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Deep Throat

The term Deep Throat has several meanings:

  • Deep Throat is a 1972 pornographic movie. This is the origin of all the other meanings of the term.
  • Deep throating is a sexual act, a type of fellatio depicted in the movie.
  • Deep Throat was the name given to the source in the Washington Post investigation of the Watergate scandal, revealed on May 31, 2005 to be former FBI associate director W. Mark Felt.
  • In general, the term Deep Throat has since been used for secret inside informers or whistleblowers.
  • Deep Throat is the pseudonym of several fictional characters who have acted as a whistleblower:
    • Deep Throat in the television series The X-Files.
    • Deep Throat is the alias of a character in Metal Gear Solid.
  • Deep Throat or Win32.DeepThroat is a computer virus
  • Inside Deep Throat is a 2005 documentary about the 1972 movie.

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The term Deep Throat has several meanings:. Source: Steeler's All-Time Roster by Jersey Number. Inside Deep Throat is a 2005 documentary about the 1972 movie.
. Deep Throat or Win32.DeepThroat is a computer virus. Other Hall-of-Famers associated with Steelers. Deep Throat is the alias of a character in Metal Gear Solid. Elected on the basis of performance with Steelers.

Deep Throat in the television series The X-Files. ^At the end of the 2005 NFL season, the Steelers All-Time Record is 523-502-21 (including playoffs). Deep Throat is the pseudonym of several fictional characters who have acted as a whistleblower:

    . Note: W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties. In general, the term Deep Throat has since been used for secret inside informers or whistleblowers. Needing a way to excite the fans during a 1975 playoff game against the Baltimore Colts, Cope urged fans to take yellow dish towels to the game and wave them throughout. Mark Felt. The "Terrible Towel" is a gimmick created by Myron Cope, a broadcaster, for the Steelers.

    Deep Throat was the name given to the source in the Washington Post investigation of the Watergate scandal, revealed on May 31, 2005 to be former FBI associate director W. Since the late 1990s, each player has worn a Steelers logo patch on left side of his jersey. Deep throating is a sexual act, a type of fellatio depicted in the movie. The helmet is solid black with a gold central stripe and small white uniform numbers on the forehead. This is the origin of all the other meanings of the term. The design consists of gold pants and either black jerseys or white jerseys. Deep Throat is a 1972 pornographic movie. The Steelers started to use the uniform design that they wear today since the late 1960s.

    [1][2] A year after introducing the logo, they switched to black helmets to make it stand out more. (It's also been rumored the team's longtime equipment manager, Jack Hart, wasn't happy with slapping the logo on so many helmets and refused to do both sides). At first, it was a test to see how the logo appeared on their gold helmets, but its popularity led the team to leave it that way permanently. The Steelers are the only NFL team that puts their logo on only one side of the helmet (the right side).

    While the "Steelmark" logo only contains the word "Steel", the Steelers were given special permission to add "-ers". The original meanings behind the astroids were, "Steel lightens your work, brightens your leisure and widens your world" and later the colors came to represent the ingredients of steel, the yellow representing coal; the orange, ore; and the blue, steel scrap. It consists of the word "Steelers" surrounded by three astroids (hypocycloids of four cusps). Steel, by Cleveland, Ohio based Republic Steel, and now owned by AISI.

    The Steelers logo was then introduced in 1962, and is based on the "Steelmark", originally designed for U.S. Unlike most other cities, the colors are currently also used by the Pittsburgh Pirates baseball team and the Pittsburgh Penguins hockey team, making it the official team colors of every professional sports team in the city. Originally, the team wore solid gold helmets and black jerseys. The Steelers have used black and gold as it colors since the 1950s.

    With their Super Bowl XL victory, the Steelers became the first sixth-seeded playoff team, since the NFL expanded to a 12-team postseason tournament in 1990, to win the Super Bowl. Overall, Cowher has taken his team to the playoffs in 10 out of his 14 seasons, including appearances in Super Bowl XXX in 1996 and the franchise's record-tying fifth Super Bowl win in Super Bowl XL in 2006. Cowher led the Steelers to the playoffs in each of his first six seasons as coach, a feat that had only previously been accomplished by legendary coach Paul Brown of the Cleveland Browns. In 1992 Chuck Noll retired and was succeeded by Kansas City Chiefs defensive coordinator Bill Cowher, a native of the Pittsburgh suburb of Crafton.

