Boston Red Sox

Boston Red Sox

American League

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Pawtucket Red Sox

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Portland Sea Dogs

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Wilmington Blue Rocks
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Gulf Coast Red Sox

The Boston Red Sox are a Major League Baseball team located in Boston, Massachusetts. They are in the American League East Division. They are the defending World Series champions. The New York Yankees are their top rival.

Founded: 1893, as the Toledo, Ohio franchise in the minor Western League. Moved to Boston when that league became the American League in 1900.
Team Name: The name Red Sox, chosen by owner John I. Taylor after the 1907 season, is based on an obsolete form of socks, as in the red footwear worn by the team starting in 1908. The older Boston National League club had originally been called the Red Stockings, and in fact had worn red stockings until temporarily abandoning them in 1907, which inspired the American League club owner to grab the nickname. Prior to 1908, the A.L. team in fact wore dark blue stockings, and did not have an official nickname. They were simply "the Bostons" or "the Boston Baseball club"; some newspaper writers referred to them as the Boston "Americans" (as in "American Leaguers", Boston being a two-team city) or "Somersets" (for a one-time club owner), but these were unofficial names. The team was never known as either the Boston "Pilgrims" or "Puritans". Those names were invented years later by historical revisionists.
Current ownership: John Henry and Tom Werner, who paid $660 million and assumed $400 million in debt, in February 2002. The purchase includes Fenway Park and 82 percent of New England Sports Network. The purchase price set a record for a major league baseball franchise.
Current payroll: About $123.5 million, more than $80 million less than that of the New York Yankees. Last year, in 2004, their payroll was $127 million, $57 million shy of the New York Yankees. In both of the last two years they have been the second-highest paid team in MLB.[1] (http://asp.usatoday.com/sports/baseball/salaries/default.aspx)
Home ballpark: Fenway Park (1912 - Present), Braves Field (1929 - 1932 Sundays, 1915 - 1916 World Series), Huntington Avenue Grounds (1901-1911). Fenway is the oldest ballpark in baseball. The Red Sox ownership group has recently committed to keeping the team at Fenway for years to come. Plans are already under way for the first ballpark centennial celebration in MLB history in 2012.
Mascot: Wally the Green Monster, named after both the left field Green Monster and the one time Red Sox pitcher, Wally Masterson.
Uniform colors: Navy blue, grey, red, and white
Logo design: Two hanging red socks with white heels and toes, over a white baseball surrounded by the words Boston and Red Sox. The word Boston is in navy blue outlined in red, the words Red Sox are in red outlined in navy blue, and the entire logo is surrounded by a thick red circle. Recently the team has begun phasing in a new logo that removes the outline, text and baseball, leaving only the pair of red socks.
Theme Song: None officially, but several unofficial theme songs exist:
  • played in the middle of the eighth inning at Fenway Park: Neil Diamond's "Sweet Caroline", performed with raucous audience participation.
  • played after each victory at Fenway Park: "Dirty Water" by The Standells.
  • played after Dirty Water and for rallies: The Dropkick Murphys' rewrite of Tessie. The original Tessie, a Broadway tune, was adopted by the Boston fans during the 1903 World Series and sung regularly until 1916.
Championships and Pennants: see below

Franchise history

Early 20th century

Crowd outside the 1903 World Series

The Boston Red Sox won the first World Series in 1903 against the favored National League team, the Pittsburgh Pirates. In the following decade, the club won four World Series championships in a six-year span despite changing ownership several times. The 1912 and 1915 clubs featured an outfield considered to be among the finest in the game: Tris Speaker, Harry Hooper and Duffy Lewis.

Duffy Lewis, Tris Speaker and Harry Hooper - Boston's famous "Million-Dollar Outfield". Photo: The Boston Globe archives.

The Red Sox were owned by Joseph Lannin from 1913 to 1916 and he signed Babe Ruth, commonly seen as the best player in baseball history. In 1919, the team's new owner, Harry Frazee, sold Ruth to the New York Yankees. Legend has it that he did so in order to finance a Broadway play No, No Nanette starring 'a friend', but in actual fact the play did not open on Broadway until 1925. Rather, Frazee sold Ruth mostly because he was a serious disciplinary problem (and continued to be one in New York) and because although Ruth was a star, it was not necessarily apparent that he would become the superstar player he quickly became in New York. The contract was a straight sale; the Red Sox got no players in return. Frazee also unloaded a number of other Hall of Fame quality players to the Yankees for other reasons. Carl Mays quit the team in mid-game and refused to return; his trade was essentially a salvage operation. Other Frazee era players went to New York as part of Frazee's financial strategy after he decided to leave baseball, having been driven out by Ban Johnson, including Sad Sam Jones and Waite Hoyt. These players (some of them Hall of Fame members) formed the nucleus of the first championship Yankee teams of the 1920s.

Tom Yawkey and Ted Williams

Ted Williams & Tom Yawkey

In 1933, a wealthy, shy young man named Tom Yawkey bought the Red Sox and began pumping money into the team.

In 1939, the Red Sox purchased the contract of outfielder Ted Williams, then playing in the Pacific Coast League, ushering in an era of the team sometimes called the "Ted Sox". Williams was perhaps the most obsessive hitter in baseball history, and is generally considered the greatest hitter of all time, being able to hit for both power and average. Stories of his being able to hold a bat in his hand and correctly estimate its weight down to the ounce have floated around baseball circles for decades. Science of Hitting, his book on the subject, is considered by some as a bible of hitting theory and science. He is also the last player to hit over .400 for a full season, in 1941.

With Williams, the Red Sox went to the World Series in 1946, but lost to the St. Louis Cardinals, in part because of the use of the "Williams Shift", in which the shortstop would move to the right side of the infield to make it harder for the left-handed-hitting Williams to hit to that side of the field. Some have claimed that Williams was too proud to hit to the other side of the field, not wanting to let the Cardinals take away his game. He did not hit well in the Series, gathering only five singles in 25 at-bats, for a .200 average. However, this was also likely influenced by an elbow injury he had received a few days before when he was hit by a pitch in an exhibition game.

The Red Sox featured several other very good players during the 1940s, including SS Johnny Pesky (for whom the right field foul pole in Fenway - "Pesky's Pole" - is named), 2B Bobby Doerr, and CF Dom DiMaggio (brother of Joe). Despite this, they lost the pennant by one game in each of 1948 and 1949, and Williams never played in another World Series.

The 1950s were a bleak time for the Red Sox. Unlike other teams, they refused to sign black players, even passing up a chance at future Hall-of-Famer Jackie Robinson. Ted Williams hit .388 at the age of 38 in 1957, but there was little else for Boston fans to root for. Williams retired at the end of the 1960 season, famously hitting a home run in his final at-bat.

The Sox finally became the last Major League team to sign an African American player when they signed modest infielder Pumpsie Green in 1959. Prior to signing Green, Yawkee passed on Hall of Famers Willie Mays and Jackie Robinson both of who tried out for the Red Sox and were highly praised by Red Sox scouts.

Supposedly the right-field bullpens in Fenway Park were built in part for Williams' left-handed swing, and these are sometimes called "Williamsburg".

