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Deep Throat

The term Deep Throat has several meanings:

  • Deep Throat is a 1972 pornographic movie. This is the origin of all the other meanings of the term.
  • Deep throating is a sexual act, a type of fellatio depicted in the movie.
  • Deep Throat was the name given to the source in the Washington Post investigation of the Watergate scandal, revealed on May 31, 2005 to be former FBI associate director W. Mark Felt.
  • In general, the term Deep Throat has since been used for secret inside informers or whistleblowers.
  • Deep Throat is the pseudonym of several fictional characters who have acted as a whistleblower:
    • Deep Throat in the television series The X-Files.
    • Deep Throat is the alias of a character in Metal Gear Solid.
  • Deep Throat or Win32.DeepThroat is a computer virus
  • Inside Deep Throat is a 2005 documentary about the 1972 movie.

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The term Deep Throat has several meanings:. Because of its controversy, many newspaper publishers either relegate the strip to the op-ed section of the paper, pull more potentially controversial strips from being published, or do not publish the strip at all, tactics also similar to Doonesbury.
. Inside Deep Throat is a 2005 documentary about the 1972 movie. Some attribute the disputes over the strip to a political correctness that discourages any discussion or recognition of racial distinctions. Deep Throat or Win32.DeepThroat is a computer virus. In particular, the principal characters often discuss racial and American socio-economic class issues. Deep Throat is the alias of a character in Metal Gear Solid. In this aspect, it is similar to Doonesbury.

Deep Throat in the television series The X-Files. The comic strip has been withheld by newspapers several times. Deep Throat is the pseudonym of several fictional characters who have acted as a whistleblower:

    . The Boondocks is very political and occasionally subject to great controversy, usually sparked by the comments and behavior of its main character, Huey. In general, the term Deep Throat has since been used for secret inside informers or whistleblowers. Their young daughter Jazmine is very insecure about her racial identity and is often the subject of Huey's antipathy for being, in his opinion, out of touch with her African ancestry. Mark Felt. The Freemans' neighbors are NAACP member Thomas Dubois (a reference both to WEB DuBois and Uncle Tom) and his White wife Sara, who are both lawyers.

    Deep Throat was the name given to the source in the Washington Post investigation of the Watergate scandal, revealed on May 31, 2005 to be former FBI associate director W. He is also a budding comedian, although most of his humor consists of trying to play the dozens on Huey, which always falls flat. Deep throating is a sexual act, a type of fellatio depicted in the movie. Huey's best friend is Michael Caesar, a dreadlocked aspiring MC who agrees with many of Huey's criticisms but serves as a positive counterpoint to Huey's typically pessimistic attitude by taking a humorous approach to issues. This is the origin of all the other meanings of the term. Their grandfather is a firm disciplinarian who is offended by their values and ideas. Deep Throat is a 1972 pornographic movie. Riley, on the other hand, is enamored of gangsta rap culture and the "thug"/bling-bling lifestyle.

    Newton) and is harshly critical of many aspects of modern Black culture. Huey is a devotee of black radical ideas of the past few decades (as explained in the May 4, 1999 strip, Huey is in fact named after Black Panther Huey P. The strip depicts Huey Freeman and his younger brother Riley, two black children who have been moved out of Chicago by their grandfather to live with him in the predominantly white suburb of Woodcrest (most likely in Maryland, as seen from the area code stated in the March 16, 2000 strip). The Boondocks animated series premiered on Cartoon Network's Adult Swim on November 6, 2005.

    McGruder has sold the television and film rights for The Boondocks to Sony Pictures Entertainment. I think I'm a better writer than artist." [1] Seng has since left and Carl Jones has illustrated the strip since late 2004. In an interview with The New Yorker, McGruder said, "If something had to give, it was going to be the art. In the fall of 2003, McGruder passed art duties on to Boston-based artist Jennifer Seng.

