Caddyshack

Caddyshack is a 1980 US comedy film directed by Harold Ramis and written by Brian Doyle-Murray, Harold Ramis and Douglas Kenney. It stars Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield, Ted Knight, Michael O'Keefe and Bill Murray. Doyle-Murray also has a supporting role.

The film was Ramis's first feature and was a major boost to Dangerfield's film career: he was previously known mostly for his stand-up comedy. Grossing almost $40 million in the US alone (16th highest of the year) it was the first of a series of similar comedies.

Spoiler warning: Plot or ending details follow.

Set primarily on the golf course at Bushwood Country Club, the story is a farcical clash between classes, on one side the wealthy and privileged and on the other, the anarchic, young and noisy. The club is represented by the chronically uptight Judge Smails (Knight) and opposite him the vulgar, noisy, witty self-made man Al Czervik (Dangerfield) and a group of caddies including Danny Noonan (O'Keefe). Ty Webb (Chase) is a well-to-do but unassuming golf savant who blithely plays both sides of the brawl. Out of the fight, but periodically crossing paths with the others, is Carl Spackler (Murray), a lunatic assistant greenskeeper locked in an increasingly armed death-struggle with a gopher.

The plot, such as it is, hinges on two key golf matches. In the first, Noonan wins a college scholarship and the favour of Smails. The second is an illegal high-stakes gambling match which forces Danny to side either with Czervik or Smails, at the end of which Spackler dynamites the majority of the course trying - unsuccessfully - to kill the gopher.

Caddyshack shares a similar feel to Animal House (1978), also co-written by Ramis and Kenney. A belated sequel in 1988, Caddyshack II, was not well received by critics or the public.


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A belated sequel in 1988, Caddyshack II, was not well received by critics or the public. He enters the bathroom and looks into the mirror, quietly contemplating. Caddyshack shares a similar feel to Animal House (1978), also co-written by Ramis and Kenney. The movie ends with Bullitt returning home to find Cathy asleep. The second is an illegal high-stakes gambling match which forces Danny to side either with Czervik or Smails, at the end of which Spackler dynamites the majority of the course trying - unsuccessfully - to kill the gopher. With Ross dead, the case is finally closed. In the first, Noonan wins a college scholarship and the favour of Smails. Inside the terminal, Bullitt finally corners Ross at the door and fires two shots from his gun, the only time he uses it in the movie.

The plot, such as it is, hinges on two key golf matches. There ensues a foot chase across the runway and field, with Ross shooting at Bullitt. Out of the fight, but periodically crossing paths with the others, is Carl Spackler (Murray), a lunatic assistant greenskeeper locked in an increasingly armed death-struggle with a gopher. Ross jumps from the back door of the plane. Ty Webb (Chase) is a well-to-do but unassuming golf savant who blithely plays both sides of the brawl. Bullitt enters the plane as the passengers are coming off and sees the real Johnny Ross (played by Renella). The club is represented by the chronically uptight Judge Smails (Knight) and opposite him the vulgar, noisy, witty self-made man Al Czervik (Dangerfield) and a group of caddies including Danny Noonan (O'Keefe). He arrives at the airport just as the plane is about to take off, but phones the plane and the pilot returns to the terminal.

Set primarily on the golf course at Bushwood Country Club, the story is a farcical clash between classes, on one side the wealthy and privileged and on the other, the anarchic, young and noisy. Bullitt has to stop him before he can make his getaway on the flight to Rome as Albert Renick. Grossing almost $40 million in the US alone (16th highest of the year) it was the first of a series of similar comedies. Ross must have also set Renick up to get the heat off him, then killed his wife to shut her up. The film was Ramis's first feature and was a major boost to Dangerfield's film career: he was previously known mostly for his stand-up comedy. The real Johnny Ross must have paid Renick to impersonate him, while letting Ross use his passport and identity to leave the country. Doyle-Murray also has a supporting role. The man who was murdered was not mobster Johnny Ross, he was actually Dorothy's husband, Albert Renick, a used car salesman from Chicago with no Mafia connections.

It stars Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield, Ted Knight, Michael O'Keefe and Bill Murray. When he gets a copy of the passport photo, Bullitt realizes Chalmers has been conned. Caddyshack is a 1980 US comedy film directed by Harold Ramis and written by Brian Doyle-Murray, Harold Ramis and Douglas Kenney. He then tells Delgetti to call immigration in Chicago and have them send Ross's passport application while he gets a finger print check. Renick. He also finds a lot of money. He finds out her true identity was Dorothy Renick (played by Carroll), and that she was scheduled on a flight from San Francisco International Airport to Rome, Italy, with her husband, Albert E.

Bullitt and Delgetti check the luggage of the victim, which has arrived at the police station. "You're living in a sewer, Frank!" she says. She has trouble accepting his job, and the true nature of police work. He comes to her.

After a while, she gets out of the car. She is upset as they leave. Cathy gets out of the car and wonders in on the crime scene, where she sees the murder victim. His trophy architect girlfriend, Cathy (played by Bisset), drives him to the swanky hotel, where he discovers the woman has been murdered.

He needs a car, but one is not available at the station. Back at the police station, Bullitt begins to check out Dorothy Simmons, the woman Johnny Ross called in San Mateo. But the spectacular car chase and action is not the engine that drives the movie to its culmination. They crash into a gas station and both are killed in the fiery explosion.

The chase comes to an end after Mike shoots at Bullitt's car with a 12 gauge shotgun and Phil loses control of the car. Phil and Bullitt then slam down the gas pedal to the metal and have a flat out race between two bellowing muscle cars as they tear up the roads. Though he seems unaware they are after him, he turns the tables on the criminals when he backtracks and comes up behind their car, surprising them. They are following Bullitt to set him up for an ambush, but lose him.

