Bonnie and Clyde (movie)

Bonnie and Clyde (1967) is a film about Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, who roamed the United States' Southwest robbing banks during the Great Depression. The couple is eventually ambushed and killed by the police, as in real life. The film was directed by Arthur Penn and starred Warren Beatty as Clyde Barrow and Faye Dunaway as Bonnie Parker. The screenplay was written by David Newman and Robert Benton, with Robert Towne doing some uncredited work.

The movie was partly filmed in and around Dallas, Texas, in some cases using actual locations that the real Bonnie and Clyde either robbed or used as hide outs.

On its release, the film was extremely controversial for supposedly glorifying two coldblooded murderers and its unprecedented violence--an honor which has since gone on to Sam Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch, and then to other, even more graphically violent (but largely forgotten) films. Bonnie and Clyde was innovative in its character's gunshots--the squibs commonly used today, where a charge causes a small bag of red liquid to explode out of the clothes, were invented for the movie. The movie took great liberties with the facts about Barrow and Parker. The real life couple were killers who murdered as many as thirteen people. The movie also was questionable in its portrayal of Texas Ranger Frank Hamer (Denver Pyle).

Estelle Parsons won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in the film, and Burnett Guffey won an Academy Award for Best Cinematography for his work in the film. The film is #27 on the American Film Institute's 100 Years, 100 Movies, #13 on its list of 100 American thrillers, and #65 on its list of 100 American romances. The film has been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry.


Music

The background music "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" by Flatt and Scruggs has been made famous by this movie.

External Links

  • Bonnie and Clyde (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0061418/) at the Internet Movie Database
  • Review of the Movie by Roger Ebert (http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19670925/REVIEWS/709250301/1023)

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The background music "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" by Flatt and Scruggs has been made famous by this movie. It was nominated for Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Tom Berenger), Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Willem Dafoe), Best Cinematography and Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen.
. It won Academy Awards for Best Director, Best Film Editing, Best Picture and Best Sound. The film has been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry. The missions they carry out never seem to have any purpose or point, which represents the war on a much larger scale. The film is #27 on the American Film Institute's 100 Years, 100 Movies, #13 on its list of 100 American thrillers, and #65 on its list of 100 American romances. It shows many US soldiers as violent and indiscriminate killers.

Estelle Parsons won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in the film, and Burnett Guffey won an Academy Award for Best Cinematography for his work in the film. It was both praised and criticised for its presentation of the brutal violence seen in the war. The movie also was questionable in its portrayal of Texas Ranger Frank Hamer (Denver Pyle). Ellias is shot by Barnes in a chilling scene near the end of the movie. The real life couple were killers who murdered as many as thirteen people. In the end he sides with Elias (Wilem Dafoe) who has embraced the counterculture ethic of the 60's yet still is a tremendous leader. The movie took great liberties with the facts about Barrow and Parker. While the ostensible enemy was the North Vietnamese, Taylor finds himself immersed in a struggle between two sergeants Barnes and Elias, played by Tom Berenger and Willem Dafoe respectively.

Bonnie and Clyde was innovative in its character's gunshots--the squibs commonly used today, where a charge causes a small bag of red liquid to explode out of the clothes, were invented for the movie. The film can be seen as a war for the soul of Taylor and the rest of the unit. On its release, the film was extremely controversial for supposedly glorifying two coldblooded murderers and its unprecedented violence--an honor which has since gone on to Sam Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch, and then to other, even more graphically violent (but largely forgotten) films. His innocence soon turns to cynicism as he experiences the harshness of the jungle and infantry life, witnessing friendly fire to illegal killings, culminating in himself taking an act of revenge against a superior. The movie was partly filmed in and around Dallas, Texas, in some cases using actual locations that the real Bonnie and Clyde either robbed or used as hide outs. There he joins his infantry unit and begins to experience warfare in the jungle. The screenplay was written by David Newman and Robert Benton, with Robert Towne doing some uncredited work. The story starts with a raw recruit Chris Taylor (Charlie Sheen), the narrator, recently being posted to Vietnam.

The film was directed by Arthur Penn and starred Warren Beatty as Clyde Barrow and Faye Dunaway as Bonnie Parker. The story is loosely based on his own experiences in Vietnam. The couple is eventually ambushed and killed by the police, as in real life. Oliver Stone himself served in Vietnam, and upon his return he began writing the script for Platoon as a counter to the vision of the Vietnam war portrayed in John Wayne's The Green Berets. Bonnie and Clyde (1967) is a film about Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, who roamed the United States' Southwest robbing banks during the Great Depression. Platoon is a 1986 Vietnam war film, written and directed by Oliver Stone and starring Tom Berenger, Willem Dafoe, Charlie Sheen and Forest Whitaker. Review of the Movie by Roger Ebert (http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19670925/REVIEWS/709250301/1023).

Bonnie and Clyde (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0061418/) at the Internet Movie Database.

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