This page will contain discussion groups about dannebrog, as they become available.

Flag of Denmark

The Dannebrog. This version, known as the Stutflag, is used for civilian purposes. Proportions: 28:37

The national flag of Denmark, the Dannebrog, is red with a white Scandinavian cross that extends to the edges of the flag; the vertical part of the cross is shifted to the hoist side. The cross design of the Danish flag was subsequently adopted by the other Nordic countries: Sweden, Norway, Finland, and Iceland. During the Danish-Norwegian personal union, the Dannebrog was also the flag of Norway and continued to be, with slight modifications, until Norway adopted its current flag in 1821.

The royal Danish yacht is named after the flag.

The legendary origin of the flag

The legend of the flag is very popular among Danes, but most consider it to be a legend though a beautiful one. The legend says that during the Battle of Lyndanisse, also known as the Battle of Valdemar (Danish: "Volmerslaget"), near Reval (Tallinn) in Estonia, on 15 June 1219, the flag fell from the sky during a critical stage, resulting in Danish victory.

Dannebrog falling from the sky during the Battle of Lyndanisse, 15 June, 1219. Painted by Christian August Lorentzen in 1809. Original located on Statens Museum for Kunst, Denmark

No historical record supports this legend. The first record of the legend dates from more than 300 years after the campaign, and the first record connects the legend to a much smaller battle, though still in Estonia; the battle of Fellin (Viljandi) in 1208. Though no historical support exists for the flag story in the Fellin battle either, it is not difficult to understand how a small and unknown place is replaced with the much grander battle of Reval from the Estonia campaign of King Valdemar II.

This story originates from two written sources from the early 16th century.

The first is found in Christiern Pedersen's "Danske Krønike", which is a sequel to Saxo’s Gesta Danorum, written 1520-1523. It is not mentioned in connection to the campaign of King Valdemar II in Estonia, but in connection with a campaign in Russia. He also mentions that this flag, falling from the sky during the Russian campaign of King Valdemar II, is the very same flag that King Eric of Pomerania took with him when he left the country in 1440 after being deposed as King.

The second source is the writing of the Franciscan monk Petrus Olai (Peder Olsen) of Roskilde, from 1527. This record describes a battle in 1208 near a place called "Felin" during the Estonia campaign of King Valdemar II. The Danes were all but defeated when a lamb-skin banner depicting a white cross falls from the sky and miraculously leads to a Danish victory. In another record by Petrus Olai called "Danmarks Tolv Herligheder" (Twelve Splendours of Denmark), in splendour number nine, the same story is re-told almost to the word, however a paragraph has been inserted correcting the year to 1219.

Whether or not these records describe a truly old oral story in existents at that time, or a 16th century invented story, is not currently determined.

Some historians believe that the story by Petrus Olai refers to a source from the first half of the 15th century, making this the oldest reference to the falling flag.

The continuation of the romantic legend

The story of the original flag has a continuation that many Danes are not aware of.

According to tradition, the original flag from the Battle of Lyndanisse was used in the small campaign of 1500 when King Hans tried to conquer Dithmarschen (in western Holstein in north Germany). The flag was lost in a devastating defeat on 17 February 1500. In 1559, King Frederik II recaptured it during his own Dithmarschen campaign. In the capitulation terms it is stated that all Danish banners lost in 1500 were to be returned.

One of Hans Knieper’s heroic paintings of Danish kings from 1585. King Erik Menved storming a castle. Note the two Danish flags. Original located on Kronborg Castle.

This legend is found in two sources, Hans Svanning's History of King John from 1558-1559 and Johan Rantzau's History about the Last Dithmarschen War, from 1569. Both claims that this was the original flag, and consequently both writers knew the legend of the falling flag. In 1576, the son of Johan Rantzau, Henrik Rantzau, also writes about the war and the fate of the flag. He notes that the flag was in a poor condition when returned.

Sources from Dithmarschen, written shortly after the battle of 1500, do mention banners, including the Royal banner, being captured from the Danes, but there is no mention of Dannebrog or the "original" flag. It is quite plausible that the king’s personal banner as well as the leading banner of the army were both lost, as the battle was led by the King himself. However, it is more questionable if he indeed was carrying the "original" flag.

In a letter dated 22 February 1500 to Oluf Stigsøn, King John describes the battle, but does not mention the loss of an important flag. In fact, the entire letter gives the impression that the lost battle was noting more than an "unfortunate affair".

An indication that we are dealing with multiple flags, are the 1570 writings of Niels Hemmingsøn regarding a bloody battle between Danes and Swedes near the Swedish town of Uppsala in 1520. He writes that the "Danish head banner" ("Danmarckis Hoffuitbanner") was nearly captured by the Swedes. It was saved only by the combined efforts of the banner-carrier Mogens Gyldenstierne, taking multiple wounds, and a young man coming to his rescue. This young man was Peder Skram. This "Danmarckis Hoffuitbanner" was probably nothing short of the "Banner of the Realm'" (Rigsbanner), the Dannebrog.

This is however not the end of the story. A priest and historian from Dithmarschen, Johan Neocorus, wrote in 1598 that the banner captured in 1500, was brought to the church in Wohrden and hung there for the next 59 years, until it was returned to the Danes as part of the peace settlement in 1559. Henrik Rantzau states in his writing of 1576 that the flag was brought to Slesvig city and placed in the cathedral, following its return.

