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New York Yankees


Major league affiliations
  • American League (1901-present)
    • East Division (1969-present)
Major league titles
World Series titles (26) 2000 • 1999 • 1998 • 1996
1978 • 1977 • 1962 • 1961
1958 • 1956 • 1953 • 1952
1951 • 1950 • 1949 • 1947
1943 • 1941 • 1939 • 1938
1937 • 1936 • 1932 • 1928
1927 • 1923
AL Pennants (39) 2003 • 2001 • 2000 • 1999
1998 • 1996 • 1981 • 1978
1977 • 1976 • 1964 • 1963
1962 • 1961 • 1960 • 1958
1957 • 1956 • 1955 • 1953
1952 • 1951 • 1950 • 1949
1947 • 1943 • 1942 • 1941
1939 • 1938 • 1937 • 1936
1932 • 1928 • 1927 • 1926
1923 • 1922 • 1921
East Division titles (14) [1][2][3] 2005 • 2004 • 2003 • 2002
2001 • 2000 • 1999 • 1998
1996 • 1981 • 1980 • 1978
1977 • 1976
Wild card berths (2) 1997 • 1995

[1] - In 1981, a players' strike in the middle of the season forced the season to be split into two halves. New York had the best record in the East Division when play was stopped and was declared the first-half division winner. The Yankees had the third best record in the division when considering the entire season, two games behind Milwaukee and Baltimore.
[2] - In 1994, a players' strike wiped out the last eight weeks of the season and all post-season. New York was in first place in the East Division by six and a half games when play was stopped. No official titles were awarded in 1994.
[3] - In 2005, the Yankees and the Boston Red Sox finished the season with identical records of 95-67 and finished tied for first place in the East Division standings. Because New York won the regular season series with Boston, New York was awarded the division championship and Boston was awarded the wild card.

Major league nicknames
  • New York Yankees (1913-present)
  • New York Highlanders (1903-1912)
  • Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902)

(Also referred to as "Americans" 1903-1909 and "Yankees" 1910-1912)

Major league home ballparks
  • Yankee Stadium (1976-present)
  • Shea Stadium (1974-1975)
  • Yankee Stadium (1923-1973)
  • Polo Grounds (IV) (1913-1922)
    • a.k.a. Brush Stadium (1913-1919)
  • Hilltop Park (1903-1912)
  • Oriole Park (Baltimore) (1901-1902)
Current uniform
Retired numbers

♦ - Hall of Famer
Jackie Robinson's #42 is retired by Major League Baseball

• This box contains major league affiliations only; National Association, Western League and other minor league affiliations are not included.
• The "Established" date indicates when major league status was gained.
• Postseasons prior to 1903 are not included as they were regarded more as exhibitions.
        edit infobox

The New York Yankees are a Major League Baseball team based in The Bronx, New York City, New York. They are in the Eastern Division of the American League.

One of the American League's eight charter franchises, the Yankees have been among the most storied teams in North America over their 100+ year history; along with franchises like the Boston Celtics, Dallas Cowboys, and Montreal Canadiens, the Yankees have helped exemplify the phrase "dynasty" in professional athletics. They are one of two major league franchises which operate in New York City, the other being the New York Mets of the National League.

The Yankees have won 26 World Series in 39 appearances; the St. Louis Cardinals and the Oakland Athletics are tied for second with 9 World Series victories each, and the Los Angeles Dodgers is second in World Series appearances with 18. Among the North American major sports, the Yankees' success is only approached by the 23 Stanley Cup championships of the Montreal Canadiens of the National Hockey League. The Yankees are also the only team that is represented at every position in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Origins

At the end of the 1900 season the American League re-organized and, with its president Ban Johnson as the driving force, decided to assert itself as a new major league. Previously a minor league (known as the Western League until 1899), the American League carried over five of its previous locations and added three more on the East Coast, including one in Baltimore, Maryland, which had lost its National League team when that league contracted the year before. The intention of Johnson and the American League had been to place a team in New York City, but their efforts had been stymied by the political connections that owners of the National League New York Giants had with Tammany Hall.

When the team began play as the Baltimore Orioles in 1901, they were managed by John McGraw. As a result of a feud with league president Ban Johnson, who rigidly enforced rules about rowdyism on the field of play, McGraw jumped leagues to manage the New York Giants in the middle of the 1902 season. A week later the owner of the Giants also gained controlling interest of the Orioles and raided the team for players, after which the league declared the team forfeit and took control, still intending to move the franchise to New York when and if possible.

In January 1903, the American and National Leagues held a "peace conference" to settle conflicts over player contract disputes and to agree on future cooperation. The NL also agreed that the "junior circuit" could establish a franchise in New York. The AL's Baltimore franchise became the New York franchise when its new owners, Frank Farrell and William Devery, were able to find a ballpark location not blocked by the Giants. Farrell and Devery both had deep ties into city politics and gambling. Farrell owned a casino and several pool halls, while Devery had served as a blatantly corrupt chief of the New York City police and had only been forced out of the department at the start of 1902.

The Highlanders

The franchise's first park in New York was located at 165th St. and Broadway in Manhattan, near the highest point on the island. Consequently the field was known as Hilltop Park and the team quickly became known as the New York Highlanders. The name was also a reference to the noted British military unit The Gordon Highlanders, as the team president from 1903 to 1906 was named Joseph Gordon. Today the site of the original Hilltop Park is occupied by buildings of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center.

As the Highlanders, the team enjoyed success only twice, finishing in second place in 1904 and 1910; but otherwise, much of their first fifteen years in New York was spent in the cellar. Their somewhat tainted ownership, along with the questionable activities of some players, notably first baseman Hal Chase, raised suspicions of game-fixing, but little of that was ever proven.

Their best chance came on the last day of the 1904 season, at the Hilltop. New York pitcher Jack Chesbro threw a wild pitch in the ninth inning which allowed the eventual pennant-winning run to score for the Boston Americans. This event had historical significance in several ways. First, the presence of the Highlanders in the race had led the Giants to announce they would not participate in the World Series against a "minor league" team. Although Boston had won the pennant, the Giants still refused to participate. The resulting tongue-lashing of the Giants by the media stung their owner, John T. Brush, who then led a committee that formalized the rules governing the World Series. 1904 was the last year a Series was not played, until the strike-truncated year of 1994. For fans of the team formally named the Red Sox in 1908, the 1904 season-ender would prove to be the last time Boston would defeat the Yankees in a pennant-deciding game for literally a century.

From 1913 to 1922 the team would play in the Polo Grounds, a park owned by their National League rivals, the Giants. Relations between the clubs had warmed when the Giants were allowed to lease Hilltop Park while the Polo Grounds was being rebuilt in 1911 following a disastrous fire. During the early 1900s, the nickname "Yankees" was occasionally applied to the club, as a variant on "Americans", verifiably as early as June 21, 1904, when Patsy Dougherty was traded from Boston to New York, and the Boston Herald's report was headlined "Dougherty as a Yankee". That matter-of-fact wording suggests the nickname was already well-known. The New York Herald, on April 15, 1906, reported "Yankees win opening game from Boston, 2-1". The name grew in popularity over the team's first decade. With the change of parks in 1913, the "Highlanders" reference became obsolete, and the de facto team nickname became exclusively "Yankees". Before very long, New York Yankees had become the official nickname of the club.

By the mid 1910s, owners Farrell and Devery had become estranged and both were in need of money. At the start of 1915, they sold the team to Colonel Jacob Ruppert and Captain Tillinghast L'Hommedieu Huston. Ruppert was heir to the Ruppert brewery fortune and had also been tied to the Tammany Hall machine, serving as a U.S. Congressman for eight years. Ruppert later said, "For $450,000 we got an orphan ball club, without a home of its own, without players of outstanding ability, without prestige." But now with an owner possessing deep pockets, and a willingness to dig into them to produce a winning team.

The Ruth and Gehrig era

Perhaps one of the greatest ironies of the Yankees dominance comes from its roots. The Yankees detente with the Boston Red Sox and Chicago White Sox circa 1920 (all three collectively known as the "Insurrectos") paid off well. Over the next few years the new owners would begin to enlarge the payroll. Many of the newly acquired players who would later contribute to their success came from the Boston Red Sox, whose owner, theater impresario Harry Frazee, had bought his team on credit and needed money to pay off his loans and purchase Fenway Park from the Fenway Park Trust. Further, as Frazee owned the strongest of the "Insurrectos" franchizes, which antagonized A.L. President Ban Johnson, Frazee faced most of the legal battles which proved costly[1]. From 1919 to 1922, the Yankees acquired pitchers Waite Hoyt, Carl Mays and Herb Pennock, catcher Wally Schang, shortstop Everett Scott and third baseman Joe Dugan, all from the Red Sox. However, pitcher-turned-outfielder Babe Ruth was the biggest of them all. Frazee traded Ruth in January of 1920, citing Ruth's demand for a raise after being paid the highest salary in baseball, and despite owning the single season homerun record at the time of the trade (hitting 29 homeruns in 1919[2]). Frazee also wished to aid the Yankees, as giving the Yankees a box office draw would strengthen a legal ally, and reduce the pressure he faced[3]. Ruth was also regarded as a problem, a carouser. That would continue during his Yankees years, but the ownership was more tolerant, provided he brought fans and championships to the ballpark. Two of the four Boston newspapers agreed with the deal at the time. The Red Sox did not win a World Series from 1919 until 2004 (see Curse of the Bambino), often finding themselves out of the World Series hunt as a result of the success of the Yankees. Harry Frazee finally found success on Broadway in 1927 with the musical comedy No No Nanette, which included the song "Tea For Two".

Babe Ruth

Other critical newcomers in this period were manager Miller Huggins and general manager Ed Barrow. Huggins was hired in 1919 by Ruppert while Huston was serving in Europe with the army (this would lead to a break between the two owners, with Ruppert eventually buying Huston out in 1923). Barrow came on board after the 1920 season, and like many of the new Yankee players had previously been a part of the Red Sox organization, having managed the team since 1918. Barrow would act as general manager or president of the Yankees for the next 25 years and may deserve the bulk of the credit for the team's success during that period. He was especially noted for development of the Yankees' farm system.

The home run hitting exploits of Ruth proved popular with the public, to the extent that the Yankees were soon outdrawing their landlords, the Giants. In 1921 the Yankees were told to move out of the Polo Grounds after the 1922 season. At that time, John McGraw was said to have commented that the Yankees should "move to some out-of-the-way place, like Queens". Instead, to McGraw's chagrin, they broke ground for a new ballpark just across the Harlem River from the Polo Grounds. The construction crew moved with remarkable speed and finished the big new ballpark in less than a year. In 1923 the Yankees moved into Yankee Stadium at 161st St. and River Avenue in the Bronx. The site for the stadium was chosen because the IRT Jerome Avenue subway line, now the MTA's#4 train, went right by there, practically on top of Yankee Stadium's right-field wall. The Stadium was the first triple-deck venue in baseball and seated an astounding 58,000. It was truly "the House that Ruth Built",

From 1921 to 1928, the Yankees went through their first period of great success, winning six American League pennants and three World Series. In 1921 through 1923 they faced the Giants in the World Series, losing the first two match-ups but turning the tables in 1923 after the Big Stadium opened. Giants outfielder Casey Stengel, who even then was being called "Old Case", hit two homers to win the two games the Giants came away with. Stengel would later become a "giant" for the Yankees as a manager.

The 1927 team was so potent that it became known as "Murderers' Row" and is sometimes considered to have been the best team in the history of baseball (though similar claims have been made for other Yankee squads, notably those of 1939, 1961 and 1998). Ruth's home run total of 60 in 1927 set a single-season record which would stand for 34 years, and first baseman Lou Gehrig had his first big season with 47 round-trippers.