    Mean Joe Greene retired after the 1981 season, Lynn Swann and Jack Ham after 1982, Terry Bradshaw and Mel Blount after 1983, and Jack Lambert after 1984. The team was then hit with the retirements of all their key players from the Super Bowl years. 1981 was no better, with an 8-8 showing. The Steelers suffered a rash of injuries in the 1980 season and missed the playoffs with a 9-7 record.

    This group of players formed the base of one of the greatest teams in NFL history, making the playoffs 8 seasons in a row and winning 4 Super Bowls. Noll's most remarkable talent was in his draft selections, taking Hall of Famers "Mean" Joe Greene in 1969, Terry Bradshaw and Mel Blount in 1970, Jack Ham in 1971, Franco Harris in 1972, and finally, in 1974, the best draft in Steelers history, pulled the incredible feat of selecting four Hall of Famers in one draft year, Mike Webster, Lynn Swann, John Stallworth and Jack Lambert. Their luck changed with the hiring of coach Chuck Noll. That would be Pittsburgh's last playoff game for 25 years.

    This forced a tie-breaking playoff game at Forbes Field, which the Steelers lost 21-0. The Steelers made the playoffs for the first time in 1947, tying for first place in the division at 8-4 with the Philadelphia Eagles. In 1944 they merged with the Chicago Cardinals and were known as "Card-Pitt" and informally known as the "Car-Pitts" or "Carpets". This team went 5-4-1.

    During the 1943 season, they merged with the Philadelphia Eagles forming the "Phil-Pitt Eagles" and were known as the "Steagles". They twice merged with other NFL franchises in order to field a team. During World War II, the Steelers experienced player shortages. But the team maintained a long history of futility for the next three decades.

    In 1941, the team was renamed the Steelers after the city's prominence as a steel-making center. Supreme Court to what was at the time the biggest contract in NFL history, but he only played one year with the Pirates before signing with the Detroit Lions. Pittsburgh did make history in 1938 by signing Byron White, a future justice on the U.S. Through the 1930s the Pirates never finished higher than second place in their division, or with a record better than .500 (1936).

    The Pittsburgh NFL team first took to the field on September 20, 1933, losing 23-2 to the New York Giants. . The team was renamed the Steelers in 1941 after the city's prominent steel industry to reflect the "blue collar" work ethic of the many Pittsburgh fans. paid a $2,500 fee.

    Originally named the Pittsburgh Pirates, the team along with the Philadelphia Eagles and the now-defunct Cincinnati Reds football team joined the NFL as 1933 expansion teams, after Art Rooney, Sr. The team has appeared in six Super Bowls, winning five of them, and thirteen Conference Championship Games winning six of them. They currently belong to the Northern Division of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The Pittsburgh Steelers are a professional American football team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

    National Football League (1933-present). Bill Cowher (1992-Present). Chuck Noll (1969-1991). Bill Austin (1966-1968).

    Mike Nixon (1965). Raymond "Buddy" Parker (1957-1964). Walt Kiesling (1954-1956). Joe Bach (1952-1953).

    John Michelosen (1948-1951). Jock Sutherland (1946-1947). Jim Leonard (1945). Walt Kiesling (1941-1944).

    Bert Bell (1941). Aldo Donelli (1941). Walt Kiesling (1939-1940). John McNally (1937-1939).

    Joe Bach (1935-1936). Luby DiMelio (1934). Forrest Douds (1933). Josh Miller.

    Rod Woodson. Dwight White. Supreme Court Justice). Byron White (U.S.

    Bobby Walden. Yancy Thigpen. Kordell Stewart. Andy Russell.

    Eric Pegram. Actor Ed O'Neill was signed by the Steelers as a free agent in 1969, but was subsequently cut during training camp. Neil O'Donnell. Gerry Mullins.

    Bam Morris. Chris Fuamatu-Ma'afala. Ray Mansfield. Greg Lloyd.

    Louis Lipps. Tim Lester. Carnell Lake. Jon Kolb.

    Levon Kirkland. Ernie Holmes. Merril Hoge. Greenwood.

    L.C. Kevin Greene. Eric Green. Joe Gilliam.

