Betty Furness

Elizabeth Mary Furness, better known as Betty Furness (January 3, 1916–April 2, 1994) was an American actress, consumer advocate and current affairs commentator.

Born in New York, New York, Furness began her professional career as a model before being signed to a film contract by RKO Studios. Her first film role was as the "Thirteenth Woman" in the 1932 film Thirteen Women but her scenes were deleted before the film's release. Over the next few years she appeared in several RKO films, and became a popular actress. Among her film successes were Magnificent Obsession (1935) and the Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers film Swing Time (1936). By the end of the decade she had appeared in over forty films, but during the 1940s found it difficult to secure acting roles.

In 1948 she was performing in the television series Studio One which was broadcast live. She filled in for an actor to promote Westinghouse products during the advertisement break, and impressed the company with her easy and professional manner. They offered her a contract to promote their products and she subsequently became closely associated with them. In 1953 she appeared in her own television series Meet Betty Furness which was sponsored by Westinghouse and she remained a spokesperson for the company until 1960. She then attempted to move into a less commercialized role in television but found herself too closely associated with advertising to be taken seriously. During this time she worked on radio, and also on behalf of the Democratic Party.

In 1967 President Lyndon Baines Johnson, aware of her work for the Democrats contacted Furness and offered her a position as Special Assistant for Consumer Affairs. She accepted the assignment and continued in this role until the end of the Johnson administration in 1969. During her tenure she silenced her critics by applying herself studiously to her role and learning the issues relating to consumer rights. She headed the Consumer Affairs Departments of both New York City, and New York State from the late 1960s before returning to television.

Signed by WNBC in New York, Furness reported on consumer issues, and specifically targeted examples of consumer fraud. In 1976 she began an association with The Today Show filling in as anchor, and providing regular reports. In 1977 her program Buyline: Betty Furness won the Peabody Award.

In 1990 she was diagnosed with cancer. She continued working for The Today Show until she was released from her contract in 1992. Her dismissal was widely publicised and controversial and was viewed by many of Furness' supporters as ageism.

She had always expressed throughout her life that her philosophy was to never turn down a job, and she stated that it was this attitude that had allowed her to progress through such an unconventional series of professions. During her illness she stated that she wanted nothing more than to be able to work, but her health continued to deteriorate until her death in New York from stomach cancer.

Betty Furness has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for her contribution Motion Pictures, and to Television.


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Betty Furness has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for her contribution Motion Pictures, and to Television. Tippi Hedren has been married four times:. During her illness she stated that she wanted nothing more than to be able to work, but her health continued to deteriorate until her death in New York from stomach cancer. It spoils the whole story (concerning The Birds.)" 4. She had always expressed throughout her life that her philosophy was to never turn down a job, and she stated that it was this attitude that had allowed her to progress through such an unconventional series of professions. I hate to tell you that. Her dismissal was widely publicised and controversial and was viewed by many of Furness' supporters as ageism. I do.

She continued working for The Today Show until she was released from her contract in 1992. No, I like 'em. In 1990 she was diagnosed with cancer. When asked about this point by an audience member, she replied, "I love birds. In 1977 her program Buyline: Betty Furness won the Peabody Award. The preserve also houses many birds, according to Hedren. In 1976 she began an association with The Today Show filling in as anchor, and providing regular reports. Shambala, an animal rescue preserve, houses (and has housed) the animals that appeared in Roar. Hedren lives onsite, and conducts monthly tours of Shambala for the public.

Signed by WNBC in New York, Furness reported on consumer issues, and specifically targeted examples of consumer fraud. Roar directly led to the establishment of Hedren's Shambala Preserve, located in Acton, California between the Antelope Valley and the Santa Clarita Valley just north of Los Angeles. She headed the Consumer Affairs Departments of both New York City, and New York State from the late 1960s before returning to television. Jan de Bont, the director of photography, was scalped in the film's making. During her tenure she silenced her critics by applying herself studiously to her role and learning the issues relating to consumer rights. "It's amazing no one was killed." During the production of Roar,, both Hedren and her husband at the time, Noel Marshall, were attacked by lions in filming. She accepted the assignment and continued in this role until the end of the Johnson administration in 1969. "This was probably one of the most dangerous films that Hollywood has ever seen," remarked the actress.