The Yankees would repeat as American League champions in 1928, fighting off the resurgent Philadelphia Athletics, and sweep the St. Louis Cardinals in the World Series. Babe Ruth hit .625 with 3 home runs in that series, while Lou Gehrig hit .545 and belted 4 round-trippers. After three also-ran seasons, the Yankees returned to the American League top perch under new manager Joe McCarthy in 1932 and swept the Chicago Cubs in the World Series, running their streak of consecutive World Series game wins to 12, a mark which would stand until the 2000 Yankees bested it in the World Series that year. Babe Ruth hit his famous "Called Shot" home run in Wrigley Field in Game 3 of that Series, a fitting "Swan Song" to his illustrious post-season career.

The DiMaggio era

The Yankees run during the 1930s could also be facetiously called the "McCarthy era", as manager Joe McCarthy (no relation to the infamous Senator of the same name) would guide the Yankees to new heights. Just as Gehrig stepped out of Ruth's considerable shadow, a new titan appeared on the horizon, in the person of Joe DiMaggio. The young center fielder from San Francisco was an immediate impact player, batting .323, hitting 29 homers and driving in 125 runs in his rookie season of 1936.

Behind the thundering Yankees bats of DiMaggio, Gehrig and Frank Crosetti, and a superb pitching staff led by Red Ruffing and Lefty Gomez and anchored by catcher Bill Dickey, the Yankees reeled off an unprecedented four consecutive World Series wins during 1936-1939. They did it without Gehrig for most of 1939, as the superstar's retirement due to ALS saddened the baseball world.

The strongest competition for the Yankees during that stretch was the Detroit Tigers, who won two pennants before that Yankees four-year stretch, and one after. When the Yankees did get into the Series, they had little trouble. During Game 2 of the 1936 Series, they pounded the Giants 18-4, still the World Series record (through 2005) for most runs by a team in one game. They took the Giants 4 games to 2 in that Series, and 4 games to 1 the next year. They also swept the Chicago Cubs in 1938, and the Cincinnati Reds in 1939.

After an off season came the Summer of 1941, a much-celebrated year, often described by sportswriters as the last great year of the "Golden Era", before World War II and other realities intervened. Ted Williams of the Red Sox was in the hunt for the elusive .400 batting average, which he achieved on the last day of the season. Meanwhile, DiMaggio, who had once hit in 61 straight games as a minor leaguer with the San Francisco Seals, began a hitting streak on May 15 which stretched to an astonishing 56 games.

A popular song by Les Brown celebrated this event, as Betty Bonney and the band members sang it: "He tied the mark at 44 / July the First, you know / Since then he's hit a good 12 more / Joltin' Joe DiMaggio / Joe, Joe DiMaggio, we want you on our side." The last game of the streak came on July 16 at Cleveland's League Park. The streak was finally snapped in a game at Cleveland Stadium the next night before a huge crowd at the lakefront. A crucial factor in ending the streak was the fielding of Cleveland third baseman Ken Keltner, who stopped two balls that DiMaggio hit hard to the left.

Modern baseball historians regard it as unlikely that anyone will ever hit .400 again, barring a change to the way the game is played; and as virtually impossible that anyone will approach DiMaggio's 56-game streak, which is so far beyond second place (44) as to be almost a statistical anomaly.

The Yankees made short work of the Brooklyn Dodgers in the 1941 Series. Two months and one day after the final game of the Yanks' 4 to 1 win, the Pearl Harbor attacks occurred, and many of the best ballplayers went off to World War II. The war-thinned ranks of the major leagues nonetheless found the Yanks in the post-season again, as they traded World Series wins with the St. Louis Cardinals during 1942 and 1943.

The Yanks then went into a bit of a slump, and manager McCarthy was let go early in the 1946 season. After a couple of interim managers had come and gone, Bucky Harris was brought in and the Yankees righted the ship again, winning the 1947 pennant and facing a much-tougher Dodgers team than their 1941 counterparts, in a Series that went seven games and was a harbinger of things to come for much of the next decade.

Despite finishing only 3 games back of the pennant-winning Cleveland Indians in 1948, Harris was released, and the Yankees brought in Casey Stengel as their manager. Casey had a reputation for being somewhat of a clown and had been associated with managing excruciatingly bad teams such as the mid-1930s Boston Braves, so his selection was met with no little skepticism. His tenure would prove to the most successful in the Yankees' history up to that point. The 1949 season is another that has been written about poetically, as a Yankees team that was seen as "underdogs" came from behind to catch and surpass the powerful Red Sox on the last two days of the season, in a faceoff that could be said to be the real beginning of the modern intense rivalry between these teams. The post-season proved to be a bit easier, as the Yankees knocked off their cross-town Flatbush rivals 4 games to 1.

By this time, the Great DiMaggio's career was winding down. It has often been reported that he said he wanted to retire before he became an "ordinary" player. He was also hampered by bone spurs in his heel, which hastened the final docking of the "Yankee Clipper". As if on cue, new superstars began arriving, including the "Oklahoma Kid", Mickey Mantle, whose first year (1951) was DiMaggio's curtain call.

The 1950s and 1960s

Bettering the McCarthy-era clubs, Stengel's squad won the World Series in his first five years as manager, 1949 through 1953. The five consecutive championships won by the Yankees during this period remains the major league record. Led by players like center fielder Mickey Mantle, pitcher Whitey Ford, and catcher Yogi Berra, Stengel's teams won 10 pennants and seven World Series titles in his twelve seasons as Yankee manager.

The 1950s were also a decade of significant individual achievement for Yankee players. In 1956, Mantle won the major league triple crown, leading both leagues in batting average (.353), home runs (52), and RBIs (130).

On October 8, 1956, in Game 5 of the 1956 World Series against the Dodgers, pitcher Don Larsen threw the only perfect game in World Series history. Not only was it the only perfect game to be pitched in World Series play, it remains the only no-hitter of any kind to be pitched in postseason play. The Yankees went on to win yet another World Series that season, and Larsen earned World Series MVP honors.

Yankee players also dominated the American League MVP award, with a Yankee claiming ownership six times in the decade (1950 Rizzuto, 1951 Berra, 1954 Berra, 1955 Berra, 1956 Mantle, 1957 Mantle). Pitcher Bob Turley also won the Cy Young Award in 1958, the award's third year of existence.

For the decade, the Yankees won six World Series championships ('50, 51, '52, '53, '56, '58) and eight American League pennants. Led by Mantle, Ford, Berra, Elston Howard, and the newly acquired Roger Maris, the Yankees burst into the new decade seeking to replicate the remarkable success of the 1950s.

However, the Yankees lost the 1960 World Series in heartbreaking fashion when Bill Mazeroski hit a game-winning, series-winning home run in the bottom of the ninth inning of Game 7 off Ralph Terry. It remains the only Game 7, walk-off home run in World Series history. Stengel was blamed for the World Series loss for failing to start his ace, Ford, three times in the Series, and was replaced as manager with Ralph Houk prior to the 1961 season. Stengel himself, who had reached his seventh decade in July of that year, clearly thought the issue was age discrimination, remarking, "I'll never make the mistake of turning 70 again." Yogi Berra's assessment of the loss was the equally famous comment, "We made too many wrong mistakes."

During the 1960-61 offseason, a seemingly innocuous development may have marked the beginning of the end for this Yankees dynasty. In December of 1960, Chicago insurance executive Charlie Finley purchased the Kansas City Athletics from the estate of Arnold Johnson, who had died that March.

Johnson had acquired the then-Philadelphia Athletics from the family of Connie Mack in 1954. He was the owner of Yankee Stadium at the time, but was forced to sell the stadium by American League owners as a condition of purchasing the Athletics. Johnson was also a longtime business associate of then-Yankees owners Del Webb and Dan Topping. During Johnson's ownership, the Athletics traded many young players to the Yankees for cash and aging veterans. Maris had been acquired by the Yankees in one such trade. Many fans, and even other teams, frequently accused the Athletics of being operated as an effective farm team for the Yankees. Once Finley purchased the Athletics, he immediately terminated the team's "special relationship" with the Yankees.

In the meantime, 1961 was one of the greatest years in Yankee history. Throughout the summer, Mantle and reigning-MVP Roger Maris hit home runs at a record pace as both chased Babe Ruth's single season home run record of 60. The duo's home run prowess led the media and fans to christen them 'The M & M Boys.' Ultimately, Mantle was forced to bow out in mid-September with 54 home runs when a severe hip infection forced him from the lineup. On October 1, 1961, on the final day of the season, Maris broke the record when he sent a pitch from Boston's Tracy Stallard into the right field stands at Yankee Stadium for his 61st home run. However, by decree of Commissioner Ford Frick, separate single-season home run records were maintained to reflect the fact that Ruth hit his 60 home runs during a 154-game season, while Maris hit his 61 in the first year of the new 162-game season. Some 30 years later, on September 4, 1991, an 8-member Committee for Historical Accuracy appointed by Major League Baseball did away with the dual records, giving Maris sole possession of the single-season home run record until it was broken by Mark McGwire on September 8, 1998. (McGwire's record was later broken by Barry Bonds, whose 73 home runs in 2001 remain the major league record. Maris still holds the American League record.)

The Yankees won the pennant with a 109-53 record and went on to defeat the Cincinnati Reds in five games to win the 1961 World Series. The 109 regular season wins posted by the '61 club remain the third highest single-season total in franchise history, behind only the 1998 team's 114 regular season wins and 1927 team's 110 wins. The 1961 Yankees also clubbed a then-major league record for most home runs by a team with 240, a total not surpassed until the 1996 Baltimore Orioles hit 257 with the aid of the designated hitter. Maris won his second consecutive MVP Award while Whitey Ford captured the Cy Young.

Because of the excellence of Maris, Mantle, and World Series-MVP Ford, a fine pitching staff, stellar team defense, the team's amazing depth and power, and their overall dominance, the 1961 Yankees are universally considered to be one of the greatest teams in the history of baseball, compared often to their pinstriped-brethren, the 1927 Yankees, the 1939 Yankees, and the 1998 Yankees.

In 1962, the Yankees won their second consecutive World Series, defeating the San Francisco Giants in seven games.

The Yanks would again reach the Fall Classic in 1963, but were swept in four games by the Los Angeles Dodgers. Behind World Series-MVP Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale, and Johnny Podres, the Dodgers starting pitchers threw four complete games and combined to give up just four runs all Series. This was the first time the Yankees were swept in a World Series.

Feeling burnt out after the season, Houk left the manager's chair to become the team's general manager and Berra, who himself had just retired from playing, was named the new manager of the Yankees.

The aging Yankees returned to the World Series in 1964 to face the St. Louis Cardinals in a Series immortalized by David Halberstam's book, October 1964. Despite a valiant performance by Mantle, including a walk-off home run in the bottom of the ninth of Game 3 off Cardinals' reliever Barney Schultz, the Yankees fell to the Cardinals in seven games. It was to be the last World Series appearance by the Yankees for 12 years.

After the 1964 season, CBS purchased the Yankees from Topping and Webb for $11.2 million. Jokesters at the time wondered if Walter Cronkite would become the manager, perhaps with Yogi Berra doing the newscasts. Topping and Webb had owned the Yankees for 20 years, missing the World Series only 5 times, and going 10-5 in the World Series.

By contrast, the CBS-owned teams never went to the World Series, and in the first year of the new ownership - 1965 - the Yankees finished in the second division for the first time in 40 years; the introduction of the major league amateur draft in 1965 also meant that the Yankees could no longer sign any player they wanted. In 1966 the team finished last in the AL for the first time since 1912, and next-to-last the following year. After that the team's fortunes improved somewhat, but they would not become serious contenders again until 1974.

