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New York Yankees


Major league affiliations
  • American League (1901-present)
    • East Division (1969-present)
Major league titles
World Series titles (26) 2000 • 1999 • 1998 • 1996
1978 • 1977 • 1962 • 1961
1958 • 1956 • 1953 • 1952
1951 • 1950 • 1949 • 1947
1943 • 1941 • 1939 • 1938
1937 • 1936 • 1932 • 1928
1927 • 1923
AL Pennants (39) 2003 • 2001 • 2000 • 1999
1998 • 1996 • 1981 • 1978
1977 • 1976 • 1964 • 1963
1962 • 1961 • 1960 • 1958
1957 • 1956 • 1955 • 1953
1952 • 1951 • 1950 • 1949
1947 • 1943 • 1942 • 1941
1939 • 1938 • 1937 • 1936
1932 • 1928 • 1927 • 1926
1923 • 1922 • 1921
East Division titles (14) [1][2][3] 2005 • 2004 • 2003 • 2002
2001 • 2000 • 1999 • 1998
1996 • 1981 • 1980 • 1978
1977 • 1976
Wild card berths (2) 1997 • 1995

[1] - In 1981, a players' strike in the middle of the season forced the season to be split into two halves. New York had the best record in the East Division when play was stopped and was declared the first-half division winner. The Yankees had the third best record in the division when considering the entire season, two games behind Milwaukee and Baltimore.
[2] - In 1994, a players' strike wiped out the last eight weeks of the season and all post-season. New York was in first place in the East Division by six and a half games when play was stopped. No official titles were awarded in 1994.
[3] - In 2005, the Yankees and the Boston Red Sox finished the season with identical records of 95-67 and finished tied for first place in the East Division standings. Because New York won the regular season series with Boston, New York was awarded the division championship and Boston was awarded the wild card.

Major league nicknames
  • New York Yankees (1913-present)
  • New York Highlanders (1903-1912)
  • Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902)

(Also referred to as "Americans" 1903-1909 and "Yankees" 1910-1912)

Major league home ballparks
  • Yankee Stadium (1976-present)
  • Shea Stadium (1974-1975)
  • Yankee Stadium (1923-1973)
  • Polo Grounds (IV) (1913-1922)
    • a.k.a. Brush Stadium (1913-1919)
  • Hilltop Park (1903-1912)
  • Oriole Park (Baltimore) (1901-1902)
Current uniform
Retired numbers

♦ - Hall of Famer
Jackie Robinson's #42 is retired by Major League Baseball

• This box contains major league affiliations only; National Association, Western League and other minor league affiliations are not included.
• The "Established" date indicates when major league status was gained.
• Postseasons prior to 1903 are not included as they were regarded more as exhibitions.
        edit infobox

The New York Yankees are a Major League Baseball team based in The Bronx, New York City, New York. They are in the Eastern Division of the American League.

One of the American League's eight charter franchises, the Yankees have been among the most storied teams in North America over their 100+ year history; along with franchises like the Boston Celtics, Dallas Cowboys, and Montreal Canadiens, the Yankees have helped exemplify the phrase "dynasty" in professional athletics. They are one of two major league franchises which operate in New York City, the other being the New York Mets of the National League.

The Yankees have won 26 World Series in 39 appearances; the St. Louis Cardinals and the Oakland Athletics are tied for second with 9 World Series victories each, and the Los Angeles Dodgers is second in World Series appearances with 18. Among the North American major sports, the Yankees' success is only approached by the 23 Stanley Cup championships of the Montreal Canadiens of the National Hockey League. The Yankees are also the only team that is represented at every position in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Origins

At the end of the 1900 season the American League re-organized and, with its president Ban Johnson as the driving force, decided to assert itself as a new major league. Previously a minor league (known as the Western League until 1899), the American League carried over five of its previous locations and added three more on the East Coast, including one in Baltimore, Maryland, which had lost its National League team when that league contracted the year before. The intention of Johnson and the American League had been to place a team in New York City, but their efforts had been stymied by the political connections that owners of the National League New York Giants had with Tammany Hall.

When the team began play as the Baltimore Orioles in 1901, they were managed by John McGraw. As a result of a feud with league president Ban Johnson, who rigidly enforced rules about rowdyism on the field of play, McGraw jumped leagues to manage the New York Giants in the middle of the 1902 season. A week later the owner of the Giants also gained controlling interest of the Orioles and raided the team for players, after which the league declared the team forfeit and took control, still intending to move the franchise to New York when and if possible.

In January 1903, the American and National Leagues held a "peace conference" to settle conflicts over player contract disputes and to agree on future cooperation. The NL also agreed that the "junior circuit" could establish a franchise in New York. The AL's Baltimore franchise became the New York franchise when its new owners, Frank Farrell and William Devery, were able to find a ballpark location not blocked by the Giants. Farrell and Devery both had deep ties into city politics and gambling. Farrell owned a casino and several pool halls, while Devery had served as a blatantly corrupt chief of the New York City police and had only been forced out of the department at the start of 1902.

The Highlanders

The franchise's first park in New York was located at 165th St. and Broadway in Manhattan, near the highest point on the island. Consequently the field was known as Hilltop Park and the team quickly became known as the New York Highlanders. The name was also a reference to the noted British military unit The Gordon Highlanders, as the team president from 1903 to 1906 was named Joseph Gordon. Today the site of the original Hilltop Park is occupied by buildings of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center.

As the Highlanders, the team enjoyed success only twice, finishing in second place in 1904 and 1910; but otherwise, much of their first fifteen years in New York was spent in the cellar. Their somewhat tainted ownership, along with the questionable activities of some players, notably first baseman Hal Chase, raised suspicions of game-fixing, but little of that was ever proven.

Their best chance came on the last day of the 1904 season, at the Hilltop. New York pitcher Jack Chesbro threw a wild pitch in the ninth inning which allowed the eventual pennant-winning run to score for the Boston Americans. This event had historical significance in several ways. First, the presence of the Highlanders in the race had led the Giants to announce they would not participate in the World Series against a "minor league" team. Although Boston had won the pennant, the Giants still refused to participate. The resulting tongue-lashing of the Giants by the media stung their owner, John T. Brush, who then led a committee that formalized the rules governing the World Series. 1904 was the last year a Series was not played, until the strike-truncated year of 1994. For fans of the team formally named the Red Sox in 1908, the 1904 season-ender would prove to be the last time Boston would defeat the Yankees in a pennant-deciding game for literally a century.

From 1913 to 1922 the team would play in the Polo Grounds, a park owned by their National League rivals, the Giants. Relations between the clubs had warmed when the Giants were allowed to lease Hilltop Park while the Polo Grounds was being rebuilt in 1911 following a disastrous fire. During the early 1900s, the nickname "Yankees" was occasionally applied to the club, as a variant on "Americans", verifiably as early as June 21, 1904, when Patsy Dougherty was traded from Boston to New York, and the Boston Herald's report was headlined "Dougherty as a Yankee". That matter-of-fact wording suggests the nickname was already well-known. The New York Herald, on April 15, 1906, reported "Yankees win opening game from Boston, 2-1". The name grew in popularity over the team's first decade. With the change of parks in 1913, the "Highlanders" reference became obsolete, and the de facto team nickname became exclusively "Yankees". Before very long, New York Yankees had become the official nickname of the club.

By the mid 1910s, owners Farrell and Devery had become estranged and both were in need of money. At the start of 1915, they sold the team to Colonel Jacob Ruppert and Captain Tillinghast L'Hommedieu Huston. Ruppert was heir to the Ruppert brewery fortune and had also been tied to the Tammany Hall machine, serving as a U.S. Congressman for eight years. Ruppert later said, "For $450,000 we got an orphan ball club, without a home of its own, without players of outstanding ability, without prestige." But now with an owner possessing deep pockets, and a willingness to dig into them to produce a winning team.

The Ruth and Gehrig era

Perhaps one of the greatest ironies of the Yankees dominance comes from its roots. The Yankees detente with the Boston Red Sox and Chicago White Sox circa 1920 (all three collectively known as the "Insurrectos") paid off well. Over the next few years the new owners would begin to enlarge the payroll. Many of the newly acquired players who would later contribute to their success came from the Boston Red Sox, whose owner, theater impresario Harry Frazee, had bought his team on credit and needed money to pay off his loans and purchase Fenway Park from the Fenway Park Trust. Further, as Frazee owned the strongest of the "Insurrectos" franchizes, which antagonized A.L. President Ban Johnson, Frazee faced most of the legal battles which proved costly[1]. From 1919 to 1922, the Yankees acquired pitchers Waite Hoyt, Carl Mays and Herb Pennock, catcher Wally Schang, shortstop Everett Scott and third baseman Joe Dugan, all from the Red Sox. However, pitcher-turned-outfielder Babe Ruth was the biggest of them all. Frazee traded Ruth in January of 1920, citing Ruth's demand for a raise after being paid the highest salary in baseball, and despite owning the single season homerun record at the time of the trade (hitting 29 homeruns in 1919[2]). Frazee also wished to aid the Yankees, as giving the Yankees a box office draw would strengthen a legal ally, and reduce the pressure he faced[3]. Ruth was also regarded as a problem, a carouser. That would continue during his Yankees years, but the ownership was more tolerant, provided he brought fans and championships to the ballpark. Two of the four Boston newspapers agreed with the deal at the time. The Red Sox did not win a World Series from 1919 until 2004 (see Curse of the Bambino), often finding themselves out of the World Series hunt as a result of the success of the Yankees. Harry Frazee finally found success on Broadway in 1927 with the musical comedy No No Nanette, which included the song "Tea For Two".

Babe Ruth

Other critical newcomers in this period were manager Miller Huggins and general manager Ed Barrow. Huggins was hired in 1919 by Ruppert while Huston was serving in Europe with the army (this would lead to a break between the two owners, with Ruppert eventually buying Huston out in 1923). Barrow came on board after the 1920 season, and like many of the new Yankee players had previously been a part of the Red Sox organization, having managed the team since 1918. Barrow would act as general manager or president of the Yankees for the next 25 years and may deserve the bulk of the credit for the team's success during that period. He was especially noted for development of the Yankees' farm system.

The home run hitting exploits of Ruth proved popular with the public, to the extent that the Yankees were soon outdrawing their landlords, the Giants. In 1921 the Yankees were told to move out of the Polo Grounds after the 1922 season. At that time, John McGraw was said to have commented that the Yankees should "move to some out-of-the-way place, like Queens". Instead, to McGraw's chagrin, they broke ground for a new ballpark just across the Harlem River from the Polo Grounds. The construction crew moved with remarkable speed and finished the big new ballpark in less than a year. In 1923 the Yankees moved into Yankee Stadium at 161st St. and River Avenue in the Bronx. The site for the stadium was chosen because the IRT Jerome Avenue subway line, now the MTA's#4 train, went right by there, practically on top of Yankee Stadium's right-field wall. The Stadium was the first triple-deck venue in baseball and seated an astounding 58,000. It was truly "the House that Ruth Built",

From 1921 to 1928, the Yankees went through their first period of great success, winning six American League pennants and three World Series. In 1921 through 1923 they faced the Giants in the World Series, losing the first two match-ups but turning the tables in 1923 after the Big Stadium opened. Giants outfielder Casey Stengel, who even then was being called "Old Case", hit two homers to win the two games the Giants came away with. Stengel would later become a "giant" for the Yankees as a manager.

The 1927 team was so potent that it became known as "Murderers' Row" and is sometimes considered to have been the best team in the history of baseball (though similar claims have been made for other Yankee squads, notably those of 1939, 1961 and 1998). Ruth's home run total of 60 in 1927 set a single-season record which would stand for 34 years, and first baseman Lou Gehrig had his first big season with 47 round-trippers.

The Yankees would repeat as American League champions in 1928, fighting off the resurgent Philadelphia Athletics, and sweep the St. Louis Cardinals in the World Series. Babe Ruth hit .625 with 3 home runs in that series, while Lou Gehrig hit .545 and belted 4 round-trippers. After three also-ran seasons, the Yankees returned to the American League top perch under new manager Joe McCarthy in 1932 and swept the Chicago Cubs in the World Series, running their streak of consecutive World Series game wins to 12, a mark which would stand until the 2000 Yankees bested it in the World Series that year. Babe Ruth hit his famous "Called Shot" home run in Wrigley Field in Game 3 of that Series, a fitting "Swan Song" to his illustrious post-season career.

The DiMaggio era

The Yankees run during the 1930s could also be facetiously called the "McCarthy era", as manager Joe McCarthy (no relation to the infamous Senator of the same name) would guide the Yankees to new heights. Just as Gehrig stepped out of Ruth's considerable shadow, a new titan appeared on the horizon, in the person of Joe DiMaggio. The young center fielder from San Francisco was an immediate impact player, batting .323, hitting 29 homers and driving in 125 runs in his rookie season of 1936.

Behind the thundering Yankees bats of DiMaggio, Gehrig and Frank Crosetti, and a superb pitching staff led by Red Ruffing and Lefty Gomez and anchored by catcher Bill Dickey, the Yankees reeled off an unprecedented four consecutive World Series wins during 1936-1939. They did it without Gehrig for most of 1939, as the superstar's retirement due to ALS saddened the baseball world.

The strongest competition for the Yankees during that stretch was the Detroit Tigers, who won two pennants before that Yankees four-year stretch, and one after. When the Yankees did get into the Series, they had little trouble. During Game 2 of the 1936 Series, they pounded the Giants 18-4, still the World Series record (through 2005) for most runs by a team in one game. They took the Giants 4 games to 2 in that Series, and 4 games to 1 the next year. They also swept the Chicago Cubs in 1938, and the Cincinnati Reds in 1939.

After an off season came the Summer of 1941, a much-celebrated year, often described by sportswriters as the last great year of the "Golden Era", before World War II and other realities intervened. Ted Williams of the Red Sox was in the hunt for the elusive .400 batting average, which he achieved on the last day of the season. Meanwhile, DiMaggio, who had once hit in 61 straight games as a minor leaguer with the San Francisco Seals, began a hitting streak on May 15 which stretched to an astonishing 56 games.

A popular song by Les Brown celebrated this event, as Betty Bonney and the band members sang it: "He tied the mark at 44 / July the First, you know / Since then he's hit a good 12 more / Joltin' Joe DiMaggio / Joe, Joe DiMaggio, we want you on our side." The last game of the streak came on July 16 at Cleveland's League Park. The streak was finally snapped in a game at Cleveland Stadium the next night before a huge crowd at the lakefront. A crucial factor in ending the streak was the fielding of Cleveland third baseman Ken Keltner, who stopped two balls that DiMaggio hit hard to the left.

Modern baseball historians regard it as unlikely that anyone will ever hit .400 again, barring a change to the way the game is played; and as virtually impossible that anyone will approach DiMaggio's 56-game streak, which is so far beyond second place (44) as to be almost a statistical anomaly.

The Yankees made short work of the Brooklyn Dodgers in the 1941 Series. Two months and one day after the final game of the Yanks' 4 to 1 win, the Pearl Harbor attacks occurred, and many of the best ballplayers went off to World War II. The war-thinned ranks of the major leagues nonetheless found the Yanks in the post-season again, as they traded World Series wins with the St. Louis Cardinals during 1942 and 1943.

