Acura Integra

The Acura Integra, sold as a Honda in most of the world, is a small, sporty vehicle sold primarily as a coupe. It is Acura's smallest, least expensive model, designed to offer a competitor to vehicles like Volkswagen's Golf GTI, which was the most well known and popular "hot hatch" of the 1980s when the Integra was introduced. Although a sedan was available for several years, the 4-door body was dropped when the vehicle transitioned to its current fourth-generation "DC5" platform, which is now sold as the RSX in North America.

First Generation 1985-1989

First Generation Integra

The vehicle debuted in Japan in 1985 as the Honda Integra before going on sale a year later in North America as part of the then-new Acura lineup. Three and 5-door hatchback bodies as well as a traditional four-door sedan were available, with a 1.6 L DOHC 16-valve engine powering all three. The engine was the vehicle's most publicized feature, as twin-cam, multi-valve engines were anything but commonplace in entry-level models at the time.

The Integra shared its platform with the less-sporty Civic, although it featured a small list of key upgrades over its lesser stablemate to help merit a price increase over the CRX Si, which was otherwise the sportiest compact vehicle being offered by Honda/Acura; enlarged 4-wheel disc brakes replaced the small front-disc/rear-drum setup used by the Civic and CRX, suspension calibration was re-worked, better tires were used and a 113 horsepower DOHC fuel injected 16-valve engine was used in place of the SOHC, 90 horsepower unit from the CRX Si. Combined with sleeker styling and a nicer interior, buyers were effectivly convinced that the Integra was worth the extra money, and nearly 228,000 units were sold during the five year run of the first generation model.

The model was not without its shortcomings though; despite having 113 horsepower and a reachable 7,000 RPM redline, the new twin-cam engine had little torque and needed to be wound up quite a bit to make full power, leading to criticism that the model wasn't well-suited for day to day driving on surface streets, but was better tuned for spirited driving down tight, windy roads.

Second Generation 1990-1993

Second Generation Integra

Acura debuted the second generation Integra in 1990, now powered by a new 1.8 litre engine making 130 horsepower, giving the model a necessary boost in performance. The three-door hatchback and 4-door sedan body styles continued to be available, but the 5-door hatch was discontinued due to poor market reception.

Trim levels for 1990 and 1991 included the RS (base model), LS, and GS. The GS model could also be had with a leather interior, which made it a sort of "deluxe" model, and featured its own model number.

For 1992 Honda added the GS-R trim level, powered by a de-stroked, 1.7 litre version of the standard engine with the VTEC system from the then-new NSX added-on, bumping output to 160 horsepower. Other small updates came on at the same time, namely new front and rear bumpers, a new steering wheel, new rear turn signals, new ECU, chromed interior door handles and an increase in power to 140 for the non-VTEC engine. Honda had already used the vtec system in the b16a engines in the late 80s which are a predacessor to the b17 engine.

The second generation was the last Integra to be sold without airbags in the United States. Motorized "passive" seat belts were used instead. Canada and the rest of the world got regular seat belts.

This generation also saw Acura make a bit of a marketing shift. Prior to the 1991 model year, Acura had made a minor point of the supposed understated elegance of minimal exterior badging. Therefore, from 1986 to 1990 the only external clues to any Integra's identity came at the rear, where badges for "Acura" "Integra", and the trim level appeared. For the 1991 model year however, Acura's "A" logo appeared for the very first time on the front of the hood, as well as between the taillights. Every Integra made since then has had the "A" badges.

  • 262,285 units sold from 1990-1993

Third Generation 1994-1997

Acura debuted the third generation model in 1994, now based on the all-new Civic chassis that had been introduced in '92. Standard horsepower increased to 142, and the GS-R recieved a dual-stage intake manifold and a displacment boost to 1.8 litre, bringing horsepower up to 170.