Return to glory

George Steinbrenner purchased the club for $10 million on January 3, 1973 from CBS, renovated Yankee Stadium, hired and fired Billy Martin a number of times, feuded with star outfielder Reggie Jackson, and presided over the resurgence of the Yankees in the late '70s. Jackson's three home runs in the sixth and final game of the 1977 World Series against three different Dodger pitchers (earning him the nickname "Mr. October") defined the period as much as Martin and Steinbrenner.

The race for the pennant often came to a close competition between the Yankees and the Red Sox, and for fans of both clubs, a game between the two teams (whether in the regular season or post-season championship games) was cause for a rivalry that was often bitter and ruthless, with brawls frequently erupting between both players and fans from the two clubs. The Yankees-Red Sox rivalry came to a head in the 1978 season, when the two clubs finished the regular season in a tie for first place in the AL East. A playoff game between the two teams was held to decide who would go on to the pennant, with the game being held at Boston's Fenway Park (because the Red Sox had won more head-to-head games between the two teams that season). The Yankees won the day, driving a stake through the hearts of their rivals' fans when Bucky Dent drove a game-winning home run over the "Green Monster," one of several emotional moments in the team's history that had Red Sox fans wondering if their team was under some kind of a curse.

A new dynasty

The Yankees entered the 1990s as a last-place team, having spent well but not always wisely on free-agent players since their last appearance in the World Series in 1981. During the 1980s the Yankees, led by their All-Star first baseman Don Mattingly, had the most total wins out of any major league team, but failed to win a World Series (the first such decade since the 1910s). In 1990, Yankee pitcher Andy Hawkins became the first Yankees pitcher ever to lose a no-hitter, when the third baseman (Mike Blowers) committed an error, followed by 2 walks and an error by the left fielder (Jim Leyritz) with the bases loaded, scoring all 3 runners as well as the batter. The 4-0 loss (to the White Sox) was the largest margin of any no-hitter loss in the 20th century. To add to the oddity, the Yankees (and Hawkins) were no-hit by the White Sox 11 days later.

The bad judgment and bad luck of the '80s and early '90s started to change when, while owner Steinbrenner was under suspension, management was able to implement a coherent program without interference from above. Under general managers Gene Michael and Bob Watson and manager Buck Showalter, the club shifted its emphasis from buying talent to developing talent through its farm system and then holding onto it. The first significant sign of success came in 1994, when the Yankees had the best record in the AL when the season was cut short by the players' strike. A year later, the team reached the playoffs as the wild card and was eliminated only after a memorable series against the Seattle Mariners.

Showalter left after the 1995 season due to personality clashes with Steinbrenner and his staff and was replaced by Joe Torre. Initially derided as a retread choice ("Clueless Joe" ran the headline on one of the city's tabloid newspapers), Torre's smooth manner proved out as he led the Yankees to a World Series victory in 1996, defeating the Atlanta Braves in six games. General manager Bob Watson was dismissed when the Yankees failed to repeat in 1997 and was replaced by Brian Cashman, a former Yankees intern. However, the foundation laid by Michael and Watson of players like Derek Jeter, Andy Pettitte, Jorge Posada, Mariano Rivera and Bernie Williams was a significant factor in the Yankees' return to prominence. Other prominent members of the late 1990s championships teams acquired through trades included Paul O'Neill, David Cone, Tino Martinez, John Wetteland, Chuck Knoblauch, and Roger Clemens, while Jimmy Key, Wade Boggs, David Wells, Mike Stanton, and Orlando "El Duque" Hernández were signed as free agents.

The 1998-2000 Yankees were the first team to "three-peat" with World Series victories since the Oakland Athletics of the early 1970s. In 1998 and 1999, they swept the San Diego Padres and Atlanta Braves, respectively. In 2000, the Yankees met up with cross-town New York Mets for the first Subway Series since 1956 and won four games to one. In these four World Series victories, the Yankees won fourteen straight games. The Yankees are the most recent major league team to repeat as World Series champions.

The 1998 Yankees are widely acknowledged to be one of the greatest teams in baseball history, having compiled a then-AL record of 114 regular season wins against just 48 losses en route to a World Series sweep of the Padres. The '98 Yankees went 11-2 during the playoffs and finished with a combined record of 125-50, a major league record. However, their regular season record was surpassed by the 2001 Seattle Mariners, who went 116-46 before losing to the Yankees in the American League Championship Series.

The 21st century

In the emotional October 2001, following the September 11 attack on New York City's World Trade Center, the Yankees defeated the Oakland Athletics 3 games to 2 in the Division Series, and then the Seattle Mariners in the ALCS, 4 games to 1. But, the usually unhittable Mariano Rivera shockingly blew the lead - and World Series - to the Arizona Diamondbacks in the bottom of the 9th inning of Game 7. Arizona manager Bob Brenly used his pitching staff, which included Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling, very effectively. In addition, the usually potent Yankee attack turned ice-cold.

In 2003, the Yankees defeated their long-time rival the Boston Red Sox in a tough seven-game ALCS, which featured a near-brawl in Game 3 and a series-ending walk-off home run by Aaron Boone in the 11th inning of the final game, only to be defeated by the Florida Marlins - a team with a payroll a quarter of the size of the Yankees' - in the World Series, 4 games to 2.

The loss in the 2001 World Series effectively marked the end of the 1990s Yankee dynasty, as lynchpin players began to retire, not be re-signed, or traded. The Yankees' quick ejection from the 2002 playoffs at the hands of the Anaheim Angels accelerated the changes, as ownership and management began to look increasingly on free agent acquisitions and major trades. The trend continued after the 2003 World Series, culminating when the Yankees traded for the "best player in baseball", Alex Rodriguez, in February 2004. Other significant acquisitions during 2002 to 2004 included Jason Giambi, Hideki Matsui, Gary Sheffield, Kevin Brown, and Javier Vázquez.

In the 2004 American League Championship Series against the Red Sox, the Yankees became the first team in professional baseball history, and only the third team in North American pro sports history (it happened in the NHL twice), to lose a best-of-7 series after taking a 3-0 series lead. After the 2004 World Series, the Yankees needed to improve their pitching, which suffered in the huge collapse to the Red Sox. They signed pitchers Carl Pavano and Jaret Wright. The Yankees also acquired dominant lefty Randy Johnson from the Arizona Diamondbacks.

The 2005 season didn't start as it expected to be, once they were in last place in the American League East division. Pavano and Wright struggled, so did Johnson. As the season went on, the Yankees got better and slugger Jason Giambi started to hit again. Most of the season, the Yankees were chasing the Boston Red Sox for the division title. The Yankees seemed destined to win the division, and they did.

In the 2005 Division Series, the Angels defeated the Yankees in five games in the first round of the postseason, winning the final game by a score of 5-3. After the 2005 season, the Yankees needed to get younger and more athletic. In the 2005-2006 offseason, general manager Brian Cashman took control of the Yankees, because owner George Steinbrenner and his advisors signed older talented players after the 2001 season. From the end of the 2005 World Series to December 2005, the baseball world noticed that the Yankees were patient with signing free agents. On December 23, 2005, the Yankees stunned the baseball world by signing center fielder Johnny Damon from the rival Red Sox, where he was a marquee player.

Many explanations have been given for the lack of Yankee World Series titles since 2000. These include depletion of the Yankee farm system because of trades and free agent acquisitions, the aging or departure of the players who had formed the core of the Yankees during the late 1990s, and allegedly poor coaching (like the overuse of Mariano Rivera in the 2001 World Series). Buster Olney, in his book The Last Night of the Yankee Dynasty, argues that George Steinbrenner's management style resulted in the players burning out psychologically. Several sabermetricians have argued that success in the playoffs is largely the result of luck. This argument is bolstered by the fact that the production of the Yankees' core players has decreased steadily since their 1996 World Series title.

One particularly creative explanation jokingly proposed by blogger Larry Mahnken is the "Curse of Clay Bellinger". By analogy with the Curse of the Bambino, Mahnken points to the departure of utility player Clay Bellinger from the Yankee roster following the 2001 season and asserts that the Yankees will never again win the World Series until either they make amends to Bellinger or they win the championship anyway. The tautology is part of the joke.

Despite their most recent drought in World Series championships, the Yankees have continued to perform well in the regular season, recently winning their eighth straight AL East division title. In September 2005, the club set a new American League home attendance record of 4,090,696. The Yankees are only the third franchise in sports history to draw over 4 million in regular season attendance at their own ballpark (the others being the 1993 Toronto Blue Jays with 4,057,947 and the 1993 Colorado Rockies with 4,483,350).

Controversy

The Yankees are a notable team not only for their impressive history on the field, but also for their financial situation. The current ownership spends more on player salaries than any other franchise in baseball. As of 2005, the team payroll is more than $208 million, which is $85 million more than the second-highest team, the Red Sox, and more than the five lowest-payroll teams combined [4]. Frustrated after being outbid for pitcher Jose Contreras prior to the 2003 season, Red Sox CEO Larry Lucchino even went so far as to dub the Yankees the "Evil Empire," a characterization that is primarily popular among Red Sox fans.

It is a heated debate whether the Yankees' free-spending is positive or negative for baseball, and whether a strict salary cap would make the sport fairer and increase parity among the large-market and small-market teams. The following are arguments for and against these spending practices:

For:

Against:

In 2003, the Office of Foreign Assets Control reported that the Yankees engaged in illegal trade with Cuba and had to settle with the United States government for US$75,000 [6].

Quick facts

Postseason appearances

Baseball Hall of Famers

(Affiliation according to National Baseball Hall of Fame; R. Jackson is affiliated with the Athletics, but wears a Yankee cap[7][8][9])

Further information: New York Yankees: Award Winners and League Leaders

Current roster

40-man roster

Updated on January 27, 2006  

Coaching Staff

Manager

Coaches



Minor league affiliations


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. has had two television specials, detailing behind-the-scenes information, interviews, and bloopers.
. The O.C. Coaches. Main article at: List of episodes of The O.C.. Manager. Notable plots include:.

Updated on January 27, 2006  . Season 3, 2005-2006, premiered on September 8, 2005. Jackson is affiliated with the Athletics, but wears a Yankee cap[7][8][9]). She shoots Trey in the back, and it is unsure if he lives or dies (though it is revealed in the third season that he fell into a coma). (Affiliation according to National Baseball Hall of Fame; R. They fight, and Marissa arrives as Trey is in the process of strangling Ryan. In 2003, the Office of Foreign Assets Control reported that the Yankees engaged in illegal trade with Cuba and had to settle with the United States government for US$75,000 [6]. Ryan finds out about Trey's attempted rape of Marissa, and confronts him.

Against:. Jess and Trey become involved in a drug deal at the Bait Shop. For:. Initially unwilling to go, Kirsten is convinced by her family. The following are arguments for and against these spending practices:. After Kirsten gets drunk yet again, Sandy decides to send her to a rehabilitation clinic. It is a heated debate whether the Yankees' free-spending is positive or negative for baseball, and whether a strict salary cap would make the sport fairer and increase parity among the large-market and small-market teams. The Season Finale opens with Caleb's funeral, for which Hailey and Jimmy return.

Frustrated after being outbid for pitcher Jose Contreras prior to the 2003 season, Red Sox CEO Larry Lucchino even went so far as to dub the Yankees the "Evil Empire," a characterization that is primarily popular among Red Sox fans. Notable plots included:. As of 2005, the team payroll is more than $208 million, which is $85 million more than the second-highest team, the Red Sox, and more than the five lowest-payroll teams combined [4]. The second season, November 2004 - May 2005, contained 24 episodes and once again ended with a cliffhanger. The current ownership spends more on player salaries than any other franchise in baseball. Most of all, Seth ran away on the Summer Breeze, his sailboat, distraught by Ryan's departure. The Yankees are a notable team not only for their impressive history on the field, but also for their financial situation. Ryan discovered Theresa was pregnant, possibly by him, and decided to move back to Chino to support her.