Carl "Yaz" Yastrzemski

Carl "Yaz" Yastrzemski

The 1960s also started poorly for the Red Sox, though 1961 saw the debut of Carl Yastrzemski ("Yaz"), who would become one of the best hitters of the pitching-rich decade.

Red Sox fans remember 1967 as the year of the "Impossible Dream." The team had finished the 1966 season in ninth place, but they found new life with Yaz leading the team to the World Series. Yaz won the American League Triple Crown and put on one of the greatest displays of hitting down the stretch in baseball history. But the Red Sox lost the series - again to the St. Louis Cardinals. The 1967 season is remembered as one of the great pennant races in baseball history since four teams were in the AL pennant race until almost the last game.

The Sox won the AL pennant in 1975, with Yaz surrounded by other stars such as rookie outfielders Jim Rice and Fred Lynn (who won both the AL Rookie of the Year and MVP awards), veteran outfielder Dwight Evans, catcher Carlton Fisk, and pitchers Luis Tiant and the eccentric junkballer Bill Lee.

Game 6 of the 1975 World Series, against the Cincinnati Reds' so-called "Big Red Machine," is regarded by some as the greatest game in baseball postseason history, an extra-inning drama featuring dramatic home runs by Bernie Carbo and Fisk (the latter a game-winner, the famous 'body English' homerun). Despite the series-tying win, the Red Sox lost Game 7, and this time it would be Yaz who never again played in a World Series.

The Red Sox may have lost to the National League champions in the World Series, but their true rivals were the New York Yankees, who after the Babe Ruth trade in 1919 would go on to win 26 World Series championships. The race for the pennant often came to a close competition between the Red Sox and the Yankees. The Red Sox-Yankees rivalry came to a head in the 1978 season, when the two clubs finished the regular season in a tie for the American League East division title. A winner-take-all playoff game was held at Fenway Park. The Yankees drove a stake through the hearts of Red Sox fans when Bucky Dent drove a game-winning home run over the Green Monster.

The "Curse of the Bambino"

Babe Ruth, as a young pitcher for the Red Sox

After the Yawkeys

Tom Yawkey had passed away in 1976, and his wife Jean took control of the team, until her death in 1992, ending over 60 years of Yawkey ownership. A trust controlled by John Harrington took control of the team.

Longtime Sox general manager Lou Gorman was replaced in 1994 by Dan Duquette, who had previously run the Montreal Expos. Duquette's reign began with promises to revive the flagging Sox farm system, but ended with several huge contracts to major stars and a great deal of public acrimony. The fans and local media often turned on the players; general managers humiliated the manager; managers and players sniped at each other.

In the strike-shortened 1995 season, the Sox won the newly-realigned American League East, finishing 7 games ahead of the rival Yankees. Once again, they were swept, this time 3-0 by the Cleveland Indians, running their postseason losing streak to 13 games, dating back to the 1986 World Series.

In 1998 the Red Sox traded for Expos star pitcher Pedro Martínez, and signed him to a long-term contract. Martinez would have several spectacular seasons for the Red Sox. In 1998 they won the wild card, but again lost the American League Division Series to the Indians, this time 3-1, despite winning Game 1 11-3 behind Martinez.

In 1999 they got revenge on the Indians. Cleveland took a 2-0 series lead, but the Red Sox won Game 3 9-3 behind the pitching of Ramón Martínez, Pedro's brother, and Derek Lowe. Game 4 was a blowout 23-7 win for the Red Sox and the highest scoring playoff game in history. Game 5 was a tense affair, with the Indians taking a 5-2 lead after two innings, but Pedro Martínez came on in the fourth inning and pitched six innings of no-hit ball while the offense rallied for a 12-8 win, behind two home runs from Troy O'Leary. The Red Sox then met the hated New York Yankees and lost 4 games to 1. The sole win was a cathartic 13-1 demolition of former Red Sox Roger Clemens in Fenway Park.

The Duquette era ended in 2002, when president and Yawkey trustee John Harrington sold the Red Sox to a consortium comprising John Henry, Tom Werner, and Les Otten, with Larry Lucchino as president and CEO. Duquette was fired, and replaced for the 2002 season by Mike Port. After almost hiring Oakland's Billy Beane during the 2002 off-season, the Red Sox promoted Yale graduate Theo Epstein to general manager. At 28, he became the youngest GM in the history of the Major Leagues.

June 27, 2003, the Red Sox established a new Major League Baseball record by scoring 10 runs against the Florida Marlins before the Marlins could get an out in the first inning.

The 2003 postseason delivered another blow to Red Sox fans. The Sox rallied from a 2-0 deficit against the Oakland Athletics to win the best-of-5 American League Division Series. They then faced the Yankees in the 2003 American League Championship Series. In the deciding Game 7, Boston had a 5-2 lead over the Yankees in the 8th inning, but Pedro Martínez allowed three runs to tie the game, and the Red Sox lost the game 6-5 in 11 innings, on a home run by Yankee third baseman Aaron Boone. Many Red Sox fans blamed the loss on their manager, Grady Little, for not removing Martínez after seven strong innings, when he began to show signs of tiring. Most Red Sox fans saw this as the culmination of two years of questionable decisionmaking by Little, and it was the "straw that broke the camel's back" which led to him not being brought back the following offseason. He was replaced by Terry Francona, a man who finally brought Boston a championship for the first time in 86 years.

2004: A "Curse" Reversed

During the offseason, the Red Sox acquired another ace pitcher in Curt Schilling and almost landed shortstop Alex Rodriguez, but the deal fell through, and Rodriguez went to the Yankees instead. Nevertheless, the Red Sox were picked by many to win the American League East in 2004. In seven meetings with New York in April, the Sox lost just one, and opened up a 4-game lead early in the season. Through midseason, the team struggled mightily, and fell more than 10 games behind New York. Management shook up the team at the MLB trading deadline on July 31 by trading shortstop Nomar Garciaparra to the Chicago Cubs in exchange for Orlando Cabrera of the Montreal Expos and Doug Mientkiewicz of the Minnesota Twins in a four-team deal. Also acquired, though less publicized, was speedy outfielder Dave Roberts of the LA Dodgers for minor league prospects. After splitting six games with the Yankees in September, the Red Sox remained in contention, but finished three games back in the AL East, again qualifying as the AL Wild Card.

The playoffs started with a bang as the Red Sox swept the AL West champion Anaheim Angels, winning Game 3 by a score of 8-6 on David Ortiz's 10th inning walk-off home run over the Green Monster. The Red Sox thus advanced to a rematch in the 2004 American League Championship Series against their bitter rivals: the New York Yankees.

In Game 1, the Red Sox didn't have a hit until the seventh, and lost 10-7. Worse, Schilling left early in the game due to an ankle injury suffered in the Anaheim series. Pedro started Game 2 and pitched effectively, but the team lost 3-1 because of an unexpected pitching gem by Jon Lieber. In Game 3, the Red Sox were demolished 19-8, a game which set the record for most runs scored by both teams in a League Championship Series, to fall behind 3-0 in the series. In Game 4 of the playoff, down 4-3 in the ninth with Yankees closer Mariano Rivera on the mound, the Sox rallied thanks to a stolen base by Roberts, an RBI single by Bill Mueller and Ortiz's 2-run walk-off home run in the 12th inning to win the game 6-4. Again trailing the next night, the Sox again rallied, and in the 14th inning, Ortiz's RBI single won the game 5-4. Game 5 set a record for longest postseason game in terms of time (5 hours and 49 minutes) and for longest ALCS game (14 innings). The Red Sox rally continued through Game 6, in which Schilling returned to pitch seven innings on an ankle held that had three sutures wrapped in a bloody, literally red sock, and into Game 7, when Johnny Damon (who affectionately referred to the team as "The Idiots" to describe its eclectic roster) hit a grand slam in the second inning and added another home run later. The Sox rolled 10-3 to win the series 4-3.