A Type R model was added for the 1997 model year, powered by a highly tuned, hand-finished variant of the GS-R's powerplant producing 195 horsepower, meaning it made more hp per litre than the Ferrari F355's V8. Although impressive, the Type R was still hampered by some criticism; its maximum torque output was only 130 ft·lbs, and maximum output could not be achieved until 7000 RPM, meaning that the engine was only performing at peak between 7,000 RPM and its 8,400 RPM redline. Although the engine's "split personality" and unusually high capability to rev made it popular among hardcore enthusiasts, it cost the vehicle points in comparison tests where drivers noted that the vehicle was too hard-edged, loud and rev-hungry to be an easy daily driver.

Fourth Generation 1998-2001

Despite some popular demand for a new Integra model for 1998, Acura chose to give the third-generation model a slight facelift and rerelease it. The 1998 Integra had slightly larger headlights and a more aggressive front bumper. It also has all-red taillights and a revised rear bumper. The GS-R edition received 5-spoke "blade" style wheels as a stylistic change.

Once again, the Type-R saw a limited release in the US.

Type R

The Type R was the pinnacle of the Integra line. It had many exclusive features found on no other Integra.

The B18C5 Type R engine contained more key differences than just some manual assembly steps and an increased redline. The B16A's cylinder head returned for an encore, with differently shaped combustion chambers and intake ports compared to the regular B18C in the GS-R. Molybdenum-coated, high compression pistons and stronger-but-lighter connecting rods strengthened the reciprocating assembly. Two extra counterweights on the crankshaft altered its vibration modes to enhance durability at high RPM. The intake valves were reshaped with a thinner stem and crown that reduced weight and improved flow. The intake ports were given a minor port and polish. Stiffer valve springs resisted float on more aggressive camshafts. Intake air was now drawn from inside the fender well, for a colder, denser charge. That intake fed a short-runner intake manifold with a larger throttle body for better breathing. An improved stainless steel exhaust collector with more gentle merge angles, a change to a larger, consistent piping diameter, flared internal piping in the muffler allowed easier exit of gasses. A retuned engine computer also contributed to improve power output.

The transmission was upgraded with lower and closer gear ratios in second through fifth gears, in order to take advantage of the additional rev range. The American version retained the same 4.4 final drive throughout the Type R's production run, unlike the Japanese market version, which in 1998 changed to a 4.785 final drive along with revised gearing. The clutch disk has a slightly smaller swept area, for improved bite. The GS-R's open differential was replaced with a torque-sensing limited slip type.

The chassis received enhancements in the form of reinforcements to the rear wheel wells, roof rail, and other key areas. "Performance rods," chassis braces that were bolted in place, were added to the rear trunk wall and rear subframe. The front strut tower bar was replaced with a stronger aluminum piece. Camber rigidity was improved at the rear by increasing wheel bearing span by 10 mm. The Type R's body also received a new functional rear wing, body-colored rocker panels, and 5 bolt hubs with special lightweight Type-R wheels. Under those wheels was a much larger set of disk brakes front and back. The tires were upgraded to Bridgestone RE010 "summer" tires.

The Type R received very aggressive tuning in its suspension settings. All soft rubber bushings were replaced with much stiffer versions, as much as 5.3 times higher in durometer readings. The springs and dampers were much stiffer, with a 10 mm reduction in ride height. The rear anti-roll bar diameter was increased to 22 mm in diameter. The front anti-roll bar retained the same size, although the end links were changed to a more responsive sealed ball joint as opposed to a rubber bushing on the lesser models. The result was a chassis with very responsive, racetrack-ready handling that ably absorbed mid-corner bumps well. Mild oversteer was easy to induce with a lift of the throttle, and during steady-state cornering the car maintained a slight tail-out stance.

The interior was stripped down to reduce weight. The air conditioning system was removed and nearly all the sound-dampening material was eliminated. This provided for a much noisier ride, but since the Type-R was a racecar for the street, most owners didn't mind. The Type R was a no-compromise sports car, and it showed the world what Honda was capable of.

  • 301,103 Units sold from 1994-2001 - 2005555

Replacement for Acura Integra

The fourth generation Integra, produced from 2002 onwards, has been renamed the Acura RSX. The new name conforms to Acura's new naming scheme for all cars in its line up (e.g. NSX, TSX, MDX, etc). It also has an entirely new engine, the K-series, which is considered by some to be the best engine Honda has ever released.