    Jason Gildon. Roy Gerela. Frenchy Fuqua. Barry Foster.

    Amos Zereoue. Buddy Dial. Dermontti Dawson. Bennie Cunningham.

    Craig Colquitt. Plaxico Burress. Bubby Brister. Rocky Bleier.

    Kendrell Bell. Matt Bahr. Gary Anderson. Walter Abercrombie.

    Mike Tomczak. The number hasn't been used since. According to legend, the equipment manager--who assigns jersey numbers to new players--later stripped Seabaugh of the number because the player "wasn't Jack Ham". 59 was used once in 1984 by Todd Seabaugh, who played one season with the team.

    Note: After Jack Ham retired, no. Used four times officially since Mel Blount's retirement, most recently to safety Scott Shields in 2000. 47 has been issued during the preseason regulary, and on some occasions to the final 53-man roster. Note: No.

    31. Since Donnie Shell's retirement after the 1987 season, Logan is the only Steeler to wear no. 31 is currently being used by backup safety Mike Logan, a native of the Pittsburgh suburb of McKeesport, Pennsylvania, and is currently in his fifth season with the Steelers. Note: No.

    75 (Joe Greene). 63 (Dermontti Dawson). 59 (Jack Ham, see below). 58 (Jack Lambert).

    52 (Mike Webster). 47 (Mel Blount, see below). 32 (Franco Harris). 31 (Donnie Shell, see below).

    12 (Terry Bradshaw). However, the Steelers no longer issue the following numbers, which are in essence retired as well:. Are the only officially retired number. Ernie Stautner's #70 And, Jerome Bettis (#36).

    Myron Cope, Pittsburgh Steelers broadcaster, was awarded the 2005 Pro Football Hall of Fame's Pete Rozelle Radio-Television Award. 16 Len Dawson, QB, 1957-59. 36 Marion Motley, RB, 1955. 56 Bill Hewitt, TE-DE, 1943 (Steagles).

    Earle "Greasy" Neale, Co-head coach with Kiesling on 1943 war-forced merged team with Philadelphia, "Steagles". Bert Bell, Co-owner, 1941-46. 36 Cal Hubbard, T-DT, 1936. "Johnny Blood"), RB, 1934, 1937-38.

    24 Johnny McNally (a.k.a. 52 Mike Webster, C, 1974-88. 82 John Stallworth, WR, 1974-87. 58 Jack Lambert, LB, 1974-84.

    88 Lynn Swann, WR, 1974-82. 32 Franco Harris, RB, 1972-83. 59 Jack Ham, LB, 1971-82. 12 Terry Bradshaw, QB, 1970-83.

    47 Mel Blount, CB, 1970-83. 75 "Mean" Joe Greene, DT, 1969-81. Chuck Noll, Head Coach, 1969-91. 35 John Henry Johnson, RB, 1960-65.

    22 Bobby Layne, QB, 1958-62. 70 Ernie Stautner, DT, 1950-63. 35 Bill Dudley, RB-DB, 1942, 1945-46 (missed 1943-44 due to military service). 2 Walt Kiesling, G, 1937-39; Head Coach, 1939-44, 1954-56.

    Dan Rooney, Executive, 1955-present; Owner, 1988-present. Art Rooney, Founder-owner, 1933-88. Heinz Field (2001-present). Three Rivers Stadium (1970-2000).

    Pitt Stadium (1958-1969). Forbes Field (1933-1963). AFC North: 2002, 2004. AFC Central: 1972, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1983, 1984, 1992, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2001.

    AFC: 1974, 1975, 1978, 1979, 1995, 2005. Super Bowl Championships (5)
    1974 (IX), 1975 (X), 1978 (XIII), 1979 (XIV), 2005 (XL). Pittsburgh Steelers (1945-present). Card-Pitt (1944).

    Philadelphia-Pittsburgh "Steagles" (1943). Pittsburgh Steelers (1941-1942). Pittsburgh Pirates (1933-1940). AFC North (2002-present).

    AFC Central (1970-2001). American Football Conference (1970-present)

      . Century Division (1967-1969). Eastern Conference (1953-1969)
        .

        American Conference (1950-1952). Western Division (1944). Eastern Division (1933-1943; 1945-1949).

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