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National Hockey League

The modernized NHL shield logo debuted in 2005, replacing the orange and black shield, which had been used since the league's inception. The silver color is a homage to the Stanley Cup, the trophy awarded to the NHL champion.

The National Hockey League (NHL) is a professional sports organization composed of hockey teams in the United States and Canada, where it is also known by its French name, Ligue Nationale de Hockey (LNH). It is generally regarded as the premier professional ice hockey league in the world. The NHL is one of the major professional sports leagues of North America.

History

The beginnings to The Original Six

The National Hockey League was founded in 1917 in Montreal after a series of disputes within the (Canadian) National Hockey Association (NHA) between the Toronto Blueshirts' owner Edward J. Livingstone and the owners of the other teams. The owners met in Montreal's Windsor Hotel to consider the league's future on February 11, 1917. Livingstone, unable to attend the meeting because of illness, was shocked to learn that owners had chosen to effectively eject him and the Blueshirts from the NHA. Arguments and discussions ensued which eventually led to the formation of the National Hockey League at on November 26, 1917, with the Montreal Canadiens, Montreal Wanderers, Ottawa Senators, Quebec Bulldogs and newly-renamed Toronto Arenas as founding members.

The classic NHL shield logo, used until the end of the 2004 lockout.

The NHL endured a rocky inaugural season in 1917-18, starting with the temporary shuttering of the Bulldogs. On January 2, 1918, the Westmount Arena in Montreal, home to the Wanderers and Canadiens, was destroyed in a fire. The Wanderers, already a shadow of its former self, folded in the wake of the fire, ending one of the most storied franchises in the early years of Canadian professional hockey. With the Bulldogs and Wanderers out, the NHL operated with just three teams for the remainder of its opening year, and through the second season.

Though the league struggled to stay in business during its first decade, NHL teams were quite successful on the ice, winning the Stanley Cup seven out of its first nine years. (The 1918-19 competition was cancelled because of the Spanish Flu epidemic that had hit Seattle). By 1926, having increased player salaries to a level that couldn't be matched by other Canadian leagues, the NHL was alone in Stanley Cup competition. The league had also expanded into the United States, with the Boston Bruins in 1924, the New York Americans and the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1925 and the New York Rangers, Detroit Cougars (later to become the Red Wings), and Chicago Blackhawks in 1926. Canadian additions included the Montreal Maroons and Hamilton Tigers. By the end of the 1930-31 season, the NHL featured a total of 10 teams. However, the Great Depression took a toll on the league; teams such as the Pirates, Americans and Ottawa Senators folded. With these developments and the onset of World War II, the NHL was reduced to six teams during its 25th anniversary year of (1942) – six teams still known today, if somewhat inaccurately, as the Original Six: The Canadiens, Maple Leafs, Red Wings, Bruins, Rangers, and Blackhawks.

Expansion: 1967 and beyond

The rise of the Western Hockey League, which many pundits thought planned to transform into a major league and challenge for the Stanley Cup, spurred the NHL in 1967 to undertake its first expansion since the 1920s. Six new teams were added to the NHL roster, and placed in their own newly-created division. They were the Philadelphia Flyers, St. Louis Blues, Minnesota North Stars, Los Angeles Kings, Oakland Seals, and Pittsburgh Penguins. Three years later, the NHL added the Vancouver Canucks and Buffalo Sabres as franchises.

In 1972, the World Hockey Association (WHA) was formed. Though it never challenged for the Stanley Cup, its status as a viable NHL rival was unquestionable. In response to that, the NHL decided to rush its own expansion plans by adding the New York Islanders and Atlanta Flames that year, along with the Kansas City Scouts and Washington Capitals two years later. The dilution of the talent pool, however, caused the overall quality of play to suffer. The two leagues fought for the services of hockey players and fans until the WHA folded in 1979. Four of the remaining six WHA teams merged with the NHL: The Hartford Whalers, Québec Nordiques, Edmonton Oilers, and Winnipeg Jets. As of 2005, the Oilers are the last remaining original WHA franchise still playing in the city where they began in the NHL.

In the early 90's the NHL expanded further with five new franchises. The San Jose Sharks debuted in 1991, a season later the Ottawa Senators would join the NHL along with the Tampa Bay Lightning. In 1993, the NHL added an additional two teams, the Anaheim Mighty Ducks and the Florida Panthers. Approaching the new millennium, the NHL added another four teams; the Nashville Predators (1998), the Atlanta Thrashers (1999), the Minnesota Wild and the Columbus Blue Jackets (both added in 2000) bringing the total to 30 teams.

Labour Issues

There have been three work stoppages in NHL history, all happening between 1992 and 2005.