Awards

The Integra was on Car and Driver magazine's annual Ten Best list six times, in 1987, 1988, and 1994 through 1997. The GS-R model was called out specifically in 1994 and 1995. It made a return on the Ten Best as the Acura RSX for 2002 and 2003


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It made a return on the Ten Best as the Acura RSX for 2002 and 2003. Other centers included:. The GS-R model was called out specifically in 1994 and 1995. Principal centers of the style were:. The Integra was on Car and Driver magazine's annual Ten Best list six times, in 1987, 1988, and 1994 through 1997. Diamonds were usually given subsidiary roles, used alongside less familiar materials such as moulded glass, horn and ivory. It also has an entirely new engine, the K-series, which is considered by some to be the best engine Honda has ever released. In most of the enamelled work of the period precious stones receded.

NSX, TSX, MDX, etc). The jewellers were keen to establish the new style in a noble tradition, and for this they looked back to the Renaissance, with its jewels of sculpted and enamelled gold, and its acceptance of jewellers as artists rather than craftsmen. The new name conforms to Acura's new naming scheme for all cars in its line up (e.g. Lalique glorified nature in jewellery, extending the repertoire to include new aspects of nature — dragonflies or grasses — inspired by his encounter with Japanese art. The fourth generation Integra, produced from 2002 onwards, has been renamed the Acura RSX. Contemporary French critics were united in acknowledging that jewellery was undergoing a radical transformation, and that the French designer-jeweller René Lalique was at its heart. The Type R was a no-compromise sports car, and it showed the world what Honda was capable of. The jewellers of Paris and Brussels created and defined Art Nouveau in jewellery, and in these cities it achieved the most renown.

This provided for a much noisier ride, but since the Type-R was a racecar for the street, most owners didn't mind. With Art Nouveau, a different type of jewellery emerged, motivated by the artist-designer rather than the jeweller as setter of precious stones. The air conditioning system was removed and nearly all the sound-dampening material was eliminated. For the previous two centuries the emphasis in fine jewellery had been on gemstones, particularly on the diamond, and the jeweller or goldsmith had been principally concerned with providing settings for their advantage. The interior was stripped down to reduce weight. The widespread interest in Japanese art and the more specialised enthusiasm for Japanese metalworking skills, fostered new themes and approaches to ornament. Mild oversteer was easy to induce with a lift of the throttle, and during steady-state cornering the car maintained a slight tail-out stance. Jewelry of the Art Nouveau period revitalised the jeweller's art, with nature as the principal source of inspiration, complemented by new levels of virtuosity in enamelling and the introduction of new materials, such as opals and semi-precious stones.

The result was a chassis with very responsive, racetrack-ready handling that ably absorbed mid-corner bumps well. Glass making was an area in which the style found tremendous expression — for example, the works of Louis Comfort Tiffany in New York and Émile Gallé and the Daum brothers in Nancy, France. The front anti-roll bar retained the same size, although the end links were changed to a more responsive sealed ball joint as opposed to a rubber bushing on the lesser models. 2-dimensional Art Nouveau pieces were painted, drawn, and quite popular in printed material like advertising, posters, labels, magazines and the like. The rear anti-roll bar diameter was increased to 22 mm in diameter. (See Hierarchy of genres.). The springs and dampers were much stiffer, with a 10 mm reduction in ride height. Art Nouveau is considered a "total" style, meaning that it encompasses a hierarchy of scales in design — architecture, interior design, jewellery, furniture and textile design, utensils and art objects, lighting, and etc.

All soft rubber bushings were replaced with much stiffer versions, as much as 5.3 times higher in durometer readings. For sculpture the principle materials employed were glass and wrought iron, leading to sculpturesque quality even in architecture. The Type R received very aggressive tuning in its suspension settings. Art Nouveau did not negate the machine, as other movements such as the Arts and Crafts Movement, but used it to an advantage. The tires were upgraded to Bridgestone RE010 "summer" tires. Some line and curve patterns became graphic clichés that were later found in works of artists from all parts of the world. Under those wheels was a much larger set of disk brakes front and back. Japanese wood-block prints with their curved lines, patterned surfaces and contrasting voids, and flatness of their picture-plane, also inspired Art Nouveau.