The Yanks then went into a bit of a slump, and manager McCarthy was let go early in the 1946 season. After a couple of interim managers had come and gone, Bucky Harris was brought in and the Yankees righted the ship again, winning the 1947 pennant and facing a much-tougher Dodgers team than their 1941 counterparts, in a Series that went seven games and was a harbinger of things to come for much of the next decade.

Despite finishing only 3 games back of the pennant-winning Cleveland Indians in 1948, Harris was released, and the Yankees brought in Casey Stengel as their manager. Casey had a reputation for being somewhat of a clown and had been associated with managing excruciatingly bad teams such as the mid-1930s Boston Braves, so his selection was met with no little skepticism. His tenure would prove to the most successful in the Yankees' history up to that point. The 1949 season is another that has been written about poetically, as a Yankees team that was seen as "underdogs" came from behind to catch and surpass the powerful Red Sox on the last two days of the season, in a faceoff that could be said to be the real beginning of the modern intense rivalry between these teams. The post-season proved to be a bit easier, as the Yankees knocked off their cross-town Flatbush rivals 4 games to 1.

By this time, the Great DiMaggio's career was winding down. It has often been reported that he said he wanted to retire before he became an "ordinary" player. He was also hampered by bone spurs in his heel, which hastened the final docking of the "Yankee Clipper". As if on cue, new superstars began arriving, including the "Oklahoma Kid", Mickey Mantle, whose first year (1951) was DiMaggio's curtain call.

The 1950s and 1960s

Bettering the McCarthy-era clubs, Stengel's squad won the World Series in his first five years as manager, 1949 through 1953. The five consecutive championships won by the Yankees during this period remains the major league record. Led by players like center fielder Mickey Mantle, pitcher Whitey Ford, and catcher Yogi Berra, Stengel's teams won 10 pennants and seven World Series titles in his twelve seasons as Yankee manager.

The 1950s were also a decade of significant individual achievement for Yankee players. In 1956, Mantle won the major league triple crown, leading both leagues in batting average (.353), home runs (52), and RBIs (130).

On October 8, 1956, in Game 5 of the 1956 World Series against the Dodgers, pitcher Don Larsen threw the only perfect game in World Series history. Not only was it the only perfect game to be pitched in World Series play, it remains the only no-hitter of any kind to be pitched in postseason play. The Yankees went on to win yet another World Series that season, and Larsen earned World Series MVP honors.

Yankee players also dominated the American League MVP award, with a Yankee claiming ownership six times in the decade (1950 Rizzuto, 1951 Berra, 1954 Berra, 1955 Berra, 1956 Mantle, 1957 Mantle). Pitcher Bob Turley also won the Cy Young Award in 1958, the award's third year of existence.

For the decade, the Yankees won six World Series championships ('50, 51, '52, '53, '56, '58) and eight American League pennants. Led by Mantle, Ford, Berra, Elston Howard, and the newly acquired Roger Maris, the Yankees burst into the new decade seeking to replicate the remarkable success of the 1950s.

However, the Yankees lost the 1960 World Series in heartbreaking fashion when Bill Mazeroski hit a game-winning, series-winning home run in the bottom of the ninth inning of Game 7 off Ralph Terry. It remains the only Game 7, walk-off home run in World Series history. Stengel was blamed for the World Series loss for failing to start his ace, Ford, three times in the Series, and was replaced as manager with Ralph Houk prior to the 1961 season. Stengel himself, who had reached his seventh decade in July of that year, clearly thought the issue was age discrimination, remarking, "I'll never make the mistake of turning 70 again." Yogi Berra's assessment of the loss was the equally famous comment, "We made too many wrong mistakes."

During the 1960-61 offseason, a seemingly innocuous development may have marked the beginning of the end for this Yankees dynasty. In December of 1960, Chicago insurance executive Charlie Finley purchased the Kansas City Athletics from the estate of Arnold Johnson, who had died that March.

Johnson had acquired the then-Philadelphia Athletics from the family of Connie Mack in 1954. He was the owner of Yankee Stadium at the time, but was forced to sell the stadium by American League owners as a condition of purchasing the Athletics. Johnson was also a longtime business associate of then-Yankees owners Del Webb and Dan Topping. During Johnson's ownership, the Athletics traded many young players to the Yankees for cash and aging veterans. Maris had been acquired by the Yankees in one such trade. Many fans, and even other teams, frequently accused the Athletics of being operated as an effective farm team for the Yankees. Once Finley purchased the Athletics, he immediately terminated the team's "special relationship" with the Yankees.

In the meantime, 1961 was one of the greatest years in Yankee history. Throughout the summer, Mantle and reigning-MVP Roger Maris hit home runs at a record pace as both chased Babe Ruth's single season home run record of 60. The duo's home run prowess led the media and fans to christen them 'The M & M Boys.' Ultimately, Mantle was forced to bow out in mid-September with 54 home runs when a severe hip infection forced him from the lineup. On October 1, 1961, on the final day of the season, Maris broke the record when he sent a pitch from Boston's Tracy Stallard into the right field stands at Yankee Stadium for his 61st home run. However, by decree of Commissioner Ford Frick, separate single-season home run records were maintained to reflect the fact that Ruth hit his 60 home runs during a 154-game season, while Maris hit his 61 in the first year of the new 162-game season. Some 30 years later, on September 4, 1991, an 8-member Committee for Historical Accuracy appointed by Major League Baseball did away with the dual records, giving Maris sole possession of the single-season home run record until it was broken by Mark McGwire on September 8, 1998. (McGwire's record was later broken by Barry Bonds, whose 73 home runs in 2001 remain the major league record. Maris still holds the American League record.)

The Yankees won the pennant with a 109-53 record and went on to defeat the Cincinnati Reds in five games to win the 1961 World Series. The 109 regular season wins posted by the '61 club remain the third highest single-season total in franchise history, behind only the 1998 team's 114 regular season wins and 1927 team's 110 wins. The 1961 Yankees also clubbed a then-major league record for most home runs by a team with 240, a total not surpassed until the 1996 Baltimore Orioles hit 257 with the aid of the designated hitter. Maris won his second consecutive MVP Award while Whitey Ford captured the Cy Young.

Because of the excellence of Maris, Mantle, and World Series-MVP Ford, a fine pitching staff, stellar team defense, the team's amazing depth and power, and their overall dominance, the 1961 Yankees are universally considered to be one of the greatest teams in the history of baseball, compared often to their pinstriped-brethren, the 1927 Yankees, the 1939 Yankees, and the 1998 Yankees.

In 1962, the Yankees won their second consecutive World Series, defeating the San Francisco Giants in seven games.

The Yanks would again reach the Fall Classic in 1963, but were swept in four games by the Los Angeles Dodgers. Behind World Series-MVP Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale, and Johnny Podres, the Dodgers starting pitchers threw four complete games and combined to give up just four runs all Series. This was the first time the Yankees were swept in a World Series.

Feeling burnt out after the season, Houk left the manager's chair to become the team's general manager and Berra, who himself had just retired from playing, was named the new manager of the Yankees.

The aging Yankees returned to the World Series in 1964 to face the St. Louis Cardinals in a Series immortalized by David Halberstam's book, October 1964. Despite a valiant performance by Mantle, including a walk-off home run in the bottom of the ninth of Game 3 off Cardinals' reliever Barney Schultz, the Yankees fell to the Cardinals in seven games. It was to be the last World Series appearance by the Yankees for 12 years.

After the 1964 season, CBS purchased the Yankees from Topping and Webb for $11.2 million. Jokesters at the time wondered if Walter Cronkite would become the manager, perhaps with Yogi Berra doing the newscasts. Topping and Webb had owned the Yankees for 20 years, missing the World Series only 5 times, and going 10-5 in the World Series.

By contrast, the CBS-owned teams never went to the World Series, and in the first year of the new ownership - 1965 - the Yankees finished in the second division for the first time in 40 years; the introduction of the major league amateur draft in 1965 also meant that the Yankees could no longer sign any player they wanted. In 1966 the team finished last in the AL for the first time since 1912, and next-to-last the following year. After that the team's fortunes improved somewhat, but they would not become serious contenders again until 1974.

Return to glory

George Steinbrenner purchased the club for $10 million on January 3, 1973 from CBS, renovated Yankee Stadium, hired and fired Billy Martin a number of times, feuded with star outfielder Reggie Jackson, and presided over the resurgence of the Yankees in the late '70s. Jackson's three home runs in the sixth and final game of the 1977 World Series against three different Dodger pitchers (earning him the nickname "Mr. October") defined the period as much as Martin and Steinbrenner.

The race for the pennant often came to a close competition between the Yankees and the Red Sox, and for fans of both clubs, a game between the two teams (whether in the regular season or post-season championship games) was cause for a rivalry that was often bitter and ruthless, with brawls frequently erupting between both players and fans from the two clubs. The Yankees-Red Sox rivalry came to a head in the 1978 season, when the two clubs finished the regular season in a tie for first place in the AL East. A playoff game between the two teams was held to decide who would go on to the pennant, with the game being held at Boston's Fenway Park (because the Red Sox had won more head-to-head games between the two teams that season). The Yankees won the day, driving a stake through the hearts of their rivals' fans when Bucky Dent drove a game-winning home run over the "Green Monster," one of several emotional moments in the team's history that had Red Sox fans wondering if their team was under some kind of a curse.

A new dynasty

The Yankees entered the 1990s as a last-place team, having spent well but not always wisely on free-agent players since their last appearance in the World Series in 1981. During the 1980s the Yankees, led by their All-Star first baseman Don Mattingly, had the most total wins out of any major league team, but failed to win a World Series (the first such decade since the 1910s). In 1990, Yankee pitcher Andy Hawkins became the first Yankees pitcher ever to lose a no-hitter, when the third baseman (Mike Blowers) committed an error, followed by 2 walks and an error by the left fielder (Jim Leyritz) with the bases loaded, scoring all 3 runners as well as the batter. The 4-0 loss (to the White Sox) was the largest margin of any no-hitter loss in the 20th century. To add to the oddity, the Yankees (and Hawkins) were no-hit by the White Sox 11 days later.

The bad judgment and bad luck of the '80s and early '90s started to change when, while owner Steinbrenner was under suspension, management was able to implement a coherent program without interference from above. Under general managers Gene Michael and Bob Watson and manager Buck Showalter, the club shifted its emphasis from buying talent to developing talent through its farm system and then holding onto it. The first significant sign of success came in 1994, when the Yankees had the best record in the AL when the season was cut short by the players' strike. A year later, the team reached the playoffs as the wild card and was eliminated only after a memorable series against the Seattle Mariners.

Showalter left after the 1995 season due to personality clashes with Steinbrenner and his staff and was replaced by Joe Torre. Initially derided as a retread choice ("Clueless Joe" ran the headline on one of the city's tabloid newspapers), Torre's smooth manner proved out as he led the Yankees to a World Series victory in 1996, defeating the Atlanta Braves in six games. General manager Bob Watson was dismissed when the Yankees failed to repeat in 1997 and was replaced by Brian Cashman, a former Yankees intern. However, the foundation laid by Michael and Watson of players like Derek Jeter, Andy Pettitte, Jorge Posada, Mariano Rivera and Bernie Williams was a significant factor in the Yankees' return to prominence. Other prominent members of the late 1990s championships teams acquired through trades included Paul O'Neill, David Cone, Tino Martinez, John Wetteland, Chuck Knoblauch, and Roger Clemens, while Jimmy Key, Wade Boggs, David Wells, Mike Stanton, and Orlando "El Duque" Hernández were signed as free agents.

The 1998-2000 Yankees were the first team to "three-peat" with World Series victories since the Oakland Athletics of the early 1970s. In 1998 and 1999, they swept the San Diego Padres and Atlanta Braves, respectively. In 2000, the Yankees met up with cross-town New York Mets for the first Subway Series since 1956 and won four games to one. In these four World Series victories, the Yankees won fourteen straight games. The Yankees are the most recent major league team to repeat as World Series champions.

The 1998 Yankees are widely acknowledged to be one of the greatest teams in baseball history, having compiled a then-AL record of 114 regular season wins against just 48 losses en route to a World Series sweep of the Padres. The '98 Yankees went 11-2 during the playoffs and finished with a combined record of 125-50, a major league record. However, their regular season record was surpassed by the 2001 Seattle Mariners, who went 116-46 before losing to the Yankees in the American League Championship Series.

The 21st century

In the emotional October 2001, following the September 11 attack on New York City's World Trade Center, the Yankees defeated the Oakland Athletics 3 games to 2 in the Division Series, and then the Seattle Mariners in the ALCS, 4 games to 1. But, the usually unhittable Mariano Rivera shockingly blew the lead - and World Series - to the Arizona Diamondbacks in the bottom of the 9th inning of Game 7. Arizona manager Bob Brenly used his pitching staff, which included Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling, very effectively. In addition, the usually potent Yankee attack turned ice-cold.

In 2003, the Yankees defeated their long-time rival the Boston Red Sox in a tough seven-game ALCS, which featured a near-brawl in Game 3 and a series-ending walk-off home run by Aaron Boone in the 11th inning of the final game, only to be defeated by the Florida Marlins - a team with a payroll a quarter of the size of the Yankees' - in the World Series, 4 games to 2.

The loss in the 2001 World Series effectively marked the end of the 1990s Yankee dynasty, as lynchpin players began to retire, not be re-signed, or traded. The Yankees' quick ejection from the 2002 playoffs at the hands of the Anaheim Angels accelerated the changes, as ownership and management began to look increasingly on free agent acquisitions and major trades. The trend continued after the 2003 World Series, culminating when the Yankees traded for the "best player in baseball", Alex Rodriguez, in February 2004. Other significant acquisitions during 2002 to 2004 included Jason Giambi, Hideki Matsui, Gary Sheffield, Kevin Brown, and Javier Vázquez.

In the 2004 American League Championship Series against the Red Sox, the Yankees became the first team in professional baseball history, and only the third team in North American pro sports history (it happened in the NHL twice), to lose a best-of-7 series after taking a 3-0 series lead. After the 2004 World Series, the Yankees needed to improve their pitching, which suffered in the huge collapse to the Red Sox. They signed pitchers Carl Pavano and Jaret Wright. The Yankees also acquired dominant lefty Randy Johnson from the Arizona Diamondbacks.

The 2005 season didn't start as it expected to be, once they were in last place in the American League East division. Pavano and Wright struggled, so did Johnson. As the season went on, the Yankees got better and slugger Jason Giambi started to hit again. Most of the season, the Yankees were chasing the Boston Red Sox for the division title. The Yankees seemed destined to win the division, and they did.

In the 2005 Division Series, the Angels defeated the Yankees in five games in the first round of the postseason, winning the final game by a score of 5-3. After the 2005 season, the Yankees needed to get younger and more athletic. In the 2005-2006 offseason, general manager Brian Cashman took control of the Yankees, because owner George Steinbrenner and his advisors signed older talented players after the 2001 season. From the end of the 2005 World Series to December 2005, the baseball world noticed that the Yankees were patient with signing free agents. On December 23, 2005, the Yankees stunned the baseball world by signing center fielder Johnny Damon from the rival Red Sox, where he was a marquee player.