They became the first team in baseball history (and the third in North American professional sports history, after the 1942 Toronto Maple Leafs and the 1975 New York Islanders of the NHL) to rally from a 3-0 deficit to win a best-of-7 series. Neither of those teams had trailed in game four of their series, this is generally regarded as the greatest comeback in North American sports history. David Ortiz was named MVP. Unfortunately the end of Game 7 did not go without rioting in the streets of Boston.

The Red Sox moved on to the 2004 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals, a team that had posted the best record in the major leagues winning 105 games on the season -- and the team that had defeated the Red Sox in the 1946 and 1967 World Series. Game 1 set a new record for the highest scoring World Series opening game (breaking the previous record set in 1932). Towards the end of the game, Manny Ramirez committed two errors, allowing St. Louis to tie the game. However, he was saved by second baseman Mark Bellhorn, who hit the eventual game-winning two-run homer. The Sox defeated the Cardinals twice in Boston and twice in St. Louis to sweep the World Series, making this their first Series win since 1918. The final out of the game was made on Cardinals shortstop Edgar Rentería at 11:40 pm, in the midst of a lunar eclipse. Joe Castiglione, a longtime radio broadcaster for the Red Sox, narrated, "Foulke to the set, the 1-0 pitch, here it is, swing and a ground ball stabbed by Foulke, he has it, he underhands to first, and the Boston Red Sox are the World Champions! For the first time in 86 years, the Red Sox have won baseball's World Championship! Can you believe it?"

The Red Sox held a parade – or as Boston mayor Thomas Menino put it, a "rolling rally" – on Saturday, October 30, 2004. A crowd of more than 3 million members of "Red Sox Nation" filled the streets of Boston to cheer as the team rode Duck Tours.

The Red Sox were chosen by Sports Illustrated as that magazine's Sportsmen of the Year. They are the first professional sports team to be chosen, and the only other teams to be chosen were the 1999 U.S. Women's soccer team and the 1980 'Miracle on Ice' U.S. Olympic hockey team.

Statistics/titles/records

Championships and pennants

Division Championships won (5): 1975, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1995
Wild Card titles won (4): 1998, 1999, 2003, 2004
Division Series won (3): 1999, 2003, 2004
American League pennants won (11): 1903, 1904, 1912, 1915, 1916, 1918, 1946, 1967, 1975, 1986, 2004
World Series championships won (6): 1903, 1912, 1915, 1916, 1918, 2004

Postseason series

Players of note

Baseball Hall of Famers

* Inducted as Red Sox

Current 25-man roster (updated on June 12, 2005)

Manager

  • 47 Terry Francona

Coaches

  • 22 Ron Jackson (hitting)
  • 17 Dave Wallace (pitching)
  • 35 Lynn Jones (first base)
  • 41 Dale Sveum (third base)
  •   2 Brad Mills (bench)
  • 37 Bill Haselman (bullpen pitching)

Not to be forgotten

* At 92, he is the oldest living former Red Sox player.

All-time team career leaders

  • Batting: Ted Williams, .344
  • Home runs: Ted Williams, 521
  • RBI: Carl Yastrzemski, 1844
  • Stolen bases: Harry Hooper, 300
  • Wins: Cy Young and Roger Clemens, 192
  • Opponent Strikeouts: Roger Clemens, 2590
  • ERA: Smokey Joe Wood, 1.99
  • Saves: Bob Stanley, 132

All-time team season records

  • Batting: Ted Williams, .406, 1941
  • Home runs: Jimmie Foxx, 50, 1938
  • RBI: Jimmie Foxx, 175, 1938
  • Runs: Ted Williams, 150, 1949
  • Hits: Wade Boggs, 240, 1985
  • Doubles: Earl Webb, 67, 1931 (MLB Record)
  • Triples: Tris Speaker, 22, 1913
  • Stolen bases: Tommy Harper, 54, 1973
  • Hitting Streak: Dom DiMaggio, 34 games, 1949
  • Strikeouts: Mark Bellhorn, 177, 2004
  • Walks: Ted Williams, 162, 1947 & 1949
  • Wins: Smokey Joe Wood, 34, 1912
  • Opponent Strikeouts: Pedro Martínez, 313, 1999
  • ERA: Dutch Leonard, 0.96, 1914 (MLB Record)
  • Saves: Tom Gordon, 46, 1998
  • For other leaderboards and awards winners see:
    • List of Boston Red Sox awards

Retired numbers

  •   1 Bobby Doerr
  •   4 Joe Cronin
  •   8 Carl Yastrzemski
  •   9 Ted Williams
  • 27 Carlton Fisk
  • 42 Jackie Robinson (retired by all Major League ballclubs)

Team captains

  • Carl Yastrzemski (1969-83)
  • Jim Rice (1985-89)
  • Jason Varitek (since 2005)

Current broadcasters

  • Joe Castiglione (since 1983)
  • Don Orsillo (since 1993)
  • Jerry Remy (since 1988)
  • Jerry Trupiano (since 1993)

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* At 92, he is the oldest living former Red Sox player. * * Has retirement honors, with a numberless jersey retired on the outfield wall. Coaches.    * Has retirement honors, as he played in the era prior to uniform numbers. Manager. Even after a blow-out loss, this segment is usually quite humorous and uplifting. * Inducted as Red Sox. After the game, all of the announcers will come together on the radio side and give their opinions on the game.

Olympic hockey team. On these occasions, Greg Papa will either fill in on the radio, or Kuiper will move to the radio side and Papa will join Krukow on television. Women's soccer team and the 1980 'Miracle on Ice' U.S. Miller holds a second job as play-by-play announcer for ESPN's Sunday Night Baseball and therefore usually misses Saturday's game as well as Sunday's. They are the first professional sports team to be chosen, and the only other teams to be chosen were the 1999 U.S. On the radio, Jon Miller and Dave Flemming take turns calling the games (usually Miller will call innings 1-3 and 7-9, and Flemming will call innings 4-6). The Red Sox were chosen by Sports Illustrated as that magazine's Sportsmen of the Year. On KTVU, Jon Miller calls play-by-play and Mike Krukow colors.

A crowd of more than 3 million members of "Red Sox Nation" filled the streets of Boston to cheer as the team rode Duck Tours. On Fox Sports Net television, the Giants games are called by Duane Kuiper and colored by Mike Krukow. The Red Sox held a parade – or as Boston mayor Thomas Menino put it, a "rolling rally" – on Saturday, October 30, 2004. In the two games which followed the ceremonies, the Giants wore uniforms with the word "Gigantes" on the front (the Spanish word for "Giants".). Joe Castiglione, a longtime radio broadcaster for the Red Sox, narrated, "Foulke to the set, the 1-0 pitch, here it is, swing and a ground ball stabbed by Foulke, he has it, he underhands to first, and the Boston Red Sox are the World Champions! For the first time in 86 years, the Red Sox have won baseball's World Championship! Can you believe it?". Leonel Fernández, the President of the Dominican Republic, was in attendance. The final out of the game was made on Cardinals shortstop Edgar Rentería at 11:40 pm, in the midst of a lunar eclipse. A statue of Marichal was dedicated on the plaza outside of the ballpark.