The Type R's body also received a new functional rear wing, body-colored rocker panels, and 5 bolt hubs with special lightweight Type-R wheels. Correspondingly organic forms, curved lines, especially floral or vegetal, and the like, were used. Camber rigidity was improved at the rear by increasing wheel bearing span by 10 mm. Though, Art Nouveau designers selected and "modernized" some of the more abstract elements of Rococo style, such as flame and shell textures, in place of the historically-derived and basically tectonic or realistic naturalistic ornament of high Victorian styles, Art Nouveau advocated the use of highly-stylized nature as the source of inspiration and expanded the "natural" repertoire to embrace seaweed, grasses, and insects. The front strut tower bar was replaced with a stronger aluminum piece. Art Nouveau in architecture and interior design eschewed the eclectic historicism of the Victorian era. "Performance rods," chassis braces that were bolted in place, were added to the rear trunk wall and rear subframe. Unlike Symbolist painting, however, Art Nouveau has a distinctive visual look; and unlike the backwards-looking Pre-Raphaelites, Art Nouveau artists quickly used new materials, machined surfaces, and abstraction in the service of pure design.

The chassis received enhancements in the form of reinforcements to the rear wheel wells, roof rail, and other key areas. As an art movement it has affinities with the Pre-Raphaelites and the Symbolism movement, and artists like Aubrey Beardsley, Alfons Mucha, Edward Burne-Jones, Gustav Klimt, and Jan Toorop could be classed in more than one of these styles. The GS-R's open differential was replaced with a torque-sensing limited slip type. Conventional moldings seem to spring to life and "grow" into plant-derived forms. The clutch disk has a slightly smaller swept area, for improved bite. Another feature is usage of hyperbolas and parabolas. The American version retained the same 4.4 final drive throughout the Type R's production run, unlike the Japanese market version, which in 1998 changed to a 4.785 final drive along with revised gearing. Dynamic, undulating and flowing, curved "whiplash" lines of syncopated rhythm characterize much of Art Nouveau.

The transmission was upgraded with lower and closer gear ratios in second through fifth gears, in order to take advantage of the additional rev range. The entrances to the Paris Metro designed by Hector Guimard in 1899 and 1900 are notable and famous examples of Art Nouveau. A retuned engine computer also contributed to improve power output. Ironically, Art Nouveau made use of many technological innovations of the late 19th century, especially the broad use of exposed iron and large, irregularly-shaped pieces of glass in architecture, but by the start of the First World War the highly stylized nature of Art Nouveau design — which itself was expensive to produce — began to be dropped in favor of more streamlined, simply rectilinear modernism that was cheaper and thought to be more faithful to the rough, plain industrial aesthetic. An improved stainless steel exhaust collector with more gentle merge angles, a change to a larger, consistent piping diameter, flared internal piping in the muffler allowed easier exit of gasses. It probably reached its apogee, however, at the 1902 Turin Exposition in Italy, where designers exhibited from almost every European country where Art Nouveau flourished. That intake fed a short-runner intake manifold with a larger throttle body for better breathing. A high point in the evolution of Art Nouveau was the Universal Exposition of 1900 in Paris, in which the "modern style" triumphed in every medium.

Intake air was now drawn from inside the fender well, for a colder, denser charge. The name "Art Nouveau" derived from the name of a shop in Paris, Maison de l'Art Nouveau, at the time run by Samuel Bing, that showcased objects that followed this approach to design. Stiffer valve springs resisted float on more aggressive camshafts. Some free-flowing wrought iron from the 1880s could also be adduced, or some flat floral textile designs, most of which owed some impetus to vegetal-derived patterns of High Victorian design. The intake ports were given a minor port and polish. Though Art Nouveau climaxed in the years 1892 to 1902, the first stirrings of an Art Nouveau can be recognized in the 1880s, in a handful of progressive designs influenced by the Arts and Crafts movement, such as the architect-designer Arthur Mackmurdo's often-illustrated bookcover design for his essay on the city churches of Sir Christopher Wren, published in 1883. The intake valves were reshaped with a thinner stem and crown that reduced weight and improved flow. .