Many explanations have been given for the lack of Yankee World Series titles since 2000. These include depletion of the Yankee farm system because of trades and free agent acquisitions, the aging or departure of the players who had formed the core of the Yankees during the late 1990s, and allegedly poor coaching (like the overuse of Mariano Rivera in the 2001 World Series). Buster Olney, in his book The Last Night of the Yankee Dynasty, argues that George Steinbrenner's management style resulted in the players burning out psychologically. Several sabermetricians have argued that success in the playoffs is largely the result of luck. This argument is bolstered by the fact that the production of the Yankees' core players has decreased steadily since their 1996 World Series title.

One particularly creative explanation jokingly proposed by blogger Larry Mahnken is the "Curse of Clay Bellinger". By analogy with the Curse of the Bambino, Mahnken points to the departure of utility player Clay Bellinger from the Yankee roster following the 2001 season and asserts that the Yankees will never again win the World Series until either they make amends to Bellinger or they win the championship anyway. The tautology is part of the joke.

Despite their most recent drought in World Series championships, the Yankees have continued to perform well in the regular season, recently winning their eighth straight AL East division title. In September 2005, the club set a new American League home attendance record of 4,090,696. The Yankees are only the third franchise in sports history to draw over 4 million in regular season attendance at their own ballpark (the others being the 1993 Toronto Blue Jays with 4,057,947 and the 1993 Colorado Rockies with 4,483,350).

Controversy

The Yankees are a notable team not only for their impressive history on the field, but also for their financial situation. The current ownership spends more on player salaries than any other franchise in baseball. As of 2005, the team payroll is more than $208 million, which is $85 million more than the second-highest team, the Red Sox, and more than the five lowest-payroll teams combined [4]. Frustrated after being outbid for pitcher Jose Contreras prior to the 2003 season, Red Sox CEO Larry Lucchino even went so far as to dub the Yankees the "Evil Empire," a characterization that is primarily popular among Red Sox fans.

It is a heated debate whether the Yankees' free-spending is positive or negative for baseball, and whether a strict salary cap would make the sport fairer and increase parity among the large-market and small-market teams. The following are arguments for and against these spending practices:

For:

Against:

In 2003, the Office of Foreign Assets Control reported that the Yankees engaged in illegal trade with Cuba and had to settle with the United States government for US$75,000 [6].

Quick facts

Postseason appearances

Baseball Hall of Famers

(Affiliation according to National Baseball Hall of Fame; R. Jackson is affiliated with the Athletics, but wears a Yankee cap[7][8][9])

Further information: New York Yankees: Award Winners and League Leaders

Current roster

40-man roster

Updated on January 27, 2006  

Coaching Staff

Manager

Coaches



Minor league affiliations


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. Here is a rough chronology of the "Yarns":.
. The Dwight-related stories fall in between these, with the short stories fleshing out the time between the main stories. Coaches. While it was the first story written, The Hard Goodbye was not the first story chronologically, with the first section of That Yellow Bastard as the first. Manager. Although there has been much fan speculation on specifics (as well as how many stories Miller will publish in total), few details have been verified thus far.

Updated on January 27, 2006  . The following have been mentioned:. Jackson is affiliated with the Athletics, but wears a Yankee cap[7][8][9]). Frank Miller has confirmed that he is working on new Sin City storylines for the upcoming movies. (Affiliation according to National Baseball Hall of Fame; R. It reprints all the short stories, in the following order:. In 2003, the Office of Foreign Assets Control reported that the Yankees engaged in illegal trade with Cuba and had to settle with the United States government for US$75,000 [6]. Booze, Broads, & Bullets is a compilation of stories from the Sin City series of comic books by Frank Miller.

Against:. We talk about all sorts of things.". For:. A bright day dawns. The following are arguments for and against these spending practices:. Fading into memory. It is a heated debate whether the Yankees' free-spending is positive or negative for baseball, and whether a strict salary cap would make the sport fairer and increase parity among the large-market and small-market teams. Miles behind us now.

Frustrated after being outbid for pitcher Jose Contreras prior to the 2003 season, Red Sox CEO Larry Lucchino even went so far as to dub the Yankees the "Evil Empire," a characterization that is primarily popular among Red Sox fans. That rotten town. As of 2005, the team payroll is more than $208 million, which is $85 million more than the second-highest team, the Red Sox, and more than the five lowest-payroll teams combined [4]. Those it can't soil, it kills. The current ownership spends more on player salaries than any other franchise in baseball. Those it can't corrupt, it soils. The Yankees are a notable team not only for their impressive history on the field, but also for their financial situation. "That rotten town.

The Yankees are only the third franchise in sports history to draw over 4 million in regular season attendance at their own ballpark (the others being the 1993 Toronto Blue Jays with 4,057,947 and the 1993 Colorado Rockies with 4,483,350). The final words in the book are internal monologue by Wallace, stating:. In September 2005, the club set a new American League home attendance record of 4,090,696. He asks her why she wanted to jump and she responds "I was lonely". Despite their most recent drought in World Series championships, the Yankees have continued to perform well in the regular season, recently winning their eighth straight AL East division title. Wallace and Esther drive out of town. The tautology is part of the joke. He seeks no revenge on Wallace or Liebowitz.

By analogy with the Curse of the Bambino, Mahnken points to the departure of utility player Clay Bellinger from the Yankee roster following the 2001 season and asserts that the Yankees will never again win the World Series until either they make amends to Bellinger or they win the championship anyway. Wallenquist lets it all be square. One particularly creative explanation jokingly proposed by blogger Larry Mahnken is the "Curse of Clay Bellinger". Liebowitz shoots The Colonel in the head for hurting his son. This argument is bolstered by the fact that the production of the Yankees' core players has decreased steadily since their 1996 World Series title. By this time, the police have launched a massive assault on the Colonel's factory, where the Colonel is captured. Several sabermetricians have argued that success in the playoffs is largely the result of luck. Wallace takes Esther to the hospital as the many police are brought in on stretchers.

Buster Olney, in his book The Last Night of the Yankee Dynasty, argues that George Steinbrenner's management style resulted in the players burning out psychologically. Jerry, a veteran, blasts it out of the sky. These include depletion of the Yankee farm system because of trades and free agent acquisitions, the aging or departure of the players who had formed the core of the Yankees during the late 1990s, and allegedly poor coaching (like the overuse of Mariano Rivera in the 2001 World Series). When Wallace gets her, a police helicopter arrives. Many explanations have been given for the lack of Yankee World Series titles since 2000. She is at the Farm. On December 23, 2005, the Yankees stunned the baseball world by signing center fielder Johnny Damon from the rival Red Sox, where he was a marquee player. It's The Colonel, telling Wallace where Esther is.

From the end of the 2005 World Series to December 2005, the baseball world noticed that the Yankees were patient with signing free agents. At this point in his story, the phone rings in Liebowitz's apartment. In the 2005-2006 offseason, general manager Brian Cashman took control of the Yankees, because owner George Steinbrenner and his advisors signed older talented players after the 2001 season. Wallace escapes without saving anyone. After the 2005 season, the Yankees needed to get younger and more athletic. Wallace explains how he had a showdown with Mariah and a bunch of mercenaries. In the 2005 Division Series, the Angels defeated the Yankees in five games in the first round of the postseason, winning the final game by a score of 5-3. Wallace discovers that the real scheme is an organ harvesting ring of which Liebowitz was unaware.

The Yankees seemed destined to win the division, and they did. Wallace confronts Liebowitz and tries to get him to join the same side. Most of the season, the Yankees were chasing the Boston Red Sox for the division title. He then threatens Liebowitz's family even further. As the season went on, the Yankees got better and slugger Jason Giambi started to hit again. He even has Mariah break Liebowitz's son's arm. Pavano and Wright struggled, so did Johnson. The Colonel is killing anyone linking Wallace to him.

The 2005 season didn't start as it expected to be, once they were in last place in the American League East division. Mariah, another female mercenary working for the Colonel, is assigned to Delia's task. The Yankees also acquired dominant lefty Randy Johnson from the Arizona Diamondbacks. They burn Captain's body. They signed pitchers Carl Pavano and Jaret Wright. He then meets up with another war buddy named Jerry. After the 2004 World Series, the Yankees needed to improve their pitching, which suffered in the huge collapse to the Red Sox. As he does, he shoots her in the head and shoots Delia in the chest.

In the 2004 American League Championship Series against the Red Sox, the Yankees became the first team in professional baseball history, and only the third team in North American pro sports history (it happened in the NHL twice), to lose a best-of-7 series after taking a 3-0 series lead. At gunpoint, Wallace makes Maxine bring him out of his hallucination hell. Other significant acquisitions during 2002 to 2004 included Jason Giambi, Hideki Matsui, Gary Sheffield, Kevin Brown, and Javier Vázquez. Gordo kills Captain as Wallace shoots Gordo. The trend continued after the 2003 World Series, culminating when the Yankees traded for the "best player in baseball", Alex Rodriguez, in February 2004. They find them at a gas station, refilling the Hummer they were driving. The Yankees' quick ejection from the 2002 playoffs at the hands of the Anaheim Angels accelerated the changes, as ownership and management began to look increasingly on free agent acquisitions and major trades. They torture the one remaining policeman and find out where Delia, Gordo, and Maxine were going.

The loss in the 2001 World Series effectively marked the end of the 1990s Yankee dynasty, as lynchpin players began to retire, not be re-signed, or traded. A battle ensues and Captain kills the police. In 2003, the Yankees defeated their long-time rival the Boston Red Sox in a tough seven-game ALCS, which featured a near-brawl in Game 3 and a series-ending walk-off home run by Aaron Boone in the 11th inning of the final game, only to be defeated by the Florida Marlins - a team with a payroll a quarter of the size of the Yankees' - in the World Series, 4 games to 2. The police show up, as does Captain. In addition, the usually potent Yankee attack turned ice-cold. He discovers a young girl dead in the trunk, intended to frame him. Arizona manager Bob Brenly used his pitching staff, which included Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling, very effectively. The car hits a tree.

But, the usually unhittable Mariano Rivera shockingly blew the lead - and World Series - to the Arizona Diamondbacks in the bottom of the 9th inning of Game 7. The whole portion of the comic where he is hallucinating is done in full colour. In the emotional October 2001, following the September 11 attack on New York City's World Trade Center, the Yankees defeated the Oakland Athletics 3 games to 2 in the Division Series, and then the Seattle Mariners in the ALCS, 4 games to 1. Maxine gives him a huge dose of something strange and Wallace goes on a trip. However, their regular season record was surpassed by the 2001 Seattle Mariners, who went 116-46 before losing to the Yankees in the American League Championship Series. He wakes at the pits, where Delia, Gordo, and a drug wizard named Maxine are preparing to abandon his car in the pits. The '98 Yankees went 11-2 during the playoffs and finished with a combined record of 125-50, a major league record. Just then, Wallace is drugged by a sniper for the second time.

The 1998 Yankees are widely acknowledged to be one of the greatest teams in baseball history, having compiled a then-AL record of 114 regular season wins against just 48 losses en route to a World Series sweep of the Padres. Wallace handcuffs her to the bed for what she believes is foreplay, when he reveals that he knows she can not be Esther's roommate since Esther's clothes would have the smell of Delia's cigarettes on them. The Yankees are the most recent major league team to repeat as World Series champions. He borrows a car from him and Wallace and Delia turn in for the night. In these four World Series victories, the Yankees won fourteen straight games. Wallace meets up with a war buddy referred to only as Captain. In 2000, the Yankees met up with cross-town New York Mets for the first Subway Series since 1956 and won four games to one. Wallace and Delia are attacked by snipers and mercenaries, but they escape.

In 1998 and 1999, they swept the San Diego Padres and Atlanta Braves, respectively. He finds her apartment occupied by Delia, who claims to be Esther's roommate. The 1998-2000 Yankees were the first team to "three-peat" with World Series victories since the Oakland Athletics of the early 1970s. Wallace spends the night in the drunk tank, and upon his release seeks out Esther. Other prominent members of the late 1990s championships teams acquired through trades included Paul O'Neill, David Cone, Tino Martinez, John Wetteland, Chuck Knoblauch, and Roger Clemens, while Jimmy Key, Wade Boggs, David Wells, Mike Stanton, and Orlando "El Duque" Hernández were signed as free agents. Apparently, The Colonel and Liebowitz are a part of this conspiracy. However, the foundation laid by Michael and Watson of players like Derek Jeter, Andy Pettitte, Jorge Posada, Mariano Rivera and Bernie Williams was a significant factor in the Yankees' return to prominence. They are ambushed by two men, who drug Wallace and kidnap Esther.

General manager Bob Watson was dismissed when the Yankees failed to repeat in 1997 and was replaced by Brian Cashman, a former Yankees intern. She likes his art and they go out for a drink. Initially derided as a retread choice ("Clueless Joe" ran the headline on one of the city's tabloid newspapers), Torre's smooth manner proved out as he led the Yankees to a World Series victory in 1996, defeating the Atlanta Braves in six games. It tells the story of Wallace, an artist/war hero/short order cook who saves a suicidal woman named Esther. Showalter left after the 1995 season due to personality clashes with Steinbrenner and his staff and was replaced by Joe Torre. Hell and Back is the longest of the Sin City stories, spanning 9 issues. A year later, the team reached the playoffs as the wild card and was eliminated only after a memorable series against the Seattle Mariners. Hell and Back (a Sin City Love Story) was first published in (July 1999–April 2000).

The first significant sign of success came in 1994, when the Yankees had the best record in the AL when the season was cut short by the players' strike. Dwight is later reintroduced to the car that he was seen driving in Hell and Back. Under general managers Gene Michael and Bob Watson and manager Buck Showalter, the club shifted its emphasis from buying talent to developing talent through its farm system and then holding onto it. They confront him at his home in Sacred Oaks where he is brutally tortured and killed. The bad judgment and bad luck of the '80s and early '90s started to change when, while owner Steinbrenner was under suspension, management was able to implement a coherent program without interference from above. Miho, Dwight, and Daisy, Carmen's lover, realize that Don Giacco Magliozzi was behind the shooting. To add to the oddity, the Yankees (and Hawkins) were no-hit by the White Sox 11 days later. It is finally revealed that Vito, a member of the Mafia, had accidentally killed Carmen, an Old Town hooker, and Old Town wants revenge.