A historian from Slesvig, Ulrik Petersen (1656-1735), wrote in the late 17th century that the flag hung in Slesvig cathedral till about 1660 until it simply crumbled away, thus ending its more than 400-year-old story.

Historically, it is of course impossible to prove or disprove that these records speak of the same flag. If the flag of 1208 or 1219 ever existed. Many of these legends are apparently built on earlier ones.

Other theories of the origin of the flag

Other origin theories have been put forth in the late 19th and early 20th century.

The Danish flag from the front page of Christiern Pedersen’s version of Saxo’s Gesta Danorum, 1514. Full frontpage can be seen here.

Theories of the origin of the flag, #2

The Danish historian Caspar Paludan-Müller in 1873 in his book "Sagnet om den himmelfaldne Danebrogsfane" put forth the theory that it is a banner sent by the Pope to the Danish King to use in his crusades in the Baltic countries. Other kings and lords certainly received such banners.

One would though imagine that if this story was true, some kind of record ought to exist of the event and presumably Danish historians would not have failed to mention it in some way. Being granted a banner by the Pope would have been a great honour, but despite the many letters of the popes relating to the crusades, none of them mentions granting a banner to a King of Denmark. On the other hand, the letter in question might simply have been lost.

Theories of the origin of the flag, #3

A similar theory was suggested by Danish explorer, adventurer and Captain Johan Støckel in the early 20th century. He suggested that it was not a pope banner to the King but a pope banner to the Churchly legate in the North, more specifically to archbishop Andreas Sunesøn, which he - without the knowledge of the King – brought with him on the King's crusade in the Baltic countries, in an effort to make the army take on a Christian symbol (over the king's symbol) and thereby strengthen the power of the church.

It is unlikely that the very fair and loyal archbishop would do such a thing behind the king's back. Moreover, it is unlikely that the pope would send such a banner, given the fact that they already had one, namely the banner of the Knights Hospitaller (Danish: "Johanitterne").

Theories of the origin of the flag, #4

A theory brought forth by the Danish historian Adolf Ditlev Jørgensen in 1875 in his book Danebroges Oprindelse, is that the Danish flag is the banner of the Knights Hospitaller. He supports his theory with that the order came to Denmark in the latter half of the 12th century and during the next centuries spread to major cities, like Odense, Viborg, Horsens, Ribe and their headquarters in Slagelse, so by the time of the Baltic crusade, the symbol was already a known symbol in Denmark.

Furthermore he claims that Bishop Theodorik, already a part initiator of the order in Livonia, the Livonian Brothers of the Sword, had the idea of starting a similar order in Estonia and that he was the original instigator of Bishop Albert of Buxhoeveden inquiry to King Valdemar II in 1218, that set the whole Danish participation in the Baltic crusades in motion.

In the contemporary writing of the priest Henry of Livonia from Riga it is said that Bishop Theodorik was killed during the 1219 battle, as the enemy stormed his tent, thinking it was the King's tent. Adolf Ditlev Jørgensen explains that it was Bishop Theodorik who carried the flag, well planted outside his tent, thus as an already well-known Knights Hospitaller symbol in Livonia, the enemy thought this was the King's symbol and mistakenly stormed Bishop Theodorik tent. He claims that the origin of the legend of the falling flag comes from this confusion in the battle.

Adolf Ditlev Jørgensen does not give an explanation how the white Maltese cross on red of the Knights Hospitaller, found its way to the Danish flag of 1219, given the fact that in that time it was a white cross on black. The Knights Hospitaller is a monk-order and used black dresses. The white on red warrior-cloak cannot be traced until later.

Theories of the origin of the flag, #5

The Danish church-historian L. P. Fabricius put up yet another theory. It is explained in his study of 1934, titled "Sagnet om Dannebrog og de ældste Forbindelser med Estland'". In this study he put the location to 1208 Fellin and not the Battle of Lyndanisse in 1219, based on the earliest source available about the story.

He says in this theory that it might have been Archbishop Andreas Sunesøn's personal ecclestical banner or perhaps even the flag of Archbishop Absalon. That is based on his tireless efforts to expand Christianity to the Baltic countries and that under his initiative and supervision several smaller crusades had already been conducted in Estonia. The banner would then already be known in Estonia. He repeats the story about the flag being planted in front of Bishop Theodorik's tent which the enemy mistakenly attacks believing it to be the tent of the King.

All these theories centre on two battles in Estonia, whether it is in Fellin (1208) or Lyndanisse (1219), and thus try to explain the origin in relation to the tale brought forth over 300 years after the event.

Theories of the origin of the flag, #6

A much different theory is briefly discussed by Fabricius and elaborated more by Helga Bruhn in a book from 1949. She claims that it is neither the battle nor the banner that is central to the tale, but rather the cross in the sky. Similar tales of appearances in the sky at critical moments, particularly of crosses, can be found all over Europe.

Bruhn mentions a battle (also mentioned by Fabricius) taking place on September 10, 1217 between Christian knights and Moor warriors on the Iberian Peninsula near the castle Alcazar, where it is said that a golden cross on white appeared in the sky, to bring victory to the Christians. Likewise an almost identical Swedish tale from the 18th century about a yellow cross on blue appearing in 1157 during a Swedish battle in Finland. Probably a later invention to counter the legendary origins of the Danish flags, but never the less of the same nature. The English flag, the Saint George's Cross is also claimed to have appeared in the sky during a critical battle, in this case in Jerusalem during the crusades.