    Blair's help to the budding strip went unnoticed during the allegations against the latter of article fabrication, as McGruder joined others in lampooning Blair. The strip got its start as a result of The Diamondback's editor Jayson Blair (of New York Times source falsification infamy), who decided to pay McGruder $30 per strip, $17 more than the others at the time. . In the fall of 2005, The Boondocks was adapted into an animated television series of the same name for Cartoon Network's Adult Swim programming block.

    A popular and highly controversial strip, The Boondocks deals with various issues involving African-American culture and American politics, as seen through the eyes of its main protagonist, a ten-year-old Black radical named Huey Freeman. As it gained popularity, and a loyal following the comic strip was picked up by the Universal Press Syndicate in 1999 and made its national debut on April 19 of that year. Created by McGruder in 1997 for The Diamondback, the student newspaper at the University of Maryland, College Park, the strip moved from the college pages and was printed in the monthly hip-hop magazine, The Source, in 1997. The Boondocks is a daily comic strip written and originally drawn by Aaron McGruder.

    2005: Public Enemy #2. 2002: A Right to Be Hostile (treasury). 2001: Fresh for '01...You Suckas!. 2000: Because I Know You Don't Read the Newspaper.

    Has struggled trying to debate with Huey during class. Old-fashioned and not used to dealing with Blacks, he is intimidated by Huey's intellect. Petto - Huey and Caesar's teacher, who is as clueless about how to handle them as the principal is. Mr.

    Somehow has access to FBI files of Huey. The school principal - an out of touch young man who prepared for the arrival of Huey and Riley by mistakenly renting several blaxploitation films thinking of them as representative of black culture. Later, he ran into Lucas himself and decided to kick him in the rear, sparking a brief wave of publicity for both himself and Huey, who claimed responsibility for the attack. Finding the movie disappointing, he thought he had nothing left to live for, until Huey convinced him to sue George Lucas, though Huey didn't actually mean for him to do so.

    Huey regularly visited him in line. Psycho Star Wars Guy - a long-haired young man who stood in line for The Phantom Menace for months. Hiro only appeared in the original Diamondback version of the strip. One of Huey's friends; a young Asian-American DJ.

    Hiro Otomo. Uncle Ruckus - a mentally disturbed neighborhood handyman and acquaintance of the Freemans who plays the archetypal role of a Black man who dislikes his own race and constantly, but often illogically, praises Caucasians. She shows a fondness and curiosity for rap music (Snoop Dogg in particular). Cindy McPhearson - a Caucasian girl in Huey's class who appears to be utterly clueless about racial issues and is a general airhead.

    Jazmine is often portrayed as naive, and is very optimistic in contrast to Huey's pessimism. Jazmine Dubois - Thomas and Sarah's biracial daughter who seems to like Huey, despite the fact that he is occasionally cold towards her. Tom is often seen talking with Huey about present events in politics. They both work as lawyers.

    Thomas and Sarah Dubois - an interracial couple in the neighborhood. He is often shown to be an "old school" disciplinarian when dealing with the kids. Robert is known to overpanic and for occasionally being selfish and valuing his own peace and comfort over the needs of others, but does look out for the children's welfare. Robert Freeman - Huey and Riley's retired "Granddad".

    Unlike Huey, Caesar is more optimistic and cheerful, and is usually making jokes about whatever issue is at hand. Michael Caesar - Huey's classmate and best friend, and agrees with most of Huey's views of life. Riley Freeman - The opposite of his older brother, eight-year-old Riley praises the "thug life", and aspires to be the same as all the rappers and thugs he sees on television. He can be seen as a less upbeat Michael Evans.

    Newton, co-founder of the Black Panthers. In the early days of the strip, he is mentioned to be named after Huey P. He is clearly disturbed by the ignorance in modern-day black television and issues in politics. Huey Freeman - a ten-year-old boy who appears angry most of the time and sees himself as a revolutionary.

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