The 4-0 loss (to the White Sox) was the largest margin of any no-hitter loss in the 20th century. Watching out for him at every turn, the ninja Miho carves a relentless path of severed limbs on her trusty roller blades. In 1990, Yankee pitcher Andy Hawkins became the first Yankees pitcher ever to lose a no-hitter, when the third baseman (Mike Blowers) committed an error, followed by 2 walks and an error by the left fielder (Jim Leyritz) with the bases loaded, scoring all 3 runners as well as the batter. After getting the inside dirt from an aging starlet, he follows a lead through Basin City's underworld that ultimately brings him into the upper tiers of the mob and city hall. During the 1980s the Yankees, led by their All-Star first baseman Don Mattingly, had the most total wins out of any major league team, but failed to win a World Series (the first such decade since the 1910s). After one of the Old Town hookers is killed in the cross fire of a botched Mafia drive-by, Dwight starts asking questions at a run-down diner. The Yankees entered the 1990s as a last-place team, having spent well but not always wisely on free-agent players since their last appearance in the World Series in 1981. Ladies' man Dwight and the silent killer Miho, stars of A Dame to Kill For and The Big Fat Kill, return for a gritty story of revenge and corruption.

The Yankees won the day, driving a stake through the hearts of their rivals' fans when Bucky Dent drove a game-winning home run over the "Green Monster," one of several emotional moments in the team's history that had Red Sox fans wondering if their team was under some kind of a curse. Unlike the previous four stories, Family Values was released as a 128-page graphic novel rather than in serialized issues that would later be collected in a trade paperback volume. A playoff game between the two teams was held to decide who would go on to the pennant, with the game being held at Boston's Fenway Park (because the Red Sox had won more head-to-head games between the two teams that season). Family Values is the fifth "yarn" in Frank Miller's series of Sin City comic books published by Dark Horse Comics. The Yankees-Red Sox rivalry came to a head in the 1978 season, when the two clubs finished the regular season in a tie for first place in the AL East. Family Values was first published in (October 1997). The race for the pennant often came to a close competition between the Yankees and the Red Sox, and for fans of both clubs, a game between the two teams (whether in the regular season or post-season championship games) was cause for a rivalry that was often bitter and ruthless, with brawls frequently erupting between both players and fans from the two clubs. Marv kills the last one, but cannot seem to remember where he got his coat or gloves.

October") defined the period as much as Martin and Steinbrenner. He chases them to The Projects, where the overprotective tenants kill several of the kids. Jackson's three home runs in the sixth and final game of the 1977 World Series against three different Dodger pitchers (earning him the nickname "Mr. He gets drunk and steps outside to find some college kids burning drunks to death. George Steinbrenner purchased the club for $10 million on January 3, 1973 from CBS, renovated Yankee Stadium, hired and fired Billy Martin a number of times, feuded with star outfielder Reggie Jackson, and presided over the resurgence of the Yankees in the late '70s. He gets depressed seeing Nancy leave with Hartigan, seeing as how he always had a crush on Nancy. After that the team's fortunes improved somewhat, but they would not become serious contenders again until 1974. He lights one of the dead guys' cigarettes and thinks back; since it is Saturday, he realizes he must have been watching Nancy at Kadie's...

In 1966 the team finished last in the AL for the first time since 1912, and next-to-last the following year. Marv regains consciousness in the projects, surrounded by dead young guys, unable to remember how he got there. By contrast, the CBS-owned teams never went to the World Series, and in the first year of the new ownership - 1965 - the Yankees finished in the second division for the first time in 40 years; the introduction of the major league amateur draft in 1965 also meant that the Yankees could no longer sign any player they wanted. It is the story of what Marv was up to on the night Hartigan met back up with Nancy (from That Yellow Bastard). Topping and Webb had owned the Yankees for 20 years, missing the World Series only 5 times, and going 10-5 in the World Series. It was later reprinted in a mass-market edition as Just Another Saturday Night (October 1998). Jokesters at the time wondered if Walter Cronkite would become the manager, perhaps with Yogi Berra doing the newscasts. Just Another Saturday Night was first published in Sin City #1/2 (August 1997), a limited mail-in comic available only through a special offer in Wizard (magazine) #73.

After the 1964 season, CBS purchased the Yankees from Topping and Webb for $11.2 million. Her response is "Only the ones I really like.". It was to be the last World Series appearance by the Yankees for 12 years. "Delia-- do you plan to make love to each and every one of them?" he asks. Despite a valiant performance by Mantle, including a walk-off home run in the bottom of the ninth of Game 3 off Cardinals' reliever Barney Schultz, the Yankees fell to the Cardinals in seven games. Leaving the rear of the train, the Colonel waits for her. Louis Cardinals in a Series immortalized by David Halberstam's book, October 1964. When they're done, she snaps his neck and throws him off the train.

The aging Yankees returned to the World Series in 1964 to face the St. Delia hits on him, and they make love near the back of the train. Feeling burnt out after the season, Houk left the manager's chair to become the team's general manager and Berra, who himself had just retired from playing, was named the new manager of the Yankees. His internal monologue explains that he had a flat tire. This was the first time the Yankees were swept in a World Series. Eddie is riding the train. Behind World Series-MVP Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale, and Johnny Podres, the Dodgers starting pitchers threw four complete games and combined to give up just four runs all Series. Wrong Track is the second story, which picks up soon after.

The Yanks would again reach the Fall Classic in 1963, but were swept in four games by the Los Angeles Dodgers. Delia explains that she has a train to catch. In 1962, the Yankees won their second consecutive World Series, defeating the San Francisco Giants in seven games. They throw him in as well and Gordo pushes the car into the pits. Because of the excellence of Maris, Mantle, and World Series-MVP Ford, a fine pitching staff, stellar team defense, the team's amazing depth and power, and their overall dominance, the 1961 Yankees are universally considered to be one of the greatest teams in the history of baseball, compared often to their pinstriped-brethren, the 1927 Yankees, the 1939 Yankees, and the 1998 Yankees. They check the trunk of Phil's car and find his wife with six bullets in her belly. Maris won his second consecutive MVP Award while Whitey Ford captured the Cy Young. She meets up with the Colonel and Gordo at the entrance to the pits.

The 1961 Yankees also clubbed a then-major league record for most home runs by a team with 240, a total not surpassed until the 1996 Baltimore Orioles hit 257 with the aid of the designated hitter. She sticks the heel of her shoe in his eye socket, killing him. The 109 regular season wins posted by the '61 club remain the third highest single-season total in franchise history, behind only the 1998 team's 114 regular season wins and 1927 team's 110 wins. Eddie was supposed to be driving a similar Studebaker, and looked very similar. The Yankees won the pennant with a 109-53 record and went on to defeat the Cincinnati Reds in five games to win the 1961 World Series. He explains that he is a used car salesman named Phil, and she understands. Maris still holds the American League record.). She claims he has a trunk-load of stolen jewels he plans to sell in Sacred Oaks, violating an exclusivity agreement with the Wallenquist Organization.

(McGwire's record was later broken by Barry Bonds, whose 73 home runs in 2001 remain the major league record. She starts choking him and calls him by the name of Eddie. Some 30 years later, on September 4, 1991, an 8-member Committee for Historical Accuracy appointed by Major League Baseball did away with the dual records, giving Maris sole possession of the single-season home run record until it was broken by Mark McGwire on September 8, 1998. In the middle of it, he confesses that he is, in fact, married. However, by decree of Commissioner Ford Frick, separate single-season home run records were maintained to reflect the fact that Ruth hit his 60 home runs during a 154-game season, while Maris hit his 61 in the first year of the new 162-game season. She takes him to the pits, and they make love. On October 1, 1961, on the final day of the season, Maris broke the record when he sent a pitch from Boston's Tracy Stallard into the right field stands at Yankee Stadium for his 61st home run. She asks if he is married, and he says that he is not.

The duo's home run prowess led the media and fans to christen them 'The M & M Boys.' Ultimately, Mantle was forced to bow out in mid-September with 54 home runs when a severe hip infection forced him from the lineup. He offers to take her to the hospital, but she refuses. Throughout the summer, Mantle and reigning-MVP Roger Maris hit home runs at a record pace as both chased Babe Ruth's single season home run record of 60. He picks her up, and she tells him that she must have got struck by lightning. In the meantime, 1961 was one of the greatest years in Yankee history. He drives aimlessly in the rain, eventually finding Delia unconscious on a dirt road. Once Finley purchased the Athletics, he immediately terminated the team's "special relationship" with the Yankees. Wrong Turn is the first story, in which a man named Phil has just killed his wife.

Many fans, and even other teams, frequently accused the Athletics of being operated as an effective farm team for the Yankees. The two stories take place on the same night, with the second taking place minutes after the first. Maris had been acquired by the Yankees in one such trade. Sex & Violence was first published in March 1997 and only contains two stories, both of which feature Delia:. During Johnson's ownership, the Athletics traded many young players to the Yankees for cash and aging veterans. The sadistic war criminal stuffs rats in his oven to eat, and is killed by a mercenary in the exact same way. Johnson was also a longtime business associate of then-Yankees owners Del Webb and Dan Topping. [1].

He was the owner of Yankee Stadium at the time, but was forced to sell the stadium by American League owners as a condition of purchasing the Athletics. It was adapted to a 2004 fan film of the same name. Johnson had acquired the then-Philadelphia Athletics from the family of Connie Mack in 1954. Rats is the final story, it is about a disturbed war criminal who eats dog food. In December of 1960, Chicago insurance executive Charlie Finley purchased the Kansas City Athletics from the estate of Arnold Johnson, who had died that March. He gives her an assignment and she takes on the name Blue Eyes, which is what Jim used to call her. During the 1960-61 offseason, a seemingly innocuous development may have marked the beginning of the end for this Yankees dynasty. After killing Jim, the Colonel appears who was none other than the hitman.

Stengel himself, who had reached his seventh decade in July of that year, clearly thought the issue was age discrimination, remarking, "I'll never make the mistake of turning 70 again." Yogi Berra's assessment of the loss was the equally famous comment, "We made too many wrong mistakes.". She wants to become a hitwoman, and she must first kill the only man she ever loved. Stengel was blamed for the World Series loss for failing to start his ace, Ford, three times in the Series, and was replaced as manager with Ralph Houk prior to the 1961 season. She then attacks him, and explains that this is her test. It remains the only Game 7, walk-off home run in World Series history. They go back to his place and make love. However, the Yankees lost the 1960 World Series in heartbreaking fashion when Bill Mazeroski hit a game-winning, series-winning home run in the bottom of the ninth inning of Game 7 off Ralph Terry. Marv steals his drink.

Led by Mantle, Ford, Berra, Elston Howard, and the newly acquired Roger Maris, the Yankees burst into the new decade seeking to replicate the remarkable success of the 1950s. The hitman enters the bar and Jim convinces Delia to leave with him. For the decade, the Yankees won six World Series championships ('50, 51, '52, '53, '56, '58) and eight American League pennants. Marv is sitting next to them at the bar, and provides some comic relief. Pitcher Bob Turley also won the Cy Young Award in 1958, the award's third year of existence. He runs into Kadie’s, where he is confronted by an ex-flame named Delia. Yankee players also dominated the American League MVP award, with a Yankee claiming ownership six times in the decade (1950 Rizzuto, 1951 Berra, 1954 Berra, 1955 Berra, 1956 Mantle, 1957 Mantle). It begins as a man named Jim notices a hitman following him.

The Yankees went on to win yet another World Series that season, and Larsen earned World Series MVP honors. Blue Eyes, the second story, is the first appearance of Delia. Not only was it the only perfect game to be pitched in World Series play, it remains the only no-hitter of any kind to be pitched in postseason play. This was apparently a test, and the two buffoons get thrown several yards away as the explosion hits. On October 8, 1956, in Game 5 of the 1956 World Series against the Dodgers, pitcher Don Larsen threw the only perfect game in World Series history. Shlubb disagrees and pulls the boots off, to discover that there are no feet in them, and a ticking sound rings through their ears. In 1956, Mantle won the major league triple crown, leading both leagues in batting average (.353), home runs (52), and RBIs (130). Klump tells him that they're supposed to leave the body as it is.

The 1950s were also a decade of significant individual achievement for Yankee players. In this yarn, Shlubb's boots are in horrible shape, and he wishes to steal the shoes off a corpse, wrapped in a rug, that they're supposed to dump in the river. Led by players like center fielder Mickey Mantle, pitcher Whitey Ford, and catcher Yogi Berra, Stengel's teams won 10 pennants and seven World Series titles in his twelve seasons as Yankee manager. However their wordy speeches are sprinkled with malapropisms. The five consecutive championships won by the Yankees during this period remains the major league record. Fat Man and Little Boy is a short three-page story about Douglas Klump and Burt Shlubb, who also appear in "That Yellow Bastard" and "Family Values." These characters use a large vocabulary to make it appear that they are more intelligent than they truthfully are. Bettering the McCarthy-era clubs, Stengel's squad won the World Series in his first five years as manager, 1949 through 1953. First published December 1996, Lost, Lonely, & Lethal contains three stories:.

As if on cue, new superstars began arriving, including the "Oklahoma Kid", Mickey Mantle, whose first year (1951) was DiMaggio's curtain call. The story closes with Daddy closing his hands around Johnny's throat. He was also hampered by bone spurs in his heel, which hastened the final docking of the "Yankee Clipper". Daddy beats Johnny half to death and it becomes apparent that he is not only her father but also her lover and that the entire ruse was a sadistic form of sexual role-playing. It has often been reported that he said he wanted to retire before he became an "ordinary" player. Temporarily overcome with remorse, Johnny realizes that it was all fake and the bullets he shot were blanks. By this time, the Great DiMaggio's career was winding down. Daddy refuses and Johnny shoots him with a revolver.

The post-season proved to be a bit easier, as the Yankees knocked off their cross-town Flatbush rivals 4 games to 1. Torn by his emotions and manipulated by Amy, he attempts to confront her father first, asking for her hand in marriage. The 1949 season is another that has been written about poetically, as a Yankees team that was seen as "underdogs" came from behind to catch and surpass the powerful Red Sox on the last two days of the season, in a faceoff that could be said to be the real beginning of the modern intense rivalry between these teams. Amy insists that they can't be together and alludes to the solution that he kill her father. His tenure would prove to the most successful in the Yankees' history up to that point. Johnny is a middle-aged man who seems to be in love with a much younger girl by the name of Amy. Casey had a reputation for being somewhat of a clown and had been associated with managing excruciatingly bad teams such as the mid-1930s Boston Braves, so his selection was met with no little skepticism. Daddy's Little Girl was first published in A Decade of Dark Horse #1 (July 1996) and reprinted in Tales to Offend #1 (July 1997), and Booze, Broads, and Bullets..

Despite finishing only 3 games back of the pennant-winning Cleveland Indians in 1948, Harris was released, and the Yankees brought in Casey Stengel as their manager. Nancy -- who prior to this story had no last name -- was named "Callahan," presumably after Clint Eastwood's character in those films. After a couple of interim managers had come and gone, Bucky Harris was brought in and the Yankees righted the ship again, winning the 1947 pennant and facing a much-tougher Dodgers team than their 1941 counterparts, in a Series that went seven games and was a harbinger of things to come for much of the next decade. In the DVD commentary, Frank Miller indicated that he was initially motivated to write That Yellow Bastard after his disappointment with The Dead Pool, the fifth and final film in the Dirty Harry series. The Yanks then went into a bit of a slump, and manager McCarthy was let go early in the 1946 season. Mort had been replaced by Bob when Hartigan is released from prison in the motion picture and the theatrical release omits an appearance by Carla Gugino as Lucille which is reinstated in the extended version released to DVD. Louis Cardinals during 1942 and 1943. Some notable differences exist in the film version.