The scene is set for the legendary and exciting high-speed car chase through San Francisco, with the other thug, Phil, driving. The gunman, Mike, then appears at the hospital to finish Ross off, but gets away. With the hearing the next day, Bullitt begins to realize that this dead mobster may not be who he seems. He finds that one was to a hotel in San Mateo; to a woman registered under the name Dorothy Simmons.

He then investigates the phone calls Ross made. Bullitt suppresses the news and keeps the death secret, having the doctor misplace the chart and the body placed in the morgue as an unidentified John Doe. Stanton survives his wounds, but Ross dies during surgery. He is not interested in the injured policeman or the hit-men, only in the hearings that will launch his national political career, and wants to shut down Bullitt's investigation.

Chalmers is angered and blames Bullitt, threatening to ruin his career if Ross dies. Bullitt wants to get to the bottom of the case and catch who shot them, as well as the Mafia boss who ordered the hit. Stanton and Ross are both in the hospital. He then turns and shoots Ross.

A pair of hit-men, Mike (played by Genge) and Phil (played by Hickman), then burst into the room and Mike shoots Detective Stanton. Stanton calls and tells Bullitt, who tells him no, that Chalmers would not be there at one in the morning. In the meantime, Ross walks over to the door and unlocks it. Later, while Stanton is guarding him, the desk clerk calls and says Chalmers and a friend are there and want to come to the room. Before Ross enters the hotel, he makes several phone calls.

Bullitt and his men, Detectives Delgetti (played by Gordon) and Stanton (played by Reindel), will take turns giving Ross around the clock protection at an undisclosed cheap hotel near an overhead freeway. Chalmers has the Police Department place Johnny Ross (played by Orlandi) in protective custody and requests that the unit headed by Detective Lieutenant Frank Bullitt (played by McQueen) be assigned to guard him. Johnny stole $2,000,000 dollars from his Mafia cronies and two attempts were made on his life before he left for San Francisco. The witness scheduled to testify, Johnny Ross, worked with his brother, Chicago mobster Pete Ross (played by Tayback).

An ambitious politician, Walter Chalmers (played by Vaughn), is holding a Senate subcommittee hearing in San Francisco on Organized Crime in America and has a key witness that he hopes will further his national aspirations as he brings down a powerful Mafia syndicate. 113 mins.; Technicolor. The movie as a whole, including the car chase, makes excellent use of the San Francisco Bay Area. The scene had Bullitt in a dark green 1968 Ford Mustang GT-390, chasing two hit-men in a black Dodge Charger.

Bullitt is most-remembered for its central car chase scene through the streets of downtown San Francisco, one of the earliest and most influential car chase sequences in movies. Keller); and was nominated for Best Sound. The movie won the Academy Award for Best Film Editing (Frank P. Lalo Schifrin wrote the original music score, a memorable mix of jazz, brass and percussion.

Fish. The story was adapted for the screen by Alan Trustman and Harry Kleiner, based on the novel titled Mute Witness (1963) by Robert L. The director was Peter Yates. action crime/mystery/thriller motion picture starring Steve McQueen, Robert Vaughn, and Jacqueline Bisset, with Don Gordon, Carl Reindel, Felice Orlandi, Vic Tayback, Pat Renella, Paul Genge, Bill Hickman, and Brandy Carroll.

Bullitt is a 1968 Warner Bros. Chalmers.". You sent us to guard the wrong man, Mr. Bullitt: "He was the man who was shot at the Hotel Daniels.

Chalmers: "Who's Renick?". Chalmers: "I do not choose to have people accuse me of false promises for the sake of cheap sensationalism, or to be compromised by your lieutenant.". Bullitt: "Shotgun and a backup man, professionals.". Bennett: "What about the setup? What do you make of that?".

Bullitt: "I'm waiting to ask him.". Captain Bennett: "He let the killers in himself? Why would he do a thing like that?". Bullitt: "You sell whatever you want, but don't sell it here tonight.". Bullitt: "Bullshit.".

Chalmers: "Frank, we must all compromise.". Integrity is something you sell the public.". We both know how careers are made. Don't be naive, Lieutenant.

Walter Chalmers: "Come on, now. You work your side of the street and I'll work mine.". Frank Bullitt: "You believe what you want. And you're paying for the contract.".

If you can't find him, we have people who can. phone voice: "He's your brother, Ross. We lost him.". Pete Ross: (on phone) "This is Pete.

The production company was denied permission to film on the Golden Gate Bridge. Filming of the chase scene took three weeks, resulting in 9 minutes and 42 seconds of footage. The director called for speeds of about 75-80 mph, but the cars (including the ones containing the cameras) reached speeds of over 110 mph. When the mirror is up, visible, McQueen is behind the wheel, and when it is down, not visible, Ekin is in the car.

The Mustang's interior rearview mirror goes up and down depending on who is driving. Though it is widely believed that Steve McQueen, who was a great race car driver, did the bulk of the driving stunt work, the stunt coordinator, Carey Loftin, had famed stuntman and motorcycle racer Bud Ekins do most of the risky stunts in the Mustang. The cars were modified for the high-speed chase by veteran car racer Max Balchowsky. Both Mustangs were owned by Ford Motor Company and were part of a promotional loan agreement with Warner Bros.

Two Mustangs and two Dodge Chargers were used for the chase scene. The famous chase sequence from Bullitt has been voted the best car chase in film history, in front of The French Connection (1971) and the original Gone in 60 Seconds (1974).

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