The first was a strike by the National Hockey League Players Association in April 1992 which lasted for 10 days, but the strike was settled quickly and all affected games were rescheduled.

A lockout at the start of the 1994-95 forced the league to reduce the schedule from 84 games to just 48, with the teams playing only intra-conference games during the reduced season. The resulting collective bargaining agreement was set for renegotiation in 1998 and extended to September 15, 2004.

Negotiations to replace the contract that expired in 2004 turned into one of the most contentious collective bargaining sessions in the history of professional sports. The league vowed to install what it dubbed "cost certainty" for its teams, but the National Hockey League Players Association countered that the move was little more than a euphemism for a salary cap, which the union initially said it would not accept. With no new agreement in hand when the existing contract expired on September 15, 2004, league commissioner Gary Bettman announced a lockout of the players union and cessation of operations by the NHL head office, causing the NHL to lose an entire season.

A new collective bargaining agreement was ratified in July 2005 with a term of six years with an option of extending the collective bargaining agreement for an additional year at the end of the term, allowing the NHL to resume as of the 2005-06 season.

Post Lockout

On October 5, 2005, the first post-lockout NHL season got under way with 15 games. Of those 15 games, 11 were in front of sell out crowds. The NHL, despite negative press generated during the lockout, has success attracting fans to the initial games of the season and extends fan bases into non-traditional markets in the US such as Nashville, Atlanta, and the Carolinas.

Current organization

The National Hockey League currently has 30 teams divided into two conferences, and 6 divisions, an organization that started in the year 2000. Over the years many different organizations have existed. For a list of previous teams see List of defunct NHL teams.

Eastern Conference

Western Conference

Season structure

Regular season

Each team in the NHL plays 82 regular season games, 41 games at home and 41 on the road. Teams play 32 games within their division (8 games against four other teams), 40 games against non-divisional, conference opponents (4 games against 10 other teams) and 10 interconference games, 1 game against each team in two of the three divisions in the opposite conference. The two divisions from the opposite conference which each team plays against will be rotated every year, much like interleague play in baseball.

Points are awarded for each game as follows:

  • Two points are awarded for a win
  • One point for losing in overtime or a shootout
  • Zero points for a loss in regulation time.

At the end of the regular season, the team that finishes with the most points in each division is crowned the division champion.

Stanley Cup playoffs

At the end of the regular season, the three division champions and the five other teams in each conference with the highest number of points, 8 teams in each conference, qualify for the Stanley Cup playoffs. The division winners are seeded one through three, and the next five teams with the best records in the conference are seeded four through eight.

The Stanley Cup Playoffs is an elimination tournament, where two teams battle to win a best-of-seven series in order to advance to the next round. The first round of the playoffs, or conference quarterfinals, consists of the first seed playing the eighth seed, the second playing the seventh, third playing the sixth, and the fourth playing the fifth. In the second round, or conference semifinals, the NHL re-seeds (unlike the NBA) the teams, with the top remaining conference seed playing against the lowest remaining seed, and the other two remaining conference teams pairing off. In the third round, the conference finals, the two remaining teams in each conference play each other, with the conference champions proceeding to the Stanley Cup Finals.

In each round the higher-ranked team is said to be the team with the home-ice advantage. Four of the seven games are played at this team's home venue - the first and second, and, where necessary, the fifth and seventh, with the other games played at the lower-ranked team's home venue.

During playoff games if the score is tied at the end of the third period an overtime period is played. If the score is tied at the end of an overtime period, additional overtime periods are played until a winner is determined. Overtimes are also full periods of twenty minutes (of five-on-five hockey), rather than the five minutes (of four-on-four hockey, followed by a shootout) in the regular season. The overtime is sudden death with the game ending when either team scores a goal.

Rules

While the National Hockey League follows the general rules of Ice hockey, it differs slightly from those used in international games organized by the International Ice Hockey Federation such as the Olympics.

Game timing

Each game is 60 minutes composed of three 20 minute periods. Between each period there is a 15 minute intermission. Between stoppages of play, teams have 25 seconds before substituting their players except for referee stoppages for TV commercials.

Each team may also take one 30 second time-out which may only be taken during a normal stoppage of play.

Hockey rink

The hockey rink is an ice rink which is rectangular with rounded corners and surrounded by a wall . The red line divides the ice in half lengthwise. The red line is used to judge icing violations. There are two blue lines that divide the rink roughly into thirds. They divide the ice into zones. Near each end of the rink, there is a thin red goal line spanning the width of the ice. It is used to judge goals and icing calls.

