Caddyshack

Caddyshack is a 1980 US comedy film directed by Harold Ramis and written by Brian Doyle-Murray, Harold Ramis and Douglas Kenney. It stars Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield, Ted Knight, Michael O'Keefe and Bill Murray. Doyle-Murray also has a supporting role.

The film was Ramis's first feature and was a major boost to Dangerfield's film career: he was previously known mostly for his stand-up comedy. Grossing almost $40 million in the US alone (16th highest of the year) it was the first of a series of similar comedies.

Spoiler warning: Plot or ending details follow.

Set primarily on the golf course at Bushwood Country Club, the story is a farcical clash between classes, on one side the wealthy and privileged and on the other, the anarchic, young and noisy. The club is represented by the chronically uptight Judge Smails (Knight) and opposite him the vulgar, noisy, witty self-made man Al Czervik (Dangerfield) and a group of caddies including Danny Noonan (O'Keefe). Ty Webb (Chase) is a well-to-do but unassuming golf savant who blithely plays both sides of the brawl. Out of the fight, but periodically crossing paths with the others, is Carl Spackler (Murray), a lunatic assistant greenskeeper locked in an increasingly armed death-struggle with a gopher.

The plot, such as it is, hinges on two key golf matches. In the first, Noonan wins a college scholarship and the favour of Smails. The second is an illegal high-stakes gambling match which forces Danny to side either with Czervik or Smails, at the end of which Spackler dynamites the majority of the course trying - unsuccessfully - to kill the gopher.

Caddyshack shares a similar feel to Animal House (1978), also co-written by Ramis and Kenney. A belated sequel in 1988, Caddyshack II, was not well received by critics or the public.


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A belated sequel in 1988, Caddyshack II, was not well received by critics or the public. The original version has been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry. Caddyshack shares a similar feel to Animal House (1978), also co-written by Ramis and Kenney. Another remake is currently in production, due for release in 2006. The second is an illegal high-stakes gambling match which forces Danny to side either with Czervik or Smails, at the end of which Spackler dynamites the majority of the course trying - unsuccessfully - to kill the gopher. It did not receive wide theatrical distribution and was for the most part critically panned. In the first, Noonan wins a college scholarship and the favour of Smails. In its structure it plays like a straightforward alien invasion thriller, and does not attempt to create the overriding paranoiac mood of the earlier films.

The plot, such as it is, hinges on two key golf matches. This time the story was set on a military base, and did not attempt to follow the plot of either the original or the 1978 version. Out of the fight, but periodically crossing paths with the others, is Carl Spackler (Murray), a lunatic assistant greenskeeper locked in an increasingly armed death-struggle with a gopher. John, and was directed by Abel Ferrara. Ty Webb (Chase) is a well-to-do but unassuming golf savant who blithely plays both sides of the brawl. It was adapted by Raymond Cistheri, Larry Cohen, Stuart Gordon, Dennis Paoli and Nicholas St. The club is represented by the chronically uptight Judge Smails (Knight) and opposite him the vulgar, noisy, witty self-made man Al Czervik (Dangerfield) and a group of caddies including Danny Noonan (O'Keefe). A 1993 version, called Body Snatchers, stars Terry Kinney, Meg Tilly and Gabrielle Anwar.

Set primarily on the golf course at Bushwood Country Club, the story is a farcical clash between classes, on one side the wealthy and privileged and on the other, the anarchic, young and noisy. There are distinct similarities between the 1978 film and the tone of the "mythology" episodes of the popular 1990s television series The X-Files. Grossing almost $40 million in the US alone (16th highest of the year) it was the first of a series of similar comedies. The script could thus be thought to reflect growing anti-government fears that would later manifest themselves among conspiracy theorists. The film was Ramis's first feature and was a major boost to Dangerfield's film career: he was previously known mostly for his stand-up comedy. Lacking the Cold War subtext of the original, Kaufman concentrated on a style of paranoia that was more reflective of the mistrust and malaise pervasive in post-Vietnam, post-Watergate America. Kaufman's film is set not in a small town but in San Francisco; in one scene, Sutherland's character calls Washington for help, only to find his calls are being intercepted and his name is known to the person on the other line before he gives it. Doyle-Murray also has a supporting role. Richter and directed by Philip Kaufman, and, unlike many remakes, met with generally favorable critical response.

It stars Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield, Ted Knight, Michael O'Keefe and Bill Murray. The 1978 version was adapted by W.D. Caddyshack is a 1980 US comedy film directed by Harold Ramis and written by Brian Doyle-Murray, Harold Ramis and Douglas Kenney. The remake ends with Sutherland's character destroying the "pod people's" facility where they grow the pods, but he is found and turned into a pod person, which is revealed in the last second of the film. As with the first film, it does not have a "happy ending". Grateful Dead guitarist Jerry Garcia also appears briefly, as does Robert Duvall.

There are a number of interesting cameo appearances in the film, among them the star and director of the original; Kevin McCarthy appears briefly as a man on the street frantically screaming about aliens (in a shot reminiscent of the final shot of the original) and Don Siegel appears as a cab driver. The first of two remakes appeared in 1978, starring Donald Sutherland, Brooke Adams, Jeff Goldblum Veronica Cartwright and Jerry Walter. It was directed by Don Siegel. The screenplay was adapted by Richard Collins (uncredited), Daniel Mainwaring and Sam Peckinpah from the novel The Body Snatchers by Jack Finney.

The taking-over of ordinary citizens metaphorically reflected the paranoia in Cold War America of how communism might infiltrate the body politic in such a way that you would have no way of suspecting if your friends and neighbors had been corrupted. The film is frequently cited as an indictment of the hysteria of McCarthyism during the early stages of the Cold War. Once a pod person is fully grown and integrated into society, he works secretly to spread more pods, so that more people will be taken over. The "pod people" are indistinguishable from normal people, except for their utter lack of emotion.

They emerge from plantlike pods, and grow into perfect physical duplications of their human victims, who themselves die and are discarded. An alien race departs their dying world and lands on Earth. It stars Kevin McCarthy, Dana Wynter, Larry Gates, King Donovan and Carolyn Jones. Invasion of the Body Snatchers is a 1956 science fiction/horror film which tells the story of ordinary small town people whose bodies are taken over by aliens.

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