Two extra counterweights on the crankshaft altered its vibration modes to enhance durability at high RPM. In Catalonia, the movement was centred in Barcelona and was known as "modernisme", with Antoni Gaudí as the most noteworthy practitioner. Molybdenum-coated, high compression pistons and stronger-but-lighter connecting rods strengthened the reciprocating assembly. In Italy, "Stile Liberty" was named for the London shop, Liberty & Co, which distributed modern design emanating from the Arts and Crafts movement, a sign both of the Art Nouveau's commercial aspect and the "imported" character that it always retained in Italy. The B16A's cylinder head returned for an encore, with differently shaped combustion chambers and intake ports compared to the regular B18C in the GS-R. In Russia, the movement revolved around the art magazine World of Art, which spawned the revolutionary Ballets Russes. The B18C5 Type R engine contained more key differences than just some manual assembly steps and an increased redline. Other, more localized terms for the cluster of self-consciously radical, somewhat mannered reformist chic that formed a prelude to 20th-century modernism, included "Jugendstil" in Germany and the Netherlands, named for the snappy avant-garde periodical Jugend ('Youth') or "Sezessionsstil" ('Secessionism') in Vienna, where forward-looking artists and designers seceded from the mainstream salon exhibitions, to exhibit on their own in more congenial surroundings.

It had many exclusive features found on no other Integra. Art Nouveau (French for "new art") is a style in art, architecture and design that peaked in popularity at the beginning of the 20th century. The Type R was the pinnacle of the Integra line. Gustav Klimt (1862-1918). Once again, the Type-R saw a limited release in the US. Mikhail Vrubel (1856-1910). The GS-R edition received 5-spoke "blade" style wheels as a stylistic change. Philippe Wolfers (1858-1929).

It also has all-red taillights and a revised rear bumper. Hermann Obrist (1863-1927). The 1998 Integra had slightly larger headlights and a more aggressive front bumper. Georges de Feure (1868-1928). Despite some popular demand for a new Integra model for 1998, Acura chose to give the third-generation model a slight facelift and rerelease it. Auguste Delaherche (1857-1940). Although the engine's "split personality" and unusually high capability to rev made it popular among hardcore enthusiasts, it cost the vehicle points in comparison tests where drivers noted that the vehicle was too hard-edged, loud and rev-hungry to be an easy daily driver. Jules Brunfaut (1852-1942).

Although impressive, the Type R was still hampered by some criticism; its maximum torque output was only 130 ft·lbs, and maximum output could not be achieved until 7000 RPM, meaning that the engine was only performing at peak between 7,000 RPM and its 8,400 RPM redline. William Bradley (1868-1962). A Type R model was added for the 1997 model year, powered by a highly tuned, hand-finished variant of the GS-R's powerplant producing 195 horsepower, meaning it made more hp per litre than the Ferrari F355's V8. Ashbee (1863-1942). Standard horsepower increased to 142, and the GS-R recieved a dual-stage intake manifold and a displacment boost to 1.8 litre, bringing horsepower up to 170. Charles R. Acura debuted the third generation model in 1994, now based on the all-new Civic chassis that had been introduced in '92. Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933).

Every Integra made since then has had the "A" badges. René Lalique (1860-1945). For the 1991 model year however, Acura's "A" logo appeared for the very first time on the front of the hood, as well as between the taillights. Jacques Gruber (1870-1936). Therefore, from 1986 to 1990 the only external clues to any Integra's identity came at the rear, where badges for "Acura" "Integra", and the trim level appeared. Émile Gallé (1846-1904). Prior to the 1991 model year, Acura had made a minor point of the supposed understated elegance of minimal exterior badging. Daum Frères (1825-1885).

This generation also saw Acura make a bit of a marketing shift. Henry van de Velde (1863-1957). Canada and the rest of the world got regular seat belts. Louis Majorelle (1859-1926). Motorized "passive" seat belts were used instead. Eugène Gaillard (1862-1933). The second generation was the last Integra to be sold without airbags in the United States. Carlo Bugatti (1856-1940).

