Arsenic and Old Lace (movie)

Arsenic and Old Lace is a film directed by Frank Capra based on a play (see Arsenic and Old Lace (play)) by Joseph Kesselring. The script was adapted by Julius J. Epstein. Capra actually filmed the movie in 1941 but it was not released until 1944 while the studio waited for the stage version to finish its run on Broadway.

In addition to Cary Grant as Mortimer Brewster, the film also starred Josephine Hull and Jean Adair as the Brewster Sisters, Abby and Martha, respectively. Both Hull and Adair reprised their roles from the original 1941 stage production as well as John Alexander as Teddy.

Spoiler warning: Plot or ending details follow.

The film concerns a theatre-hating drama critic and confirmed bachelor Mortimer Brewster (Cary Grant) who on his wedding day must cope with his bizarre family, especially his two elderly aunts who live in the old family home in Brooklyn.

Mortimer's aunts are "kindly" serving lonely old bachelors elderberry wine poisoned with arsenic and then burying the bodies in the basement. His younger brother Teddy thinks he is Teddy Roosevelt and yells "Charge!" when running up the stairs (after Teddy Roosevelt's 'charge up San Juan Hill'). Mortimer's other brother Jonathan (Raymond Massey), a wanted murderer whose face resembles that of Frankenstein's creature (as portrayed by Boris Karloff, a comparison frequently made in the film's dialogue), arrives with a surgeon, Dr. Einstein (Peter Lorre) in tow. Eventually, Mortimer is overjoyed to discover that he is not biologically related to these insane people, and is actually the son of a sea cook.


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Eventually, Mortimer is overjoyed to discover that he is not biologically related to these insane people, and is actually the son of a sea cook.
For the album by the Swedish band Opeth, see Deliverance. Einstein (Peter Lorre) in tow.
. Mortimer's other brother Jonathan (Raymond Massey), a wanted murderer whose face resembles that of Frankenstein's creature (as portrayed by Boris Karloff, a comparison frequently made in the film's dialogue), arrives with a surgeon, Dr. Running time: 109 minutes. His younger brother Teddy thinks he is Teddy Roosevelt and yells "Charge!" when running up the stairs (after Teddy Roosevelt's 'charge up San Juan Hill'). The film was selected by the New York Times as one of "The Best 1,000 Movies Ever Made.".

Mortimer's aunts are "kindly" serving lonely old bachelors elderberry wine poisoned with arsenic and then burying the bodies in the basement. In 2001, the book was named as one of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century by the editorial board of the American Modern Library. The film concerns a theatre-hating drama critic and confirmed bachelor Mortimer Brewster (Cary Grant) who on his wedding day must cope with his bizarre family, especially his two elderly aunts who live in the old family home in Brooklyn. The rapids within both book and film become a major symbol and plot device to reflect the natural dangers of the untamed wilderness towards urban outsiders. Both Hull and Adair reprised their roles from the original 1941 stage production as well as John Alexander as Teddy. In the years following the film's release, more than 30 people have drowned attempting to recreate the canoe trip along the section of the river where the film was shot. In addition to Cary Grant as Mortimer Brewster, the film also starred Josephine Hull and Jean Adair as the Brewster Sisters, Abby and Martha, respectively. Deliverance was shot on the Chattooga River, dividing the states of South Carolina and Georgia.

Capra actually filmed the movie in 1941 but it was not released until 1944 while the studio waited for the stage version to finish its run on Broadway. The three leave the river valley forever, lying about their ordeal to police investigators (the sheriff was played by author James Dickey) in order to escape their double murder charge, and vowing to keep their story of death and survival a secret for the rest of their lives. Epstein. For their survival, Ed must climb the cliffs and overcome his very fears in order to dispatch the other mountain man with his bow and arrow. The script was adapted by Julius J. One mountain man is killed by Lewis' archery skills, and the four make a run for it downriver, but soon Drew is shot and killed from behind in his canoe by the other mountain man, and then Lewis breaks his femur in the following boat crash in the rocky rapids. Arsenic and Old Lace is a film directed by Frank Capra based on a play (see Arsenic and Old Lace (play)) by Joseph Kesselring. The song won the 1974 Grammy Award for Best Country Instrumental Performance.

In the scene at the rural gas station, character Drew Ballinger plays the instrumental "Dueling Banjos" on his guitar with a retarded mountain boy named Lonny (implied as being an inbred albino in the James Dickey novel), who eventually outplays Drew with his banjo. The film is also noted for the memorable music scene near the beginning that sets the tone for what lies ahead: a trip into unknown and potentially dangerous territory. In what remains one of the most disturbing scenes in film history, at gunpoint one of the canoeists, character Bobby Trippe, is forced to strip naked, his ear twisted to bring him to his knees, and then ordered to "squeal like a pig" before being sodomized while Ed is bound to a tree by his belt tightened around his neck. Travelling in twos, their canoes are briefly separated and the occupants of one canoe (Bobby and Ed) encounter a pair of gritty mountain men emerging from woods.

The trip turns into a terrifying ordeal revealing the primal nature of man, his animal instincts of survival, and even his potential for violence. Widely acclaimed as a landmark film, it is the story of four southern suburbanites on a weekend getaway to canoe down the fictional Cahulawassee River in the remote Georgia wildernesses, hoping to have fun and see the glory of nature before the river valley is flooded over with the upcoming construction of a dam. Studios into a 1972 motion picture drama. Deliverance is a 1970 novel by American author James Dickey that was made by Warner Bros.

Golden Globe Award for Best Screenplay - James Dickey. Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song - Arthur "Guitar Boogie" Smith, Eric Weissberg and Steve Mandell. Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Drama - Jon Voight. Academy Award for Film Editing - Tom Priestley.

New York Film Critics Circle for Best Director - John Boorman. Golden Globe Award for Best Director - John Boorman. Academy Award for Directing - John Boorman. New York Film Critics Circle for Best Film.

Golden Globe Award for Best Picture - Drama. Academy Award for Best Picture. Herbert 'Cowboy' Coward - Toothless Man. Bill McKinney - Mountain Man.

Randall Deal - Second Griner. Seamon Glass - First Griner. Billy Redden - Lonny. James Dickey - Sheriff Bullard.

Ronny Cox - Drew Ballinger. Ned Beatty - Bobby Trippe. Burt Reynolds - Lewis Medlock. Jon Voight - Ed Gentry.

Music: Eric Weissberg and Steve Mandell - "Dueling Banjos" (1955 composition by Arthur "Guitar Boogie" Smith). Cinematography: Vilmos Zsigmond. Screenplay adaption: James Dickey. Original story: James Dickey from his novel.

Producer: John Boorman. Director: John Boorman.

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