Scoring and winning

A goal is scored when the puck passes the goal line and enters the net. The team that has the most goals at the end of 60 minutes wins the game. If the game is tied at the end of regulation time, a 5 minute, 4-on-4 sudden death overtime period is played, where the first team that scores a goal wins the game. If the game is still tied at the end of overtime, the game enters a shootout. Three players for each team in turn perform a penalty shot. The team with the most goals during this shootout wins the game. If the game is still tied after the three shootout rounds, the shootout continues, but becomes sudden death.

Offside

In ice hockey, play is said to be offside if a player on the attacking team enters the attacking zone before the puck. When an offside violation occurs, the linesman blows play dead, and a faceoff is conducted in the neutral zone.

The NHL in 2006 removed the offside pass or two-line pass which was a pass from inside a team's defending zone that crosses the red line.

Icing

Icing occurs when a player shoots the puck across both the red line and the opposing team's goal line without the puck going into the net. When icing occurs, a linesman stops play. Play is resumed with a faceoff in the defending zone of the team that committed the infraction. A short handed team is not penalized for clearing the puck out of its zone during a powerplay. If the goalie on the side of the ice where the puck is being sent touches the puck, the icing is waved off.

Under the rules following the 2004-2005 lockout, if a team ices the puck under five-on-five conditions, they are not allowed to make a line change for the following faceoff.

Penalties

A penalty is a punishment for inappropriate behaviour. A referee makes all penalty calls. A linesman may call only obvious technical infractions such as too many men on the ice. In the NHL, the Linesman may call major intent-to-injure penalties that the referee may have missed.

During a penalty, the player who committed the infraction is sent to the penalty box. In most cases, the penalized team cannot replace that player and is thus shorthanded for the duration of the penalty. Normally, hockey teams have five skaters (excluding the goaltender), so if one penalty is called, play becomes five-on-four.

This is called a power play for the attackers and a penalty kill for the defenders. A team is far more likely to score on a power play than during normal play. If the penalized team is scored on during a minor penalty, the penalty immediately ends.

Trophies and awards

Stanley Cup on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame

The National Hockey League presents numerous trophies per year; some are given to teams, and other are given to players.

Trophies awarded to teams

  • Stanley Cup -- overall playoff champion.
  • Clarence S. Campbell Bowl -- Western conference playoff champion.
  • Prince of Wales Trophy -- Eastern conference playoff champion.
  • Presidents' Trophy (1986 - present) - best regular season by a team
  • The O'Brien Trophy was awarded in the NHL before it was retired following the 1949-50 NHL season.

Trophies awarded to individuals

  • Art Ross Memorial Trophy (1948 - present) -- regular season league scoring champion
  • Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy (1968 - present) -- perseverance and sportsmanship
  • Calder Memorial Trophy (1933 - present) -- rookie of the year
  • Conn Smythe Trophy (1965 - present) -- most valuable player during the playoffs
  • Frank J. Selke Trophy (1978 - present) -- top defensive forward
  • Hart Memorial Trophy (1924 - present) -- most valuable player during the regular season
  • Jack Adams Award (1974 - present) -- coach of the year
  • James Norris Memorial Trophy (1954 - present)-- most outstanding defenceman
  • King Clancy Memorial Trophy (1988 - present) -- leadership and humanitarian contribution
  • Lady Byng Memorial Trophy (1925 - present) -- player combining ability and sportsmanship
  • Lester B. Pearson Award (1971 - present) -- most outstanding player as selected by peers
  • Maurice 'Rocket' Richard Trophy (1999 - present) -- to the goal-scoring leader during the regular season
  • NHL Plus/Minus Award (1968 - present) -- highest plus/minus statistic
  • Roger Crozier Saving Grace Award (2000 - present) -- best save percentage by a goalkeeper
  • Vezina Trophy (1927 - present) -- voted to be the most outstanding goaltender
  • William M. Jennings Trophy (1982 - present) -- goalkeeper(s) for the team with the fewest goals against them
  • The Lester Patrick Trophy has been presented by the National Hockey League since 1966 to honour a recipient's contribution to hockey in the United States.

Three years after retirement, players are eligible to be voted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. In the past, if a player was deemed significant enough, the pending period would be waived. However, only 10 individual have been honoured in this manner. In 1999 Wayne Gretzky became the last player to have the three years waived. After Gretzky's induction, the NHL declared that he would be the last one to have the waiting period omitted.

NHL: An International League

NHL is very proud of its players coming from all around the world. Since the 1990s, the league has tried to promote itself throughout Europe with ads, media, and magazines. The league also voluntarily stops its season so that its players can play in the Winter Olympics to have the players represent their own country. While the league has always had a strong Canadian majority, the percentage of Canadian players has gone down slowly in the past 20 years since the arrival of European players.