The similarities to the legends is obvious. In Spain, the colours of the Pope appears in the sky, in Finland the Swedish colours. In Estonia it is the Danish colours, and in Jerusalem the English colours. Basically, these are all variations of the same legend.

Since King Valdamar II was married to the Portuguese princess, Berengaria, it is not unthinkable that the origin of the story, if not the flag, was the Spanish tale or a similar tale, which again might have been inspired by an even older legend.

Earliest recorded use of the flag

One of the seals of Erik VII, 1398. Note the Dannebrog banner in the coat of arms

Danish literature of the 13th and 14th centuries remains suspiciously quiet about the national flag. Whether the flag has its origins in a divine sign, a banner of a military order, an ecclesiastical banner, or perhaps something entirely different, Danish literature is no help before the early 15th century.

However, several coins, seals and images exist, both foreign and domestic, from the 13th to 15th centuries and even earlier, showing flags similar to the Dannebrog. In the 19th and early 20th century, these images were used by many Danish historians, with a good flair of nationalism, trying to date the origins of the flag to 1219. However, if one examines the few existing foreign sources about Denmark from the 13th to 15th centuries, it is apparent that, at least from foreign point of view; the national symbol of Denmark was not a red-and-white banner but the royal coat of arms (three blue lions of a golden shield.) This coat of arms remains in use to this day.

An obvious place to look for documentation is in the Estonian city of Tallinn, the site of the legendary battle. In Tallinn, a coat-of-arms resembling the flag is found on several buildings and can be traced back to the middle of the 15th century where it appears in the coat-of-arms of the "Die Grosse Gilde", a sort of merchant consortium which greatly influenced the city's development. The symbol later became the coat-of-arms of the city. Efforts to trace it from Estonia back to Denmark have, however, been in vain.

The national Coat of Arms of Estonia, three blue lions on a golden shield, is almost identical to the Coat of Arms of Denmark, and its origin can be traced directly back to King Valdemar II and Danish rule in Estonia 1219-1346.

Earliest undisputed link

Page 55 verso in the Dutch book Wapenboek Gelre. Displaying the earliest known undisputed colourized image of Dannebrog

The earliest source that indisputably links the red flag with a white cross to a Danish King, and to the realm itself, is found in a Dutch register of coats-of-arms “Wapenboek Gelre”, written between 1340 and 1370 (some sources say 1378 or 1386). Most historians claim that the book was written by Geldre Claes Heinen. The book displays some 1700 coats-of-arms from all over Europe, in colour. It is now located on the Royal Library of Brussels (the "Bibliothèque royale Albert Ier").

On page 55 verso we find the Danish coat-of-arms with a helmet on top with horns. On the right horn is a Danish banner. The text left of the coat of arms says “die coninc van denmarke” (The King of Denmark). This is the earliest known undisputed colour rendering of the Dannebrog.

This image has been used to acknowledge a previously disputed theory that the cross found in Valdemar Atterdag's coats of arms located in his Danælog seal ("Rettertingsseglet") from 1356 is indeed the cross from the Danish flag.

This image from "Wapenboek Gelre" is near identical found in an old coats of arms book from the 15th century now located in the National Archives of Sweden, ("Riksarkivet")

From Queen Margaret I and King Erik VII time we also have a case that undisputedly links Dannebrog to Denmark. The royal seal of King Erik VII from 1398 - the first combined coat of arms found in Denmark - shows the flag twice; the cross that separates the four coats-of-arms is the cross of the Dannebrog and the coat of arms representing Denmark show the three lions holding a Dannebrog banner.

Origin and meaning of "Dannebrog"

From King's banner to National flag

Laws and flag variations

Denmark does not have a specified flag law, but various regulations and rules spread out over many documents, from King Christian IV's time till today, can be found. The quest to unite them into a specified flag law have been brought forth many times, especially in the 20th century, but it never amounted to anything.

National flag

The size and shape of the coufhordie flag ("Koffardiflaget") for merchant ships is given in the regulation of June 11, 1748, which says: A red flag with a white cross with no split end. The white cross must be 1/7 of the flags height. The two first fields must be square in form and the two outer fields most be 6/4 lengths of those.

The proportions are thus: 3:1:3 vertically and 3:1:4.5 horizontally. This definition are the absolute proportions for the Danish national flag to this day, for both the civil version of the flag, "Stutflaget", as well as the merchant flag ("Handelsflaget"). Both flags are identical.

A somewhat curious regulation came in 1758 concerning Danish ships sailing in the Mediterranean. These had to carry the King's cypher logo in the center of the flag, to distinguish them from Maltese ships, due to the similarity of the flag of the Order of St. John (a.k.a. the Knights Hospitaller). To the best of knowledge, this regulation has never been revoked, however it is probably no longer done.

According to the regulation of June 11, 1748 the colour was simply red, which is common known today as "Dannebrog rød" ("Dannebrog red"). The only available red fabric colour in 1748 was made of bracken root, which make a brownish red. The private company, Dansk Standard, regulation number 359 of 2005, defines the red colour of the flag as Pantone 186c. No official nuance definition of "Dannebrog rød" exists.

During the next about 150 years nobody paid much attention to actually abide fully to the proportions of the flag given in the 1748 regulation, not even the government. As late as 1892 it was stated in a series of regulations that the correct lengths of the two last fields in the flag were 6/4. Some interested in the matter made inquires into the issue and concluded that the 6/4 length would make the flag look blunt. Any new flag would also quickly become unlawful, due to wear and tear. They also noted that the flag currently used had lengths, of the last two fields, anywhere between 7/4 to 13/6.

