurenche, Enrico Medioli and Vladimir Pozner, and directed by Mauro Bolognini. It stars Carla Fracci.

In 1984 a version of Camille was produced for television. It was adapted by Blanche Hanalis and directed by Desmond Davis. It stars Greta Scacchi, Colin Firth, John Gielgud, Billie Whitelaw, Patrick Ryecart, Denholm Elliott and Ben Kingsley.


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It stars Greta Scacchi, Colin Firth, John Gielgud, Billie Whitelaw, Patrick Ryecart, Denholm Elliott and Ben Kingsley. It was also performed as a musical, the "original" story and the much-altered Disney version. It was adapted by Blanche Hanalis and directed by Desmond Davis. The story has been adapted to the screen a number of times, including:. In 1984 a version of Camille was produced for television. Generally most readers consider Quasimodo, Esmeralda, and Claude Frollo to be the story's three major characters. It stars Carla Fracci. Other notable characters include the philosophical poet Gringoire, Claude Frollo--the lust-haunted priest, and the soldier, Phoebus.

It was adapted by Jean Aurenche, Enrico Medioli and Vladimir Pozner, and directed by Mauro Bolognini. The human drama within the novel revolves around the gypsy Esmeralda, and which of several suitors she will choose. A 1980 version, La Dame aux camélias, in French, was produced. The author felt the primary character was the Notre Dame de Paris itself, the Cathedral. It stars Danièle Gaubert and Nino Castelnuovo. However, this was not the author's intent. It was adapted by Michael DeForrest and directed by Radley Metzger. The title given in some English translations has led some people to believe the primary character of the drama was the hunchback, Quasimodo.

In 1969, a drug-laced Italian language version called Camille 2000 was produced. However, this is a very small part of Hugo's novel (especially as Quasimodo is much less sympathetic than he is in many film adaptations). It stars Mona Maris. Many film adaptations of the novel have simplified the thematic and historical concerns greatly, leading to the most important theme being the mistreatment of Quasimodo for his ugliness, and the moral that one shouldn't judge people by their looks. In the same year, La Mujer de las camelias, an Argentine version was adapted by Alexis de Arancibia (as Wassen Eisen) and Ernesto Arancibia, and directed by Ernesto Arancibia. Like many of his other works, Hugo is also very concerned with social justice, his descripreligious fanaticism are also examined. It was directed by Gavaldón, and stars María Félix. The book portrays the Gothic era as one of extremes of architecture, passion and religion; which despite being the cause of many problems are seen by Hugo to be more authentic than the sentiments of his time.

A 1954 Mexican version, called Camelia was adapted by José Arenas, Edmundo Báez, Roberto Gavaldón and Gregorio Walerstein. As stated by many critics and scholars, the Cathedral of Notre Dame appears to be the main setting, which is almost elevated to the status of a character. It stars Gino Cervi, Micheline Presle and Roland Alexandre. Quasimodo, overcome by grief, entombs himself with Esmeralda, and that is where his skeleton is found. A 1953 French version called La Dame aux camélias was adapted by Bernard Natanson and directed by Raymond Bernard. He sees Frollo laughing maniacally at the scene, realises that he was the catalyst of the whole plot, and pushes the mad priest off a balcony to his death. It was adapted by Roberto Tasker and directed by Gabriel Soria, and stars Lina Montes and Emilio Tuero. From the cathedral, Quasimodo sees Esmeralda hanged.

A 1944 Spanish language version was produced in Mexico. Phoebus witnesses part of the struggle, but does nothing. The movie was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress (Greta Garbo). The movie inspired Milton Benjamin to write and publish a song called "I'll Love Like Robert Taylor, Be My Greta Garbo". She seizes Esmeralda, raising a cry for her to be hanged. Then, she finds out that it is Esmeralda who is actually her daughter - but it is too late as the guards arrive and wrench the two apart. It stars Greta Garbo, Robert Taylor and Lionel Barrymore. Frollo again pleads with Esmeralda; when she rejects him, he turns her over to the recluse in the cell. It was adapted by Zoe Akins, Frances Marion and James Hilton, and directed by George Cukor. Esmeralda escapes with Gringoire and Frollo, who hides himself till Gringoire slips away.