The Yankees are only the third franchise in sports history to draw over 4 million in regular season attendance at their own ballpark (the others being the 1993 Toronto Blue Jays with 4,057,947 and the 1993 Colorado Rockies with 4,483,350). Seth and Summer had problems after her father did not take a liking to him. In September 2005, the club set a new American League home attendance record of 4,090,696. Jimmy and Sandy's restaurant seemed likely never to open. Despite their most recent drought in World Series championships, the Yankees have continued to perform well in the regular season, recently winning their eighth straight AL East division title. Marissa moved in with Julie and Caleb, but had redeveloped her drinking problem. The tautology is part of the joke. In the season finale, many events came to a head: Caleb and Julie were married in a surprisingly uneventful ceremony; however Caleb later revealed to Sandy that he was on the verge of bankruptcy.

By analogy with the Curse of the Bambino, Mahnken points to the departure of utility player Clay Bellinger from the Yankee roster following the 2001 season and asserts that the Yankees will never again win the World Series until either they make amends to Bellinger or they win the championship anyway. Notable plots included:. One particularly creative explanation jokingly proposed by blogger Larry Mahnken is the "Curse of Clay Bellinger". This was due to the FOX network's coverage of Major League Baseball playoffs and the World Series. This argument is bolstered by the fact that the production of the Yankees' core players has decreased steadily since their 1996 World Series title. It comprised 27 episodes, including a seven-episode "season zero" that began in late summer, with a 43-day hiatus before the next twenty episodes. Several sabermetricians have argued that success in the playoffs is largely the result of luck. The first season ran from August 2003 - May 2004.

Buster Olney, in his book The Last Night of the Yankee Dynasty, argues that George Steinbrenner's management style resulted in the players burning out psychologically. Additionally, many of the characters make fun of their stereotypes, such as when Ryan escapes a conversation by saying, "I'm going to go brood silently". These include depletion of the Yankee farm system because of trades and free agent acquisitions, the aging or departure of the players who had formed the core of the Yankees during the late 1990s, and allegedly poor coaching (like the overuse of Mariano Rivera in the 2001 World Series). This could be seen as a self-irony, since most of the actors playing the teens on the show are over 25. Many explanations have been given for the lack of Yankee World Series titles since 2000. In that episode, Ryan comments on the actor's age: "How can they play high school kids?", by which Seth replies: "Hollywood, man!". On December 23, 2005, the Yankees stunned the baseball world by signing center fielder Johnny Damon from the rival Red Sox, where he was a marquee player. Notable examples include comments about Benjamin McKenzie's likeness to Russell Crowe, Peter Gallagher's eyebrows, and Mischa Barton's weight - things often cited by fans - in addition to the show featuring its own soap opera entitled The Valley, which is similar to The O.C. An episode of the first season entitled "The L.A." introduced the viewers to some of the actors from that show.

From the end of the 2005 World Series to December 2005, the baseball world noticed that the Yankees were patient with signing free agents. The show also often makes fun of its soap opera elements and often includes self-referential jokes. In the 2005-2006 offseason, general manager Brian Cashman took control of the Yankees, because owner George Steinbrenner and his advisors signed older talented players after the 2001 season. Unlike many other family-friendly teen shows, The O.C. takes on the gritty issues of the rich and wealthy, such as marital problems, drugs and alcohol, and familial relationships. After the 2005 season, the Yankees needed to get younger and more athletic. Ryan becomes good friends with the Cohens' geeky misfit son Seth, and falls in love with the beautiful girl next door, Marissa Cooper, whose best friend, Summer Roberts, is the girl Seth has been infatuated with for years. In the 2005 Division Series, the Angels defeated the Yankees in five games in the first round of the postseason, winning the final game by a score of 5-3. He is taken in under the care of Sandy Cohen, a successful lawyer who himself rose from humble roots; and his wife Kirsten, daughter of enormously-wealthy Orange County real estate mogul, Caleb Nichol.

The Yankees seemed destined to win the division, and they did. The story follows Ryan Atwood, a troubled teenage boy from a dysfunctional family in Chino, California, who is transplanted to an upper-class community. Most of the season, the Yankees were chasing the Boston Red Sox for the division title. The show revolves around two upper-class families in the southern California city of Newport Beach, in Orange County. As the season went on, the Yankees got better and slugger Jason Giambi started to hit again. . Pavano and Wright struggled, so did Johnson. To date it has aired in over 35 countries worldwide.

The 2005 season didn't start as it expected to be, once they were in last place in the American League East division. The show has been criticized by some Orange County residents who feel that the show misrepresents their community. The Yankees also acquired dominant lefty Randy Johnson from the Arizona Diamondbacks. The series has been noted for its music selections, which have helped some previously little-known bands gain a certain level of fame (exposure at the least), so much so that to date, the producers have released five compilation albums featuring highlighted performers. They signed pitchers Carl Pavano and Jaret Wright. The series, created by Josh Schwartz, debuted on August 5, 2003, with the tagline, "The best new show of the fall is coming this summer." The show's third season originally aired in the US on Thursday nights at 8/7c PM, the same timeslot it held in the second season, before moving to 9/8c PM in January 2006. After the 2004 World Series, the Yankees needed to improve their pitching, which suffered in the huge collapse to the Red Sox. O.C. stands for Orange County, California.

In the 2004 American League Championship Series against the Red Sox, the Yankees became the first team in professional baseball history, and only the third team in North American pro sports history (it happened in the NHL twice), to lose a best-of-7 series after taking a 3-0 series lead. The O.C. is an American television drama program broadcast on the Fox Network in the USA and on various networks around the world. Other significant acquisitions during 2002 to 2004 included Jason Giambi, Hideki Matsui, Gary Sheffield, Kevin Brown, and Javier Vázquez. The complete first and second season are also available on DVD. The trend continued after the 2003 World Series, culminating when the Yankees traded for the "best player in baseball", Alex Rodriguez, in February 2004. Broadcast by Swedish Channel 5. The Yankees' quick ejection from the 2002 playoffs at the hands of the Anaheim Angels accelerated the changes, as ownership and management began to look increasingly on free agent acquisitions and major trades. The complete first and second seasons are also available on DVD.

The loss in the 2001 World Series effectively marked the end of the 1990s Yankee dynasty, as lynchpin players began to retire, not be re-signed, or traded. Currently showing on E4 (first look) on Tuesday nights, and Channel 4 a few days later. In 2003, the Yankees defeated their long-time rival the Boston Red Sox in a tough seven-game ALCS, which featured a near-brawl in Game 3 and a series-ending walk-off home run by Aaron Boone in the 11th inning of the final game, only to be defeated by the Florida Marlins - a team with a payroll a quarter of the size of the Yankees' - in the World Series, 4 games to 2. Broadcast by Channel 4 as part of their Sunday morning T4 strand of youth-oriented programming, in the slot formerly occupied by Dawson's Creek. In addition, the usually potent Yankee attack turned ice-cold. Also replayed on Sundays 6:00pm. Arizona manager Bob Brenly used his pitching staff, which included Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling, very effectively. CNBC-E is now showing the second season on Thursdays at 9:00pm and 1:00am late night.

But, the usually unhittable Mariano Rivera shockingly blew the lead - and World Series - to the Arizona Diamondbacks in the bottom of the 9th inning of Game 7. Broadcasted by CNBC-E (www.cnbce.com). In the emotional October 2001, following the September 11 attack on New York City's World Trade Center, the Yankees defeated the Oakland Athletics 3 games to 2 in the Division Series, and then the Seattle Mariners in the ALCS, 4 games to 1. Rachel Bilson and particularly Adam Brody are very successful among the Italian public. However, their regular season record was surpassed by the 2001 Seattle Mariners, who went 116-46 before losing to the Yankees in the American League Championship Series. is successful in Italy. The '98 Yankees went 11-2 during the playoffs and finished with a combined record of 125-50, a major league record. Like Dawson's Creek and Beverly Hills 90210, The O.C.

The 1998 Yankees are widely acknowledged to be one of the greatest teams in baseball history, having compiled a then-AL record of 114 regular season wins against just 48 losses en route to a World Series sweep of the Padres. The complete first is avaiable on DVD. The Yankees are the most recent major league team to repeat as World Series champions. is named simply "O.C.". In these four World Series victories, the Yankees won fourteen straight games. The O.C. In 2000, the Yankees met up with cross-town New York Mets for the first Subway Series since 1956 and won four games to one. Italia 1 is now showing the second season on Wednesday at 9:00pm.

In 1998 and 1999, they swept the San Diego Padres and Atlanta Braves, respectively. Broadcasted by Italia 1(Mediaset). The 1998-2000 Yankees were the first team to "three-peat" with World Series victories since the Oakland Athletics of the early 1970s. The complete first and second seasons are available on DVD. Other prominent members of the late 1990s championships teams acquired through trades included Paul O'Neill, David Cone, Tino Martinez, John Wetteland, Chuck Knoblauch, and Roger Clemens, while Jimmy Key, Wade Boggs, David Wells, Mike Stanton, and Orlando "El Duque" Hernández were signed as free agents. Shows on Monday at 8:00 pm with re-runs the next Sunday at 1:00pm. However, the foundation laid by Michael and Watson of players like Derek Jeter, Andy Pettitte, Jorge Posada, Mariano Rivera and Bernie Williams was a significant factor in the Yankees' return to prominence. Broadcasted by ETC.

General manager Bob Watson was dismissed when the Yankees failed to repeat in 1997 and was replaced by Brian Cashman, a former Yankees intern. Unlike other series, this drama does not have a Chinese-translated name, or is just simply called "OC". Initially derided as a retread choice ("Clueless Joe" ran the headline on one of the city's tabloid newspapers), Torre's smooth manner proved out as he led the Yankees to a World Series victory in 1996, defeating the Atlanta Braves in six games. It's still showing on Wednesdays at 9:30 pm with Chinese subtitles. Showalter left after the 1995 season due to personality clashes with Steinbrenner and his staff and was replaced by Joe Torre. - Obsessed Completely"), then Season 2 immediately started on the next Wednesday (which was already September) at 9:30 pm. A year later, the team reached the playoffs as the wild card and was eliminated only after a memorable series against the Seattle Mariners. Season 1 was shown on Monday to Thursday at 9:30 pm in August 2005 (the last Thursday after episode 27 was the television special "The O.C.

The first significant sign of success came in 1994, when the Yankees had the best record in the AL when the season was cut short by the players' strike. Broadcasted by TVB Pearl. Under general managers Gene Michael and Bob Watson and manager Buck Showalter, the club shifted its emphasis from buying talent to developing talent through its farm system and then holding onto it. Inital two-hour slot (9:00 pm to 10:00 pm; 10:00 pm to 11:00 pm) on Tuesdays, presently Tuesday 9:00 pm on Star World -- Monday 9:00 pm on Zee Cafe; although both channels are still in the first season, Zee Cafe is about three episodes ahead of Star World. The bad judgment and bad luck of the '80s and early '90s started to change when, while owner Steinbrenner was under suspension, management was able to implement a coherent program without interference from above. Broadcasted by both Star World and Zee Cafe. To add to the oddity, the Yankees (and Hawkins) were no-hit by the White Sox 11 days later. The complete first and second seasons are available on DVD.