The war-thinned ranks of the major leagues nonetheless found the Yanks in the post-season again, as they traded World Series wins with the St. In Rodriguez's adaptation, Bruce Willis stars as Hartigan, Jessica Alba as Nancy, Nick Stahl as the Yellow Bastard/Junior, Powers Boothe as Senator Roark and Michael Madsen as Hartigan's partner, Bob. Two months and one day after the final game of the Yanks' 4 to 1 win, the Pearl Harbor attacks occurred, and many of the best ballplayers went off to World War II. In order to spare Nancy this fate, in an act of pure love, Hartigan commits suicide to protect her, blowing his brains out with his revolver. The Yankees made short work of the Brooklyn Dodgers in the 1941 Series. Hartigan also realizes that Senator Roark would most likely target Nancy first, in order to make Hartigan suffer for killing his son. Modern baseball historians regard it as unlikely that anyone will ever hit .400 again, barring a change to the way the game is played; and as virtually impossible that anyone will approach DiMaggio's 56-game streak, which is so far beyond second place (44) as to be almost a statistical anomaly. he has made a deadly enemy of Senator Roark, who would stop at nothing until Hartigan was dead.

A crucial factor in ending the streak was the fielding of Cleveland third baseman Ken Keltner, who stopped two balls that DiMaggio hit hard to the left. With Nancy gone, Hartigan realizes that by killing Roark Jr. The streak was finally snapped in a game at Cleveland Stadium the next night before a huge crowd at the lakefront. Hartigan then tells Nancy to flee, lying to her that he will call up some old police friends of his to clean up the scene of the crime. A popular song by Les Brown celebrated this event, as Betty Bonney and the band members sang it: "He tied the mark at 44 / July the First, you know / Since then he's hit a good 12 more / Joltin' Joe DiMaggio / Joe, Joe DiMaggio, we want you on our side." The last game of the streak came on July 16 at Cleveland's League Park. Nancy and Hartigan share another kiss, this time without Hartigan's paternalistic feelings getting in the way. Meanwhile, DiMaggio, who had once hit in 61 straight games as a minor leaguer with the San Francisco Seals, began a hitting streak on May 15 which stretched to an astonishing 56 games. Hartigan suddenly pulls out a switchblade and stabs him in the chest, calls him a "sucker" and then proceeds to castrate Junior a second time with his bare hands and then brutally beat his head into pulp, killing him.

Ted Williams of the Red Sox was in the hunt for the elusive .400 batting average, which he achieved on the last day of the season. Junior shoves Nancy aside and decides to slice Hartigan up while he's on the floor. After an off season came the Summer of 1941, a much-celebrated year, often described by sportswriters as the last great year of the "Golden Era", before World War II and other realities intervened. Hartigan has a heart attack and drops his gun. They also swept the Chicago Cubs in 1938, and the Cincinnati Reds in 1939. Hartigan shows up, takes down a few corrupt police officers guarding the Farm and confronts Junior, who has Nancy at knife point. They took the Giants 4 games to 2 in that Series, and 4 games to 1 the next year. At this time, Nancy is being flogged by Junior and, like Hartigan, won't give her torturer the pleasure of her pain by screaming.

During Game 2 of the 1936 Series, they pounded the Giants 18-4, still the World Series record (through 2005) for most runs by a team in one game. Racing to the Farm, Hartigan suffers a severe angina attack, but continues in order to save Nancy. When the Yankees did get into the Series, they had little trouble. Junior's henchmen, who had shown up to dispose of Hartigan's body, are quickly subdued, and forced to tell Hartigan that Junior had fled to the Roark family farm (described as a place where bad things happen) with Nancy, presumably to rape her. The strongest competition for the Yankees during that stretch was the Detroit Tigers, who won two pennants before that Yankees four-year stretch, and one after. Hartigan, after seemingly giving up, awakes in his noose, wills himself back to life, and manages to break free from the rope by breaking a window and using a shattered glass shard to cut the rope around his hands. They did it without Gehrig for most of 1939, as the superstar's retirement due to ALS saddened the baseball world. He then kicks the desk under Hartigan and escapes with Nancy.

Behind the thundering Yankees bats of DiMaggio, Gehrig and Frank Crosetti, and a superb pitching staff led by Red Ruffing and Lefty Gomez and anchored by catcher Bill Dickey, the Yankees reeled off an unprecedented four consecutive World Series wins during 1936-1939. Junior knocks Hartigan down, lynches him naked with a noose and tells of how in the past 8 years he raped and killed dozens of girls. The young center fielder from San Francisco was an immediate impact player, batting .323, hitting 29 homers and driving in 125 runs in his rookie season of 1936. As a result, Junior lives, but as an unnatural abomination. Just as Gehrig stepped out of Ruth's considerable shadow, a new titan appeared on the horizon, in the person of Joe DiMaggio. Senator Roark used his vast financial resources to resurrect his son using means outside the boundaries of conventional science, hiring doctors, witch doctors, and gene therapists to bring Junior out of his coma and reconstitute his severed body parts. The Yankees run during the 1930s could also be facetiously called the "McCarthy era", as manager Joe McCarthy (no relation to the infamous Senator of the same name) would guide the Yankees to new heights. Hartigan, in the shower, is confronted once again by "That Yellow Bastard", who reveals himself to be Roark Jr.

Babe Ruth hit his famous "Called Shot" home run in Wrigley Field in Game 3 of that Series, a fitting "Swan Song" to his illustrious post-season career. There, they share a kiss, where Nancy reveals she is in love with him; but Hartigan refuses to move any further because of the paternalistic nature of his relationship to Nancy. After three also-ran seasons, the Yankees returned to the American League top perch under new manager Joe McCarthy in 1932 and swept the Chicago Cubs in the World Series, running their streak of consecutive World Series game wins to 12, a mark which would stand until the 2000 Yankees bested it in the World Series that year. Eventually, he and Nancy hide out in a motel. Babe Ruth hit .625 with 3 home runs in that series, while Lou Gehrig hit .545 and belted 4 round-trippers. Accompanied by Nancy, Hartigan disovers the "Bastard's" foul-smelling blood everywhere, but no body. Louis Cardinals in the World Series. Hartigan, with Nancy's revolver, fires a precise shot that hits the "Bastard" in the neck, and Hartigan insists on checking to see if he's been killed.

The Yankees would repeat as American League champions in 1928, fighting off the resurgent Philadelphia Athletics, and sweep the St. With Nancy at the wheel, there is a high-speed pursuit with the "Bastard" close on their tail. Ruth's home run total of 60 in 1927 set a single-season record which would stand for 34 years, and first baseman Lou Gehrig had his first big season with 47 round-trippers. They leave Kadies' shortly and get into her car. The 1927 team was so potent that it became known as "Murderers' Row" and is sometimes considered to have been the best team in the history of baseball (though similar claims have been made for other Yankee squads, notably those of 1939, 1961 and 1998). Hartigan and Nancy have a quick reunion when she recognizes him and jumps into his arms. Stengel would later become a "giant" for the Yankees as a manager. "That Yellow Bastard", the man who arrived at the cell with the envelope, has followed him, and he has revealed Nancy's position.

Giants outfielder Casey Stengel, who even then was being called "Old Case", hit two homers to win the two games the Giants came away with. Hartigan smells a set-up, and something far worse, the distinct odor of rotting garbage. In 1921 through 1923 they faced the Giants in the World Series, losing the first two match-ups but turning the tables in 1923 after the Big Stadium opened. The envelope containing the finger was merely a ploy to get him to crack and lead Roark to Nancy. From 1921 to 1928, the Yankees went through their first period of great success, winning six American League pennants and three World Series. Hartigan finds that she is no longer the little girl he rescued from a child-murderer 8 years ago, but is now a woman who works in the club as an exotic dancer and is unharmed. It was truly "the House that Ruth Built",. He follows that lead to where Nancy, now nineteen, can be at or at least maybe get more leads.

The Stadium was the first triple-deck venue in baseball and seated an astounding 58,000. There's no clues to where she is except for a pack of matches from Kadie's bar. The site for the stadium was chosen because the IRT Jerome Avenue subway line, now the MTA's#4 train, went right by there, practically on top of Yankee Stadium's right-field wall. He goes to her apartment, but finds it empty and in disarray. and River Avenue in the Bronx. He looks her name up in a phone book and learns she lives somewhere on North Culver. In 1923 the Yankees moved into Yankee Stadium at 161st St. Back on the streets, the elderly ex-con/ex-cop sets off to find Nancy.

The construction crew moved with remarkable speed and finished the big new ballpark in less than a year. Hartigan is finally released on parole, apparently due to Senator Roark's satisfaction over his confession and submission. Instead, to McGraw's chagrin, they broke ground for a new ballpark just across the Harlem River from the Polo Grounds. Hartigan knows it's a ruse to insult him, but to show sincerity that he's a reformed man, he asks Senator Roark for forgiveness for what he did to his son. At that time, John McGraw was said to have commented that the Yankees should "move to some out-of-the-way place, like Queens". At his parole hearing, he is humiliated again when Senator Roark acts like a good man who's willing to forgive Hartigan. In 1921 the Yankees were told to move out of the Polo Grounds after the 1922 season. Much to his own lawyer's surprise and disgust, Hartigan decides to claim responsibility to the crimes he was accused of.

The home run hitting exploits of Ruth proved popular with the public, to the extent that the Yankees were soon outdrawing their landlords, the Giants. He decides to find some way out, and contacts his lawyer, Lucille (the lesbian parole officer from The Hard Goodbye). He was especially noted for development of the Yankees' farm system. Believing Nancy to be in imminent danger, Hartigan's passive view of his current incarceration changes. Barrow would act as general manager or president of the Yankees for the next 25 years and may deserve the bulk of the credit for the team's success during that period. Except instead of a letter from her inside, it contains an index finger from the right hand of a nineteen-year-old girl. Barrow came on board after the 1920 season, and like many of the new Yankee players had previously been a part of the Red Sox organization, having managed the team since 1918. Hartigan awakens and discovers the same type of envelope Nancy always uses.

Huggins was hired in 1919 by Ruppert while Huston was serving in Europe with the army (this would lead to a break between the two owners, with Ruppert eventually buying Huston out in 1923). His fears are confirmed when a deformed, hairless visitor with sickly yellow skin who smells distinctly like a garbage can, arrives at his prison cell and punches him out. Other critical newcomers in this period were manager Miller Huggins and general manager Ed Barrow. Although he initially believes Nancy has merely outgrown her childhood hero, Hartigan soon becomes increasingly worried that Senator Roark has finally found Nancy. Harry Frazee finally found success on Broadway in 1927 with the musical comedy No No Nanette, which included the song "Tea For Two". For eight years, he drags himself through his jail time, his only respite being the letters his young admirer sends him, until finally the letters stop coming. The Red Sox did not win a World Series from 1919 until 2004 (see Curse of the Bambino), often finding themselves out of the World Series hunt as a result of the success of the Yankees. Hartigan quickly develops a paternal love for little Nancy, and sees her as the daughter he never had.

Two of the four Boston newspapers agreed with the deal at the time. Afterwards, he finds himself alone in prison, and abandoned by his wife Eileen (who proceeds to re-marry and finally have children) and friends, he finds solace in the carefully disguised weekly letters he receives from Nancy. That would continue during his Yankees years, but the ownership was more tolerant, provided he brought fans and championships to the ballpark. Even amidst the hours of repeated punching and being tempted by prison luxuries and even sex with an Old Town prostitute, Hartigan doesn't crack under the pressure. Ruth was also regarded as a problem, a carouser. Liebowitz in order to get him to sign a false confession. Frazee also wished to aid the Yankees, as giving the Yankees a box office draw would strengthen a legal ally, and reduce the pressure he faced[3]. After his stint in the hospital, Hartigan is seen tied to a chair, cuffed and being beaten by Det.

Frazee traded Ruth in January of 1920, citing Ruth's demand for a raise after being paid the highest salary in baseball, and despite owning the single season homerun record at the time of the trade (hitting 29 homeruns in 1919[2]). Before leaving, Nancy tells Hartigan she loves him. However, pitcher-turned-outfielder Babe Ruth was the biggest of them all. Hartigan complies and says goodbye to her. From 1919 to 1922, the Yankees acquired pitchers Waite Hoyt, Carl Mays and Herb Pennock, catcher Wally Schang, shortstop Everett Scott and third baseman Joe Dugan, all from the Red Sox. She'll sign her name as "Cordelia" so no one who know who it's really from by Hartigan. President Ban Johnson, Frazee faced most of the legal battles which proved costly[1]. Hartigan tells her to stay away from him or else she'll be killed, so Nancy tells Hartigan she'll write him letters instead for forever.

Further, as Frazee owned the strongest of the "Insurrectos" franchizes, which antagonized A.L. The only one who Hartigan talked in the hospital was Nancy, who snuck out against her parents' wishes to see the man who saved her. Many of the newly acquired players who would later contribute to their success came from the Boston Red Sox, whose owner, theater impresario Harry Frazee, had bought his team on credit and needed money to pay off his loans and purchase Fenway Park from the Fenway Park Trust. Despite his innocence and the pariah status he has achieved as a result of his conviction, he remains silent about his pain, knowing that Senator Roark would kill anyone who ever found out the truth. Over the next few years the new owners would begin to enlarge the payroll. Hartigan finds himself framed for raping Nancy, is branded a pedophile and sentenced to a lengthy prison term amidst a public outcry that brands him one of Sin City's most hated citizens. The Yankees detente with the Boston Red Sox and Chicago White Sox circa 1920 (all three collectively known as the "Insurrectos") paid off well. lapses into a coma from his injuries, and Senator Roark takes issue with the abuse of his son.

Perhaps one of the greatest ironies of the Yankees dominance comes from its roots. Roark Jr. Ruppert later said, "For $450,000 we got an orphan ball club, without a home of its own, without players of outstanding ability, without prestige." But now with an owner possessing deep pockets, and a willingness to dig into them to produce a winning team. Before he can finish Junior off, Hartigan's corrupt partner Bob, who fears angering Senator Roark, shoots him in the back. Congressman for eight years. Hartigan succeeds in rescuing Nancy by disabling Junior's getaway car, and then proceeds to use his revolver to surgically shoot off Junior's left ear, right hand, and genitals. Ruppert was heir to the Ruppert brewery fortune and had also been tied to the Tammany Hall machine, serving as a U.S. It is Hartigan's mission to rescue Junior's latest quarry, skinny little Nancy Callahan.

At the start of 1915, they sold the team to Colonel Jacob Ruppert and Captain Tillinghast L'Hommedieu Huston. Roark Junior, son of one of the most powerful and corrupt officials in Basin City, is continuing his penchant for raping and murdering little girls. By the mid 1910s, owners Farrell and Devery had become estranged and both were in need of money. The story begins with a good-hearted cop, Hartigan (who has a bad heart condition) on his final mission before his forced retirement. Before very long, New York Yankees had become the official nickname of the club. That Yellow Bastard is currently under publication by Dark Horse Comics, the first edition was available in July 1997 (ISBN 1569712255). With the change of parks in 1913, the "Highlanders" reference became obsolete, and the de facto team nickname became exclusively "Yankees". It follows the usual black and white noir style artistry of previous Sin City novels.