So in May 1893 a new regulation to all chiefs of police, stated that the police should not intervene, if the two last fields in the flag were longer than 6/4 as long as these did not exceed 7/4, and provided that this was the only rule violated.

This regulation is still in effect today and thus the legal proportions of the National flag is today anywhere between 3:1:3 width / 3:1:4.5 length and 3:1:3 width / 3:1:5.25 length.

That some confusion still exists in this matter can be seen from the regulation of May 4, 1927, which once again states that Danish merchant ships have to fly flags according to the regulation of 1748.

Splitflag

The Splitflag - the Danish State Flag. Proportions: 56:107 The Orlogsflag - the Danish Naval Flag. Proportions: 56:107

The Splitflag or Orlogsflag have similar specifications, but legally, they are two different flags. The Splitflag is a Danish flag ending in a swallow-tail, it is Dannebrog red, and is used on land. The Orlogsflag is a Splitflag with a deeper red colour and is only used on sea.

The Orlogsflag with no markings, may only be used by the Royal Danish Navy. There are though a few exceptions to this. A few institutions have been allowed to fly the clean Orlogsflag. Same flag with markings has been approved for a few dozen companies and institutions over the years.

Furthermore, the Orlogsflag is only described as such if it has no additional markings. Any swallow-tail flag, no matter the color, is called a Splitflag provided it bears additional markings.

The first regulation regarding the Splitflag dates from 27 March, 1630, where King Christian IV orders that Norwegian "Defensionskibe" (merchants ships with guns) may only use the Splitflag if they are in war-service under Denmark. In 1685 an order, distributed to a number of cities in Slesvig, says that all ships must carry the Danish flag, and in 1690 all merchants ships is forbidden to use the Splitflag, with the exception of ships sailing in the East Indies, West Indies and at the coast of Africa. In 1741 it is re-stated that the regulation of 1690 is still very much in effect, that merchants ships may not use the Splitflag. At the same time it is now allowed the Danish East India Company to use the Splitflag when past the equator.

It is obvious that some confusion must have existed regarding the Splitflag. In 1696 the Admiralty presented the King with a proposal for a standard regulating both size and shape of the Splitflag. In the same year a Royal resolution defines the proportions of the Splitflag, which in this resolution is called Kongeflaget (the King's flag), as follows: The cross must be 1/7 of the flags height. The two first fields must be square in form with the sides three times the cross width. The two outer fields are rectangular and 1½ the length of the square fields. The tails are the length of the flag.

These numbers are the basic for the Splitflag, or Orlogsflag, today, though the numbers have been slightly altered. The term Orlogsflag dates from 1806 and denotes use in the Royal Danish Navy.

From about 1750 to early 1800's a number of ships / companies which the government has interests in, received approval to used the Splitflag. From the mid 1800's to 1899 another bunch of institutions and private companies also received approval to use the Splitflag. Especially after 1870 the government generous and with little thought hand out approval to all kinds to institutions.

In royal resolution of October 25, 1939 for the Danish Navy, it is stated that the Orlogsflag is a Splitflag with a deep red ("Kraprød" or "dybrød") colour. Like the National flag, no nuance is given, but in modern days this is given as 195U. Furthermore the size and shape is corrected in this resolution to be: The cross must be 1/7 of the flags height. The two first fields must be square in form with the height of 3/7 of the flags height. The two outer fields are rectangular and 5/4 the length of the square fields. The tails are 6/4 the length of the rectangular fields.

Comparing this to the 1696 resolution one can see that both the rectangular fields and the tails have become smaller.

Who may use what?

1. Stutflag: This is the national flag of Denmark and is used by for all civilian purposes including the merchant navy. Any Dane can have a flagpole in the garden and use the flag according to the law. When the flag is not hoisted, for instance during darkness, a long narrow version called a vimpel or a wider version called a stander can be flown.

2. Splitflag: The use of the swallow-tail flag is restricted to the Danish Government and Navy. Note: The Naval Flag has a darker hue than the State Flag. Private yachts and motor boats are allowed to use the Naval Flag with the letters Y.F.(for Yacht Flag) superimposed in the upper canton. This flag is not allowed on boats for hire.

3. Kongeflag (literally: The King's Flag): This is the flag of the Monarch. It is currently used by H.M. Queen Margrethe II.

4. Dronningeflag (literally: The Queen's flag). This is the flag of the consort of the monarch. The main difference from the flag of the monarch is that this version of the royal coat-of-arms lacks the supporters, two wild men. This flag was used by H.M. Queen Ingrid, and is currently not in use, since the Prince Consort, H.R.H. Prince Henrik uses a special flag with a his personal coat of arms in the centre (originally, he used a flag with a crowned "H" in the centre).

5. Rigsforstanderflag: This flag is used by the leading member of the Royal Family when the Queen is abroad, and shows that the person currently assumes the constitutional duties of the Monarch. This person remains the de facto Monarch, until the Monarch returns to Danish territory.

6. Tronfølgerflag: This is the flag of the Crown Prince of Denmark, currently H.R.H. Crown Prince Frederik.

7. Kongehusflag: This flag can be used by any member of the Danish Royal Family.

8. Forsvarsminister: This is the flag of the Minister of Defence.

9. Admiral: Used on a ship to indicate that an Admiral is on board.

10. Viceadmiral: Used on a ship to indicate that a Vice Admiral is on board.

11. Kontreadmiral: Used on a ship to indicate that an Rear Admiral is on board.

12. Postflag: This is the former flag of the Royal Danish Mail and Telegraph (Danish: Kongelig Post og Telegrafvæsen), now Post Danmark.