The Sox defeated the Cardinals twice in Boston and twice in St. Louis to sweep the World Series, making this their first Series win since 1918. On May 25, 2005, the Giants held a celebration in honor of Baseball Hall of Famer Juan Marichal. However, he was saved by second baseman Mark Bellhorn, who hit the eventual game-winning two-run homer. At the present time, Barry Bonds' playing future remains very much in doubt as well, although some positive noises from the Giants' camp have led fans to once again hope that a comeback from their superstar slugger is a little nearer on the horizon. Louis to tie the game. Further injuries have hampered the Giants, with ace starting pitcher Jason Schmidt also missing games, and, as of June 13th, the team has a record of 25 wins compared to 36 losses, which leaves them fourth in the NL West standings, ten games begind the division-leading Arizona Diamondbacks. Game 1 set a new record for the highest scoring World Series opening game (breaking the previous record set in 1932). Towards the end of the game, Manny Ramirez committed two errors, allowing St. At the time of writing, Tyler Walker has temporarily assumed a closer role, amid speculation that Benitez may not return at all this season.

Louis Cardinals, a team that had posted the best record in the major leagues winning 105 games on the season -- and the team that had defeated the Red Sox in the 1946 and 1967 World Series. He was rewarded with the out. The Red Sox moved on to the 2004 World Series against the St. The team has struggled to win games so far this season, and were dealt another major blow when it was announced that Benitez - signed in the offseason specifically to solve the team's closer woes of the past couple of seasons - would miss four-to-six months after tearing his right hamstring when he stepped awkwardly to cover first base on the final play in a game against the San Diego Padres on April 26th. Unfortunately the end of Game 7 did not go without rioting in the streets of Boston. The Giants' attempts to return to the playoffs in 2005 did not get off to the best start, however. David Ortiz was named MVP. It is a philosophy which has been seen from other successful MLB franchises lately, notably the Boston Red Sox, who signed pitcher Curt Schilling, then 37, prior to the 2004 season which culminated in a World Series title for the 'Sox and a key role for Schilling in that victory.

Neither of those teams had trailed in game four of their series, this is generally regarded as the greatest comeback in North American sports history. His philosophy is one of aiming for immediate success, rather than building towards the future. They became the first team in baseball history (and the third in North American professional sports history, after the 1942 Toronto Maple Leafs and the 1975 New York Islanders of the NHL) to rally from a 3-0 deficit to win a best-of-7 series. Manager Felipe Alou claims to be unconcerned by the age of his squad members. The Sox rolled 10-3 to win the series 4-3. That said, the roster does also include 42-year-old left-handed pitcher Jeff Fassero. The Red Sox rally continued through Game 6, in which Schilling returned to pitch seven innings on an ankle held that had three sutures wrapped in a bloody, literally red sock, and into Game 7, when Johnny Damon (who affectionately referred to the team as "The Idiots" to describe its eclectic roster) hit a grand slam in the second inning and added another home run later. Much of the team's youth is presently focused amongst their pitchers, with the popular Noah Lowry, 24, a rising star who went unbeaten in his first 16 appearances in the majors.

Game 5 set a record for longest postseason game in terms of time (5 hours and 49 minutes) and for longest ALCS game (14 innings). Moisés Alou is 38, as are Vizquel and outfielder Marquis Grissom, while first baseman J.T. Snow is 37. Again trailing the next night, the Sox again rallied, and in the 14th inning, Ortiz's RBI single won the game 5-4. Indeed, the Giants' present roster has one of the highest average ages in all of Major League Baseball. In Game 4 of the playoff, down 4-3 in the ninth with Yankees closer Mariano Rivera on the mound, the Sox rallied thanks to a stolen base by Roberts, an RBI single by Bill Mueller and Ortiz's 2-run walk-off home run in the 12th inning to win the game 6-4. There are question marks over Bonds' status, with speculation that, at age 40, he may decide to retire from baseball. In Game 3, the Red Sox were demolished 19-8, a game which set the record for most runs scored by both teams in a League Championship Series, to fall behind 3-0 in the series. The biggest star on the team by some distance, however, is still Barry Bonds, despite the fact that he has not played at all in 2005 due to a knee injury.

Pedro started Game 2 and pitched effectively, but the team lost 3-1 because of an unexpected pitching gem by Jon Lieber. Other new additions include shortstop Omar Vizquel, relief pitcher Armando Benitez and catcher Mike Matheny, a multiple Gold Glove Award winner. Worse, Schilling left early in the game due to an ankle injury suffered in the Anaheim series. The team is presently coached by former star player Felipe Alou, whose son Moisés was amongst the new players brought in by the Giants prior to the 2005 season. In Game 1, the Red Sox didn't have a hit until the seventh, and lost 10-7. Recent stars include Will Clark, Matt Williams, Barry Bonds, and Jason Schmidt. The Red Sox thus advanced to a rematch in the 2004 American League Championship Series against their bitter rivals: the New York Yankees. Willie Mays, one of the last holdovers of the New York years, thrived in San Francisco, as did Willie McCovey, Orlando Cepeda, Felipe Alou, Gaylord Perry, Bobby Bonds, Jack Clark, and Juan Marichal.

The playoffs started with a bang as the Red Sox swept the AL West champion Anaheim Angels, winning Game 3 by a score of 8-6 on David Ortiz's 10th inning walk-off home run over the Green Monster. What has not changed is the Giants' share of stars gracing the field. After splitting six games with the Yankees in September, the Red Sox remained in contention, but finished three games back in the AL East, again qualifying as the AL Wild Card. It was also the first time the Giants had finished first or second in their division for eight consecutive seasons since they consistently were first or second from 1917-1925 whilst still the New York Giants. Also acquired, though less publicized, was speedy outfielder Dave Roberts of the LA Dodgers for minor league prospects. Barry Bonds received his fourth consecutive MVP award, marking the fifth consecutive year a Giant has received the award—Jeff Kent received it in 2000—a feat no other team has accomplished. Management shook up the team at the MLB trading deadline on July 31 by trading shortstop Nomar Garciaparra to the Chicago Cubs in exchange for Orlando Cabrera of the Montreal Expos and Doug Mientkiewicz of the Minnesota Twins in a four-team deal. Once again, their fierce rivals the Dodgers prevented them from winning the division, with a stunning come-from-behind victory on a Steve Finley grand slam.