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While the league has always had a strong Canadian majority, the percentage of Canadian players has gone down slowly in the past 20 years since the arrival of European players.
. The league also voluntarily stops its season so that its players can play in the Winter Olympics to have the players represent their own country.
. Since the 1990s, the league has tried to promote itself throughout Europe with ads, media, and magazines. The theme is currently a remixed version of the one used between 1991 and 1995 and is composed by Tony Gibber. NHL is very proud of its players coming from all around the world. This was replaced in 1986 with "The Wizard", a composition by Paul Hardcastle.

After Gretzky's induction, the NHL declared that he would be the last one to have the waiting period omitted. In 1981 an original song 'Yellow Pearl' by Phil Lynott was commissioned as the new theme music. In 1999 Wayne Gretzky became the last player to have the three years waived. was used as the show's theme tune for most of the 1970s, and also in a remixed version between 1998 and 2003, although ironically the band never performed on the show. However, only 10 individual have been honoured in this manner. S. In the past, if a player was deemed significant enough, the pending period would be waived. C.

Three years after retirement, players are eligible to be voted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. A version of Led Zeppelin's "Whole Lotta Love" by C. The National Hockey League presents numerous trophies per year; some are given to teams, and other are given to players. Mainly this has been performers who disliked the mime format of the show, often as a more effective protest of this rather than just refusing to appear. If the penalized team is scored on during a minor penalty, the penalty immediately ends. A number of performers have sent up the format in various ways. A team is far more likely to score on a power play than during normal play. In addition, the creator of the show, Johnnie Stewart, died on April 29, 2005.

This is called a power play for the attackers and a penalty kill for the defenders. Although the original four presenters are still alive, five presenters of the show have passed away — Stuart Henry, Kenny Everett, occasional presenter Caron Keating, John Peel and Tommy Vance. Normally, hockey teams have five skaters (excluding the goaltender), so if one penalty is called, play becomes five-on-four. An edited version of the UK show can be seen on BBC Prime, the weekend after UK transmission. In most cases, the penalized team cannot replace that player and is thus shorthanded for the duration of the penalty. It is being planned for a possible Fall 2006 launch. During a penalty, the player who committed the infraction is sent to the penalty box. It is expected to be similar to the 1987 version, but it will also utilize the Billboard magazine music charts, most notably the Hot 100 chart.

In the NHL, the Linesman may call major intent-to-injure penalties that the referee may have missed. On January 23, 2006, record producer Lou Pearlman made a deal to bring "Top of the Pops" back to the airwaves in the United States. A linesman may call only obvious technical infractions such as too many men on the ice. Viewer interest was gone and the show was taken off BBC America's schedule. A referee makes all penalty calls. BBC America then tinkered with the show by cutting a few minutes out of each show and moving it to a weekday time slot. A penalty is a punishment for inappropriate behaviour. The network would get the episodes one week after they were transmitted in the UK.

Under the rules following the 2004-2005 lockout, if a team ices the puck under five-on-five conditions, they are not allowed to make a line change for the following faceoff. In 2002, BBC America presented the BBC version of Top of the Pops as part of their weekend schedule. If the goalie on the side of the ice where the puck is being sent touches the puck, the icing is waved off. The show was presented on late Friday nights and lasted almost a year. A short handed team is not penalized for clearing the puck out of its zone during a powerplay. It was hosted by Nia Peeples and even showed performances from the BBC version of the programme. Play is resumed with a faceoff in the defending zone of the team that committed the infraction. In 1987, the CBS television network decided to try an American version of the show.

When icing occurs, a linesman stops play. Top of the Pops had short-lived fame in the United States. Icing occurs when a player shoots the puck across both the red line and the opposing team's goal line without the puck going into the net. This is aimed at a younger audience as is part of the CBBC Saturday Morning lineup. The NHL in 2006 removed the offside pass or two-line pass which was a pass from inside a team's defending zone that crosses the red line. A more recent spin-off is Top of the Pops Reloaded (previously Top of the Pops Saturday), showing on Saturday mornings on BBC One. When an offside violation occurs, the linesman blows play dead, and a faceoff is conducted in the neutral zone. It has been shown on BBC2 since September 1994, although the network's new controller Roly Keating announced in the summer of 2004 that it was being "rested" (repeats, however, continue on the digital channel UKTV G2).

In ice hockey, play is said to be offside if a player on the attacking team enters the attacking zone before the puck. The BBC have also had a show called TOTP2 which shows archive footage from as early as the 1960s of musicians on earlier Top of the Pops shows. If the game is still tied after the three shootout rounds, the shootout continues, but becomes sudden death. It now averages around 1.5 million viewers. The team with the most goals during this shootout wins the game. Since the move to Sundays, Cotton has continued to host with a different guest presenter each week, such as Rufus Hound or Richard Bacon. Three players for each team in turn perform a penalty shot. The show was co-hosted by Reggie Yates and Fearne Cotton until 11th July 2005 every Friday night.