13. Statens skibe: This flag is used on ships owned by the Danish State.

14. DSB: This flag is used by the DSB, the state railway company (Danske Statsbaner).

15. Havnepoliti: This is used by the Danish harbour police.

Flag days



References

  • Dannebrog - Vort Flag, Lieutenant Colonel Thaulow, Forlaget Codan, Copenhagen 1943
  • Dannebrog, Helga Bruhn, Forlaget Jespersen og Pios, Copenhagen 1949
  • Danebrog - Danmarks Palladium, E. D. Lund, Forlaget H. Hagerups, Copenhagen 1919
  • DS 359:2005 ’Flagdug’, Dansk Standard, 2005

This page about dannebrog includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about dannebrog
News stories about dannebrog
External links for dannebrog
Videos for dannebrog
Wikis about dannebrog
Discussion Groups about dannebrog
Blogs about dannebrog
Images of dannebrog


. Milan has 14 sister cities:.
.
There are other stadiums and multiuse palaces located in the metropolitan area, the biggest being Monza Brianteo Stadium (18,000 seats), the PalaDesio (10,000) and Geas Stadium (8,500). Havnepoliti: This is used by the Danish harbour police. Milan and Lombardy are candidates for the Summer Olympic Games of 2016 (Milan-Lombardy 2016). 15. Many of the strongest Italian football players were born in Milan, in the surrounding metropolitan area, or in Lombardy: Valentino Mazzola, Renzo De Vecchi, Paolo Maldini, Giuseppe Meazza, Giacinto Facchetti, Gianni Rivera, Paolo Rossi, Luigi Riva, Gaetano Scirea, Giuseppe Bergomi, Walter Zenga, Antonio Cabrini, Roberto Donadoni, Gianluca Vialli, Silvio Piola, Virginio Rosetta, Giampiero Boniperti, Giuseppe Dossena, Gabriele Oriali, Giuseppe Signori, Ugo Locatelli, Giampiero Marini, Aristide Guarneri, Paolino Pulici, Marcello Lippi, Giovanni Trapattoni, Franco e Giuseppe Baresi, Luigi Cevenini, Virgilio e Giuseppe Fossati, Giovanni Ferrari...

DSB: This flag is used by the DSB, the state railway company (Danske Statsbaner). Both teams play at Giuseppe Meazza - San Siro Stadium (85,700). 14. Milan is the only city in Europe whose teams have won both the European Cup and the Intercontinental Cup. Statens skibe: This flag is used on ships owned by the Danish State. Milan and Internazionale. 13. Football is the most important sport in Italy, and Milan is home to 2 world-famous football teams: A.C.

Postflag: This is the former flag of the Royal Danish Mail and Telegraph (Danish: Kongelig Post og Telegrafvæsen), now Post Danmark. Prices are based on time elapsed and distance traveled. 12. All taxis are the same color: white. Kontreadmiral: Used on a ship to indicate that an Rear Admiral is on board. Milan has an efficient Taxi service, operated by private companies and licensed by the City of Milan (Comune di Milano). 11. The "Passante ferroviario" is an underground railway serving a couple of "S" lines and is very much like another subway line (and is even marked as such on subway maps), except that it is connected to the FNME and Trenitalia suburban networks.

Viceadmiral: Used on a ship to indicate that a Vice Admiral is on board. The Regional Railway Service ( "R"), instead, links Milan with the rest of Lombardy and the national railway system. 10. The Suburban Railway Service ( "S" Lines, a service similar to the French RER and German S-Bahn), composed of 8 suburban lines and 10 more scheduled for 2008, connects the "Greater Milan" to cities such as Como and Varese. Admiral: Used on a ship to indicate that an Admiral is on board. At the end of the work, the TAV station for Milan to the east will be:. 9. A line from Milan to Venice and then to Trieste is under construction.

Forsvarsminister: This is the flag of the Minister of Defence. The stations for the TAV (Treni ad Alta Velocità - High Speed Trains) will be:. 8. High speed train lines are under contruction all across Italy, and new lines will open from Milan to Rome and Naples, and from Milan to Torino. Kongehusflag: This flag can be used by any member of the Danish Royal Family. Three new stations for passenger service are under construction:. 7. Milan is one of the most important railway hubs of Italy, and the 5 major stations of Milan are among Italy's busiest:.

Crown Prince Frederik. The local transportation authority (ATM) transported more than 600 million passengers in 2003 . Tronfølgerflag: This is the flag of the Crown Prince of Denmark, currently H.R.H. 93 bus lines cover over 1,070 km between them. 6. Greater Milan also has one of the most extensive tramway systems in the world, with more than 286 km of track, and 20 lines. This person remains the de facto Monarch, until the Monarch returns to Danish territory. Lines 4 (linking downtown with Linate Airport) and 6 are in planning stages.