Through midseason, the team struggled mightily, and fell more than 10 games behind New York. It was only the second time this decade in which the Giants failed to make the postseason, 2001 being the other occasion. In seven meetings with New York in April, the Sox lost just one, and opened up a 4-game lead early in the season. In 2004, the Giants ended the season one game behind the Houston Astros for the wild card race, and two games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers in the division race. Nevertheless, the Red Sox were picked by many to win the American League East in 2004. They lost to the wild card Florida Marlins 3 games to 1 in the 2003 National League Division Series as Ivan Rodriguez, offensively and defensively, led the way for the Marlins to their second World Series championship in seven seasons. During the offseason, the Red Sox acquired another ace pitcher in Curt Schilling and almost landed shortstop Alex Rodriguez, but the deal fell through, and Rodriguez went to the Yankees instead. The previous three were Baltimore in 1997, Cleveland in 1998, and Seattle in 2001.

He was replaced by Terry Francona, a man who finally brought Boston a championship for the first time in 86 years. They became just the ninth wire-to-wire winner of a division or pennant in baseball history. Most Red Sox fans saw this as the culmination of two years of questionable decisionmaking by Little, and it was the "straw that broke the camel's back" which led to him not being brought back the following offseason. With their 100-61 record, the Giants spent the entire season in first place in the NL West. Many Red Sox fans blamed the loss on their manager, Grady Little, for not removing Martínez after seven strong innings, when he began to show signs of tiring. In 2003, the Giants recorded 100 victories for the seventh time in franchise history and the third time in San Francisco. In the deciding Game 7, Boston had a 5-2 lead over the Yankees in the 8th inning, but Pedro Martínez allowed three runs to tie the game, and the Red Sox lost the game 6-5 in 11 innings, on a home run by Yankee third baseman Aaron Boone. The Angels then staged a historic rally (apparently helped in part by the scoreboard icon, the "Rally Monkey") to win the game as the bullpen collectively fell apart (with fans not realizing that this was Robb Nen's last appearance as a major leaguer), and then defeated Liván Hernández in Game 7 to win their first World Series in franchise history.

They then faced the Yankees in the 2003 American League Championship Series. The Giants were up 5-0 in the seventh inning of Game 6, just eight outs away from their first championship since moving to San Francisco, when Dusty flipped the ball to Russ Ortiz as a souvenir, angering the Angels' players. The Sox rallied from a 2-0 deficit against the Oakland Athletics to win the best-of-5 American League Division Series. As he carried him back to the dugout, he asked him, "Are you OK, buddy?" and Darren assured him that he was. The 2003 postseason delivered another blow to Red Sox fans. With Bell racing right behind him, Snow deftly snared little Darren by his jacket while stepping on home plate, getting the young'un out of harm's way. June 27, 2003, the Red Sox established a new Major League Baseball record by scoring 10 runs against the Florida Marlins before the Marlins could get an out in the first inning. As Snow streaked toward home plate, he suddenly became aware that manager Dusty Baker's small son, Darren, had come out on the field to retrieve Lofton's bat.

At 28, he became the youngest GM in the history of the Major Leagues. Snow and David Bell on base, Kenny Lofton smashed what proved to be a triple. After almost hiring Oakland's Billy Beane during the 2002 off-season, the Red Sox promoted Yale graduate Theo Epstein to general manager. With J.T. The Duquette era ended in 2002, when president and Yawkey trustee John Harrington sold the Red Sox to a consortium comprising John Henry, Tom Werner, and Les Otten, with Larry Lucchino as president and CEO. Duquette was fired, and replaced for the 2002 season by Mike Port. In the seventh inning of that game, a scary and touching moment occurred. The sole win was a cathartic 13-1 demolition of former Red Sox Roger Clemens in Fenway Park. The Giants eventually took a 3-2 lead in the series, winning Game 5 by a lopsided 16-4 score.

The Red Sox then met the hated New York Yankees and lost 4 games to 1. The Giants faced their wild card counterparts from the American League, the Anaheim Angels, in the 2002 World Series. The games seesawed from well pitched games to wild affairs during the series. Game 5 was a tense affair, with the Indians taking a 5-2 lead after two innings, but Pedro Martínez came on in the fourth inning and pitched six innings of no-hit ball while the offense rallied for a 12-8 win, behind two home runs from Troy O'Leary. Louis Cardinals (who had beaten the Giants in the NLCS 4 games to 3 in 1987), in the NLCS 4 games to 1, to stake claim to their first NL pennant since 1989. Game 4 was a blowout 23-7 win for the Red Sox and the highest scoring playoff game in history. They first defeated the Atlanta Braves in the NLDS 3 games to 2, and then the St. Cleveland took a 2-0 series lead, but the Red Sox won Game 3 9-3 behind the pitching of Ramón Martínez, Pedro's brother, and Derek Lowe. As underdogs in 2002, they beat two teams who had been thorns in the San Franciso Giants' side for much of the life of the franchise: the Braves and the Cardinals.

In 1999 they got revenge on the Indians. Following division championships in 1997 and 2000, the Giants reached the World Series again in 2002 as the wild card team. In 1998 they won the wild card, but again lost the American League Division Series to the Indians, this time 3-1, despite winning Game 1 11-3 behind Martinez. Snow's leaning 3-run homer off Armando Benitez to push game 2 into extra innings, and Bobby Jones pitching the game of his life in game 4 to clinch the series. Martinez would have several spectacular seasons for the Red Sox. The Giants were booted out in the first round of playoffs by the New York Mets, however, 3 games to 1, highlighted by Edgardo Alfonzo's clutch hitting, J.T. In 1998 the Red Sox traded for Expos star pitcher Pedro Martínez, and signed him to a long-term contract. Pac Bell Park played like parks from olden times, boosting up doubles and especially triples, but dampening home run power.

In the strike-shortened 1995 season, the Sox won the newly-realigned American League East, finishing 7 games ahead of the rival Yankees. Once again, they were swept, this time 3-0 by the Cleveland Indians, running their postseason losing streak to 13 games, dating back to the 1986 World Series. They actually ended up with a great home record of 55-26, despite the fact that lefties not named Barry Bonds had their power cancelled by Pac Bell Park's configuration. The fans and local media often turned on the players; general managers humiliated the manager; managers and players sniped at each other. 2000 was the Giants' inaugural season in Pacific Bell Park, and after a horrendous and inauspicious 0-6 start at their new home, they roared off to win their second NL West title under Sabean and Baker, finishing with the best record in the National League. Duquette's reign began with promises to revive the flagging Sox farm system, but ended with several huge contracts to major stars and a great deal of public acrimony. Unfortunately, the Florida Marlins ended the Giants' season with a 3-0 sweep in the first round of playoffs, as the Marlins marched on their way to their first World Series championship. Longtime Sox general manager Lou Gorman was replaced in 1994 by Dan Duquette, who had previously run the Montreal Expos. Snow enabled the Giants to win their first NL West division title of the 1990s in 1997.

A trust controlled by John Harrington took control of the team. It turns out he was indeed not an "idiot," as the players he acquired in the Williams trade - Jeff Kent, Jose Vizcaino, Julian Tavarez, and Joe Roa (plus the $1 million in cash that enabled them to sign Darryl Hamilton) - plus the trade for J.T. Tom Yawkey had passed away in 1976, and his wife Jean took control of the team, until her death in 1992, ending over 60 years of Yawkey ownership. I'm sitting here telling you there is a plan.". A winner-take-all playoff game was held at Fenway Park. The Yankees drove a stake through the hearts of Red Sox fans when Bucky Dent drove a game-winning home run over the Green Monster. In his first trade as GM, he shocked Giants fans across the world by trading Matt Williams for seemingly a bunch of spare parts, and the reaction was great enough for him to have to publicly explain: "I didn't get to this point by being an idiot.. The race for the pennant often came to a close competition between the Red Sox and the Yankees. The Red Sox-Yankees rivalry came to a head in the 1978 season, when the two clubs finished the regular season in a tie for the American League East division title. Prior to being named GM, he was already rumored to have engineered the deal to get Kirk Rueter from the Montreal Expos.