If the game is still tied at the end of overtime, the game enters a shootout. It was not renewed due to his apparent lack of popularity with TV viewers. If the game is tied at the end of regulation time, a 5 minute, 4-on-4 sudden death overtime period is played, where the first team that scores a goal wins the game. The new show was hosted by MTV presenter Tim Kash until his contract expired in August 2004. The team that has the most goals at the end of 60 minutes wins the game. In a break with the previous format, the show is to play more up-and-coming tracks ahead of any chart success, and also to feature interviews with artists. A goal is scored when the puck passes the goal line and enters the net. In November 2003, the show was radically overhauled in what has been widely reported as a make-or-break attempt to revitalise the long-running series.

It is used to judge goals and icing calls. While this resulted in some of the show's best performances — notably Kurt Cobain's singing on "Smells Like Teen Spirit" — it also exposed a number of poor live singers, and was dropped as a general rule. Near each end of the rink, there is a thin red goal line spanning the width of the ice. For a few years from 1991 the show adopted a live vocal to pre-recorded backing track policy. They divide the ice into zones. Acts performing on the show have traditionally mimed to a pre-recorded track and this accounts for a number of performers who never appeared on the show due to a resistance to mime. There are two blue lines that divide the rink roughly into thirds. In its heyday during the glam rock era of the early 1970s, the show featured the tightly choreographed dance troupe Pan's People (later succeeded by Legs & Co.), something which has been widely imitated on similar shows ever since.

The red line is used to judge icing violations. The show has historically been closely associated with the BBC radio station Radio 1, usually being presented by DJs from the station (although from October 1991 to January 1994 no Radio 1 DJs presented the show, and the association has not been as close as it once was). The red line divides the ice in half lengthwise. It celebrated its 2000th show in 2002. The hockey rink is an ice rink which is rectangular with rounded corners and surrounded by a wall . This chart show has seen many changes through the decades: in style, design, fashion and taste. Each team may also take one 30 second time-out which may only be taken during a normal stoppage of play. The first edition on BBC Two was broadcast on 17 July 2005 at 7pm.

Between stoppages of play, teams have 25 seconds before substituting their players except for referee stoppages for TV commercials. However, it was insisted that the move was in fact so that the show would air immediately after the official announcement of the new top 40 chart on Radio 1, as it was thought that by the following Friday, the chart seemed out-of-date. Between each period there is a 15 minute intermission. This move has been widely reported as a final "sidelining" of the show, and perhaps a move towards cancelling it altogether. Each game is 60 minutes composed of three 20 minute periods. By November 2004, viewing figures had plummeted to below three million, prompting announcement by the BBC that the show was going to move again to Sunday evenings on BBC Two, thus losing its prime-time slot on BBC One which it had maintained for forty years.[2]. While the National Hockey League follows the general rules of Ice hockey, it differs slightly from those used in international games organized by the International Ice Hockey Federation such as the Olympics. It was traditionally shown on a Thursday night, but was moved to a Friday in 1996, a change which caused some controversy.

The overtime is sudden death with the game ending when either team scores a goal. During its heyday in the 1970s, it attracted 15 million viewers each week [1]. Overtimes are also full periods of twenty minutes (of five-on-five hockey), rather than the five minutes (of four-on-four hockey, followed by a shootout) in the regular season. It was originally intended to have only a few programmes but has been going for over 40 years. If the score is tied at the end of an overtime period, additional overtime periods are played until a winner is determined. Over 2000 episodes have been shown over the years; and the act that has appeared in the most episodes is the British rock band, Status Quo. During playoff games if the score is tied at the end of the third period an overtime period is played. Savile rotated with three other presenters: Alan Freeman, Pete Murray and David Jacobs.

Four of the seven games are played at this team's home venue - the first and second, and, where necessary, the fifth and seventh, with the other games played at the lower-ranked team's home venue. DJ Jimmy Savile presented the first show, which featured (in order) The Rolling Stones with "I Wanna Be Your Man'", Dusty Springfield with "I Only Want to be With You", the Dave Clark Five with "Glad All Over", The Hollies with "Stay", The Swinging Blue Jeans with "The Hippy Hippy Shake" and The Beatles with "I Want to Hold Your Hand", that week's number one. In each round the higher-ranked team is said to be the team with the home-ice advantage. Top of the Pops began on New Year's Day 1964 in a studio set in a disused church in Manchester. In the third round, the conference finals, the two remaining teams in each conference play each other, with the conference champions proceeding to the Stanley Cup Finals. . In the second round, or conference semifinals, the NHL re-seeds (unlike the NBA) the teams, with the top remaining conference seed playing against the lowest remaining seed, and the other two remaining conference teams pairing off. Each programme consists of half an hour of performances of some of that week's best-selling popular music.