The name grew in popularity over the team's first decade. First published in February 1996–July 1996, That Yellow Bastard is a six-issue comic book miniseries, and the sixth in the Sin City series. The New York Herald, on April 15, 1906, reported "Yankees win opening game from Boston, 2-1".
. That matter-of-fact wording suggests the nickname was already well-known. It was later revealed in the two disc special edition DVD that Becky died at the end of the film. During the early 1900s, the nickname "Yankees" was occasionally applied to the club, as a variant on "Americans", verifiably as early as June 21, 1904, when Patsy Dougherty was traded from Boston to New York, and the Boston Herald's report was headlined "Dougherty as a Yankee". A notable difference from the comic version is that Becky survives the final gunfight by hiding in a nook in the alley, leaving her alive for the final "epilogue" scene of the movie.

Relations between the clubs had warmed when the Giants were allowed to lease Hilltop Park while the Polo Grounds was being rebuilt in 1911 following a disastrous fire. In the film, Clive Owen plays Dwight, Brittany Murphy plays Shellie, Benicio del Toro plays Jack, Rosario Dawson plays Gail, Devon Aoki plays Miho, Alexis Bledel plays Becky, and Michael Clarke Duncan plays Manute. From 1913 to 1922 the team would play in the Polo Grounds, a park owned by their National League rivals, the Giants. The story is one of three from Sin City related in the film Sin City. For fans of the team formally named the Red Sox in 1908, the 1904 season-ender would prove to be the last time Boston would defeat the Yankees in a pennant-deciding game for literally a century. Before any defensive measures can be taken, the men and Becky are gunned down. 1904 was the last year a Series was not played, until the strike-truncated year of 1994. The gangsters now realize they are in a trap as the girls of Old Town reveal themselves, heavily armed also, on the roof.

Brush, who then led a committee that formalized the rules governing the World Series. Dwight then triggers the grenades stolen from the last mercenary, exploding the head. The resulting tongue-lashing of the Giants by the media stung their owner, John T. Becky questions why the head is now bandaged when it wasn't before. Although Boston had won the pennant, the Giants still refused to participate. As Dwight stands alone in an alley outside the gangsters' building with the head, outnumbered and outgunned, the trade is made: Gail being freed and the head, now bandaged up, handed over. First, the presence of the Highlanders in the race had led the Giants to announce they would not participate in the World Series against a "minor league" team. As the gangsters prepare to further torture Gail, and kill Becky, an arrow shoots through one of the henchmen with a note prompting a trade: Jack's head for Gail's life.

This event had historical significance in several ways. With the head in tow they go off to rescue Gail and Old Town. New York pitcher Jack Chesbro threw a wild pitch in the ninth inning which allowed the eventual pennant-winning run to score for the Boston Americans. Dwight is caught off guard by more grenades and is about to be cut up until Miho arrives to finish Brian off. Their best chance came on the last day of the 1904 season, at the Hilltop. After dodging some grenades, Dwight corners Brian, the last mercenary, in the sewers. Their somewhat tainted ownership, along with the questionable activities of some players, notably first baseman Hal Chase, raised suspicions of game-fixing, but little of that was ever proven. Dallas rams the car into the mercenaries' and she ends up getting gunned down by one of them.

As the Highlanders, the team enjoyed success only twice, finishing in second place in 1904 and 1910; but otherwise, much of their first fifteen years in New York was spent in the cellar. They cut through backroads to reach the Projects, where they catch up with their targets. Today the site of the original Hilltop Park is occupied by buildings of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. Dwight, Dallas and Miho realize they must recover Jack's head. The name was also a reference to the noted British military unit The Gordon Highlanders, as the team president from 1903 to 1906 was named Joseph Gordon. Gail bites and rips a chunk off of Becky's neck in anger, vowing that she deserves worse. Consequently the field was known as Hilltop Park and the team quickly became known as the New York Highlanders. It becomes clear that Becky had sold out Old Town for money and her mother's safety.

and Broadway in Manhattan, near the highest point on the island. Gail is tortured but refuses to "facilitate" the process of surrendering Old Town. The franchise's first park in New York was located at 165th St. Back at Old Town, Gail has been ambushed and kidnapped by Manute, who has survived the assaults of Dwight and Miho. Farrell owned a casino and several pool halls, while Devery had served as a blatantly corrupt chief of the New York City police and had only been forced out of the department at the start of 1902. Along with Miho and her driver, Dallas, he takes off in pursuit of the remaining mercenaries. Farrell and Devery both had deep ties into city politics and gambling. Miho rescues him and Dwight begins to figure out that there is a snitch in Old Town who informed the mob that a cop was murdered by the Old Town prostitutes.

The AL's Baltimore franchise became the New York franchise when its new owners, Frank Farrell and William Devery, were able to find a ballpark location not blocked by the Giants. The mercenaries decapitate Jack, taking the head and leaving Dwight for dead, sinking into the pits. The NL also agreed that the "junior circuit" could establish a franchise in New York. He quickly disposes of four of them, but is knocked out by a grenade and falls into the pit along with the car. In January 1903, the American and National Leagues held a "peace conference" to settle conflicts over player contract disputes and to agree on future cooperation. At the Pits Dwight is attacked by Irish mercenaries. A week later the owner of the Giants also gained controlling interest of the Orioles and raided the team for players, after which the league declared the team forfeit and took control, still intending to move the franchise to New York when and if possible. The cop then notifies Dwight that he's driving with a broken taillight, and lets him off with a warning.

As a result of a feud with league president Ban Johnson, who rigidly enforced rules about rowdyism on the field of play, McGraw jumped leagues to manage the New York Giants in the middle of the 1902 season. Dwight tells the cop he's the designated driver. When the team began play as the Baltimore Orioles in 1901, they were managed by John McGraw. The cop looks through Dwight's window and notices the corpse, believing it to be an unconscious, drunken friend. The intention of Johnson and the American League had been to place a team in New York City, but their efforts had been stymied by the political connections that owners of the National League New York Giants had with Tammany Hall. Jack's body slumps forward, hiding the neck wound and the gun casing lodged in his head. Previously a minor league (known as the Western League until 1899), the American League carried over five of its previous locations and added three more on the East Coast, including one in Baltimore, Maryland, which had lost its National League team when that league contracted the year before. As he contemplates whether or not to kill the cop, he brakes hard.

At the end of the 1900 season the American League re-organized and, with its president Ban Johnson as the driving force, decided to assert itself as a new major league. With his mind not completely focused, his driving suffers, attracting police attention again. . Although Dwight knows he is hallucinating, unlike Marv, he cannot quiet the gibbering corpse. The Yankees are also the only team that is represented at every position in the Baseball Hall of Fame. On the way there, Dwight begins to hallucinate that Jack is egging him on. Among the North American major sports, the Yankees' success is only approached by the 23 Stanley Cup championships of the Montreal Canadiens of the National Hockey League. After acquiring a car, slicing up all the bodies to stuff in the back trunk and leaving Jack in the front seat due to lack of space, Dwight begins the rainy drive to the Pits.

Louis Cardinals and the Oakland Athletics are tied for second with 9 World Series victories each, and the Los Angeles Dodgers is second in World Series appearances with 18. Finally, after a tense argument between Gail and Dwight, the girls agree to hide the bodies in the Pits as Dwight recommended. The Yankees have won 26 World Series in 39 appearances; the St. Gail starts proclaiming they'll fight anyone who tries to take them out while Dwight tries to recommend disposing the bodies before anyone suspects anything. They are one of two major league franchises which operate in New York City, the other being the New York Mets of the National League. This new fact is bad for all of Old Town, as the shaky truce between the police and the girls is all but shattered. One of the American League's eight charter franchises, the Yankees have been among the most storied teams in North America over their 100+ year history; along with franchises like the Boston Celtics, Dallas Cowboys, and Montreal Canadiens, the Yankees have helped exemplify the phrase "dynasty" in professional athletics. Then he realizes that Shellie was screaming "COP!".

They are in the Eastern Division of the American League. As the girls loot the corpses, Dwight searches Jack's person and finds a police badge revealing him to be "Iron" Jack Rafferty. The New York Yankees are a Major League Baseball team based in The Bronx, New York City, New York. Miho finishes him off by slicing his neck. ♦ - Hall of Famer
Jackie Robinson's #42 is retired by Major League Baseball
. When Jack tries to shoot the intervening Dwight his gun backfires, sending the barrel into his forehead. (Also referred to as "Americans" 1903-1909 and "Yankees" 1910-1912). As Dwight tries to make Jack quit his foolish game, Miho sabotages his gun by throwing a plug into the barrel.

Because New York won the regular season series with Boston, New York was awarded the division championship and Boston was awarded the wild card.. Miho and Jack get in a standoff. No official titles were awarded in 1994.
[3] - In 2005, the Yankees and the Boston Red Sox finished the season with identical records of 95-67 and finished tied for first place in the East Division standings. During the attack, Dwight has an impending sense that something is wrong but can't place his finger on it. New York was in first place in the East Division by six and a half games when play was stopped. Immediately afterward Miho throws a swastika-shaped projectile that cuts off Jack's hand, then descend on the car and quickly kills every man but Jack. The Yankees had the third best record in the division when considering the entire season, two games behind Milwaukee and Baltimore.
[2] - In 1994, a players' strike wiped out the last eight weeks of the season and all post-season. Instead of being scared or surprised, Becky is instead filled with pity, proclaiming that he has just done the dumbest thing in his life.

New York had the best record in the East Division when play was stopped and was declared the first-half division winner. He finally pulls out a handgun and aims it at her. [1] - In 1981, a players' strike in the middle of the season forced the season to be split into two halves. Meanwhile, Jack continues to pester Becky, escalating to outright anger at the egging on of his friends. Rookie: GCL Yankees, Gulf Coast League. As Dwight spots Miho on the roof, he uncomfortably agrees and watches as the alley is closed off. Short A: Staten Island Yankees, New York-Penn League. She advises Dwight to stay put and let the girls handle Jack themselves.

A: Charleston RiverDogs, South Atlantic League. Dwight follows close behind and is then caught off guard by Gail, one of Old Town's most experienced hookers and guardians. Advanced A: Tampa Yankees, Florida State League. As Jack spots a young girl named Becky walking alone in a dark alley, he follows beside her, asking coyly for her services and constantly being rejected. AA: Trenton Thunder, Eastern League. A police car follows them both, but stops and turns around once the cars enter Old Town, the area of Sin City full of and run by the prostitutes of the area. AAA: Columbus Clippers, International League. As Dwight speeds toward Jack's car, his speeding has caught the attention of the police.

54 Rob Thomson (special assignment instructor). He jumps off the building, ignoring Shellie's muffled yell that sounds like "Stop!". -- Tony Peña (first base). After ensuring her safety, Dwight becomes worried that Jack will cause more trouble and must be stopped somehow. 50 Rich Monteleone (special pitching instructor). Shellie investigates the apartment and finds Dwight on the railing outside the building. -- Lee Mazzilli (bench). Jack awakens a few seconds later and storms out, demanding that his group not mention these events.

23 Don Mattingly (hitting). When Jack scoffs at the threat Dwight dunks his head into the toilet (where Jack had been urinating the minute before) until his body goes limp. -- Joe Kerrigan (bullpen pitching). Getting the jump on Jack, Dwight holds a knife to his neck and tells him to stop bothering Shellie. 49 Ron Guidry (pitching). He then goes to the bathroom where Dwight is hiding in the shower stall. -- Larry Bowa (third base). Shellie refuses and it culminates in Jack hitting her in the face.

99 Mike Borzello (bullpen catching). The drunken man, named Jack, talks about his plans to have fun at every bar in town that night and insists Shellie call in some of her fellow co-workers to come along.  6 Joe Torre. When the man outside threatens to break down her door, Shellie reluctantly opens it while Dwight hides in the toilet. The Yankee Stadium grounds crew has become famous in their own right for their infield sweeping in the middle of the fifth inning when they dance to the popular 70's hit YMCA by the Village People. Dwight tells the barmaid to let the man, and his ensuing entourage, in. The Yankee fans who sit behind the right-field portion of the bleacher seats in Yankee Stadium have become so well known for their rowdy behavior that they are often referred to as the "bleacher creatures." They have also popularized a type of chant called "Role Call" where, in the top of the first inning, they chant each field player's name on the Yankees repeatedly until the player acknowledges the chant. Shellie is obviously scared, but is comforted by Dwight who has gotten a new face.

The Yankees have teamed up with New Era and Adidas to make caps for sale. First published November 1994–March 1995, The Big Fat Kill opens in Shellie's apartment, where a drunken former fling is furiously rapping on her door, demanding to be let in. Under George Steinbrenner, the team has a strict dress code that forbids long hair and facial hair below the lip. Let's get you home." With the girl in his arms, he walks off into the distance, as the snow obscures his receding form. American football's example of balanced salaries, correlated with its now-massive parity and mainstream impact, demonstrates that keeping athletic salaries fair is good for the sport and therefore everyone - TV outlets, owners, fans. He retrieves the little girl, saying, "Your momma's been callin' after you, Kimberly. Manny Ramírez, Pedro Martínez), who might otherwise freely use the potentiality as a bargaining chip. It only then becomes apparent that the child was being sold for sex.

This phenomenon even causes the Yankees to announce their intentions not to pursue certain free agents (e.g. Marv draws two pistols and kills the pair of henchmen, then executes the woman. The willingness of the Yankees to pay premium prices for top talent encourages players and their agents to demand unreasonably high prices, further diluting talent throughout the rest of the league. Through a small viewing slit, he can see a terrified little girl crouching in darkness in the room beyond. Allowing one team to bid highly for the best talent makes it more difficult for lower-spending teams (primarily in smaller metropolitan areas) to compete. Marv hands her a wad of bills and is shown to a steel door in the far wall. In a free-market society, an owner who wishes to spend as much as he wants should not be restricted from doing so. He is met by two armed men and a leather-clad woman, who is apparently their boss.

The Yankees drive attendance, merchandise sales and TV revenues, helping to subsidize less-profitable teams. He intimidates the bouncer, Fatman, with his sheer size and is led inside and down a flight of stairs. It has also been argued that the New York Mets, because they share the same market, could spend at a higher level if their owner was inclined to do so, and therefore the Yankees spending reflects Steinbrenner's greater commitment to winning rather than a singular advantage over all other teams.[5]. Against a backdrop of heavy snow, Marv, a hulking, trenchcoat-clad figure, approaches a door in a dark alley. New York, as the largest market with the highest revenues, should spend in accordance with their vast resources. It is a 15-page story about Marv's rescue of a little girl, in which there is almost no dialogue; only one speech bubble appears in the entire story. As "America's Team" the Yankees give other baseball fans a team to "hate" or root against, thereby further generating interest in baseball games involving the Yankees and baseball in general. Silent Night is a one-shot short story that Frank Miller released in November 1994.