The Red Sox may have lost to the National League champions in the World Series, but their true rivals were the New York Yankees, who after the Babe Ruth trade in 1919 would go on to win 26 World Series championships. These bad times led the Giants to name Brian Sabean as their new general manager, replacing Bob Quinn. Despite the series-tying win, the Red Sox lost Game 7, and this time it would be Yaz who never again played in a World Series. The only bright spot was Barry Bonds, highlighted by his joining the 40-40 club with 42 homers and 40 stolen bases in the 1996 season. Game 6 of the 1975 World Series, against the Cincinnati Reds' so-called "Big Red Machine," is regarded by some as the greatest game in baseball postseason history, an extra-inning drama featuring dramatic home runs by Bernie Carbo and Fisk (the latter a game-winner, the famous 'body English' homerun). The Giants then came in last place in both 1995 and 1996, as key injuries and slumps hurt them. The Sox won the AL pennant in 1975, with Yaz surrounded by other stars such as rookie outfielders Jim Rice and Fred Lynn (who won both the AL Rookie of the Year and MVP awards), veteran outfielder Dwight Evans, catcher Carlton Fisk, and pitchers Luis Tiant and the eccentric junkballer Bill Lee. The strike cost Matt Williams a chance to beat Roger Maris' single season home run record - he was on pace for over 60 homers when the strike hit with 47 games left to play.

The 1967 season is remembered as one of the great pennant races in baseball history since four teams were in the AL pennant race until almost the last game. The period of 1994 to 1996 were not good years for the Giants, punctuated by the strike that cancelled the World Series in 1994. Louis Cardinals. A late-season win streak did put the Giants in position to determine their fate, but destiny spat in their face again as Salomon Torres, their just called-up ace pitching prospect, was put in the impossible position of needing a win against their hated rivals the Dodgers, and was battered. But the Red Sox lost the series - again to the St. Unfortunately, the Atlanta Braves won the NL West by one game as the Giants, in first place much of the year, were just not as hot as the Braves after they picked up Fred McGriff in a mid-season trade. Yaz won the American League Triple Crown and put on one of the greatest displays of hitting down the stretch in baseball history. This led the Giants to a great 103-59 record in Dusty Baker's first year as manager, which earned Dusty the Manager of the Year award.

Red Sox fans remember 1967 as the year of the "Impossible Dream." The team had finished the 1966 season in ninth place, but they found new life with Yaz leading the team to the World Series. The Barry Bonds era started with a bang as Barry put up the numbers for the third MVP of his career: 46 homers, 129 runs, 123 RBI, .336/.458/.677/1.135, all career highs. The 1960s also started poorly for the Red Sox, though 1961 saw the debut of Carl Yastrzemski ("Yaz"), who would become one of the best hitters of the pitching-rich decade. Before even hiring a new General Manager or officially being approved as the new owners, Magowan signed superstar free agent Barry Bonds (a move which the MLB initially blocked until some terms were negotiated to protect Lurie and Bonds in case the sale failed), a move that shaped the franchise's fortunes for more than a decade. Supposedly the right-field bullpens in Fenway Park were built in part for Williams' left-handed swing, and these are sometimes called "Williamsburg". A group of investors from Saint Petersburg reached an agreement to purchase the team and move them across the country. However, Major League Baseball blocked the move, paving the way for the team to stay in San Francisco with an ownership group lead by Peter Magowan, the former CEO of Safeway. Prior to signing Green, Yawkee passed on Hall of Famers Willie Mays and Jackie Robinson both of who tried out for the Red Sox and were highly praised by Red Sox scouts. After the 1992 season, owner Bob Lurie, who had previously saved the franchise from moving to Toronto in 1976, put the team up for sale.

The Sox finally became the last Major League team to sign an African American player when they signed modest infielder Pumpsie Green in 1959. Following the '89 World Series defeat, a local ballot initiative to fund a new stadium in San Francisco failed, threatening the franchise's future in the city. Williams retired at the end of the 1960 season, famously hitting a home run in his final at-bat. Oakland went on to sweep San Francisco 4 games to none, as the Giants did not have the starting pitching to match up with Oakland. Ted Williams hit .388 at the age of 38 in 1957, but there was little else for Boston fans to root for. The quake caused a ten-day delay in the Series that Oakland led 2-0 at the time. Unlike other teams, they refused to sign black players, even passing up a chance at future Hall-of-Famer Jackie Robinson. The 7.1-magnitude Loma Prieta earthquake caused no major injuries at the ballpark, but there were a number of fatalities in other parts of the cities.

The 1950s were a bleak time for the Red Sox. The picture became staticky, the distracted commentator did a verbal double-take, and then Al Michaels broke in and said, "I'll tell you what; we're having an earthqu-" just as power went out. Despite this, they lost the pennant by one game in each of 1948 and 1949, and Williams never played in another World Series. Unbeknownst to the viewing audience just yet, the ground was beginning to shake. The Red Sox featured several other very good players during the 1940s, including SS Johnny Pesky (for whom the right field foul pole in Fenway - "Pesky's Pole" - is named), 2B Bobby Doerr, and CF Dom DiMaggio (brother of Joe). In the pre-game TV segment, some game footage was being shown. However, this was also likely influenced by an elbow injury he had received a few days before when he was hit by a pitch in an exhibition game. The series is perhaps best remembered for what happened on October 17, 1989 before Game 3 at Candlestick Park.

He did not hit well in the Series, gathering only five singles in 25 at-bats, for a .200 average. In 1989, the Giants faced the Oakland Athletics in the "Bay Bridge Series", also known as the BART Series in reference to both the Bay Area Rapid Transit and to the baseball Commissioner, Bart Giamatti, who had died suddenly just weeks before the end of the season. Some have claimed that Williams was too proud to hit to the other side of the field, not wanting to let the Cardinals take away his game. In the League Championship Series, the Pittsburgh Pirates and Roberto Clemente easily defeated the Giants on their way ultimately to a World Series win over the Baltimore Orioles. Louis Cardinals, in part because of the use of the "Williams Shift", in which the shortstop would move to the right side of the infield to make it harder for the left-handed-hitting Williams to hit to that side of the field. The Giants' next appearance in the post-season was 1971. With Williams, the Red Sox went to the World Series in 1946, but lost to the St. This time, Charlie cires, "Or why couldn't McCovey have hit the ball just two feet higher?".