Arguably the most famous version was the 1936 Hollywood version. Quasimodo finds Esmeralda's cell empty, Gringoire having taken her away. It stars Yvonne Printemps and Pierre Fresnay. The mob storms the building, only to be forced to retreat when the King's troops arrive on the scene. It was adapted by Abel Gance and directed by Gance and Fernand Rivers. Gringoire is almost arrested and put to death by the king in the commotion but escapes. The first sound version was made in French in 1934, called La Dame aux camélias. This leads to an enormous riot with many casualties (including Jehan), as Quasimodo defends the Cathedral by flinging down stones, timber, and molten lead.

There are no known copies of this film extant. In an attempt to save Esmeralda from being in Parliament's grasp, Gringoire organises the thief clans of Paris to march on the Cathedral. It stars Norma Talmadge and Gilbert Roland. Claude Frollo meets with Gringoire and informs Esmeralda's husband that the Court of Parliament has voted to strip her of her sanctuary and sent her to the gallows within three days' time. It was directed by Fred Niblo. After Frollo finds out about where Esmeralda's room is, there is a confrontation between him, Quasimodo and Esmeralda and for the first time, there is contention between Frollo and his adopted son. A 1926 version was adapted by Fred De Gresac, George Marion Jr., Olga Printzlau and Chandler Sprague. She is grateful to Quasimodo for saving her and taking care of her, but is unable to get past his monstrous appearance. Quasimodo even attempts to get Phoebus to meet her, but the fickle archer refuses to go.

It stars Uno Henning and Tora Teje. While Frollo is close to a breakdown because of his obsession with Esmeralda, she is living in sanctuary in the Cathedral tower. A 1925 Swedish film called Damen med kameliorna was adapted and directed by Olof Molander. Just before she is hanged, Quasimodo dramatically storms down from the Cathedral, takes her and runs back in, leading her to a sanctuary where the law cannot touch her. It stars Alla Nazimova and Rudolph Valentino. Although it turns out the stabbing is not fatal, Esmeralda is brought to trial and convicted for Phoebus's attempted murder. Frollo visits her in the dungeon and offers salvation in return for being with him - a proposition which she vehemently rejects. In the meanwhile, Phoebus does nothing to help Esmeralda. Smallwood. The chapter is noted for a heated encounter between Claude Frollo, who is struggling with his lust over Esmeralda, and Jehan, who wants money from Claude for his debauchery.

A 1921 version was adapted by June Mathis and directed by Ray C. Esmeralda faints and wakes up to find herself arrested for murder. It stars Theda Bara, Alan Roscoe, Walter Law, Glen White, Alice Gale, Claire Whitney and Richard Barthelmess. Frollo watches their love scene until, unable to control himself, he emerges and stabs Phoebus. Gordon Edwards. With the help of his brother Jehan, Frollo strikes up a deal with Phoebus that allows him to hide and watch Phoebus and Esmeralda during their meeting. In 1917 an American film was made, adapted by Adrian Johnson and directed by J. Meanwhile, Frollo's madness and obsession grow as he obtains information about Esmeralda from an unsuspecting Gringoire.

It stars Hesperia, Alberto Collo and Ida Carloni Talli. Esmeralda encounters Phoebus, his wealthy fiancée, and her family, and the gypsy's infatuation with him becomes apparent. Phoebus's hope for a lucrative marriage does not keep him from arranging a rendezvous with Esmeralda. It was directed by Baldassarre Negroni and Gustavo Serena. She hates Esmeralda especially, as she is as old as her lost daughter. An Italian language film was also made in the same year, called La Signora delle camelie. The woman is a recluse who has made a cell for herself on the street, as a sign of mourning for her daughter who she believes to have been kidnapped by gypsies. It was adapted by Frances Marion and directed by Albert Capellani, and stars Clara Kimball Young, Paul Capellani, Lillian Cook and Robert Cummings. At that point, a woman shouts a curse at Esmeralda.

