Bonnie and Clyde (movie)

Bonnie and Clyde (1967) is a film about Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, who roamed the United States' Southwest robbing banks during the Great Depression. The couple is eventually ambushed and killed by the police, as in real life. The film was directed by Arthur Penn and starred Warren Beatty as Clyde Barrow and Faye Dunaway as Bonnie Parker. The screenplay was written by David Newman and Robert Benton, with Robert Towne doing some uncredited work.

The movie was partly filmed in and around Dallas, Texas, in some cases using actual locations that the real Bonnie and Clyde either robbed or used as hide outs.

On its release, the film was extremely controversial for supposedly glorifying two coldblooded murderers and its unprecedented violence--an honor which has since gone on to Sam Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch, and then to other, even more graphically violent (but largely forgotten) films. Bonnie and Clyde was innovative in its character's gunshots--the squibs commonly used today, where a charge causes a small bag of red liquid to explode out of the clothes, were invented for the movie. The movie took great liberties with the facts about Barrow and Parker. The real life couple were killers who murdered as many as thirteen people. The movie also was questionable in its portrayal of Texas Ranger Frank Hamer (Denver Pyle).

Estelle Parsons won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in the film, and Burnett Guffey won an Academy Award for Best Cinematography for his work in the film. The film is #27 on the American Film Institute's 100 Years, 100 Movies, #13 on its list of 100 American thrillers, and #65 on its list of 100 American romances. The film has been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry.


Music

The background music "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" by Flatt and Scruggs has been made famous by this movie.

External Links

  • Bonnie and Clyde (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0061418/) at the Internet Movie Database
  • Review of the Movie by Roger Ebert (http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19670925/REVIEWS/709250301/1023)

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The background music "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" by Flatt and Scruggs has been made famous by this movie. The film has been deemed "culturally significant" by the Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry.
. The romance theme was later given words and became better known as the song "Smile" ("Smile though your heart is breaking...") and covered by such artists as Judy Garland, Liberace and Nat King Cole. The film has been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry. The music score was composed by Chaplin himself. The film is #27 on the American Film Institute's 100 Years, 100 Movies, #13 on its list of 100 American thrillers, and #65 on its list of 100 American romances. As the police break up the protest they arrest the flag-waving Tramp as the protest leader.

Estelle Parsons won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in the film, and Burnett Guffey won an Academy Award for Best Cinematography for his work in the film. Meanwhile, he fails to notice that a parade of labor protesters have come up behind him. The movie also was questionable in its portrayal of Texas Ranger Frank Hamer (Denver Pyle). Another has the Tramp picking up a warning flag that fell off the back of a truck and waving it to attract the driver's attention. The real life couple were killers who murdered as many as thirteen people. In one memorable scene, Chaplin's character looks for a bolt to tighten while he is being pulled through the gears of an enormous machine. The movie took great liberties with the facts about Barrow and Parker. Chaplin created the effect deliberately.

Bonnie and Clyde was innovative in its character's gunshots--the squibs commonly used today, where a charge causes a small bag of red liquid to explode out of the clothes, were invented for the movie. Most of the film was shot at "silent speed", 18 frames per second, which when projected at "sound speed", 24 frames per second, made the slapstick action appear even more frenetic. On its release, the film was extremely controversial for supposedly glorifying two coldblooded murderers and its unprecedented violence--an honor which has since gone on to Sam Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch, and then to other, even more graphically violent (but largely forgotten) films. Near the end of the film the Little Tramp's voice is heard for the first time as he ad-libs pseudo-French and Italian gibberish to the tune of Léo Daniderff's popular song, Je cherche après Titine. The movie was partly filmed in and around Dallas, Texas, in some cases using actual locations that the real Bonnie and Clyde either robbed or used as hide outs. Modern Times was one of the last silent films made, although it does include sound effects, music, singers, and voices coming from radios and loudspeakers. The screenplay was written by David Newman and Robert Benton, with Robert Towne doing some uncredited work. The factory where the Tramp works has a futuristic look and may have been influenced by Fritz Lang's Metropolis. People who saw both Modern Times and the the earlier À nous la liberté usually (at least according to IMDB comments) think that Chaplin got inspiration from it, but Chaplin denied it.

The film was directed by Arthur Penn and starred Warren Beatty as Clyde Barrow and Faye Dunaway as Bonnie Parker. The Tramp attempts multiple jobs but quickly, and comically, loses them. The couple is eventually ambushed and killed by the police, as in real life. The movie follows the Tramp and a young woman, which he rescues from the authorities who want to put her in an orphanage, as they try to overcome their impoverished street life. Bonnie and Clyde (1967) is a film about Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, who roamed the United States' Southwest robbing banks during the Great Depression. It was written and directed by Chaplin. Review of the Movie by Roger Ebert (http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19670925/REVIEWS/709250301/1023). The movie stars Chaplin, Paulette Goddard, Henry Bergman, Stanley Sandford and Chester Conklin.

Bonnie and Clyde (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0061418/) at the Internet Movie Database. Conditions created, in Chaplin's view, by the efficiencies of modern industrialization. The film is a comment on the desperate employment and fiscal conditions many people faced during the Great Depression. Modern Times is a 1936 film by Charlie Chaplin that has his famous Little Tramp character struggling to survive in the modern, industrialized world.

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