He is also the last player to hit over .400 for a full season, in 1941. In the last panel, Charlie cries to the heavens, "Why couldn't McCovey have hit the ball just three feet higher?" Some weeks later, same scene. Science of Hitting, his book on the subject, is considered by some as a bible of hitting theory and science. In the first two panels, Charlie Brown and Linus are sitting on a porch step, looking glum. Stories of his being able to hold a bat in his hand and correctly estimate its weight down to the ounce have floated around baseball circles for decades. Giants fan Charles Schulz made a rare reference to the real world in one of his Peanuts strips soon afterward. Williams was perhaps the most obsessive hitter in baseball history, and is generally considered the greatest hitter of all time, being able to hit for both power and average. In addition, to rub salt in the wound, Richardson was not originally positioned to catch the drive, he only moved there (three steps to the left) in reaction to a foul smash by McCovey on the previous pitch.

In 1939, the Red Sox purchased the contract of outfielder Ted Williams, then playing in the Pacific Coast League, ushering in an era of the team sometimes called the "Ted Sox". Earlier in the inning, a failed bunt by Felipe Alou had ultimately resulted in Matty not scoring on Mays' double, which started a lifelong dedication to fundamentals on Felipe's part. In 1933, a wealthy, shy young man named Tom Yawkey bought the Red Sox and began pumping money into the team. He hit a screaming line drive that was snared by second baseman Bobby Richardson, bringing the Series to a sudden end. These players (some of them Hall of Fame members) formed the nucleus of the first championship Yankee teams of the 1920s. All Willie McCovey needed was a single. Other Frazee era players went to New York as part of Frazee's financial strategy after he decided to leave baseball, having been driven out by Ban Johnson, including Sad Sam Jones and Waite Hoyt. With Matty Alou on first base and two outs, Willie Mays sliced a double down the right field line. Rightfielder Roger Maris, whose 61 home run season in 1961 has historically overshadowed his great defensive work, quickly got to the ball and rifled a throw to the infield, preventing Alou from scoring the tying run.

Carl Mays quit the team in mid-game and refused to return; his trade was essentially a salvage operation. In 1962, they lost by 4 games to 3 to the New York Yankees, losing the final game in the bottom of the ninth, 1-0, in a pitchers' duel. Frazee also unloaded a number of other Hall of Fame quality players to the Yankees for other reasons. The Giants may never have won a World Series since moving to San Francisco, but they have been close, playing in three of them. The contract was a straight sale; the Red Sox got no players in return. The Giants no longer play at Candlestick Park, which has been renamed Monster Park and remains the home of the San Francisco 49ers football team. Rather, Frazee sold Ruth mostly because he was a serious disciplinary problem (and continued to be one in New York) and because although Ruth was a star, it was not necessarily apparent that he would become the superstar player he quickly became in New York. Candlestick Park's reputation was sealed during the 1961 All-Star Game, when gusts of wind blew pitcher Stu Miller off the mound.

Legend has it that he did so in order to finance a Broadway play No, No Nanette starring 'a friend', but in actual fact the play did not open on Broadway until 1925. The new stadium quickly gained a reputation for being one of the most inhospitable in baseball, with swirling winds and cold temperatures making for a torturous experience; the radiant heating system installed never worked. In 1919, the team's new owner, Harry Frazee, sold Ruth to the New York Yankees. After a brief sojourn in Seals Stadium, the Giants moved to Candlestick Park (sometimes known simply as "The Stick"), a stadium built on a point in San Francisco's southeast corner overlooking San Francisco Bay. The Red Sox were owned by Joseph Lannin from 1913 to 1916 and he signed Babe Ruth, commonly seen as the best player in baseball history. Most disappointingly for the large fan base that they have maintained ever since their arrival in the city, the Giants have as yet failed to win a World Series title for San Francisco. The 1912 and 1915 clubs featured an outfield considered to be among the finest in the game: Tris Speaker, Harry Hooper and Duffy Lewis. Though recently the club has enjoyed relatively sustained success, there have also been prolonged stretches of mediocrity, along with two instances when the club's ownership threatened to move it out of San Francisco.

In the following decade, the club won four World Series championships in a six-year span despite changing ownership several times. In sharp contrast to the New York years, the Giants' fortunes in San Francisco have been mixed. The Boston Red Sox won the first World Series in 1903 against the favored National League team, the Pittsburgh Pirates. The Mets still use this color scheme today. The New York Yankees are their top rival. The "NY" script on the Giants' caps, along with the orange trim on their uniforms, and the blue background used by the Dodgers, would be adopted by the Mets. They are the defending World Series champions. New York would remain a one-team town until 1962 when Joan Whitney Payson founded the New York Mets and brought National League baseball back to the city.

They are in the American League East Division. In the summer of 1957, both teams announced their moves West, and the golden era of baseball in New York City ended. The Boston Red Sox are a Major League Baseball team located in Boston, Massachusetts. Despite objections from shareholders such as Joan Whitney Payson, majority owner Horace Stoneham entered into negotiations with San Francisco mayor George Christopher around the same time that Dodgers' owner Walter O'Malley was courting the city of Los Angeles. Gulf Coast Red Sox. They stumbled to third place the year after their World Series win and attendances plunged. Wilmington Blue Rocks
Greenville Bombers
Lowell Spinners. The Giants' final three years in New York City were unmemorable.

Portland Sea Dogs. The underdog Giants went on to win the World Series that year in four straight. Pawtucket Red Sox. In game one of the 1954 World Series, Willie Mays made "The Catch" -- a dramatic over-the-shoulder catch off a line drive by Vic Wertz to deep center field which could otherwise have given the Cleveland Indians victory. American League
. Unfortunately for the "Jints", despite that dramatic regular season end, another frequent nemesis called the Yankees won the 1951 World Series. Jerry Trupiano (since 1993). The game is also remembered for Russ Hodges' commentary for WMCA Radio:.

Jerry Remy (since 1988). The Giants had been thirteen and a half games behind the league-leading Dodgers, but under Durocher's guidance the Giants caught up to tie the Dodgers for the lead on the last day of the season. Don Orsillo (since 1993). This game was the third of a three-game playoff series that was called after one of baseball's more memorable pennant races. Joe Castiglione (since 1983). One of the more famous episodes in major league baseball history, "The Shot Heard 'Round The World" is the name given to Bobby Thomson's walk-off home run that clinched the National League pennant for the Giants over their rivals, the Brooklyn Dodgers. Jason Varitek (since 2005). Durocher remained at the helm until 1955, and those eight years proved to be some of the most memorable for Giants fans, particularly because of the arrival of Willie Mays and two famous games.

Jim Rice (1985-89). In 1948, Leo Durocher became manager of the Giants, with some controversy--Durocher had been manager of the Giants' rivals, the Brooklyn Dodgers, but he had been accused of gambling in 1947 and had been suspended and the Dodgers let him go the following year. Carl Yastrzemski (1969-83). Mel Ott succeeded Terry as manager in 1942, but the war years proved to be difficult for the Giants. 42 Jackie Robinson (retired by all Major League ballclubs). Aside from Terry himself, the other stars of the era were Ott and Carl Hubbell, one of three pitchers in baseball history to master the screwball (along with Mathewson and Fernando Valenzuela). Known as "King Carl" and "The Meal Ticket", Hubbell gained fame during the 1934 All-Star Game, when he struck out--all in a row--Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx, Al Simmons, and Joe Cronin. 27 Carlton Fisk. McGraw handed over the team to Bill Terry in 1932, and Terry played for and managed the Giants for ten years, winning three pennants and one World Series.