The 4-0 loss (to the White Sox) was the largest margin of any no-hitter loss in the 20th century. Translated name: "O.C., California". In 1990, Yankee pitcher Andy Hawkins became the first Yankees pitcher ever to lose a no-hitter, when the third baseman (Mike Blowers) committed an error, followed by 2 walks and an error by the left fielder (Jim Leyritz) with the bases loaded, scoring all 3 runners as well as the batter. ProSieben is now repeating the first season on Saturday at 3:00pm. During the 1980s the Yankees, led by their All-Star first baseman Don Mattingly, had the most total wins out of any major league team, but failed to win a World Series (the first such decade since the 1910s). Was showed on Wednesday at 9:15 pm. The Yankees entered the 1990s as a last-place team, having spent well but not always wisely on free-agent players since their last appearance in the World Series in 1981. Broadcasted by ProSieben.

The Yankees won the day, driving a stake through the hearts of their rivals' fans when Bucky Dent drove a game-winning home run over the "Green Monster," one of several emotional moments in the team's history that had Red Sox fans wondering if their team was under some kind of a curse. The dubbed version of the show is called "O.C.: Um Estranho no Paraíso". A playoff game between the two teams was held to decide who would go on to the pennant, with the game being held at Boston's Fenway Park (because the Red Sox had won more head-to-head games between the two teams that season). SBT - public channel - broadcasts previous season dubbed on Sundays at 11:00 am. The Yankees-Red Sox rivalry came to a head in the 1978 season, when the two clubs finished the regular season in a tie for first place in the AL East. The complete first and second seasons are also available on DVD. The race for the pennant often came to a close competition between the Yankees and the Red Sox, and for fans of both clubs, a game between the two teams (whether in the regular season or post-season championship games) was cause for a rivalry that was often bitter and ruthless, with brawls frequently erupting between both players and fans from the two clubs. Presented firstly by Warner Channel on cable TV, currently showing Season 3 on Wednesdays at 8:00 pm and Thursdays at 1:00 pm with subtitles.

October") defined the period as much as Martin and Steinbrenner. The complete first and second seasons are available on DVD. Jackson's three home runs in the sixth and final game of the 1977 World Series against three different Dodger pitchers (earning him the nickname "Mr. The third season can be seen on Network Ten, Tuesday at 8:30 pm. George Steinbrenner purchased the club for $10 million on January 3, 1973 from CBS, renovated Yankee Stadium, hired and fired Billy Martin a number of times, feuded with star outfielder Reggie Jackson, and presided over the resurgence of the Yankees in the late '70s. Later in the year Network Ten picked up the show and owns the rights today. After that the team's fortunes improved somewhat, but they would not become serious contenders again until 1974. Aired originally on Nine Network, for three episodes before being taken off air due to lack of advertising, promotion and therefore poor ratings.

In 1966 the team finished last in the AL for the first time since 1912, and next-to-last the following year. The complete first and second seasons are available on DVD. By contrast, the CBS-owned teams never went to the World Series, and in the first year of the new ownership - 1965 - the Yankees finished in the second division for the first time in 40 years; the introduction of the major league amateur draft in 1965 also meant that the Yankees could no longer sign any player they wanted. Veronica airs reruns of Season 1 & 2 from Monday til Thursday at 6:30 PM. Topping and Webb had owned the Yankees for 20 years, missing the World Series only 5 times, and going 10-5 in the World Series. Airs Season 3 Sundays at 5:00 PM. Jokesters at the time wondered if Walter Cronkite would become the manager, perhaps with Yogi Berra doing the newscasts. Broadcasted by Net 5.

After the 1964 season, CBS purchased the Yankees from Topping and Webb for $11.2 million. The Region Two DVD set does not come with the seventh disc. It was to be the last World Series appearance by the Yankees for 12 years. Bonus features include featurettes, Gag reel from Seasons 1 and 2, Extended cut of "The Rainy Day Women", Commentary on "The Chrismukkah That Almost Wasn't" and "The Rainy Day Women", and "The O.C.: Obsessed Completely" Retrospective Special. Despite a valiant performance by Mantle, including a walk-off home run in the bottom of the ninth of Game 3 off Cardinals' reliever Barney Schultz, the Yankees fell to the Cardinals in seven games. Unlike Season 1, the episodes will be presented in widescreen for the DVD set. Louis Cardinals in a Series immortalized by David Halberstam's book, October 1964. The O.C.: The Complete Second Season (August 23, 2005) — 7 Disc DVD set that contains all 24 episodes from the show's second season.

The aging Yankees returned to the World Series in 1964 to face the St. Bonus features include featurettes, deleted scenes, commentary on the Pilot episode, and pop-up music guides on certain episodes. Feeling burnt out after the season, Houk left the manager's chair to become the team's general manager and Berra, who himself had just retired from playing, was named the new manager of the Yankees. The O.C.: The Complete First Season (October 26, 2004) — 7 Disc DVD set that contains all 27 episodes from the show's first season. This was the first time the Yankees were swept in a World Series. - A Day In The Life (First Aired 9-23-04). Behind World Series-MVP Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale, and Johnny Podres, the Dodgers starting pitchers threw four complete games and combined to give up just four runs all Series. Welcome to The O.C.

The Yanks would again reach the Fall Classic in 1963, but were swept in four games by the Los Angeles Dodgers. - Obsessed Completely (First Aired 9-16-04). In 1962, the Yankees won their second consecutive World Series, defeating the San Francisco Giants in seven games. The O.C. Because of the excellence of Maris, Mantle, and World Series-MVP Ford, a fine pitching staff, stellar team defense, the team's amazing depth and power, and their overall dominance, the 1961 Yankees are universally considered to be one of the greatest teams in the history of baseball, compared often to their pinstriped-brethren, the 1927 Yankees, the 1939 Yankees, and the 1998 Yankees. He's actually an editor for many episodes for The O.C. Maris won his second consecutive MVP Award while Whitey Ford captured the Cy Young. Matt Ramsey is a real person.

The 1961 Yankees also clubbed a then-major league record for most home runs by a team with 240, a total not surpassed until the 1996 Baltimore Orioles hit 257 with the aid of the designated hitter. According to The Simpsons episode Milhouse of Sand and Fog, Lisa Simpson enjoys watching The O.C. The 109 regular season wins posted by the '61 club remain the third highest single-season total in franchise history, behind only the 1998 team's 114 regular season wins and 1927 team's 110 wins. Delta Goodrem was rumored to play Marissa's Australian cousin. The Yankees won the pennant with a 109-53 record and went on to defeat the Cincinnati Reds in five games to win the 1961 World Series. Tate Donovan, who played Jimmy Cooper on the show, directed an episode of The O.C., "The Game Plan.". Maris still holds the American League record.). Chrismukkah is a holiday that the Cohen household celebrates to blend Seth's combined Jewish and Christian heritage.

(McGwire's record was later broken by Barry Bonds, whose 73 home runs in 2001 remain the major league record. Both season premieres from Season 2 and 3 feature an opening scene after the credits with both Summer and Marissa sitting by a pool. Some 30 years later, on September 4, 1991, an 8-member Committee for Historical Accuracy appointed by Major League Baseball did away with the dual records, giving Maris sole possession of the single-season home run record until it was broken by Mark McGwire on September 8, 1998. Before the start of the 3rd season, Adam Brody, Rachel Bilson, and Ben McKenzie were Punk'd by Ashton Kutcher or his crew members. However, by decree of Commissioner Ford Frick, separate single-season home run records were maintained to reflect the fact that Ruth hit his 60 home runs during a 154-game season, while Maris hit his 61 in the first year of the new 162-game season. They hinted at this when Summer reveals the star of "The Valley" improvises his lines. On October 1, 1961, on the final day of the season, Maris broke the record when he sent a pitch from Boston's Tracy Stallard into the right field stands at Yankee Stadium for his 61st home run. Adam Brody improvises some of his lines.

The duo's home run prowess led the media and fans to christen them 'The M & M Boys.' Ultimately, Mantle was forced to bow out in mid-September with 54 home runs when a severe hip infection forced him from the lineup. U2 debuted their song Sometimes You Can't Make It On Your Own on the show before it was released as a single, as did Coldplay with their song Fix You. Throughout the summer, Mantle and reigning-MVP Roger Maris hit home runs at a record pace as both chased Babe Ruth's single season home run record of 60. Yahoo Launch News Story. In the meantime, 1961 was one of the greatest years in Yankee history. in "The Vegas" from Season 1 which aired April 28 2004. Once Finley purchased the Athletics, he immediately terminated the team's "special relationship" with the Yankees. The Beastie Boys single "Ch-Check It Out" debuted on The O.C.

Many fans, and even other teams, frequently accused the Athletics of being operated as an effective farm team for the Yankees. Appropriately enough, most of these developments are owned by the Irvine Company. Maris had been acquired by the Yankees in one such trade. Many of the newer wealthy housing developments seen on the show are actually in Newport Coast (which was recently annexed by Newport Beach) and Crystal Cove, a few minutes drive down the PCH from Newport Beach. During Johnson's ownership, the Athletics traded many young players to the Yankees for cash and aging veterans. The parody of Laguna Beach: The Real Orange County, "Sherman Oaks: The Real Valley," is set in Sherman Oaks, an affluent community in northern LA. Johnson was also a longtime business associate of then-Yankees owners Del Webb and Dan Topping. The onscreen parody of the show, "The Valley", refers to the San Fernando Valley, a region of LA which is home to many of the large media conglomerates.

He was the owner of Yankee Stadium at the time, but was forced to sell the stadium by American League owners as a condition of purchasing the Athletics. The Newport Group seems to have been inspired by the Irvine Company, which owns a large portion of the real estate in southern and central Orange County. Johnson had acquired the then-Philadelphia Athletics from the family of Connie Mack in 1954. The Newport Group HQ is also the same building used for the Miami-Dade Police HQ in CSI: Miami. In December of 1960, Chicago insurance executive Charlie Finley purchased the Kansas City Athletics from the estate of Arnold Johnson, who had died that March. The trailer for Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith aired during the March 10th episode of the second season, precursored by a scene with OC star Adam Brody (acting as Seth). During the 1960-61 offseason, a seemingly innocuous development may have marked the beginning of the end for this Yankees dynasty. Airport, John Wayne Field but backed down the next day after his office received negative phone calls and emails from angry county residents.

Stengel himself, who had reached his seventh decade in July of that year, clearly thought the issue was age discrimination, remarking, "I'll never make the mistake of turning 70 again." Yogi Berra's assessment of the loss was the equally famous comment, "We made too many wrong mistakes.". Orange County Supervisor Chris Norby went as far as to propose changing the name of Orange County's John Wayne Airport to The O.C. Stengel was blamed for the World Series loss for failing to start his ace, Ford, three times in the Series, and was replaced as manager with Ralph Houk prior to the 1961 season. The show is called "The O.C.", and not "Orange County" as originally planned, because a movie of that name was released a year before the show premiered. It remains the only Game 7, walk-off home run in World Series history. (Compare San Francisco and "Frisco".) The abbreviation "O.C." was also used by local radio and television stations, but without "The." At first, the name of the show was met with scorn, but since then, some people call it "The O.C." as a joke. However, the Yankees lost the 1960 World Series in heartbreaking fashion when Bill Mazeroski hit a game-winning, series-winning home run in the bottom of the ninth inning of Game 7 off Ralph Terry. Before the show aired, Orange County residents referred to their county by its full name, or just "O.C.", and "The O.C." was used as a derogatory term for the area primarily used by residents of Los Angeles.

Led by Mantle, Ford, Berra, Elston Howard, and the newly acquired Roger Maris, the Yankees burst into the new decade seeking to replicate the remarkable success of the 1950s. Additionally, the TV show's Balboa Wetlands appear to be based upon real-life Orange County's Bolsa Chica Wetlands. For the decade, the Yankees won six World Series championships ('50, 51, '52, '53, '56, '58) and eight American League pennants. Newport Union High School, however, does not exist. Pitcher Bob Turley also won the Cy Young Award in 1958, the award's third year of existence. Furthermore, many of the other schools mentioned on the show, such as Mater Dei High School and UCI, are all actually there. Yankee players also dominated the American League MVP award, with a Yankee claiming ownership six times in the decade (1950 Rizzuto, 1951 Berra, 1954 Berra, 1955 Berra, 1956 Mantle, 1957 Mantle). There exists a Newport Harbor High School, but it is a public school.