The Yankees are "America's Team" They give the casual, or "bandwagon," baseball fan someone to root for when he/she does not have a local favorite, or when their local team is playing poorly. She was not a hooker, rather a nun that had flirted with temptation before ultimately deciding to dedicate her life to God. Won ALDS (3-0) over Texas Rangers. He also receives a package from Mary. Won ALCS (4-2) over Cleveland Indians. Dwight reads up on the whole situation and realizes that Fargo was simply the scapegoat for illegal drug-related activities and had paid the ultimate price. Won 1998 World Series (4-0) over San Diego Padres. He eventually receives a package from Fargo who had shipped it off before his untimely demise.

Oriole Park (Baltimore) (1901-1902). He duels with both of them again and due to insistence from Mary decides to shoot them in the leg instead of killing them. Hilltop Park (1903-1912). In the mean time, the Babe introduces herself as a hooker named Mary, but Dwight can tell she's lying. Brush Stadium (1913-1919). Although they successfully elude the pair, Dwight refuses to let them off easy, choosing rather to head to The Farm to deal with them. a.k.a. Under a barrage of sniper shots from Douglas Klump, Dwight and the Babe reach their car and speed off.

Polo Grounds (IV) (1913-1922)

    . He knocks out Shlubb and finds the titular character hiding in the shower. Yankee Stadium (1923-1973). Dwight stumbles upon the hanging corpse of Fargo in his apartment and encounters Mr Shlubb, half of the recurring supporting duo, Douglas Klump and Burt Shlubb (aka Fat Man and Little Boy). Shea Stadium (1974-1975). The Babe Wore Red centres around the character of Dwight and the murder of his friend Fargo. Yankee Stadium (1976-present). The Customer, having connections, hires The Salesman to kill her.

    Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902). The mafia member then swore to her that she would die in the most terrible way possible, and when it is least expected. New York Highlanders (1903-1912). Later information given by Frank Miller on the commentary of the Recut & Extended DVD Edition states that The Customer had an affair with a member of the mafia, and when she found out tried to break it off with him. New York Yankees (1913-present). The reader is led to believe that The Customer had fallen into a serious and difficult situation and, with no other feasible alternative, hired The Salesman to kill her. East Division (1969-present). A silenced gunshot stabs the night air to reveal that The Salesman has shot The Customer.

    American League (1901-present)

      . It is unclear what their past involves even as they embrace in a passionate kiss. The story involves an enigmatic tryst between two nameless characters; "The Customer" and "The Salesman." They meet on the terrace of a high rise building, hinting that although they seem to be acting like strangers, they do indeed have some sort of past. The sequence served as the original proof of concept footage that director Robert Rodriguez filmed to convince Frank Miller to allow him to adapt Sin City to the silver screen. The Customer is Always Right short served as the opening sequence for the movie Sin City, which featured Josh Hartnett and Marley Shelton.

      Although the Cowboy is willing to confess to the cops, the girls have other plans and invite Miho to finish the job. The enigmatic "Cowboy" is captured by the allure of Wendy and subsequently shot and tied up by Gail. And Behind Door Number Three? is a short story about Gail and Wendy (who's now wearing Marv's necklace) setting a trap for a man they suspect is 'carving up' girls in Old Town.
      .

      It reprints a serial run in Previews:. First published November 1994, The Babe Wore Red and Other Stories is a publication of short stories. Dwight finally sees through all the lies and kills Ava. Ava then tries telling Dwight that Manute had her under mind control to manipulate her and Damien and that it would be a cruel irony if he killed her now.

      Manute falls through a window and upon landing, Miho stabs him in the arms, pinning him to the ground. Six bullets fail to kill him, and Manute aims at Dwight as Ava grabs one of Manute's guns, shooting Manute in his shoulder. Gail and Miho strike from Dwight's car, and Dwight shoots Manute with a hidden .25 he had up his left sleeve. Once inside Ava's estate, Manute sees past the new face and captures Dwight.

      Dwight (with his new face), accompanied by Gail and Miho, poses as Wallenquist's man from Phoenix. Wallenquist, unaffected by Ava's flirting, tells her to tie up her loose end with Dwight and has someone arriving from Phoenix soon to meet her about that. Ava, with her late husband's financial assets, is joining her corporation with the mob boss Wallenquist. Meanwhile, Dwight is recovering from his near-fatal wounds and calls Ava to inform her he's coming for her soon.

      This culminates with Mort killing Bob, then committing suicide. Bob doubts Ava considerably now, while Mort, still sleeping with Ava, becomes more on-edge towards his partner. When they speak with Dwight's landlord, she tells about letting Ava in and the resulting loud noises of the fight the night of Damien's murder. They interrogate Agamemnon, who tells how Dwight is an upright man who went clean after being such a wild alcoholic with a short temper in his younger days.

      They believe her story, and Mort starts sleeping with her. She claims that Dwight was a stalker psychopath who killed Damien out of jealousy. Two detectives following up on Damien Lord's death, Mort and Bob, talk to Ava. He convinces Gail and Miho, a deadly assassin he saved three years prior, to let him stay, and they operate further on him.

      The girls of Old Town perform surgery on Dwight's multiple bullet wounds, then ask him to leave. Upon Dwight's insistance, Marv drives him to Old Town, where Dwight has his old flame, Gail, help him. Dwight once again falls out of a window and is picked up by Marv. She shoots Dwight six times, including once in the head.

      Ava appears, and explains how Dwight was all a part of her plan to get Damien murdered so she could inherit his estate. When he finds him, he beats him to death. With Manute occupied, Dwight makes his way to Damien. Marv rips Manute's right eye out.

      Marv tackles the guards as a distraction and eventually takes on Manute. As they approach the mansion, Dwight insists Marv leave the punk's gun, which Marv has procured, in the car. They drink together and watch Nancy dance. Dwight convinces Marv to help him storm Damien's estate.

      One of them pulls a gun on Marv, who knocks him flat. Dwight arrives at Kadie’s, where Marv is in the middle of a squabble with some out-of-town punks. He awakens to find Manute driving off with Ava. Dwight is knocked out of his upper story apartment window, where he blacks out momentarily.

      Manute arrives and violently beats a naked Dwight. They eventually reconcile and make love. In his bedroom is a nude Ava. As he arrives home, he finds his Ford Mustang returned and his door unlocked.

      Dwight calls Agamemnon for a ride home, and they stop to get pizza. Manute seemingly doesn't recognise him, but beats him brutally anyway. He is discovered and claims that he is a Peeping Tom. He hops a fence and, using his photography equipment, scopes out the estate.

      He decides to check up on Ava and her new husband, Damien Lord. Dwight goes home, but cannot sleep. Ava arrives late and tries to persuade Dwight to take her back, claiming that her life is "a living Hell." Dwight refuses as a large black man named Manute arrives, taking Ava away. Marv is also there and greets Dwight.

      She had once broken his heart, but he agrees to meet her. That night, he receives a call from a woman named Ava, asking him to meet her at a seedy bar called Club Pecos. The story begins as Dwight McCarthy, working as a photographer for a grossly overweight man named Agamemnon, saves one of the Old Town prostitutes. But Dwight begins to suspect that things aren't what they seem with Ava...

      It chronicles Dwight's and attempts to rescue Ava Lord, Dwight's former fiancée from her husband and servant, who she says are sadistically torturing her. First published November 1993–May 1994, A Dame To Kill For is the second compilation of the Sin City series. With his last words, he defiantly mocks his executioners, asking if "That's the best you can do, you pansies?" They electrocute him again, which finally kills him. Finally, Marv is electrocuted in the electric chair, but survives.

      On his last night, he is visited by Wendy, who says that he can pretend that she's Goldie in one final moment of love. Marv is sentenced to death, much to the glee of Basin City's inhabitants. A hotshot Assistant District Attorney threatens to have Marv's mother killed if Marv doesn't confess to the crimes, so Marv breaks the ADA's arm in three places, then confesses. Marv survives, is hospitalized, and ultimately is charged not only with the murders of the people he killed, but also of the serial killings committed by Kevin also.

      Marv proceeds to torture Cardinal Roark to death, but just as he's really getting it going, armed guards storm the room and fill Marv with machine gun fire. Roark rationalizes that the killings were justified because the victims were merely hookers and nobodies. Goldie found out about Kevin, so Kevin killed her, and Roark sent in the police to kill Marv, frame him, and cover up Kevin's crimes. Roark confesses to envying Kevin's "gift", ultimately joining Kevin in his meals of murdered women in order to experience it for himself.

      Roark babbles on about how Kevin not only ate his victims' bodies, but also their souls, making him pure and clean. Roark, anguished over Kevin's death, confesses that he shielded the killer, because he had a "voice like an angel". Marv then presents Kevin's still smiling head to Roark, and demands an explanation. Marv kills Roark's guards and confronts the naked Cardinal in his bed.

      Robbed of any satisfaction from Kevin's death, Marv goes on to sneak into Cardinal Roark's heavily guarded mission. Marv decapitates Kevin's body and proceeds to take the unconscious Wendy back to Nancy's (after putting a call in to Kadie's for her) where Nancy patches him up, gives him beer and agrees to put Wendy on a plane at Sacred Oaks. Even as his entrails are being devoured by his own pet, Kevin simply smiles calmly and doesn't utter a sound. Marv proceeds to dismember Kevin with a hacksaw, then feeds his still-living torso to Kevin's pet wolf.

      Wendy shows up with a gun, intending to kill Kevin; but Marv knocks her out, because he intends to torture Kevin first, and doesn't want Wendy to have nightmares from witnessing it. Marv takes quite a beating, but keeps on fighting and eventually manages to outsmart Kevin by handcuffing him to himself, allowing him to knock out Kevin with a strong punch to the face. Kevin manages to avoid Marv's razor wires, and the two of them fight it out. Armed with gasoline, razor wire and his "mitts", Marv sets up a series of traps around the Farm, then flushes Kevin out by bombarding the Farm with a Molotov cocktail bomb.

      Along with Wendy, Marv picks up the items he needs to confront Kevin. Marv convinces them that he is innocent (stating that no prostitute would let someone as ugly and fearsome-looking as him close enough to kill her), and they release him. Marv is soon captured by the Old Town prostitutes, led by Goldie's twin sister Wendy, who believe Marv is responsible for Goldie's death (and the other missing prostitutes Kevin killed and ate) and thus intend to torture and kill him. In trying to dig up more leads to who Goldie was, Marv went to Old Town.

      Marv kills the cops and learns from torturing the lead detective that the man who wants him dead is Cardinal Roark, brother to Senator Roark and a member of the powerful and corrupt Roark family that founded and runs Basin City. The cops quickly kill her to eliminate any witnesses. Believing she has been rescued, Lucille attempts to convince them not to kill Marv. Unwilling to die in a shootout, Lucille knocks Marv down and runs towards the cops.

      Marv and Lucille escape, but are intercepted by a SWAT team. From the cell, Marv watches the killer being picked up by a limousine, and learns that his name is Kevin. Lucille is understandably quite shaken, as the killer had previously forced her to watch while he sucked the flesh off her severed left hand. Also held in the cell is Lucille (his lesbian parole officer), who explains that the killer kills women so that he can dine on their flesh.

      Marv wakes up in a holding cell, where he is greeted by the sight of several stuffed female heads, mounted on the wall like trophies. The killer is supernaturally silent and quick, and manages to sneak up, blind and beat Marv (quite a feat, as Marv is over 7', 300lbs, and had earlier shown he has amazing endurance by how he escaped from the police raid on his hotel room and surviving being hit multiple times by a speeding car). Marv finally encounters Goldie's killer: a small, shadowy figure with glowing glasses and a Charlie Brown-looking sweater. Marv's investigation eventually leads him to The Farm (the same place Detective Hartigan and Yellow Bastard had their final confrontation), where he defeats a pet wolf and discovers human remains.

      At one point in his journey, Marv stops by the strip club Kadie's, where he watches the dancing act of Nancy Callahan and to send the message out through an informant named Weevil to anyone out looking for him that he's been at bars drinking heavily and lamenting Goldie's death. Finally, Marv knows from the police raid that whoever's behind Goldie's murder has deep underworld connections to set him up as Goldie's killer and have even go to his mother's home to see if Marv took refuge there. Second, he suffers from a medical condition in which he experiences vivid hallucinations, and wonders if he actually murdered Goldie (especially since the two of them were alone and he feels sure he would have known if anyone had entered the room to kill Goldie). First, he feels indebted to Goldie for her kindness and wishes to repay her by avenging her death.

      As he roams the streets in pursuit of the truth, Marv has to deal with several issues. Heavily armored police officers (on duty officers wear SWAT gear possibly due to the high crime rate) from Basin City's corrupt police force storm the building, and Marv fights his way through them and escapes into the streets. The two of them have sex, and when Marv wakes up she is lying in the bed next to him, murdered. Later they meet in an equally run-down hotel room for a night together.

      Marv, a huge, heavily scarred hulk of a man, is approached in a seedy saloon by a beautiful woman named Goldie. In the film version, Mickey Rourke plays Marv, Jaime King plays Goldie/Wendy, Carla Gugino plays Lucille, Elijah Wood plays Kevin, and Rutger Hauer plays Cardinal Roark. This story is one of three Sin City stories retold in the movie Sin City. The thirteen-part serial follows Marv on his brutal, single-minded quest to understand why Goldie was killed and bring revenge upon her murderers.

      Marv wakes up after a one-night stand to discover Goldie, the woman he had just met and had sex with, has been killed in the night. The protagonist is Marv, a dangerous, possibly psychotic convict. It was originally titled simply Sin City when it was released in the Dark Horse Presents Fifth Anniversary Special and issues Dark Horse Presents #51-62 , but it was given its own title in trade paperback form. First published as Sin City in Dark Horse Presents issues #51-62 and 5th Anniversary Special (June 1991–June 1992), and reprinted as Sin City (The Hard Goodbye) (January 1993), The Hard Goodbye is the first comic book story that Frank Miller drew and wrote about the desperate denizens of Basin City/"Sin City".

      The chronology of Sin City is described below. They are listed here in order of publication. These are the individual stories, usually referred to as "yarns", set in Frank Miller’s Sin City universe. As the various yarns progress, the audience gradually becomes familiar with key locations in and around Basin City.

      In addition, the people in charge of the city remained in charge, running it as they saw fit. These women ended up forming the district of Old Town, the prostitutes' quarter. During the Gold Rush, The Roark Family brought a large number of women to keep the miners happy. Only a handful of the cops are still honest.

      The Basin City Police are mostly lazy, cowardly, or corrupt. Usually twice a year, a downpour comes. It hardly ever rains, and if it rains it's mostly warm droplets of moist "that dissolve before it hits the ground". Basin City, almost universally referred to by the nickname Sin City, is a fictional town in the American Northwest, located somewhere 40 minutes outside of Seattle, WA.