  9 Ted Williams. They also lost in 1924, when the Washington Senators won their only World Series in their history (prior to their move to Minnesota).   8 Carl Yastrzemski. After losing the 1917 Series to the Chicago White Sox (the other Chicago team's last World Series win as of 2004), the Giants got it together and played in four straight World Series in the early 1920s, winning the first two over their tenants, the Yankees, then losing to the Yankees in 1923 when Yankee Stadium opened.   4 Joe Cronin. The Giants experienced some hard luck in the early 1910s, losing three straight World Series to the A's, the Red Sox, then the A's again.   1 Bobby Doerr. This could have been a disastrous scandal for baseball, but because Klem was honest and the Giants lost, it faded over time.

List of Boston Red Sox awards. That post-season game was further darkened by a story that someone on the Giants had attempted to bribe umpire Bill Klem. For other leaderboards and awards winners see:

    . In 1908 they finished in a tie with the Chicago Cubs and had a one-game playoff at the Polo Grounds (actually a replay of a controversial tied game resulting from Fred Merkle's "boner") which they lost to the Cubs, who would go on to win their second, and so far last World Series. Saves: Tom Gordon, 46, 1998. The Giants then had several frustrating years. ERA: Dutch Leonard, 0.96, 1914 (MLB Record). It would be the last time (as of 2004) that the Giants would best the A's in the post-season, as they have since proven to be a nemesis to the Giants on both coasts.

    Opponent Strikeouts: Pedro Martínez, 313, 1999. The Giants were back in 1905, winning the Series over the Philadelphia Athletics, with Christy Mathewson nearly winning the Series single-handedly. Wins: Smokey Joe Wood, 34, 1912. Brush leading an effort to formalize the rules and format of the World Series. Walks: Ted Williams, 162, 1947 & 1949. The ensuing criticism resulted in Giants' owner John T. Strikeouts: Mark Bellhorn, 177, 2004. The Highlanders lost to Boston on the last day, but the Giants stuck by their refusal.

    Hitting Streak: Dom DiMaggio, 34 games, 1949. His original relunctance was concern that the intra-city rival New York Americans or "Highlanders" looked like they would win the AL pennant. Stolen bases: Tommy Harper, 54, 1973. The Giants under McGraw famously snubbed their first ever modern World Series chance in 1904--an encounter with the Boston Americans (now known as the "Red Sox")--because McGraw considered the new American League as little more than a minor league. Triples: Tris Speaker, 22, 1913. Names such as Christy Mathewson, Iron Man Joe McGinnity, Bill Terry, Jim Thorpe, Mel Ott and Casey Stengel are just a sample of the many players who honed their skills under McGraw. Doubles: Earl Webb, 67, 1931 (MLB Record). McGraw would also cultivate his own crop of baseball heroes during his time with the Giants.

    Hits: Wade Boggs, 240, 1985. The Giants already had their share of stars during its brief history at this point, such as Smiling Mickey Welch, Roger Connor, Tim Keefe, Jim O'Rourke and Monte Ward, the player-lawyer who formed the renegade Players League in 1890 to protest unfair player contracts. Runs: Ted Williams, 150, 1949. Under McGraw, the Giants would win ten National League pennants and three World Series championships. RBI: Jimmie Foxx, 175, 1938. McGraw would go on and manage the Giants for three decades, one of the longest tenures in professional sports. Home runs: Jimmie Foxx, 50, 1938. In 1902, after a series of disastrous moves that left the Giants 53 1/2 games behind, Freedman signed John McGraw as a player-manager.

    Batting: Ted Williams, .406, 1941. Though considered "the worst owner in the world" during his time, Andrew Freeman changed the Giants' fortunes. Saves: Bob Stanley, 132. There the Giants would make it their home in New York City. ERA: Smokey Joe Wood, 1.99. Originally located on the corner of 110th Street and Sixth Avenue in Manhattan, the Polo Grounds moved uptown, to 155th Street and 8th Avenue. Opponent Strikeouts: Roger Clemens, 2590. The Giants' original home stadium, the Polo Grounds, also dates from this early era.

    Wins: Cy Young and Roger Clemens, 192. It is said that after one particularly satisfying victory, Mutrie (who was also the team's manager) stormed into the dressing room and exclaimed, "My big fellows! My giants!" From then on, the club was known as the Giants. Stolen bases: Harry Hooper, 300. While the Metropolitans were initially the more successful club, Day and Mutrie began moving star players to the Gothams and the team won its first National League pennant in 1888. RBI: Carl Yastrzemski, 1844. The Gothams (as the Giants were originally known) were their entry to the National League, while their other club, the Metropolitans (the original Mets) played in the American Association. Home runs: Ted Williams, 521. Day and Jim Mutrie.

    Batting: Ted Williams, .344. One of the most storied clubs in American professional sports, the Giants began life as a second baseball club founded by John B. 37 Bill Haselman (bullpen pitching). They play in the Western Division of the National League.   2 Brad Mills (bench). The San Francisco Giants are a Major League Baseball team based in San Francisco, California. 41 Dale Sveum (third base). Scottsdale Giants.

    35 Lynn Jones (first base). San Jose Giants
    Augusta GreenJackets
    Salem-Keizer Volcanoes. 17 Dave Wallace (pitching). Norwich Navigators. 22 Ron Jackson (hitting). Fresno Grizzlies. 47 Terry Francona. National League
    .

    The original Tessie, a Broadway tune, was adopted by the Boston fans during the 1903 World Series and sung regularly until 1916. San Francisco Giants official web site (http://sanfrancisco.giants.mlb.com/NASApp/mlb/sf/homepage/sf_homepage.jsp). played after Dirty Water and for rallies: The Dropkick Murphys' rewrite of Tessie. ISBN 0-385-23790-1. played after each victory at Fenway Park: "Dirty Water" by The Standells. The Giants of the Polo Grounds: the glorious times of baseball's New York Giants. New York: Doubleday. played in the middle of the eighth inning at Fenway Park: Neil Diamond's "Sweet Caroline", performed with raucous audience participation. Hynd, Noel (1988).

    Pitching saves: Rod Beck, 48 (1993). Pitching ERA: Christy Mathewson, 1.14 (1909). Pitching strikeouts: Mickey Welch, 345 (1884). Pitching wins: Mickey Welch, 44 (1885).

    Strikeouts: Bobby Bonds, 189 (1970). Walks: Barry Bonds, 232 (2004) [MLB record]. Hitting streak: Jack Clark, 26 (1978). Stolen bases: John Ward, 111 (1887).

    Extra-Base hits: Barry Bonds, 107 (2001). Triples: George Davis, 27 (1893). Doubles: Jeff Kent, 49 (2001). Singles: Bill Terry, 177 (1930).

    Hits: Bill Terry, 254 (1930). Runs: Mike Tiernan, 147 (1889). Runs batted in: Mel Ott, 151 (1929). Home runs: Barry Bonds, 73 (2001) [MLB record].

    Batting average: Bill Terry, .401 (1930). 42 Jackie Robinson (retired throughout baseball). 44 Willie McCovey. 30 Orlando Cepeda.

    27 Juan Marichal. 24 Willie Mays. 11 Carl Hubbell.   4 Mel Ott.

      3 Bill Terry.   - Christy Mathewson * *.   - John McGraw *.

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