The first round of the playoffs, or conference quarterfinals, consists of the first seed playing the eighth seed, the second playing the seventh, third playing the sixth, and the fourth playing the fifth. Top of the Pops is a long-running British music chart television programme shown each week on BBC Two and now licensed for local versions around the world. The Stanley Cup Playoffs is an elimination tournament, where two teams battle to win a best-of-seven series in order to advance to the next round. The New Jersey power pop band The Smithereens recorded a song entitled "Top of the Pops" on their album "Blow Up.". The division winners are seeded one through three, and the next five teams with the best records in the conference are seeded four through eight. Akira the Don's single, 'Living in the Future'. At the end of the regular season, the three division champions and the five other teams in each conference with the highest number of points, 8 teams in each conference, qualify for the Stanley Cup playoffs. The song "Formed a Band" by Art Brut includes in its lyrics, "We’re gonna write a song as universal as happy Birthday, that makes sure everybody knows that everything is going to be OK, we’re going to take that song and we’re going to play it 8 weeks in a row on Top of the Pops." In their song "Bad Weekend," the band also sings, "sometimes it's hard to stop when your heart is set on Top of the Pops, Top of the Pops." Art Brut Lyrics.

At the end of the regular season, the team that finishes with the most points in each division is crowned the division champion. "Me Plus One" by Anne Lilia Berge Strand or more commonly Annie. Points are awarded for each game as follows:. Rat Trap by The Boomtown Rats. The two divisions from the opposite conference which each team plays against will be rotated every year, much like interleague play in baseball. A song entitled "Top of the Pops" appeared on the Kinks album, Lola versus Powerman and the Moneygoround, Part One. Teams play 32 games within their division (8 games against four other teams), 40 games against non-divisional, conference opponents (4 games against 10 other teams) and 10 interconference games, 1 game against each team in two of the three divisions in the opposite conference. "C-30 C-60 C-90 GO!", originally by Bow Wow Wow and covered by Seattle, WA band Pretty Girls Make Graves.

Each team in the NHL plays 82 regular season games, 41 games at home and 41 on the road. The Scottish punk band The Rezillos lampooned the show as a vehicle for vapid commercialism and for paying little or no attention to talented, unknown bands, in their song "Top of the Pops." Ironically the band actually ended up performing the song on the programme (twice) when it entered the charts — it would appear the producers misunderstood the song's lyrics and thought it was an affectionate tribute. For a list of previous teams see List of defunct NHL teams. Possibly because of this, his next appearance as presenter wasn't until 1982. Over the years many different organizations have existed. When John Peel first presented the programme in 1968 he forgot the name of Amen Corner who were appearing that week. The National Hockey League currently has 30 teams divided into two conferences, and 6 divisions, an organization that started in the year 2000. When Elvis Costello performed "Radio Radio" on the show, he changed the lyrics to criticise Tony Blackburn who was the presenter that week.

The NHL, despite negative press generated during the lockout, has success attracting fans to the initial games of the season and extends fan bases into non-traditional markets in the US such as Nashville, Atlanta, and the Carolinas. Because of the BBC's former policy of deleting old programmes, nearly all of the episodes from the first ten years of the programme's history have been lost, including all of The Beatles' appearances. Of those 15 games, 11 were in front of sell out crowds. Super Furry Animals once got the whole audience to sit down during a live performance of theirs. On October 5, 2005, the first post-lockout NHL season got under way with 15 games. In 1980, the then fledgling heavy metal superstars Iron Maiden became the first band to play live on the show since The Who in 1972, when they refused to mime to their single "Running Free". A new collective bargaining agreement was ratified in July 2005 with a term of six years with an option of extending the collective bargaining agreement for an additional year at the end of the term, allowing the NHL to resume as of the 2005-06 season. It noticeably had Victoria Beckham promote her new song "This Groove", with a performance 7 times in the first 8 shows, including the (pre-recorded) Christmas special.