Honda had already used the vtec system in the b16a engines in the late 80s which are a predacessor to the b17 engine. Pierre Bonnard (1867-1947). Other small updates came on at the same time, namely new front and rear bumpers, a new steering wheel, new rear turn signals, new ECU, chromed interior door handles and an increase in power to 140 for the non-VTEC engine. Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864-1901). For 1992 Honda added the GS-R trim level, powered by a de-stroked, 1.7 litre version of the standard engine with the VTEC system from the then-new NSX added-on, bumping output to 160 horsepower. Edvard Munch (1863-1944). The GS model could also be had with a leather interior, which made it a sort of "deluxe" model, and featured its own model number. Alfons Mucha (1860-1939).

Trim levels for 1990 and 1991 included the RS (base model), LS, and GS. Gaston Gerard (1878-1969). The three-door hatchback and 4-door sedan body styles continued to be available, but the 5-door hatch was discontinued due to poor market reception. Aubrey Beardsley (1872-1898). Acura debuted the second generation Integra in 1990, now powered by a new 1.8 litre engine making 130 horsepower, giving the model a necessary boost in performance. Marian Peretiatkovich (1872-1916). The model was not without its shortcomings though; despite having 113 horsepower and a reachable 7,000 RPM redline, the new twin-cam engine had little torque and needed to be wound up quite a bit to make full power, leading to criticism that the model wasn't well-suited for day to day driving on surface streets, but was better tuned for spirited driving down tight, windy roads. Lucien Weissenburger (1860-1929).

Combined with sleeker styling and a nicer interior, buyers were effectivly convinced that the Integra was worth the extra money, and nearly 228,000 units were sold during the five year run of the first generation model. Otto Wagner (1841-1918). The Integra shared its platform with the less-sporty Civic, although it featured a small list of key upgrades over its lesser stablemate to help merit a price increase over the CRX Si, which was otherwise the sportiest compact vehicle being offered by Honda/Acura; enlarged 4-wheel disc brakes replaced the small front-disc/rear-drum setup used by the Civic and CRX, suspension calibration was re-worked, better tires were used and a 113 horsepower DOHC fuel injected 16-valve engine was used in place of the SOHC, 90 horsepower unit from the CRX Si. Henry Van de Velde (1863-1957). The engine was the vehicle's most publicized feature, as twin-cam, multi-valve engines were anything but commonplace in entry-level models at the time. Fyodor Shekhtel (1859-1926). Three and 5-door hatchback bodies as well as a traditional four-door sedan were available, with a 1.6 L DOHC 16-valve engine powering all three. Eugène Vallin (1856-1922).

The vehicle debuted in Japan in 1985 as the Honda Integra before going on sale a year later in North America as part of the then-new Acura lineup. Louis Sullivan (1856-1924). . Charles Rennie Mackintosh (1868-1928). Although a sedan was available for several years, the 4-door body was dropped when the vehicle transitioned to its current fourth-generation "DC5" platform, which is now sold as the RSX in North America. Hector Guimard (1867-1942). It is Acura's smallest, least expensive model, designed to offer a competitor to vehicles like Volkswagen's Golf GTI, which was the most well known and popular "hot hatch" of the 1980s when the Integra was introduced. Josef Hoffmann (1870-1956).

The Acura Integra, sold as a Honda in most of the world, is a small, sporty vehicle sold primarily as a coupe. Victor Horta (1861-1947). 301,103 Units sold from 1994-2001 - 2005555. Antoni Gaudi (1852-1926). 262,285 units sold from 1990-1993. August Endel (1871-1925). Raimondo Tommaso D'Aronco (1857-1932).

Paul Charbonnier (1865-1953). Georges Biet (1868-1955). Émile André (1871-1933). Amsterdam, Ålesund, Berlin, Chicago, Illinois, Helsinki, Ljubljana, Osijek, Oslo, Prague, The Hague, Subotica, Vladivostok, La Chaux-de-Fonds.

Mannheim, Barcelona, Brussels, Darmstadt, Moscow, Glasgow, Rīga, London, School of Nancy France, Paris, St.Petersburg, Russia, Munich, New York, Vienna.

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