BMW Z3

The BMW Z3 was the first modern mass-market roadster produced by BMW, as well as the first BMW model assembled in the United States. It was introduced as a 1996 model year vehicle, shortly after being featured in the James Bond movie, GoldenEye. There were a few variants of the car before its production run ended in 2002, including a coupe version for 1999. It was manufactured and assembled in Spartanburg, South Carolina. The Z3 was replaced by the BMW Z4 in late 2002 at the Paris Auto Show.

Overview

The Z3 was developed from the E36 platform of the 3 Series. The resulting platform is sometimes referred to as the E36/7. The rear semi-trailing arm suspension from the E30 was used rather than the more sophisticated multilink suspension from the E36. At first, just the 1.9 L M44B19 straight-4 engine was offered, though its 138 hp made the car less of a performer than many buyers wanted. Interior appointments, too, were not up to the standard of other BMW models, and the plastic rear window looked especially bad compared to the glass unit found on the much-cheaper 1999 Mazda Miata.

BMW Z3

This little four was complemented by a pair of straight-6es in 1997, the 2.3 L and 2.8 L M52B28. The 2.8 L engine, taken from the 328i, was especially desirable with its 189 hp. The M Roadster (see below) appeared in 1998 with a 3.2 L S52B32 I6, just as the four was retired.

All of the engines were replaced when the car was freshened for 2001. Now, the range consisted of the 2.5 L M52B25, 3.0 L M52B30, and (for the M Roadster) 3.2 L S54B32. All three of these straight-6 engines lasted through the end of the car's run in 2002. Also freshened was the car's interior appointments, though the plastic window remained.

The Z3 proved quite reliable, with problems limited to bad oxygen sensors, a flimsy plastic water pump, and failing rear shock mounts. The car's retro styling was popular, and Z3s have held their value fairly well in the resale market.

M Roadster

From 1998 to 2002, the Motorsports division of BMW produced the M Roadster which included suspension upgrades and the engine from the BMW M3. The 1998, 1999 and 2000 M roadster had the 3.2L S52 (U.S. Spec) or S50 (Europe) motor from the E36 M3 into it with quad exhaust. The 2001 and 2002 models had the S54 motor from the E46 M3. There were also interior upgrades with additional gauges in the center console, lighted "M" shift knob, various chrome bits throughout the cockpit and sport seats as standard equipment. Exterior changes were larger wheels spaced further apart and more aggressive fenders than were installed on the regular Z3. Hardtops were available as an option.

Coupe

In addition to the roadster version of the Z3, BMW also released a coupe featuring a chassis-stiffening rear hatch area. The coupe was available as the Z3 Coupe from 1999 to 2001 or as the BMW Motorsport-enhanced M Coupe from 1999 to 2002.

The Z3 Coupes were only available with the largest 6-cylinder engine offered in the Z3 roadster: the 2.8 L in 1999 and 2000 and the 3.0 L in 2001. The 1999 and 2000 M models were equipped with the 3.2L S52 (U.S. Spec) or S50 (Europe) motor from the E36 BMW M3, while all the 2001 and 2002 models came with the S54 motor from the E46 BMW M3.

Famous Owners

George O'Callaghan - Professional footballer.

Awards

The M Coupe/M Roadster made Car and Driver magazine's Ten Best list for 1999.

References

  • Nick Pon (2005). Affordable Sports. Sports Car International 21 (6): 96.

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The M Coupe/M Roadster made Car and Driver magazine's Ten Best list for 1999. The Bookcase Information Site. George O'Callaghan - Professional footballer. See also Sympson the Joiner and the early glazed bookcases made for Samuel Pepys. Spec) or S50 (Europe) motor from the E36 BMW M3, while all the 2001 and 2002 models came with the S54 motor from the E46 BMW M3. The Book on the Bookshelf by Henry Petroski also discusses the shelving of books in some detail. The 1999 and 2000 M models were equipped with the 3.2L S52 (U.S. Gladstone in the Nineteenth Century for March 1890.

The Z3 Coupes were only available with the largest 6-cylinder engine offered in the Z3 roadster: the 2.8 L in 1999 and 2000 and the 3.0 L in 2001. E. The coupe was available as the Z3 Coupe from 1999 to 2001 or as the BMW Motorsport-enhanced M Coupe from 1999 to 2002.. The whole question of the construction and arrangement of bookcases was learnedly discussed in the light of experience by W. In addition to the roadster version of the Z3, BMW also released a coupe featuring a chassis-stiffening rear hatch area. The library of the City of London at the Guildhall is a peculiarly effective example of the bay arrangement. Hardtops were available as an option. The stack system is suitable only for public libraries where economy of space is essential; the bay system is not only handsome but utilizes the space to great advantage.