Rigsforstanderflag: This flag is used by the leading member of the Royal Family when the Queen is abroad, and shows that the person currently assumes the constitutional duties of the Monarch. Line 5 is also under construction, to be finished in the first half of 2008. 5. Extensions of lines 1, 2 and 3 are under construction, to create more than 15 km of track with 10 new stations. Prince Henrik uses a special flag with a his personal coat of arms in the centre (originally, he used a flag with a crowned "H" in the centre). Raffaele Hospital with the Cascina Gobba station (M2). Queen Ingrid, and is currently not in use, since the Prince Consort, H.R.H. Raffaele", connecting the S.

This flag was used by H.M. There is also a light metro-service, "Metrò S. The main difference from the flag of the monarch is that this version of the royal coat-of-arms lacks the supporters, two wild men. Milan has 3 subway lines (M1 - red, M2 - green, M3 - yellow) and the system, called Milan Metro - "M", running for more than 80 km. This is the flag of the consort of the monarch. The main 3 airports of Milano (Malpensa, Linate and Orio) comprise the largest and most important hub in Italy, both for passengers and cargo. Dronningeflag (literally: The Queen's flag). Vergiate, Bresso, and Parma are further airports in the region.

4. A third airport is Orio al Serio (BGY), close to the city of Bergamo. Queen Margrethe II. Babila). It is currently used by H.M. Milan also has the Linate Airport (LIN) within the city limits (for European and domestic traffic), connected with bus line 73 (from S. Kongeflag (literally: The King's Flag): This is the flag of the Monarch. Malpensa was designed by the famous Ettore Sottsass.

3. The city has a large international airport known as Malpensa International Airport (MXP), located in the northern suburb of Busto Ariszio and connected to the downtown with the "Malpensa Express" railway service (from Cadorna Station). This flag is not allowed on boats for hire. In the church Santa Maria delle Grazie can be found one of the most famous paintings of Leonardo da Vinci: The Last Supper (it: "Cenacolo"). Private yachts and motor boats are allowed to use the Naval Flag with the letters Y.F.(for Yacht Flag) superimposed in the upper canton. The city is also the home of the Brera Academy of Fine Arts. Note: The Naval Flag has a darker hue than the State Flag. The Biblioteca Ambrosiana contains drawings and notebooks by Leonardo da Vinci among its vast holdings of books, manuscripts, and drawings, and is one of the main repositories of European culture.

Splitflag: The use of the swallow-tail flag is restricted to the Danish Government and Navy. Milan is one of the most important centres in the world for Opera lirica, with its famous Teatro alla Scala (La Scala, theatre). 2. Cities in the 'World City Network'" (Key Findings, Full Report). When the flag is not hoisted, for instance during darkness, a long narrow version called a vimpel or a wider version called a stander can be flown. Lang of the Brookings Institution in the economic report "U.S. Any Dane can have a flagpole in the garden and use the flag according to the law. Taylor and Robert E.

Stutflag: This is the national flag of Denmark and is used by for all civilian purposes including the merchant navy. Milan was included in a list of ten "Alpha world cities" by Peter J. 1. This new fairground, in the north-western suburb of Pero and Rho (opened in April 2005), is Europe's largest open construction project, making Fiera Milano the largest trade fair complex in the world. Comparing this to the 1696 resolution one can see that both the rectangular fields and the tails have become smaller. Fiera Milano, the city's Exhibition Center and Trade Fair complex, is one of the most important in the world. The tails are 6/4 the length of the rectangular fields. Milan is the centre of much finance, the seat of the Italian Stock Exchange (la Borsa Valori) and its hinterland is an avant-garde industrial area.

The two outer fields are rectangular and 5/4 the length of the square fields. The city is 85% Italian, 4% from other EU countries, and the remainder include Romanian, Egyptian, Filipino, Sri Lankan, Chinese, and Albanian. The two first fields must be square in form with the height of 3/7 of the flags height. A small percentage comes from Latin America. Furthermore the size and shape is corrected in this resolution to be: The cross must be 1/7 of the flags height. Many immigrants come from Asian and North African nations. Like the National flag, no nuance is given, but in modern days this is given as 195U. Milan is a very diverse city, being the second largest city in Italy, but it is the most industrial and main financial centre of the country.

In royal resolution of October 25, 1939 for the Danish Navy, it is stated that the Orlogsflag is a Splitflag with a deep red ("Kraprød" or "dybrød") colour. See also: Rulers of Milan. Especially after 1870 the government generous and with little thought hand out approval to all kinds to institutions. After the war, the city was reconstructed and has again become an important financial and industrial centre of Italy. From the mid 1800's to 1899 another bunch of institutions and private companies also received approval to use the Splitflag. When war in Italy was finally over, April 25, 1945, Milan was heavily damaged and entire neighborhoods such as Precotto and Turro were destroyed. From about 1750 to early 1800's a number of ships / companies which the government has interests in, received approval to used the Splitflag. In fact, Milan was part of Mussolini's Italian Social Republic puppet state, and an important command centre of the German Army stationed in Italy.

The term Orlogsflag dates from 1806 and denotes use in the Royal Danish Navy. The city was bombed even after Pietro Badoglio surrendered to the allied forces in 1943. These numbers are the basic for the Splitflag, or Orlogsflag, today, though the numbers have been slightly altered. As a critical industrial center of Italy, Milan was target of continuous carpet bombing during World War II. The tails are the length of the flag. In 1859 (after the second of the Wars of Italian Independence) Austrian rule was ended by the Kingdom of Sardinia (which transformed into the kingdom of Italy in 1861). The two outer fields are rectangular and 1½ the length of the square fields. Milan eventually became one of the main centers of Italian nationalism, claiming independence and the unification of Italy.