With no new agreement in hand when the existing contract expired on September 15, 2004, league commissioner Gary Bettman announced a lockout of the players union and cessation of operations by the NHL head office, causing the NHL to lose an entire season. The show's relaunch with Andi Peters as producer was widely considered the point where Top Of The Pops was Jumping The Shark. The league vowed to install what it dubbed "cost certainty" for its teams, but the National Hockey League Players Association countered that the move was little more than a euphemism for a salary cap, which the union initially said it would not accept. The most complaints the show recieved for a single episode was in 1994 when Manic Street Preachers performed their song "Faster" in a manner that was seen as intimidating and featured lead singer James Dean Bradfield wearing a balaclava such as would be worn by an IRA terrorist. Negotiations to replace the contract that expired in 2004 turned into one of the most contentious collective bargaining sessions in the history of professional sports. Cliff Richard has performed the most on Top Of The Pops, recording over 150 performances. The resulting collective bargaining agreement was set for renegotiation in 1998 and extended to September 15, 2004. The shortest performance was Super Furry Animals with Do or Die clocking in at 95 seconds.

A lockout at the start of the 1994-95 forced the league to reduce the schedule from 84 games to just 48, with the teams playing only intra-conference games during the reduced season. As of November 2005, the longest performance was of Green Day's Jesus Of Suburbia lasting 9 minutes. The first was a strike by the National Hockey League Players Association in April 1992 which lasted for 10 days, but the strike was settled quickly and all affected games were rescheduled. "I'm miming"!. There have been three work stoppages in NHL history, all happening between 1992 and 2005. The lyric he did not mime to was .. Approaching the new millennium, the NHL added another four teams; the Nashville Predators (1998), the Atlanta Thrashers (1999), the Minnesota Wild and the Columbus Blue Jackets (both added in 2000) bringing the total to 30 teams. Fish, the face painted lead singer of early 1980s prog rockers Marillion, made sure that the cameras caught a close up of his firmly closed mouth during a particular section of their single Punch and Judy.

In 1993, the NHL added an additional two teams, the Anaheim Mighty Ducks and the Florida Panthers. Singer Les Gray of Mud went on stage to perform with a ventriloquist dummy during the performance of Lonely this Christmas and had the dummy lip-synch to the voice-over in the middle of the song. The San Jose Sharks debuted in 1991, a season later the Ottawa Senators would join the NHL along with the Tampa Bay Lightning. This performance has been taken to heart by Nirvana fans, who affectionately refer to it as "Teen Gothic". In the early 90's the NHL expanded further with five new franchises. For this performance Cobain was trusted to sing live vocals to a pre-recorded backing track: instead, he sang in a low, mournful wail; he was later to claim this was his attempt to sound like Morrissey. As of 2005, the Oilers are the last remaining original WHA franchise still playing in the city where they began in the NHL. In grunge band Nirvana's only performance on Top of the Pops, frontman Kurt Cobain "played" his guitar with his fingers inches away from the frets, drummer Dave Grohl danced around in his seat for most of the performance, and bassist Krist Novoselic waved his instrument around his head.

Four of the remaining six WHA teams merged with the NHL: The Hartford Whalers, Québec Nordiques, Edmonton Oilers, and Winnipeg Jets. Faith No More lead singer Mike Patton also showed he was obviously miming a performance by sticking his tongue out of the side of his mouth during closeup shots. The two leagues fought for the services of hockey players and fans until the WHA folded in 1979. In a 2005 performance of "Lyla", Liam Gallagher made no secret of the fact that he was miming his lyrics by walking away from the microphone and chewing gum when he was supposed to be singing. The dilution of the talent pool, however, caused the overall quality of play to suffer. The performance of "Do They Know It's Christmas?" witnessed the unlikely scene of Paul Weller lip-syncing to Bono's vocals. In response to that, the NHL decided to rush its own expansion plans by adding the New York Islanders and Atlanta Flames that year, along with the Kansas City Scouts and Washington Capitals two years later. For the 1984 Christmas Day edition all of the performers from Band Aid had been booked to appear apart from Bono.

Though it never challenged for the Stanley Cup, its status as a viable NHL rival was unquestionable. The set ended with the band erupting in laughter at the Gallagher's impressions of each other. In 1972, the World Hockey Association (WHA) was formed. It also mocked the habit people had in Oasis' early years of confusing the brothers, not being able to tell them apart. Three years later, the NHL added the Vancouver Canucks and Buffalo Sabres as franchises. In 1995 Oasis played their single "Roll With It" featuring singer Liam Gallagher pretending to play guitar, while guitarist Noel Gallagher pretended to sing, just to show how fake the 'live' performance was. Louis Blues, Minnesota North Stars, Los Angeles Kings, Oakland Seals, and Pittsburgh Penguins. Despite this, to this day, many TV nostalgia shows and other sources still claim this was an error.