Exterior changes were larger wheels spaced further apart and more aggressive fenders than were installed on the regular Z3. There are three systems of arranging bookcases: Flat against the wall; in stacks or ranges parallel to each other with merely enough space between to allow of the passage of a librarian; or in bays or alcoves where cases jut out into the room at right angles to the wall-cases. There were also interior upgrades with additional gauges in the center console, lighted "M" shift knob, various chrome bits throughout the cockpit and sport seats as standard equipment. Because of the danger of tripping on the floor mounted rails or being squashed between bookcases these systems are normally reserved for closed stacks where users cannot enter. The 2001 and 2002 models had the S54 motor from the E46 M3. Because of the heavy weight of the books most of the systems are electrically powered or have some form of gearing and large wheels to move the bookcases about and create the necessary aisle at the right place. Spec) or S50 (Europe) motor from the E36 M3 into it with quad exhaust. It is possible then to visit only two bookcase sides at a time, all the others being pressed close together.

The 1998, 1999 and 2000 M roadster had the 3.2L S52 (U.S. In such systems 12 or more bookcases are mounted on wheels which are integrated in floor level guide rails, in a space normally reserved for 4 or 6 bookcases. From 1998 to 2002, the Motorsports division of BMW produced the M Roadster which included suspension upgrades and the engine from the BMW M3. For libraries where space is extremely tight there is yet another system usually called mobile shelving or high density storage. The car's retro styling was popular, and Z3s have held their value fairly well in the resale market. In the great public libraries of the 20th century the bookcases are often of iron, as in the British Museum where the shelves are covered with cowhide, or steel, as in the Library of Congress at Washington, D.C., or of slate, as in the Fitzwilliam Library at Cambridge. The Z3 proved quite reliable, with problems limited to bad oxygen sensors, a flimsy plastic water pump, and failing rear shock mounts. Dwarf bookcases were frequently finished with a slab of choice marble at the top.

Also freshened was the car's interior appointments, though the plastic window remained. Mahogany, rosewood satinwood and even choicer exotic timbers were used; they were often inlaid with marquetry and mounted with chased and gilded bronze. All three of these straight-6 engines lasted through the end of the car's run in 2002. The French cabinetmakers of the same period were also highly successful with small ornamental cases. Now, the range consisted of the 2.5 L M52B25, 3.0 L M52B30, and (for the M Roadster) 3.2 L S54B32. The alluring grace of some of Sheraton's satinwood bookcases has very rarely indeed been equalled. All of the engines were replaced when the car was freshened for 2001. Both Chippendale and Sheraton made or designed great numbers of bookcases, mostly glazed with little lozenges encased in fretwork frames often of great charm and elegance.

The M Roadster (see below) appeared in 1998 with a 3.2 L S52B32 I6, just as the four was retired. Long ranges of book-shelves are necessarily somewhat severe in appearance, and many attempts have been made by means of carved cornices and pilasters to give them a more riant appearance--attempts which were never so successful as in the hands of the great English cabinetmakers of the second half of the 18th century. The 2.8 L engine, taken from the 328i, was especially desirable with its 189 hp. The oldest bookcases in England are those in the Bodleian Library at Oxford University, which were placed in position in the last year or two of the 16th century; in that library are the earliest extant examples of shelved galleries over the flat wall-cases. This little four was complemented by a pair of straight-6es in 1997, the 2.3 L and 2.8 L M52B28. Early bookcases were usually of oak, which is still deemed to be the most appropriate wood for a stately library. Interior appointments, too, were not up to the standard of other BMW models, and the plastic rear window looked especially bad compared to the glass unit found on the much-cheaper 1999 Mazda Miata. It was not until the invention of printing had greatly cheapened books that it became the practice to write the title on the back and place the edges inwards.

At first, just the 1.9 L M44B19 straight-4 engine was offered, though its 138 hp made the car less of a performer than many buyers wanted. The band of leather, vellum or parchment which closed the book was often used for the inscription of the title, which was thus on the fore-edge instead of on the back. The rear semi-trailing arm suspension from the E30 was used rather than the more sophisticated multilink suspension from the E36. They were either placed in piles upon their sides, or if upright, were ranged with their backs to the wall and their edges outwards. The resulting platform is sometimes referred to as the E36/7. Even then, however, the volumes were not arranged in the modern fashion. The Z3 was developed from the E36 platform of the 3 Series. At a somewhat later date the doors were discarded, and the evolution of the bookcase made one step forward.

. As manuscript volumes accumulated in the religious houses or in regal palaces, they were stored upon shelves or in cupboards, and it is from these cupboards that the bookcase of to-day directly descends. The Z3 was replaced by the BMW Z4 in late 2002 at the Paris Auto Show. When books were written by hand and were excessively scarce, they were kept in small coffers which the wealthy carried about with them on their journeys. It was manufactured and assembled in Spartanburg, South Carolina. . There were a few variants of the car before its production run ended in 2002, including a coupe version for 1999. A bookcase is an article of furniture, forming a shelved receptacle, usually perpendicular or horizontal, for the storage of books.

It was introduced as a 1996 model year vehicle, shortly after being featured in the James Bond movie, GoldenEye. This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, a publication in the public domain.. The BMW Z3 was the first modern mass-market roadster produced by BMW, as well as the first BMW model assembled in the United States. Sports Car International 21 (6): 96.. Affordable Sports.

Nick Pon (2005).

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