The Yankees went on to win yet another World Series that season, and Larsen earned World Series MVP honors. The Harbor School is a fictional private school which may have been inspired by the Sage Hill School, an elite private school in the hills of Newport Coast. Not only was it the only perfect game to be pitched in World Series play, it remains the only no-hitter of any kind to be pitched in postseason play. Though the show isn't shot on location, characters frequently mention popular Orange County hangouts like South Coast Plaza and Fashion Island. On October 8, 1956, in Game 5 of the 1956 World Series against the Dodgers, pitcher Don Larsen threw the only perfect game in World Series history. Due to labor union salary rules about filming outside of Los Angeles County, The O.C. is actually filmed at Raleigh Studios in Manhattan Beach (40 miles away from the actual Newport Beach) to reduce costs. In 1956, Mantle won the major league triple crown, leading both leagues in batting average (.353), home runs (52), and RBIs (130). The show's producer, McG, attended Corona del Mar High School in Newport Beach, and he originally intended to film the high school scenes at CdM's crosstown rival Newport Harbor High School.

The 1950s were also a decade of significant individual achievement for Yankee players. Johnny's falls to his death off a cliff while being drunk. Led by players like center fielder Mickey Mantle, pitcher Whitey Ford, and catcher Yogi Berra, Stengel's teams won 10 pennants and seven World Series titles in his twelve seasons as Yankee manager. He develops a love for Marissa, for helping him out when he couldn't make the surfing team, and her sister, Kaitlin. The five consecutive championships won by the Yankees during this period remains the major league record. The arrival and departure of Johnny Harper, a former schoolmate of Marissa's while she was at Newport Union. Bettering the McCarthy-era clubs, Stengel's squad won the World Series in his first five years as manager, 1949 through 1953. He ends up missing his interview with a Brown scout and makes up an elaborate story, Summer finds out that he eventually skipped the interview and also that he is "rocking the ganja.".

As if on cue, new superstars began arriving, including the "Oklahoma Kid", Mickey Mantle, whose first year (1951) was DiMaggio's curtain call. Seth starting to smoke marijuana, which was supplied by Kaitlin to relieve college pressures. He was also hampered by bone spurs in his heel, which hastened the final docking of the "Yankee Clipper". It becomes apparent that she is more rebellious and devious than she was before, when it is revealed that she stole money to go back home, smokes marijuana and supplies Seth with some, and sparks more trouble in the Ryan-Marissa-Johnny love triangle. It has often been reported that he said he wanted to retire before he became an "ordinary" player. The return of Kaitlin Cooper, now age 14-going-on-15. By this time, the Great DiMaggio's career was winding down. He starts to develop a loving relationship with Julie Cooper, after a conversation during the Chrismukkah season.

The post-season proved to be a bit easier, as the Yankees knocked off their cross-town Flatbush rivals 4 games to 1. Neil Roberts, Summer's father. The 1949 season is another that has been written about poetically, as a Yankees team that was seen as "underdogs" came from behind to catch and surpass the powerful Red Sox on the last two days of the season, in a faceoff that could be said to be the real beginning of the modern intense rivalry between these teams. The return of Dr. His tenure would prove to the most successful in the Yankees' history up to that point. Julie and Kirsten deciding to turn their catering business into a high-end dating service. Casey had a reputation for being somewhat of a clown and had been associated with managing excruciatingly bad teams such as the mid-1930s Boston Braves, so his selection was met with no little skepticism. Summer shocking Seth with her exceptional SAT Score of 2300.

Despite finishing only 3 games back of the pennant-winning Cleveland Indians in 1948, Harris was released, and the Yankees brought in Casey Stengel as their manager. He had an affair with Johnny's ex-girlfriend. After a couple of interim managers had come and gone, Bucky Harris was brought in and the Yankees righted the ship again, winning the 1947 pennant and facing a much-tougher Dodgers team than their 1941 counterparts, in a Series that went seven games and was a harbinger of things to come for much of the next decade. The introduction of Kevin Volchok, a surfer who was Johnny's rival. The Yanks then went into a bit of a slump, and manager McCarthy was let go early in the 1946 season. Seth and Summer both applying for college; in particular, Brown University. Louis Cardinals during 1942 and 1943. Julie eventually abandons her motel room for a trailer park.

The war-thinned ranks of the major leagues nonetheless found the Yanks in the post-season again, as they traded World Series wins with the St. Julie officially hits rock bottom as she is forced to live out of a low-rent motel room, while Marissa moves in with Summer. Two months and one day after the final game of the Yanks' 4 to 1 win, the Pearl Harbor attacks occurred, and many of the best ballplayers went off to World War II. Julie & Marissa are evicted from the mansion. The Yankees made short work of the Brooklyn Dodgers in the 1941 Series. His personal life conflicts with his job, notably when he was temporarily fired for taking Ryan to a strip club, screwing up a presentation for a project, and currently dating a board member's daughter in order to persuade him on doing the hospital project. Modern baseball historians regard it as unlikely that anyone will ever hit .400 again, barring a change to the way the game is played; and as virtually impossible that anyone will approach DiMaggio's 56-game streak, which is so far beyond second place (44) as to be almost a statistical anomaly. The introduction of Matt Ramsey, Sandy's assistant in running the Newport Group.

A crucial factor in ending the streak was the fielding of Cleveland third baseman Ken Keltner, who stopped two balls that DiMaggio hit hard to the left. Sandy taking over control of the Newport Group, and hiring newcomer Matt Ramsey to help run it. The streak was finally snapped in a game at Cleveland Stadium the next night before a huge crowd at the lakefront. Jimmy originally plans to marry Julie for her inheritance, but leaves after discovering that Caleb was bankrupt. A popular song by Les Brown celebrated this event, as Betty Bonney and the band members sang it: "He tied the mark at 44 / July the First, you know / Since then he's hit a good 12 more / Joltin' Joe DiMaggio / Joe, Joe DiMaggio, we want you on our side." The last game of the streak came on July 16 at Cleveland's League Park. Jimmy eventually fails to pay back the money and as a result, he is severely beaten by Don and his cronies. Meanwhile, DiMaggio, who had once hit in 61 straight games as a minor leaguer with the San Francisco Seals, began a hitting streak on May 15 which stretched to an astonishing 56 games. The return of Jimmy, who was deep in debt with a loanshark, named Don.

Ted Williams of the Red Sox was in the hunt for the elusive .400 batting average, which he achieved on the last day of the season. She begins to start a friendship with Summer and Seth, after they look at how mean-spirited her mother is. After an off season came the Summer of 1941, a much-celebrated year, often described by sportswriters as the last great year of the "Golden Era", before World War II and other realities intervened. The introduction of Taylor Townsend, Summer's rival, the two of whom fight over the social chair position previously occupied by Marissa. They also swept the Chicago Cubs in 1938, and the Cincinnati Reds in 1939. The arrival and departure of Jack Hess, the new Dean of Discipline, who leaves after Summer finds out about his relationship with Taylor Townsend and blackmails him to let Ryan back in Harbor. They took the Giants 4 games to 2 in that Series, and 4 games to 1 the next year. Later, she is readmitted by the school board.

During Game 2 of the 1936 Series, they pounded the Giants 18-4, still the World Series record (through 2005) for most runs by a team in one game. She is introduced to Johnny Harper, Casey (his girlfriend), and Dennis "Chili" Childress (his best friend). When the Yankees did get into the Series, they had little trouble. Marissa being expelled from Harbor, after what happened in season 2. The strongest competition for the Yankees during that stretch was the Detroit Tigers, who won two pennants before that Yankees four-year stretch, and one after. Kirsten learning about Charlotte's real intentions from Julie, she forgives her and decides to try and start up a business with her. They did it without Gehrig for most of 1939, as the superstar's retirement due to ALS saddened the baseball world. Her plans to steal money from the people of Newport were thwarted by Julie Cooper, after she found out who Charlotte was and sending the money to a real organization.

Behind the thundering Yankees bats of DiMaggio, Gehrig and Frank Crosetti, and a superb pitching staff led by Red Ruffing and Lefty Gomez and anchored by catcher Bill Dickey, the Yankees reeled off an unprecedented four consecutive World Series wins during 1936-1939. The arrival and departure of Charlotte Morgan, a con artist who tries to manipulate Kirsten while at rehab. The young center fielder from San Francisco was an immediate impact player, batting .323, hitting 29 homers and driving in 125 runs in his rookie season of 1936. The departure of Trey Atwood, who was shot last season by Marissa and left Newport on a Greyhound bus to Las Vegas. Just as Gehrig stepped out of Ruth's considerable shadow, a new titan appeared on the horizon, in the person of Joe DiMaggio. Caleb's death from a heart attack. The Yankees run during the 1930s could also be facetiously called the "McCarthy era", as manager Joe McCarthy (no relation to the infamous Senator of the same name) would guide the Yankees to new heights. Seth meeting George Lucas and Zach taking Summer to the prom, which eventually switches as Zach meets Lucas and Seth goes after Summer.

Babe Ruth hit his famous "Called Shot" home run in Wrigley Field in Game 3 of that Series, a fitting "Swan Song" to his illustrious post-season career. Kirsten's addiction to alcohol and consequential car crash. After three also-ran seasons, the Yankees returned to the American League top perch under new manager Joe McCarthy in 1932 and swept the Chicago Cubs in the World Series, running their streak of consecutive World Series game wins to 12, a mark which would stand until the 2000 Yankees bested it in the World Series that year. Trey (while under the influence of drugs) attempting to rape Marissa. Babe Ruth hit .625 with 3 home runs in that series, while Lou Gehrig hit .545 and belted 4 round-trippers. The deterioration of Caleb and Julie's marriage, and his threats to divorce her. Louis Cardinals in the World Series. Trey's arrest (and subsequent acquittal) on charges related to a local bad girl, Jess, overdosing on drugs and nearly drowning at his 21st birthday party, with whom he begins to have a sexual relationship.

The Yankees would repeat as American League champions in 1928, fighting off the resurgent Philadelphia Athletics, and sweep the St. Trey Atwood's release from jail, temporary lodge with the Cohens, and move into Alex's old apartment. Ruth's home run total of 60 in 1927 set a single-season record which would stand for 34 years, and first baseman Lou Gehrig had his first big season with 47 round-trippers. The arrival and departure of Carter Buckley, the new magazine editor for Newport Living, and his sexual tension with Kirsten. The 1927 team was so potent that it became known as "Murderers' Row" and is sometimes considered to have been the best team in the history of baseball (though similar claims have been made for other Yankee squads, notably those of 1939, 1961 and 1998). The arrival and departure of Lance Baldwin, a man from Julie Cooper's past, who blackmails Julie with an 80's pornographic videotape (The Porn Identity) starring herself and Lance, which debuted at the Newport Living launch. Stengel would later become a "giant" for the Yankees as a manager. Summer breaking up with Zach after realizing she still had feelings for Seth, with whom she gets back together.

Giants outfielder Casey Stengel, who even then was being called "Old Case", hit two homers to win the two games the Giants came away with. Lindsay being confirmed by a DNA test to be Caleb's daughter, only to leave for Chicago with her mother. In 1921 through 1923 they faced the Giants in the World Series, losing the first two match-ups but turning the tables in 1923 after the Big Stadium opened. The arrival and departure of Rebecca Bloom, Sandy's previous flame, wanting to clear her name for a crime that occurred years ago (and the death of her father, Sandy's mentor). From 1921 to 1928, the Yankees went through their first period of great success, winning six American League pennants and three World Series. Caleb suffering a minor heart attack, and his subsequent desire to become more-family oriented. It was truly "the House that Ruth Built",. Alex having a passionate, but short-lived, relationship with Marissa, and her low-key departure from Newport Beach.

