Bonnie and Clyde (movie)

Bonnie and Clyde (1967) is a film about Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, who roamed the United States' Southwest robbing banks during the Great Depression. The couple is eventually ambushed and killed by the police, as in real life. The film was directed by Arthur Penn and starred Warren Beatty as Clyde Barrow and Faye Dunaway as Bonnie Parker. The screenplay was written by David Newman and Robert Benton, with Robert Towne doing some uncredited work.

The movie was partly filmed in and around Dallas, Texas, in some cases using actual locations that the real Bonnie and Clyde either robbed or used as hide outs.

On its release, the film was extremely controversial for supposedly glorifying two coldblooded murderers and its unprecedented violence--an honor which has since gone on to Sam Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch, and then to other, even more graphically violent (but largely forgotten) films. Bonnie and Clyde was innovative in its character's gunshots--the squibs commonly used today, where a charge causes a small bag of red liquid to explode out of the clothes, were invented for the movie. The movie took great liberties with the facts about Barrow and Parker. The real life couple were killers who murdered as many as thirteen people. The movie also was questionable in its portrayal of Texas Ranger Frank Hamer (Denver Pyle).

Estelle Parsons won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in the film, and Burnett Guffey won an Academy Award for Best Cinematography for his work in the film. The film is #27 on the American Film Institute's 100 Years, 100 Movies, #13 on its list of 100 American thrillers, and #65 on its list of 100 American romances. The film has been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry.


Music

The background music "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" by Flatt and Scruggs has been made famous by this movie.

External Links

  • Bonnie and Clyde (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0061418/) at the Internet Movie Database
  • Review of the Movie by Roger Ebert (http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19670925/REVIEWS/709250301/1023)

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The background music "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" by Flatt and Scruggs has been made famous by this movie. That's the price she has to pay.
. When I invite a woman to dinner I expect her to look at my face. The film has been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry. Dumont:I've been sitting right here since 7:00.
Groucho:Yes, with your back to me. The film is #27 on the American Film Institute's 100 Years, 100 Movies, #13 on its list of 100 American thrillers, and #65 on its list of 100 American romances. The film contains one of the most famous comedy scenes of all filmdom (designed in part by Buster Keaton), when loads of people crowd into Groucho's tiny stateroom (see image).

Estelle Parsons won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in the film, and Burnett Guffey won an Academy Award for Best Cinematography for his work in the film. The British rock group Queen later paid homage to this film by naming one of their most famous albums after it (see A Night at the Opera (album)). The movie also was questionable in its portrayal of Texas Ranger Frank Hamer (Denver Pyle). It has been deemed "culturally significant" by the Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry. The real life couple were killers who murdered as many as thirteen people. Sam Wood was the director. The movie took great liberties with the facts about Barrow and Parker. Kaufman, Morrie Ryskind, Al Boasberg (uncredited) and Buster Keaton (uncredited) from a story by James Kevin McGuinness.

Bonnie and Clyde was innovative in its character's gunshots--the squibs commonly used today, where a charge causes a small bag of red liquid to explode out of the clothes, were invented for the movie. The movie was adapted by George S. On its release, the film was extremely controversial for supposedly glorifying two coldblooded murderers and its unprecedented violence--an honor which has since gone on to Sam Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch, and then to other, even more graphically violent (but largely forgotten) films. Classic scenes included the Stateroom scene (where more and more people are piled into a tiny ship's cabin until they literally spill out at the end), and also the contract discussion scene between Groucho and Chico, which is a masterpiece of non-communication:. The movie was partly filmed in and around Dallas, Texas, in some cases using actual locations that the real Bonnie and Clyde either robbed or used as hide outs. These were honed on stage, as the brothers returned to touring new material on road before filming began (another Thalberg change). The screenplay was written by David Newman and Robert Benton, with Robert Towne doing some uncredited work. Some Marx Brothers fans were appalled at these format changes, yet the film undoubtedly contained some of the brothers' funniest routines ever.

The film was directed by Arthur Penn and starred Warren Beatty as Clyde Barrow and Faye Dunaway as Bonnie Parker. The opera setting allowed MGM to add big production song numbers, which were one of this studio's specialities. The couple is eventually ambushed and killed by the police, as in real life. It stars Groucho Marx, Chico Marx, Harpo Marx, Kitty Carlisle, Allan Jones, Walter Woolf King, Siegfried Rumann and Margaret Dumont. Bonnie and Clyde (1967) is a film about Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, who roamed the United States' Southwest robbing banks during the Great Depression. In A Night At the Opera, the brothers help two young lovers to succeed in love as well as in the opera world. Review of the Movie by Roger Ebert (http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19670925/REVIEWS/709250301/1023). So in the MGM films, the brothers were recast as more helpful characters. From now on they heaped their comic attacks upon only the obvious villains of the piece.

Bonnie and Clyde (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0061418/) at the Internet Movie Database. Thalberg, however, felt that this made the brothers come across as unsympathetic, particularly to female film goers. (Usually, they did deserve it). In their Paramount films, the brothers' characters were much more anarchistic: they attacked (comically) anybody that was unfortunate to cross their paths, whether they deserved it or not. It was the first film the brothers made for MGM after their departure from Paramount, and, at the suggestion of producer Irving Thalberg the film marked a change of direction in the brothers' career.

A Night At the Opera is a 1935 comedy film starring the Marx Brothers.

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