Bonnie and Clyde (movie)

Bonnie and Clyde (1967) is a film about Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, who roamed the United States' Southwest robbing banks during the Great Depression. The couple is eventually ambushed and killed by the police, as in real life. The film was directed by Arthur Penn and starred Warren Beatty as Clyde Barrow and Faye Dunaway as Bonnie Parker. The screenplay was written by David Newman and Robert Benton, with Robert Towne doing some uncredited work.

The movie was partly filmed in and around Dallas, Texas, in some cases using actual locations that the real Bonnie and Clyde either robbed or used as hide outs.

On its release, the film was extremely controversial for supposedly glorifying two coldblooded murderers and its unprecedented violence--an honor which has since gone on to Sam Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch, and then to other, even more graphically violent (but largely forgotten) films. Bonnie and Clyde was innovative in its character's gunshots--the squibs commonly used today, where a charge causes a small bag of red liquid to explode out of the clothes, were invented for the movie. The movie took great liberties with the facts about Barrow and Parker. The real life couple were killers who murdered as many as thirteen people. The movie also was questionable in its portrayal of Texas Ranger Frank Hamer (Denver Pyle).

Estelle Parsons won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in the film, and Burnett Guffey won an Academy Award for Best Cinematography for his work in the film. The film is #27 on the American Film Institute's 100 Years, 100 Movies, #13 on its list of 100 American thrillers, and #65 on its list of 100 American romances. The film has been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry.


Music

The background music "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" by Flatt and Scruggs has been made famous by this movie.

External Links

  • Bonnie and Clyde (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0061418/) at the Internet Movie Database
  • Review of the Movie by Roger Ebert (http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19670925/REVIEWS/709250301/1023)

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The background music "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" by Flatt and Scruggs has been made famous by this movie. Ebert BTW regards Being There as one of the greatest movies ever made.
. Was there a hidden, slightly submerged pier of some sort? Or did Chance truly have some special grace, given his simple innocence and simply being present to each moment without filters and ideas? Roger Ebert very effectively argues for the latter in his review on his web site. The film has been selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry. That final scene continues to generate discussion and controversy. The film is #27 on the American Film Institute's 100 Years, 100 Movies, #13 on its list of 100 American thrillers, and #65 on its list of 100 American romances. Most memorable scenes include Chance being confronted early in the movie by a street gang, and pulling out his TV remote control to change the channel then being suprised when he could not; repeating several times to important people the famous "All is well...and all will be well...in the garden," and having that interpreted as an uplifting economic and political comment; Shirley MacLaine writhing in long-suppressed sexual pleasure on a bear rug while Chance obliviously channel-surfs; and in the final scene, walking across the surface of a lake because his attention is not caught by the funeral that's going on, as the most important movers and shakers in the USA discuss running him for President.

Estelle Parsons won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in the film, and Burnett Guffey won an Academy Award for Best Cinematography for his work in the film. The people he meets almost all see qualities in him that are not there, but instead reflect qualities and needs of their own. Director Hal Ashby uses this to satirize our media driven society in a very merciless yet cunningly subtle way. The movie also was questionable in its portrayal of Texas Ranger Frank Hamer (Denver Pyle). His mental facilities and his ability to experience life are a product of decades of taking care of a garden, and of watching television. The real life couple were killers who murdered as many as thirteen people. Understand that Chance is implied as being mentally limited, as well as limited by an extremely sheltered upbringing. The movie took great liberties with the facts about Barrow and Parker. His simplistic, intentioned speaking style is interpreted by those he encounters as a sign of great wisdom, and after a car accident which leads him into the company of a powerful rich businessman (Melvyn Douglas), Chance quickly rises to national public prominence.

Bonnie and Clyde was innovative in its character's gunshots--the squibs commonly used today, where a charge causes a small bag of red liquid to explode out of the clothes, were invented for the movie. When his employer dies, Chance is forced to leave his sheltered existence in the house and discover the world outside for himself. On its release, the film was extremely controversial for supposedly glorifying two coldblooded murderers and its unprecedented violence--an honor which has since gone on to Sam Peckinpah's The Wild Bunch, and then to other, even more graphically violent (but largely forgotten) films. Apart from his limited relationship with Louise, the maid, Chance's cultural and social education is derived entirely from what he watches on the televisions provided by his employer. The movie was partly filmed in and around Dallas, Texas, in some cases using actual locations that the real Bonnie and Clyde either robbed or used as hide outs. with virtually no contact with the outside world and no social interaction. The screenplay was written by David Newman and Robert Benton, with Robert Towne doing some uncredited work. Being There depicts the story of a gardener named Chance (Peter Sellers) who grew up living as an employee on the estate of a wealthy man in Washington, D.C.

The film was directed by Arthur Penn and starred Warren Beatty as Clyde Barrow and Faye Dunaway as Bonnie Parker. It won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor (Melvyn Douglas) and was nominated for Best Actor in a Leading Role (Peter Sellers). The couple is eventually ambushed and killed by the police, as in real life. Jones (uncredited). Bonnie and Clyde (1967) is a film about Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, who roamed the United States' Southwest robbing banks during the Great Depression. The screenplay was adapted by Jerzy Kosiński and Robert C. Review of the Movie by Roger Ebert (http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19670925/REVIEWS/709250301/1023). Dysart and Richard Basehart.

Bonnie and Clyde (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0061418/) at the Internet Movie Database. The film stars Peter Sellers, Shirley MacLaine, Melvyn Douglas, Jack Warden, Richard A. Being There is a political, satirical 1971 novel by Jerzy Kosiński and a 1979 film directed by Hal Ashby. All is well...and all will be well...in the garden.. Life is a state of mind..

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