The two first fields must be square in form with the sides three times the cross width. After this period, Milan was part of the Kingdom of Lombardy-Venetia under Austrian rule. In the same year a Royal resolution defines the proportions of the Splitflag, which in this resolution is called Kongeflaget (the King's flag), as follows: The cross must be 1/7 of the flags height. But the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars saw the city annexed into the French satellite states of the Cisalpine Republic, which later became the Kingdom of Italy. In 1696 the Admiralty presented the King with a proposal for a standard regulating both size and shape of the Splitflag. In the 18th century Austria replaced Spain as Milan's overlord, because the Spanish line of Habsburgs died out. It is obvious that some confusion must have existed regarding the Splitflag. After trying to conquer the rest of northern Italy in the 15th century, Milan was conquered by France, and then later on by Austria (Habsburg), then given in the early 16th century to the Spanish Habsburg line to rule.

At the same time it is now allowed the Danish East India Company to use the Splitflag when past the equator. During the Renaissance Milan was ruled by dukes of the Visconti and Sforza families, who had artists like Leonardo da Vinci and Bramante at their service. In 1741 it is re-stated that the regulation of 1690 is still very much in effect, that merchants ships may not use the Splitflag. During the Plague of 1349 Milan was one of the few places in Europe that was untouched by the epidemic, but it was deeply affected by the plagues of 1402 (50,000 deaths), 1542 (80,000), 1576 (17,000) and 1629 (also known as Great Plague of Milan, 70,000 deaths). In 1685 an order, distributed to a number of cities in Slesvig, says that all ships must carry the Danish flag, and in 1690 all merchants ships is forbidden to use the Splitflag, with the exception of ships sailing in the East Indies, West Indies and at the coast of Africa. In the 11th century, after the Ostrogothic and Lombard periods, the city regained its importance and led other Italian cities in gaining semi-independence from the Holy Roman Empire. The first regulation regarding the Splitflag dates from 27 March, 1630, where King Christian IV orders that Norwegian "Defensionskibe" (merchants ships with guns) may only use the Splitflag if they are in war-service under Denmark. His feast day is the 7th of Decmeber.

Any swallow-tail flag, no matter the color, is called a Splitflag provided it bears additional markings. St Ambrose is now the Patron Saint of the city. Furthermore, the Orlogsflag is only described as such if it has no additional markings. At that time Milan was the second largest city in Europe, with more than 300,000 inhabitants. Same flag with markings has been approved for a few dozen companies and institutions over the years. In the 4th century CE, at the time of the bishop Saint Ambrose and emperor Theodosius I, the city was briefly the capital of the Western Roman Empire. A few institutions have been allowed to fly the clean Orlogsflag. It is presumed Milan was originally founded by the Celts of Northern Italy around 600 BCE and was conquered around 222 BCE by the Romans, who gave it the name of Mediolanum.

There are though a few exceptions to this. . The Orlogsflag with no markings, may only be used by the Royal Danish Navy. Inhabitants of Milan are referred to as "Milanesi" and nicknamed "Meneghini". The Orlogsflag is a Splitflag with a deeper red colour and is only used on sea. Milan is also famous for the Alfa Romeo motorcar and for its silk production. The Splitflag is a Danish flag ending in a swallow-tail, it is Dannebrog red, and is used on land. Another famed product of the city is the traditional Christmas sweet cake called Panettone.

The Splitflag or Orlogsflag have similar specifications, but legally, they are two different flags. Indeed the English word milliner is derived from the name of the city. That some confusion still exists in this matter can be seen from the regulation of May 4, 1927, which once again states that Danish merchant ships have to fly flags according to the regulation of 1748. Milan is one of the world capitals of fashion, like New York City, Paris, London and Rome, and design. This regulation is still in effect today and thus the legal proportions of the National flag is today anywhere between 3:1:3 width / 3:1:4.5 length and 3:1:3 width / 3:1:5.25 length. The town is famous for fashion firms and shops (via Montenapoleone) and the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele on the Piazza Duomo, reputed to be the world's oldest shopping mall. So in May 1893 a new regulation to all chiefs of police, stated that the police should not intervene, if the two last fields in the flag were longer than 6/4 as long as these did not exceed 7/4, and provided that this was the only rule violated. The province comprises 188 communes, ranging in population (2001) from Milan Municipality (1,308,311) to Nosate (638); the city of Milan has lost 113,084 inhabitants (8.3 percent), from 1991 to 2001.

They also noted that the flag currently used had lengths, of the last two fields, anywhere between 7/4 to 13/6. Its province lies in the western part of Lombardy; it covers an area of 1,982 km2 and has a population of 3,839,818 (2004); in 1991, the population was 3,738,685. Any new flag would also quickly become unlawful, due to wear and tear. It comes from the Celtic Mid-lan (meaning "in the middle of the plain") and was known as Mediolanum by the Romans. Some interested in the matter made inquires into the issue and concluded that the 6/4 length would make the flag look blunt. Milan's name has for many centuries been recorded as Mailand, which is still the German name of the city today. As late as 1892 it was stated in a series of regulations that the correct lengths of the two last fields in the flag were 6/4. The metropolitan area, called the Città Regione (The City Region) claims more than 9.4 million inhabitants (this is an ambitious definition of Milan's metropolitan area, perhaps not very comparable with figures claimed for metros outside Italy).

