Bonnie and Clyde (movie)

Bonnie and Clyde (1967) is a film about Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, who roamed the United States' Southwest robbing banks during the Great Depression. The couple is eventually ambushed and killed by the police, as in real life. The film was directed by Arthur Penn and starred Warren Beatty as Clyde Barrow and Faye Dunaway as Bonnie Parker. The screenplay was written by David Newman and Robert Benton, with Robert Towne doing some uncredited work.

The movie was partly filmed in and around Dallas, Texas, in some cases using actual locations that the real Bonnie and Clyde either robbed or used as hide outs.

On its release, the film was extremely controversial for supposedly glorifying two coldblooded murderers and its unprecedented violence--an honor which has since gone on to Sam Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch, and then to other, even more graphically violent (but largely forgotten) films. Bonnie and Clyde was innovative in its character's gunshots--the squibs commonly used today, where a charge causes a small bag of red liquid to explode out of the clothes, were invented for the movie. The movie took great liberties with the facts about Barrow and Parker. The real life couple were killers who murdered as many as thirteen people. The movie also was questionable in its portrayal of Texas Ranger Frank Hamer (Denver Pyle).

Estelle Parsons won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in the film, and Burnett Guffey won an Academy Award for Best Cinematography for his work in the film. The film is #27 on the American Film Institute's 100 Years, 100 Movies, #13 on its list of 100 American thrillers, and #65 on its list of 100 American romances. The film has been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry.


Music

The background music "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" by Flatt and Scruggs has been made famous by this movie.

External Links

  • Bonnie and Clyde (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0061418/) at the Internet Movie Database
  • Review of the Movie by Roger Ebert (http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19670925/REVIEWS/709250301/1023)

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The background music "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" by Flatt and Scruggs has been made famous by this movie. was one of George Gershwin's closest friends in real life.
. Oscar Levant, who plays Adam Cook. The film has been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry. Alexandre Trauner) were sometimes working on both sides of the ocean... The film is #27 on the American Film Institute's 100 Years, 100 Movies, #13 on its list of 100 American thrillers, and #65 on its list of 100 American romances. Ironically, a lot of older French Paris-based movies were studio work as well and the same art directors (eg.

Estelle Parsons won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in the film, and Burnett Guffey won an Academy Award for Best Cinematography for his work in the film. Great care is however sometimes put into reproducing Paris surroundings, like in this American in Paris or in Irma La Douce. The movie also was questionable in its portrayal of Texas Ranger Frank Hamer (Denver Pyle). Hollywood movies referencing France seldom use location shooting or native speakers. The real life couple were killers who murdered as many as thirteen people. In the French soundtrack, which switches to the original sound for the duration of the songs, the à nous is masked thru a plop sound, to make the sentence more palatable. The movie took great liberties with the facts about Barrow and Parker. Notably, near the beginning of the I got rhythm number, one of the "French" kids says Jerry, parle anglais à nous, which sounds rather curious.

Bonnie and Clyde was innovative in its character's gunshots--the squibs commonly used today, where a charge causes a small bag of red liquid to explode out of the clothes, were invented for the movie. The film was shot on Hollywood sets, so it features some quirks in the occasional French dialogue. On its release, the film was extremely controversial for supposedly glorifying two coldblooded murderers and its unprecedented violence--an honor which has since gone on to Sam Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch, and then to other, even more graphically violent (but largely forgotten) films. The film has also been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry. The movie was partly filmed in and around Dallas, Texas, in some cases using actual locations that the real Bonnie and Clyde either robbed or used as hide outs.
Gene Kelly received an honorary Academy Award that year for "his versatility as an actor, singer, director and dancer, and specifically for his brilliant achievements in the art of choreography on film." It was his only Oscar. The screenplay was written by David Newman and Robert Benton, with Robert Towne doing some uncredited work.
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The film was directed by Arthur Penn and starred Warren Beatty as Clyde Barrow and Faye Dunaway as Bonnie Parker. Songs include "I've Got Rhythm", "S'Wonderful", "Our Love Is Here To Stay", and "Concert in F for Piano and Orchestra". The couple is eventually ambushed and killed by the police, as in real life. The plot is interspersed with show stopping Gershwin tunes with dancing choreographed by Gene Kelly. Bonnie and Clyde (1967) is a film about Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, who roamed the United States' Southwest robbing banks during the Great Depression. Lise falls for him as well, but she is already engaged to Henri. Review of the Movie by Roger Ebert (http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19670925/REVIEWS/709250301/1023). A lonely society woman (Nina Foch) takes Jerry under her wing only for Jerry to fall for Lise (Leslie Caron), a girl he sees at a party.

Bonnie and Clyde (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0061418/) at the Internet Movie Database. His friend Adam (Levant) is a struggling pianist who's a long time associate of a famous singer Henri Baurel (Georges Guétary). Jerry Mulligan (Kelly) is an American expatriate trying to make a living in Paris as a painter. The climax of the film is 18 minutes of dancing featuring Kelly and Caron, set to Gershwin's An American In Paris. All of the music in the film is by George Gershwin and Ira Gershwin.

Starring Gene Kelly, Leslie Caron, was set in Paris, and directed by Vincente Minnelli from a script by Alan Jay Lerner. An American in Paris is a 1951 musical film based on the classical composition by George Gershwin. Academy Award for Best Film Editing - Adrienne Fazan. Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Musical or Comedy - Gene Kelly.

Golden Globe Award for Best Director - Motion Picture - Vincente Minnelli. Academy Award for Best Director - Vincente Minnelli. Writers Guild of America Award for Best Drama Written Directly for the Screen - Alan Jay Lerner. Academy Award for Best Writing, Scoring and Screenplay - Alan Jay Lerner.

Academy Award for Best Musical Score - Saul Chaplin and Johnny Green. Academy Award for Best Costume Design, Color - Orry-Kelly, Walter Plunkett, and Irene Sharaff. Academy Award for Best Cinematography, Color - John Alton and Alfred Gilks. Keogh Gleason, and Edwin B. Willis.

Academy Award for Best Art - Set Decoration, Color - E. Preston Ames, Cedric Gibbons, F. Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy. Academy Award for Best Picture - Arthur Freed, producer.

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