The Stadium was the first triple-deck venue in baseball and seated an astounding 58,000. Zach, Seth (and Summer) creating a comic book (and then graphic novel) based on the lives of their friends. The site for the stadium was chosen because the IRT Jerome Avenue subway line, now the MTA's#4 train, went right by there, practically on top of Yankee Stadium's right-field wall. Julie's ego-driven project of "Newport Living", a lifestyle magazine. and River Avenue in the Bronx. Jimmy Cooper's affair with Julie, who leaves for Maui after realizing that she and Caleb should try their marriage. In 1923 the Yankees moved into Yankee Stadium at 161st St. The discovery of Caleb's affair with Renee Wheeler, with whom he has a child, Lindsay, and attempts to develop a relationship with, culminating in his offer to adopt her.

The construction crew moved with remarkable speed and finished the big new ballpark in less than a year. The introduction of Alexandria 'Alex' Kelly, an emancipated 17-year-old who works at The Bait Shop nightclub with Seth, and both of them having an ensuing relationship. Instead, to McGraw's chagrin, they broke ground for a new ballpark just across the Harlem River from the Polo Grounds. Caleb's resignation as CEO of the Newport Group, and corresponding appointment of Julie as CEO and Kirsten as CFO. At that time, John McGraw was said to have commented that the Yankees should "move to some out-of-the-way place, like Queens". Caleb's arrest on bribery and related charges, ending with his acquittal after former employee, Renee Wheeler, testifies about their past affair. In 1921 the Yankees were told to move out of the Polo Grounds after the 1922 season. Ryan's relationship with Lindsay, fellow student at Harbor High School on an academic scholarship, which complicates under the realization that Lindsay is actually Seth's aunt.

The home run hitting exploits of Ruth proved popular with the public, to the extent that the Yankees were soon outdrawing their landlords, the Giants. The introduction of two new boyfriends, Summer's Zach, a "WASP version of Seth", and Marissa's D.J., her family's yard worker (who breaks up with her after realizing that they were together to anger Julie). He was especially noted for development of the Yankees' farm system. Seth and Ryan's eventual return to Newport Beach. Barrow would act as general manager or president of the Yankees for the next 25 years and may deserve the bulk of the credit for the team's success during that period. Seth's refusal to leave Portland, Oregon where he was staying with Luke and his father after running away in the season one finale. Barrow came on board after the 1920 season, and like many of the new Yankee players had previously been a part of the Red Sox organization, having managed the team since 1918. Theresa lying to Ryan, telling him that she had a miscarriage.

Huggins was hired in 1919 by Ruppert while Huston was serving in Europe with the army (this would lead to a break between the two owners, with Ruppert eventually buying Huston out in 1923). Kirsten's outgoing and spoiled younger sister Hailey, notorious for not doing anything with her life, coming to stay and developing a relationship with Jimmy. Other critical newcomers in this period were manager Miller Huggins and general manager Ed Barrow. Luke's discovery of his father's homosexuality and eventual moving away from Orange County (and the series). Harry Frazee finally found success on Broadway in 1927 with the musical comedy No No Nanette, which included the song "Tea For Two". Sandy's overbearing mother, Sophie, (nicknamed 'the Nana') coming to stay and announcing that she was dying of cancer. The Red Sox did not win a World Series from 1919 until 2004 (see Curse of the Bambino), often finding themselves out of the World Series hunt as a result of the success of the Yankees. Ryan's ex-girlfriend and good friend Theresa, from Chino, who came to stay for a while and whose abusive fiancé Eddie forced her to flee.

Two of the four Boston newspapers agreed with the deal at the time. Julie's short-lived relationship with Luke, and her subsequent engagement to Caleb (which many suspected was simply for money). That would continue during his Yankees years, but the ownership was more tolerant, provided he brought fans and championships to the ballpark. Seth having to choose between Summer and his good friend Anna. Ruth was also regarded as a problem, a carouser. Marissa dealing with a substance abuse problem of drinking and drugs. Frazee also wished to aid the Yankees, as giving the Yankees a box office draw would strengthen a legal ally, and reduce the pressure he faced[3]. Caleb's manipulations and dirty business deals.

Frazee traded Ruth in January of 1920, citing Ruth's demand for a raise after being paid the highest salary in baseball, and despite owning the single season homerun record at the time of the trade (hitting 29 homeruns in 1919[2]). Ryan dealing with the manipulative Oliver, who tried to take Marissa away. However, pitcher-turned-outfielder Babe Ruth was the biggest of them all. Sandy and Jimmy eventually going into business with a restaurant, only to be bought out by Caleb. From 1919 to 1922, the Yankees acquired pitchers Waite Hoyt, Carl Mays and Herb Pennock, catcher Wally Schang, shortstop Everett Scott and third baseman Joe Dugan, all from the Red Sox. Sandy's changing of jobs from public defender to private attorney, which soon saw him disillusioned with the industry. President Ban Johnson, Frazee faced most of the legal battles which proved costly[1]. Sandy's jealousy over Kirsten and Jimmy's old relationship.

Further, as Frazee owned the strongest of the "Insurrectos" franchizes, which antagonized A.L. The marriage breakdown of Marissa's parents, Jimmy and Julie, as his business fraud was made public. Many of the newly acquired players who would later contribute to their success came from the Boston Red Sox, whose owner, theater impresario Harry Frazee, had bought his team on credit and needed money to pay off his loans and purchase Fenway Park from the Fenway Park Trust. Seth's love for Marissa's best friend, Summer Roberts, becoming a strange relationship. Over the next few years the new owners would begin to enlarge the payroll. The destruction of Marissa's relationship with her boyfriend Luke, and his subsequent change in personality. The Yankees detente with the Boston Red Sox and Chicago White Sox circa 1920 (all three collectively known as the "Insurrectos") paid off well. Ryan's introduction and integration by Sandy into Orange County society, and his growing relationship with Marissa Cooper.

Perhaps one of the greatest ironies of the Yankees dominance comes from its roots. Nikki Griffin will return as Jess Sathers who is helped by Ryan Atwood with issues dealing with her boyfriend Jim. Ruppert later said, "For $450,000 we got an orphan ball club, without a home of its own, without players of outstanding ability, without prestige." But now with an owner possessing deep pockets, and a willingness to dig into them to produce a winning team. Logan Marshall-Green returned as Trey Atwood who survived a gunshot wound only to leave town in the very same episode on a bus headed to Las Vegas. Congressman for eight years. [1]. Ruppert was heir to the Ruppert brewery fortune and had also been tied to the Tammany Hall machine, serving as a U.S. Samaire Armstrong will return as Anna Stern.

At the start of 1915, they sold the team to Colonel Jacob Ruppert and Captain Tillinghast L'Hommedieu Huston. Nikki Reed will play Sadie Campbell, a cousin of Johnny Harper. By the mid 1910s, owners Farrell and Devery had become estranged and both were in need of money. Willa Holland plays Kaitlin Cooper, Marissa's little sister who is more like their mother (vain, egotistical and conniving). Before very long, New York Yankees had become the official nickname of the club. Lisa Rotondi plays Gwen Harper, Johnny's mother. With the change of parks in 1913, the "Highlanders" reference became obsolete, and the de facto team nickname became exclusively "Yankees". Cam Gigandet plays Kevin Volchok, a fellow surfer who decided to try and make Ryan's life a living hell after he tried to pick on Johnny.

The name grew in popularity over the team's first decade. Jeff Hephner plays Matt Ramsey, Kurt Williams' former associate and currently the Vice-President under Sandy Cohen at the Newport Group. The New York Herald, on April 15, 1906, reported "Yankees win opening game from Boston, 2-1". Rob Brownstein played Kurt Williams, a potential buyer of the Newport Group. That matter-of-fact wording suggests the nickname was already well-known. Paula Trickey plays Veronica Townsend, Taylor's domineering mother who continuously hounds her daughter about her own appearance and the fact she doesn't have much of a social life. During the early 1900s, the nickname "Yankees" was occasionally applied to the club, as a variant on "Americans", verifiably as early as June 21, 1904, when Patsy Dougherty was traded from Boston to New York, and the Boston Herald's report was headlined "Dougherty as a Yankee". Blake Robbins played Don, a mafia soldier who badgered Jimmy for money, when he failed to pay back the money, Jimmy was severely beaten.

Relations between the clubs had warmed when the Giants were allowed to lease Hilltop Park while the Polo Grounds was being rebuilt in 1911 following a disastrous fire. Taylor is extremely lonely, and upon realizing this, Summer and Seth become friends with her. From 1913 to 1922 the team would play in the Polo Grounds, a park owned by their National League rivals, the Giants. Autumn Reeser plays Taylor Townsend, an overachieving and conniving student who's even more superficial and vain than Summer, and who battles her for full control of Harbor School's social scene. For fans of the team formally named the Red Sox in 1908, the 1904 season-ender would prove to be the last time Boston would defeat the Yankees in a pennant-deciding game for literally a century. Eric Mabius played Jack Hess, the extremely vindictive, misantrophic, and devious new Dean of Discipline of the Harbor School who was ultimately thrown out of the school by Sandy's bluff. 1904 was the last year a Series was not played, until the strike-truncated year of 1994. Richard Voll played Glen Morgan, the husband of Charlotte and co-conspirator in her scams.

Brush, who then led a committee that formalized the rules governing the World Series. Johnny Lewis plays Dennis "Chili" Childress, a surfer and skateboarder at Newport Union. The resulting tongue-lashing of the Giants by the media stung their owner, John T. Kayla Ewell plays Casey, Johnny's ex-girlfriend who cheated on him with Kevin Volchok. Although Boston had won the pennant, the Giants still refused to participate. Ryan Donowho played Johnny Harper, a 17-year-old student at Newport Union who is into the beach and skateboarding, he had a huge crush on Marissa, his life was cut short after he falls from a cliff-top. First, the presence of the Highlanders in the race had led the Giants to announce they would not participate in the World Series against a "minor league" team. Interestingly, the character's first name resembles the word 'charlatan.'.

This event had historical significance in several ways. She tried to get Julie to scam people out of their money with a fake charity but Julie had the checks made out to a real substance abuse organization instead of the fake one. New York pitcher Jack Chesbro threw a wild pitch in the ninth inning which allowed the eventual pennant-winning run to score for the Boston Americans. She seemed to share a lot of the same traits of Kirsten but uses this to try and manipulate the latter. Their best chance came on the last day of the 1904 season, at the Hilltop. Jeri Ryan played Charlotte Morgan, a con-artist Kirsten Cohen meets in rehab. Their somewhat tainted ownership, along with the questionable activities of some players, notably first baseman Hal Chase, raised suspicions of game-fixing, but little of that was ever proven. Nikki Griffin played Jess Sathers, a sexy cocaine-addicted blonde to whom Trey was attracted.