They were the Philadelphia Flyers, St. This was a deliberate joke by the band and the production staff, but many people (including, apparently, host David Jensen) didn't realise this and thought it was a genuine mistake. Six new teams were added to the NHL roster, and placed in their own newly-created division. While performing their 1982 hit "Jackie Wilson Said" the band Dexy's Midnight Runners were seen performing in front of a projection of the darts player Jocky Wilson. The rise of the Western Hockey League, which many pundits thought planned to transform into a major league and challenge for the Stanley Cup, spurred the NHL in 1967 to undertake its first expansion since the 1920s. With these developments and the onset of World War II, the NHL was reduced to six teams during its 25th anniversary year of (1942) – six teams still known today, if somewhat inaccurately, as the Original Six: The Canadiens, Maple Leafs, Red Wings, Bruins, Rangers, and Blackhawks.

However, the Great Depression took a toll on the league; teams such as the Pirates, Americans and Ottawa Senators folded. By the end of the 1930-31 season, the NHL featured a total of 10 teams. Canadian additions included the Montreal Maroons and Hamilton Tigers. The league had also expanded into the United States, with the Boston Bruins in 1924, the New York Americans and the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1925 and the New York Rangers, Detroit Cougars (later to become the Red Wings), and Chicago Blackhawks in 1926.

By 1926, having increased player salaries to a level that couldn't be matched by other Canadian leagues, the NHL was alone in Stanley Cup competition. (The 1918-19 competition was cancelled because of the Spanish Flu epidemic that had hit Seattle). Though the league struggled to stay in business during its first decade, NHL teams were quite successful on the ice, winning the Stanley Cup seven out of its first nine years. With the Bulldogs and Wanderers out, the NHL operated with just three teams for the remainder of its opening year, and through the second season.

The Wanderers, already a shadow of its former self, folded in the wake of the fire, ending one of the most storied franchises in the early years of Canadian professional hockey. On January 2, 1918, the Westmount Arena in Montreal, home to the Wanderers and Canadiens, was destroyed in a fire. The NHL endured a rocky inaugural season in 1917-18, starting with the temporary shuttering of the Bulldogs. Arguments and discussions ensued which eventually led to the formation of the National Hockey League at on November 26, 1917, with the Montreal Canadiens, Montreal Wanderers, Ottawa Senators, Quebec Bulldogs and newly-renamed Toronto Arenas as founding members.

Livingstone, unable to attend the meeting because of illness, was shocked to learn that owners had chosen to effectively eject him and the Blueshirts from the NHA. The owners met in Montreal's Windsor Hotel to consider the league's future on February 11, 1917. Livingstone and the owners of the other teams. The National Hockey League was founded in 1917 in Montreal after a series of disputes within the (Canadian) National Hockey Association (NHA) between the Toronto Blueshirts' owner Edward J.

. The NHL is one of the major professional sports leagues of North America.

. It is generally regarded as the premier professional ice hockey league in the world. The National Hockey League (NHL) is a professional sports organization composed of hockey teams in the United States and Canada, where it is also known by its French name, Ligue Nationale de Hockey (LNH).

The Lester Patrick Trophy has been presented by the National Hockey League since 1966 to honour a recipient's contribution to hockey in the United States. Jennings Trophy (1982 - present) -- goalkeeper(s) for the team with the fewest goals against them. William M. Vezina Trophy (1927 - present) -- voted to be the most outstanding goaltender.

Roger Crozier Saving Grace Award (2000 - present) -- best save percentage by a goalkeeper. NHL Plus/Minus Award (1968 - present) -- highest plus/minus statistic. Maurice 'Rocket' Richard Trophy (1999 - present) -- to the goal-scoring leader during the regular season. Pearson Award (1971 - present) -- most outstanding player as selected by peers.

Lester B. Lady Byng Memorial Trophy (1925 - present) -- player combining ability and sportsmanship. King Clancy Memorial Trophy (1988 - present) -- leadership and humanitarian contribution. James Norris Memorial Trophy (1954 - present)-- most outstanding defenceman.

Jack Adams Award (1974 - present) -- coach of the year. Hart Memorial Trophy (1924 - present) -- most valuable player during the regular season. Selke Trophy (1978 - present) -- top defensive forward. Frank J.

Conn Smythe Trophy (1965 - present) -- most valuable player during the playoffs. Calder Memorial Trophy (1933 - present) -- rookie of the year. Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy (1968 - present) -- perseverance and sportsmanship. Art Ross Memorial Trophy (1948 - present) -- regular season league scoring champion.

The O'Brien Trophy was awarded in the NHL before it was retired following the 1949-50 NHL season. Presidents' Trophy (1986 - present) - best regular season by a team. Prince of Wales Trophy -- Eastern conference playoff champion. Campbell Bowl -- Western conference playoff champion.

Clarence S. Stanley Cup -- overall playoff champion. Zero points for a loss in regulation time. One point for losing in overtime or a shootout.

Two points are awarded for a win.

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