In 1967 President Lyndon Baines Johnson, aware of her work for the Democrats contacted Furness and offered her a position as Special Assistant for Consumer Affairs. She worked on Charlie Chaplin's last film in an acting role A Countess from Hong Kong (1967) and also produced her own film, Roar, which was a grueling, five year project starring dozens of African lions. During this time she worked on radio, and also on behalf of the Democratic Party. Hedren's acting career didn't end with Hitchcock's association with her work, however. She then attempted to move into a less commercialized role in television but found herself too closely associated with advertising to be taken seriously. He was a very controlling type of person, and I guess I'm not about to be controlled." Ending their professional relationship on a sour note, she remarked "He said, 'Well, I'll ruin your career.' And he did." Producers who wished to hire Hedren for acting roles had to go through Hitchcock, who would inform them that "she isn't available." 3. In 1953 she appeared in her own television series Meet Betty Furness which was sponsored by Westinghouse and she remained a spokesperson for the company until 1960. Strained by the director's controlling manner, Hedren declined further work with Hitchcock after Marnie. "It grew to be impossible.

They offered her a contract to promote their products and she subsequently became closely associated with them. 2. She filled in for an actor to promote Westinghouse products during the advertisement break, and impressed the company with her easy and professional manner. "For a first film, it was a lot of work," Hedren mused. In 1948 she was performing in the television series Studio One which was broadcast live. A week's rest was ordered by a doctor at that time of completing the film. By the end of the decade she had appeared in over forty films, but during the 1940s found it difficult to secure acting roles. During the filming of the last attack scene,Hedren became exhausted to the point of sitting down on the middle of the set and crying.

Among her film successes were Magnificent Obsession (1935) and the Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers film Swing Time (1936). She remembered the work (on location at Bodega Bay) as being dangerous and taxing. Over the next few years she appeared in several RKO films, and became a popular actress. Nobody would tell me who it was." Of course, it was the noted director Hitchcock who desired her after viewing a few snippets of Hedren's work. Her first film role was as the "Thirteenth Woman" in the 1932 film Thirteen Women but her scenes were deleted before the film's release. "I said, 'Well, who is this person? Who is interested?' And he just dodged the question. Born in New York, New York, Furness began her professional career as a model before being signed to a film contract by RKO Studios. At a packed house in Lancaster, California's Antelope Valley Independent Film Festival Cinema Series screening of The Birds on September 28, 2004, Hedren recounted her big acting break from Hitchcock - and her acting career - to a spellbound audience for almost an hour.

Elizabeth Mary Furness, better known as Betty Furness (January 3, 1916–April 2, 1994) was an American actress, consumer advocate and current affairs commentator. 1. Also in New York, she met her first husband, Peter Griffith. As soon as she had her 18th birthday, she bought a ticket to New York and started her professional modeling career. Her parents relocated to California while she was still a student in high school.

As a teenager, Hedren took part in department store fashion shows. "My father thought Nathalie was a little bit much for a brand new baby," Hedren remembered at a 2004 screening of The Birds. Tippi comes from the Swedish nickname "Tupsa," or "sweetheart.". Her father gave her the moniker "Tippi" even though her birth name is Nathalie Hedren. Hedren was born of a Swedish father and a German-Norwegian mother.

Active in animal causes, she was sometimes billed as 'Tippi' Hedren in her early acting career. Tippi Hedren is the mother of actress Melanie Griffith. Hedren appeared in The Birds and Marnie for Hitchcock. She was discovered by Alfred Hitchcock who saw her while she was acting in a commercial. He was looking for an actress who looked like Grace Kelly.

Nathalie Tippi Hedren (born January 19, 1931 in New Ulm, Minnesota) is an American actress. 4 Ibid. 3 op cit, page A6. 2 op cit, page A1 and A6.

Tippi Hedren airs out her early acting days, wildlife preservation, Antelope Valley Press, September 30, 2004, page A6. 1 Vroman, Lavender. Roar (producer) 1981). A Countess from Hong Kong (1967).

Marnie (1964). The Birds (1963). Martin Dinnes (2002 - present). Luis Barrenecha (1985 - 1995).

Noel Marshall (1964 - 1982). Peter Griffith (1952 - 1961).

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