As the Highlanders, the team enjoyed success only twice, finishing in second place in 1904 and 1910; but otherwise, much of their first fifteen years in New York was spent in the cellar. Marguerite Moreau played Reed Carlson, the executive of the graphic novel company for which Seth and Zach pitched their graphic novel. Today the site of the original Hilltop Park is occupied by buildings of the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. He survives the gunshot and eventually leaves the hospital and heads for Las Vegas. The name was also a reference to the noted British military unit The Gordon Highlanders, as the team president from 1903 to 1906 was named Joseph Gordon. At the end of season two Trey is shot by Marissa. Consequently the field was known as Hilltop Park and the team quickly became known as the New York Highlanders. Logan Marshall-Green played Trey Atwood, Ryan's older brother who is released from jail.

and Broadway in Manhattan, near the highest point on the island. Johnny Messner played Lance Baldwin, an opportunistic man from Julie Cooper's past. The franchise's first park in New York was located at 165th St. Billy Campbell played Carter Buckley, the former editor of Newport Living Magazine, he left after he got a new job and came close to having a relationship with Kirsten. Farrell owned a casino and several pool halls, while Devery had served as a blatantly corrupt chief of the New York City police and had only been forced out of the department at the start of 1902. Kim Delaney played Rebecca Bloom, an old flame of Sandy's who started to come between his marriage with Kirsten. Farrell and Devery both had deep ties into city politics and gambling. Olivia Wilde played Alex Kelly, who worked at the Bait Shop, who is Seth's, and later Marissa's, love interest.

The AL's Baltimore franchise became the New York franchise when its new owners, Frank Farrell and William Devery, were able to find a ballpark location not blocked by the Giants. Kathleen York played Renee Wheeler, Lindsay's mother, who had an affair with Caleb Nichol. The NL also agreed that the "junior circuit" could establish a franchise in New York. Shannon Lucio played Lindsay Gardner, a fellow student and Ryan's love interest, who lives with her mother, Renee Wheeler, in Chicago, Illinois. In January 1903, the American and National Leagues held a "peace conference" to settle conflicts over player contract disputes and to agree on future cooperation. Nicholas Gonzalez played D.J., the Nichol's gardener and one of Marissa's love interests in the beginning of season two. A week later the owner of the Giants also gained controlling interest of the Orioles and raided the team for players, after which the league declared the team forfeit and took control, still intending to move the franchise to New York when and if possible. Creator Josh Schwartz has said "He's off in Marin County working for Lucasfilm.".

As a result of a feud with league president Ban Johnson, who rigidly enforced rules about rowdyism on the field of play, McGraw jumped leagues to manage the New York Giants in the middle of the 1902 season. He eventually decided to let the two be together after realizing that they still loved one another. When the team began play as the Baltimore Orioles in 1901, they were managed by John McGraw. Michael Cassidy played Zach Stephens, who had an on-again/off-again relationship with Summer after Seth left at the end of Season 1. The intention of Johnson and the American League had been to place a team in New York City, but their efforts had been stymied by the political connections that owners of the National League New York Giants had with Tammany Hall. He returns for more apperances in Season Three. Previously a minor league (known as the Western League until 1899), the American League carried over five of its previous locations and added three more on the East Coast, including one in Baltimore, Maryland, which had lost its National League team when that league contracted the year before. Neil Roberts, Summer's father.

At the end of the 1900 season the American League re-organized and, with its president Ban Johnson as the driving force, decided to assert itself as a new major league. Michael Nouri plays Dr. . Linda Lavin plays Sophie Cohen, Sandy's overbearing and obnoxious mother, referred to as "The Nana.". The Yankees are also the only team that is represented at every position in the Baseball Hall of Fame. Eric Balfour played Eddie, Theresa's abusive fiancé. Among the North American major sports, the Yankees' success is only approached by the 23 Stanley Cup championships of the Montreal Canadiens of the National Hockey League. Shailene Woodley played Kaitlin Cooper for six episodes as Marissa's younger sister, returning midway through season 3.

Louis Cardinals and the Oakland Athletics are tied for second with 9 World Series victories each, and the Los Angeles Dodgers is second in World Series appearances with 18. The end of season 2 showed reason to believe that she would become a better person. The Yankees have won 26 World Series in 39 appearances; the St. Amanda Righetti played Hailey Nichol, Kirsten's spoiled sister and love interest for Jimmy, who eventually left for Japan to pursue a job in the fashion industry. They are one of two major league franchises which operate in New York City, the other being the New York Mets of the National League. Taylor Handley played Oliver Trask, a mentally unbalanced teenager who infatuates over Marissa after meeting her in a therapy clinic. One of the American League's eight charter franchises, the Yankees have been among the most storied teams in North America over their 100+ year history; along with franchises like the Boston Celtics, Dallas Cowboys, and Montreal Canadiens, the Yankees have helped exemplify the phrase "dynasty" in professional athletics. Navi Rawat plays Theresa, an old girlfriend of Ryan's.

They are in the Eastern Division of the American League. Kim, the Principal at Harbor High School where Ryan and his new friends attend. The New York Yankees are a Major League Baseball team based in The Bronx, New York City, New York. Rosalind Chao played Dr. ♦ - Hall of Famer
Jackie Robinson's #42 is retired by Major League Baseball
. Bonnie Somerville played Rachel, a colleague of Sandy's. (Also referred to as "Americans" 1903-1909 and "Yankees" 1910-1912). Her character left in season one for Pittsburgh and will be returning in season three.

Because New York won the regular season series with Boston, New York was awarded the division championship and Boston was awarded the wild card.. Samaire Armstrong played Anna Stern, a female version of Seth who initially appeared for one episode but was brought back at fan request for several episodes. No official titles were awarded in 1994.
[3] - In 2005, the Yankees and the Boston Red Sox finished the season with identical records of 95-67 and finished tied for first place in the East Division standings. Bradley Stryker played Trey Atwood for two episodes as Ryan's older brother. New York was in first place in the East Division by six and a half games when play was stopped. Holly was best friends with Summer and Marissa until she got caught making out with Marissa's boyfriend Luke. The Yankees had the third best record in the division when considering the entire season, two games behind Milwaukee and Baltimore.
[2] - In 1994, a players' strike wiped out the last eight weeks of the season and all post-season. Ashley Hartman played Holly Fischer for six episodes.

New York had the best record in the East Division when play was stopped and was declared the first-half division winner. He returned following Caleb's death at the end of the second season, but after running into financial troubles (and being attacked) he decided to leave Newport again early in the third season. [1] - In 1981, a players' strike in the middle of the season forced the season to be split into two halves. for Maui. Rookie: GCL Yankees, Gulf Coast League. He was a regular cast member for episodes 1-34, but his character left the O.C. Short A: Staten Island Yankees, New York-Penn League. Tate Donovan played Jimmy Cooper, Marissa's (and sister Kaitlin's) father (and Julie's husband).

A: Charleston RiverDogs, South Atlantic League. It was found out that he was broke at the reading of his will, leaving Julie with nothing. Advanced A: Tampa Yankees, Florida State League. Additionally, his is the first main character to be killed off when he had a heart attack. AA: Trenton Thunder, Eastern League. His character was recurring throughout the first season until he became a regular during the second season. AAA: Columbus Clippers, International League. Alan Dale played Caleb Nichol, Kirsten's uptight, unscrupulous and selfish businessman father and eventually Julie Cooper's husband.

54 Rob Thomson (special assignment instructor). Chris Carmack played Luke Ward, Marissa's egotistic-turned-good-natured jock ex-boyfriend and regular cast member episodes 2-24. -- Tony Peña (first base). Rachel Bilson plays Summer Roberts, the strong-willed socialite of the four main teen characters — the love interest of Seth, and best friend to Marissa. 50 Rich Monteleone (special pitching instructor). By extension, she struggles to keep her daughter Marissa away from Ryan, whose own background in Chino is as far removed from Newport as is Julie's. -- Lee Mazzilli (bench). An underlying motivation in Julie's actions comes from her effort to keep all aspects of her life far from a humble past in the decidedly less fashionable community of Riverside.

23 Don Mattingly (hitting). Part of the fallout included being evicted from the mansion where she had been living; living in a condominium purchased for her under questionable circumstances and living in a trailer park. -- Joe Kerrigan (bullpen pitching). However, she eventually lost everything when it was discovered Caleb was broke at the time of his death. 49 Ron Guidry (pitching). After Caleb's death, Julie showed signs of wanting to reconcile with Jimmy. -- Larry Bowa (third base). After learning that he stole a large sum of money from clients, she eventually divorced Jimmy and married Caleb Nichol.

99 Mike Borzello (bullpen catching). Melinda Clarke plays Marissa's vain and scheming mother Julie Cooper (formerly Julie Cooper-Nichol), who was married to financial planner Jimmy Cooper in the beginning of the series.  6 Joe Torre. Mischa Barton plays Marissa Cooper, a local teenage girl whose once-seemingly-charmed life has many problems (alcohol abuse, her dysfunctional family, her romantic relationships, and exploring her sexuality among them). The Yankee Stadium grounds crew has become famous in their own right for their infield sweeping in the middle of the fifth inning when they dance to the popular 70's hit YMCA by the Village People. Seth is a stereotypical nerd who is known for his quick quips and popular culture references. The Yankee fans who sit behind the right-field portion of the bleacher seats in Yankee Stadium have become so well known for their rowdy behavior that they are often referred to as the "bleacher creatures." They have also popularized a type of chant called "Role Call" where, in the top of the first inning, they chant each field player's name on the Yankees repeatedly until the player acknowledges the chant. Adam Brody plays Seth Cohen, the only child of Sandy and Kirsten.

The Yankees have teamed up with New Era and Adidas to make caps for sale. He has an on/off relationship with Marissa. Under George Steinbrenner, the team has a strict dress code that forbids long hair and facial hair below the lip. Benjamin McKenzie plays Ryan Atwood, an outsider from Chino, California who is brought to live with the Cohen family in Newport. American football's example of balanced salaries, correlated with its now-massive parity and mainstream impact, demonstrates that keeping athletic salaries fair is good for the sport and therefore everyone - TV outlets, owners, fans. Kelly Rowan plays Kirsten Cohen, the wife of Sandy Cohen and the mother of Seth Cohen and former CFO of her late father's real estate company and has an off and on alcohol problem. Manny Ramírez, Pedro Martínez), who might otherwise freely use the potentiality as a bargaining chip. He is currently the CEO of the Newport Group.

This phenomenon even causes the Yankees to announce their intentions not to pursue certain free agents (e.g. Peter Gallagher plays Sandy Cohen, a good-natured lawyer and former public defender who brings Ryan Atwood to his home. The willingness of the Yankees to pay premium prices for top talent encourages players and their agents to demand unreasonably high prices, further diluting talent throughout the rest of the league. Allowing one team to bid highly for the best talent makes it more difficult for lower-spending teams (primarily in smaller metropolitan areas) to compete. In a free-market society, an owner who wishes to spend as much as he wants should not be restricted from doing so.

The Yankees drive attendance, merchandise sales and TV revenues, helping to subsidize less-profitable teams. It has also been argued that the New York Mets, because they share the same market, could spend at a higher level if their owner was inclined to do so, and therefore the Yankees spending reflects Steinbrenner's greater commitment to winning rather than a singular advantage over all other teams.[5]. New York, as the largest market with the highest revenues, should spend in accordance with their vast resources. As "America's Team" the Yankees give other baseball fans a team to "hate" or root against, thereby further generating interest in baseball games involving the Yankees and baseball in general.

The Yankees are "America's Team" They give the casual, or "bandwagon," baseball fan someone to root for when he/she does not have a local favorite, or when their local team is playing poorly. Won ALDS (3-0) over Texas Rangers. Won ALCS (4-2) over Cleveland Indians. Won 1998 World Series (4-0) over San Diego Padres.

Oriole Park (Baltimore) (1901-1902). Hilltop Park (1903-1912). Brush Stadium (1913-1919). a.k.a.

Polo Grounds (IV) (1913-1922)

    . Yankee Stadium (1923-1973). Shea Stadium (1974-1975). Yankee Stadium (1976-present).

    Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902). New York Highlanders (1903-1912). New York Yankees (1913-present). East Division (1969-present).

    American League (1901-present)

      .

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