      . A TV Series based on the comics is reported to follow the second sequel. Rodriguez has expressed a desire to begin filming two sequels back-to-back starting February 2006 for release sometime in 2007. The Sin City graphic novels were reprinted with new covers and in a reduced size to coincide with the motion picture's theatrical release.

      A movie adaptation of Sin City, co-directed by Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller with "special guest director" Quentin Tarantino, was released on April 1, 2005. All stories take place in Basin City, with frequent recurring characters and intertwining stories. Several other stories of variable lengths have followed. The first story originally appeared in Dark Horse Presents from April of 1991 to June of 1992, under the title of Sin City, serialized in thirteen parts.

      Sin City is the title for a series of stories by Frank Miller, told in comic book form in a film noir-like style. Eighteen months after the beginning of The Hard Goo. The Babe Wore Red occurs, and in the story Dwight states that Marv is on death row. Dwight kills Ava.

      Dwight McCarthy (with a new face), Miho, and Gail raid Ava Lord’s estate, with Manute being gravely injured by both Miho and Dwight. Less than three months later, Ava and Wallenquist unite their criminal empires. A few days into Marv’s rampage, Bob (Hartigan's former partner in That Yellow Bastard) is shot dead by his partner Mort, who takes his own life (A Dame to Kill For). She tells them everything Gail briefed her on in Blue Eyes and sends them on their way.

      On the same night, Mort and Bob arrive at 'Kadie’s' (mere seconds after Marv’s arrival) and interview Shellie about Dwight's whereabouts following the murder of Damien Lord. In the beginning of Marv’s rampage, he goes to “Kadie’s” to try and draw attention to himself. The Hard Goodbye begins with Marv waking up and finding Goldie’s lifeless body. Marv meets Goldie.

      Marv is at the bar when Delia sweeps off with her prey. On this same night, Delia is inducted into the services of Wallenquist (Blue Eyes) placing her in league with Manute and the Colonel. Gail and the others tell Shellie that Dwight is still alive, and brief her on what she should tell the cops. Gail, Dwight, Miho and Shellie develop a plan to get revenge on Ava Lord.

      Dwight begins to be rehabilitated at this point. After Damien is killed, Dwight is taken to Old Town. Marv fights Manute, and Manute loses his eye. Marv and Dwight attack the home of Damien and Ava Lord.

      Shellie lectures Dwight at having not seen nor heard from him in six months. Fearing for her safety, Dwight goes to ‘Kadie’s’ and recruits the help of Marv. Manute interrupts their meeting. Ava mentions that it has been about four years since they last saw each other and Dwight agrees.

      A few weeks later, Ava Lord contacts Dwight and asks to meet him. Almost four years after the events of That Yellow Bastard, the twins, Goldie and Wendy, take over Old Town. The remaining events of That Yellow Bastard play out within the next few hours or so. Marv witnesses the reunion of Nancy and Hartigan, as shown in the beginning of Just Another Saturday Night.

      It is on this night that Dwight goes home with Shellie, and sleeps with her (he is seen whining to Shellie when Hartigan enters ‘Kadie’s’). Weeks later, Hartigan finds the 19-year-old Nancy Callahan when he is out on parole. Ava leaves Dwight and marries Damien Lord. Three years before A Dame to Kill For, Dwight rescues Miho from two gangsters.

      He is placed into solitary confinement for eight years. Hartigan is framed as a pedophile and charged with raping Nancy Callahan. The first section of That Yellow Bastard, wherein Detective John Hartigan rescues Nancy Callahan from Roark Jr., resulting in Hartigan and Junior winding up in the hospital, occurs about 12 years before the events of The Hard Goodbye. A prequel story about Jack.

      A story based in the World War II era (1940s-ish). A story with a brand new character. A prequel story about Hartigan. Miller has now confirmed that he will also produce a Graphic Novel of this story.

      Miller says this will show "a whole new side of Nancy." This story has been confirmed as one of the main stories for the planned movie Sin City 2. Nancy avenges Hartigan's death by killing remaining members of the Roark family. The Babe Wore Red (from The Babe Wore Red and Other Stories). Wrong Track (from Sex and Violence).

      Wrong Turn (from Sex and Violence). Daddy's Little Girl (from A Decade of Dark Horse #1 and also reprinted in Tales to Offend #1). Rats (from Lost, Lonely, & Lethal). Blue Eyes (from Lost, Lonely, & Lethal).

      And Behind Door Number Three? (from The Babe Wore Red and Other Stories). Silent Night (from Silent Night). The Customer is Always Right (from The Babe Wore Red and Other Stories). Fat Man and Little Boy (from Lost, Lonely, & Lethal).

      Just Another Saturday Night (from Sin City #1/2 and also reprinted in Just Another Saturday Night). Wrong Track (3 pages). Wrong Turn (23 pages). Rats (7 pages).

      Blue Eyes (14 pages). Fat Man and Little Boy (3 pages). The Babe Wore Red (24 pages long). The Customer is Always Right (3 pages long).

      And Behind Door Number Three? (4 pages long). He appears in The Big Fat Kill, where he is killed in an alleyway shootout. Is particularly skillful at inflicting pain with the use of his hands, without the necessity of any tool. Davis, Works for Wallenquist and specializes at torturing people.

      Mariah kills him before killing Doctor Fredric. Shoots and incapacitates Wallace to abduct Esther. Orrin, Doctor's Fredric assistant. Mariah kills him and his companion, Orrin, to make sure that Wallace doesn't substract any valuable information from him.

      Doctor Fredric, Kidnaps Esther under the Colonel's orders after incapacitating Wallace with narcotics in Hell and Back. He dies in the alley massacre. Schutz, another of Manute's henchmen. Miho shoots him twice with arrows in The Big Fat Kill, killing him humorously.

      Stuka, a henchman of Manute's who has a swastika tattooed on his forehead. Was going to deliver Jackie Boy's head, when Miho snuck behind him and stabbed him. Brian, Irish mercenary and demolitions expert. Unintentionally gunned down in the Magliozzi hit on Bruno.

      Carmen, Old Town prostitute with a traumatising past; lesbian lover to Daisy. Avenges her death by killing the remaining Magliozzi family members. Daisy, Carmen's lesbian lover. Killed by Daisy in Family Values.

      Enemies with Wallenquist. Don Giacco Magliozzi, Leader of Mafia in Sacred Oaks. Lucca, Vitto's brother and one of Magliozzi's hitmen. Drives Dwight and Miho to Don Giacco Magliozzi.

      Forced to shoot his brother Lucca. Vitto, Mobster who kills Carmen in Family Values. Helps Wallace rescue Esther. Good with missiles.

      Jerry, Captain's lover and war vet. Helps Wallace snap out of his drugged up state to kill off Delia and Maxine. Aids him in saving Esther, giving his life in the process. Captain, A loyal war buddy of Wallace's.

      Dies for her troubles. She administers drugs into Wallace's system, and later gives him the antidote at gunpoint. Maxine, Maxine works alongside Delia. Very dumb, and speaks in third-person.

      Works alongside Delia to try and set-up Wallace's death. Gordo, The Colonel’s muscle. Held captive and was most likely going to be sold for sex, until Marv saved her. Kimberly, the little girl Marv saves in 'Silent Night'.

      Johnny is lured into Amy's sick trap, as "Daddy" is really her lover, and Amy's victims are used to get a rise out of "Daddy". Amy and Daddy, Amy seduces Johnny and convinces him to kill her "father", so that they can be happy together. Unfortunately, he falls victim to Amy and "Daddy's" sick sexual role-playing. Johnny, Falls in love with a sweet girl named Amy, and in order to finally be with her, he must kill her controlling father.

      Gets Dwight out of jams in exchange for food. Agamemnon, is a sort-of friend to Dwight, who gives Dwight photography jobs and lets him use his darkroom. Otto, the bartender of the diner in which Peggy hangs out. A valuable source of info to Dwight in Family Values.

      Peggy, a single mother who hangs out in bars tempting men into buying her drinks, as she is an alcoholic. After his family is threatened, Liebowitz finally kills The Colonel. Brutally beats Hartigan upon his arrival in prison, and later is a puppet for The Colonel in Hell and Back. Liebowitz, Commissioner of the BCPD.

      Seemingly hired the Salesman to kill her. The Customer, a beautifuk young woman and one of the many targets of the Salesman. It is assumed he kills Becky at the end of the movie adaptation. The Salesman, a shadowy, poetic freelance assassin who performs a lot of jobs for the Ladies, the Cops and the Mafia.

      The primary victim of Ava's schemes. Damien Lord, Ava's rich husband whom she left Dwight for. Real names are Burt Schlubb (Fat Man) and Douglas Klump (Little Boy). Fat Man and Little Boy, a pair of low-rent hit men who use extravagant words in daily conversation to mask the fact that they're both incredibly stupid.

      She gives Marv drinks for free because he has killed a number of people for her. Kadie: A middle-aged fat transexual that owns the eponymous bar where Nancy and Shellie work. By The Big Fat Kill, they appear to have reconciled. She is Dwight McCarthy's occasional girlfriend.

      Shellie, a barmaid at Kadie's. Killed in an alleyway shootout. Becky, an young Old Town prostitute who works for the Colonel, mainly because she didn't want her mother to discover that she was a prostitute, partly because he offered her a considerable sum of money and a new life. Lucille, Marv's lesbian parole officer and Hartigan's lawyer.

      Seduced and corrupted by Ava Lord, and eventually takes Bob's, and his own, life. Mort, Partners with Bob and an honest detective. Becomes more professional during A Dame to Kill For. Betrays him and later regrets it.

      Bob, Hartigan’s corrupt partner. His goal is merely to achieve power and profit, regardless of what underhanded methods can lead him to that goal. Wallenquist aka the Kraut, the mysterious and potent leader of the Sin City mob. Has her nose broken by Wallace and manages to escape from Liebowitz's assault on the factory.

      Works for Wallenquist. Also uses the powers of seduction, but can also fight with a bo (staff). Mariah, a trained assassin in league with Delia, although apparently less skilled. She herself is killed by Wallace.

      She usually has sex with her victims before killing them. Uses the powers of seduction to lead unsuspecting men to their deaths. Delia aka "Blue Eyes", a trained assassin hired by The Colonel. His operations is eventually shut down by the Police and he is captured and shot by Commissioner Liebowitz.

      Runs an organ harvesting ring as well as other organized crimes. Trains assassins, as well as being one himself. The Colonel, enforcer for Wallenquist. Manute is finally gunned down by Old Town hookers.

      He is also well-nigh indestructible, having been crucified (by Miho), shot repeatedly (by Dwight), beat up numerous times (by Marv and Wallace), and relieved of an eye (again, by Marv). Manute, a huge black man who is very gentlemanly and polite in all situations, even while committing homicide, who served Ava Lord and is later recruited by the Colonel. The Senator's brother is Cardinal Roark. Senator Roark, a very corrupt politician with huge political and financial power, he has the influence to eliminate whomever he chooses.

      He finally meets his well-deserved death by Hartigan (who beats Roark to a pulp as well as rip his genitals off a second time). Due to these treatments, however, his body cannot process waste properly, resulting in his skin turning bright yellow and making him smell like rotting meat. Roark pays millions in physical rehabilitation treatments. In That Yellow Bastard, Hartigan shoots off his ear, hand and genitals while rescuing his Nancy, and Sen.

      He was handsome, young, and rich; as well also a sadistic child molester who raped and murdered pre-pubescent girls, a pastime that was covered up by his father and city police. Junior Roark aka That Yellow Bastard was the son of Senator Roark. His image later haunts Dwight's imagination. Miho kills him and his four buddies after they threaten Becky with a gun.

      Jack "Iron Jack" Rafferty/Jackie Boy is Shellie's former (abusive) boyfriend. Det. An expert liar, she is considered a goddess by Manute and a manipulative witch by Dwight, who eventually kills her. Ava Lord, ex-lover of Dwight McCarthy who manipulates men through her good looks and her innocence.

      He's killed by Marv in an unspecified (but incredibly gruesome) way. Roark occasionally uses Kevin as his personal assassin, and even joins him in his cannibalistic rituals. Cardinal Patrick Henry Roark, a Catholic Cardinal, who is brother to Senator Roark. Kevin is an agile, fast and skilled martial artist.

      Marv kills him after an exhausting exchange of blows by chopping off his limbs and letting the wolf eat him. He is sheltered by Cardinal Roark. The leftovers go to his pet wolf. Kevin, an intentionally mute sociopath who resides at "The Farm", kills women, and cannibalises their remains.

      She is a blade weapon and inline skate aficionado. Miho, a highly skilled, mute, Japanese assassin who works out for the Ladies Old Town. See Full Article. A good friend to Marv, whom often doubles as her protector.

      According to Hartigan her free time is spent studying, reading, and writing, so she would seem to be highly intelligent as well. John Hartigan. Nancy Callahan, a 19-year-old stripper who works at Kadie's and was saved as a child by Det. Next to Miho & Kevin, he is among one of the deadlier people in Sin City, but prefers to not fight.

      He is, however, a former Navy Seal with the Medal Of Honor. Wallace, a fit, long haired artist turned vigilante hero who saves Esther, and seems to be the most good natured person in Sin City. She has a love/hate relationship with Dwight McCarthy. She is six feet tall and is one of the authority figures of Old Town.

      Gail, a prostitute whose speciality is knot-tying. Goldie and Wendy, the twin prostitutes who are currently in control of the Old Town. See Full Article. He has a distinguishing scar on his forehead.

      John Hartigan, good-hearted 60-year-old ex-con/ex-cop. Det. See Full Article. Dwight McCarthy, a middle-aged photographer who, recently surgically bestowed with a new face, is deeply in debt to the women of Old Town and will go to great lengths to help them out.

      See Full Article. He is a classic example of a noir anti-hero. His personal code of honour dictates the repayment of debts and a sort of chivalry towards women. He suffers from a mental condition that causes him to hallucinate.

      Marv, a tough, violent, big bruiser of a man, who spends his time on the streets doing odd jobs for various people. This is where Dwight takes the corpses of Jackie Boy and his friends in The Big Fat Kill.. They are frequently used as a place to dump things you don't want found. The Pits, tar pits outside the city where dinosaur bones were excavated at some time.

      Marv burns down one of the buildings, and the Farm is abandoned sometime after the initial Sin City storyline. It was also home to Kevin, a serial killer with ties to the Roark family. "The Farm") is located at North Cross and Lennox, this farm shows up in several stories, including The Hard Goodbye, That Yellow Bastard, and Hell And Back. Roark Family Farm (a.k.a.

      Marv was born in the Projects. The Projects, the run-down and poor side of Sin City, is a tangle of high-rise apartments where crime runs rampant. Basin City Central Train Station, which has a direct connection to Phoenix. Kadie's, a stripper joint/bar where Nancy Callahan and Shellie work, and Dwight McCarthy and Marv hang out.

      A university of some sort is also located there. This suburb lies outside the city proper, a half an hour drive uphill. Sacred Oaks, home to the rich and powerful of Basin City. This is where the city's population of prostitutes reside; it recently came under the control of the twins Goldie and Wendy.

      Old Town is the red-light-district and is off limits to police.

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