In 1915, an English language film, the first one to use the name Camille, was made. During his sentence and flagellation, he is abused and humiliated by both his captors and the crowds; and it is his victim Esmeralda who has pity on him and gives him water after the ordeal is over. It stars Sarah Bernhardt. He, a deaf bellringer, is tried by a deaf judge, and the resulting misunderstandings lead to Quasimodo being sentenced to the pillory. In 1910, a French language silent film was made, directed by André Calmettes and Henri Pouctal. We return to Quasimodo, who is on trial for the attempted kidnapping of Esmeralda. Directed by Viggo Larsen, it stars Oda Alstrup, Larsen, Gustave Lund and Robert Storm Petersen. In the next chapter, Hugo expands on a comment of Frollo's which portrays two great human endeavours - printing and architecture - as diametrical opposites, and argues that the former has displaced the latter.

The first movie based on the work was a Danish silent film version in 1907 called Kameliadamen. In parting, Tourangeau hints at his true identity - King Louis XI. Like the novel, the films tell the story of gay romance in Paris in the 1840s, and one young woman who wins the heart of a wealthy young man, but gives him up for his own good. Frollo explains his quest for alchemic immortality, his meddling with the arcane and how he reads the mystical dimension of the cathedral; his guests think him mad. The novel was also the basis for Giuseppe Verdi's opera La Traviata. Frollo is visited by his friend Coictier and Coictier's mysterious friend Tourangeau, who is inquisitive about Frollo's learning. Camille is the name of several films based on the 1852 novel and play La Dame aux Camélias by Alexandre Dumas, fils. As the years go by, we see Frollo's growing withdrawal into himself, and his fascination with alchemy - as well as his related unpopularity.

Frollo is shown to be a formidably intellectual man, forced early on to become a parental figure when he and his little brother are orphaned. Quasimodo's life within the confines of the Cathedral and his only two outlets - ringing the bells (which eventually deafens him) and his love for Frollo - are described. We are told about Quasimodo's background - how he was found as a hideous and abandoned baby and taken in by Claude Frollo, the Archdeacon of Notre Dame. His neo-Gothic viewpoints and criticism of "modernisation" are explained.

Hugo digresses in two long descriptions, one of the Notre Dame Cathedral, the other of the various streets and architecture of the Paris of the novel, and how it compares to the Paris of Hugo's time. The thieves (led by Trouillefou) sentence him to death for trespassing, but Esmeralda arrives and offers to marry him to save his life. Gringoire accompanies Esmeralda to her home, but she is less than friendly. Gringoire wanders into the Court of Miracles, where he is cornered by charlatan beggars. Quasimodo attempts to kidnap Esmeralda (at the request of the Archdeacon Frollo, who is infatuated with her), but his attempt is foiled by Phoebus, captain of the King's Archers, whom Esmeralda instantly admires.

He sees Esmeralda and her goat Djali performing acts and decides to follow her, in the hope of finding shelter. Cold and hungry, Gringoire wanders the streets and finds himself in the thieves' quarter. Gringoire leaves, bitter over his play's failure and disgusted by the Paris of his times. The crowds see Quasimodo and there is a commotion at his hideousness, and are then enchanted by the sight of Esmeralda dancing in the square.

However, the performance goes awfully, with the play being interrupted by the heckling of the student crowds, the arrival of the Cardinal and the antics of a famous beggar (Clopin Trouillefou). The reader is introduced to Pierre Gringoire, a poor playwright who has come to the Great Hall to see his play performed on Epiphany. The work is divided into eleven books each consisting of two to eight chapters. Ultimately it helped to preserve Notre Dame Cathedral, where much of the story is based, in its original state.

The enormous popularity of the novel in France spurred the nascent historical preservation movement in that country and strongly encouraged Gothic revival architecture. The Hunchback of Notre Dame (in French, Notre-Dame de Paris) was a novel first published in 1831 by the French literary giant Victor Hugo. The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996), animated film by Walt Disney Pictures. The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1982), starring Anthony Hopkins and Derek Jacobi.

The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1956), starring Anthony Quinn. The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939), starring Charles Laughton. as Quasimodo. The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923), silent film starring Lon Chaney, Sr.

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