During the next about 150 years nobody paid much attention to actually abide fully to the proportions of the flag given in the 1748 regulation, not even the government. The city proper has about 1,308,311 inhabitants (2004), but the population of the urban area including the hinterland is about 4 million and is called La Grande Milano (Greater Milan, 1,981 square kilometres). No official nuance definition of "Dannebrog rød" exists. Milan (Italian: Milano; Milanese dialect: Milán) is the main city in northern Italy, and is located in the plains of Lombardy, the most populated and developed region in Italy. The private company, Dansk Standard, regulation number 359 of 2005, defines the red colour of the flag as Pantone 186c.
. The only available red fabric colour in 1748 was made of bracken root, which make a brownish red. Toronto, Canada.

According to the regulation of June 11, 1748 the colour was simply red, which is common known today as "Dannebrog rød" ("Dannebrog red"). Thessaloniki, Greece. To the best of knowledge, this regulation has never been revoked, however it is probably no longer done. Tel Aviv, Israel. the Knights Hospitaller). Tianjin, China. John (a.k.a. Shanghai, China.

These had to carry the King's cypher logo in the center of the flag, to distinguish them from Maltese ships, due to the similarity of the flag of the Order of St. São Paulo, Brazil. A somewhat curious regulation came in 1758 concerning Danish ships sailing in the Mediterranean. Saint Petersburg, Russia. Both flags are identical. Osaka, Japan. This definition are the absolute proportions for the Danish national flag to this day, for both the civil version of the flag, "Stutflaget", as well as the merchant flag ("Handelsflaget"). Melbourne, Australia.

The proportions are thus: 3:1:3 vertically and 3:1:4.5 horizontally. Lyon, France. The two first fields must be square in form and the two outer fields most be 6/4 lengths of those. Frankfurt am Main, Germany. The white cross must be 1/7 of the flags height. Dakar, Senegal. The size and shape of the coufhordie flag ("Koffardiflaget") for merchant ships is given in the regulation of June 11, 1748, which says: A red flag with a white cross with no split end. Krakow, Poland.

The quest to unite them into a specified flag law have been brought forth many times, especially in the 20th century, but it never amounted to anything. Chicago, Illinois, United States. Denmark does not have a specified flag law, but various regulations and rules spread out over many documents, from King Christian IV's time till today, can be found. Boston, Massachusetts, United States. The royal seal of King Erik VII from 1398 - the first combined coat of arms found in Denmark - shows the flag twice; the cross that separates the four coats-of-arms is the cross of the Dannebrog and the coat of arms representing Denmark show the three lions holding a Dannebrog banner. Birmingham, Great Britain, Birmingham's Partner City page. From Queen Margaret I and King Erik VII time we also have a case that undisputedly links Dannebrog to Denmark. Bethlehem, Palestine.

This image from "Wapenboek Gelre" is near identical found in an old coats of arms book from the 15th century now located in the National Archives of Sweden, ("Riksarkivet"). Radio 24. This image has been used to acknowledge a previously disputed theory that the cross found in Valdemar Atterdag's coats of arms located in his Danælog seal ("Rettertingsseglet") from 1356 is indeed the cross from the Danish flag. Radio 105. This is the earliest known undisputed colour rendering of the Dannebrog. R101. The text left of the coat of arms says “die coninc van denmarke” (The King of Denmark). Radio Deejay (National Hdq).

On the right horn is a Danish banner. Sky Italia (National Hdq). On page 55 verso we find the Danish coat-of-arms with a helmet on top with horns. MTV (South-Europe Hdq). It is now located on the Royal Library of Brussels (the "Bibliothèque royale Albert Ier"). RAI (Milan Regional Hdq). The book displays some 1700 coats-of-arms from all over Europe, in colour. Mediaset (National Hdq).

Most historians claim that the book was written by Geldre Claes Heinen. Focus (monthly). The earliest source that indisputably links the red flag with a white cross to a Danish King, and to the realm itself, is found in a Dutch register of coats-of-arms “Wapenboek Gelre”, written between 1340 and 1370 (some sources say 1378 or 1386). Explora (monthly). The national Coat of Arms of Estonia, three blue lions on a golden shield, is almost identical to the Coat of Arms of Denmark, and its origin can be traced directly back to King Valdemar II and Danish rule in Estonia 1219-1346. AnnaBella (weekly). Efforts to trace it from Estonia back to Denmark have, however, been in vain. Marie Claire (weekly).

The symbol later became the coat-of-arms of the city. Oggi (weekly). In Tallinn, a coat-of-arms resembling the flag is found on several buildings and can be traced back to the middle of the 15th century where it appears in the coat-of-arms of the "Die Grosse Gilde", a sort of merchant consortium which greatly influenced the city's development. TV Sorrisi & Canzoni (weekly). An obvious place to look for documentation is in the Estonian city of Tallinn, the site of the legendary battle. La Settimana Enigmistica (weekly). However, if one examines the few existing foreign sources about Denmark from the 13th to 15th centuries, it is apparent that, at least from foreign point of view; the national symbol of Denmark was not a red-and-white banner but the royal coat of arms (three blue lions of a golden shield.) This coat of arms remains in use to this day. Panorama (weekly).

In the 19th and early 20th century, these images were used by many Danish historians, with a good flair of nationalism, trying to date the origins of the flag to 1219. Metro (daily). However, several coins, seals and images exist, both foreign and domestic, from the 13th to 15th centuries and even earlier, showing flags similar to the Dannebrog. La Gazzetta dello Sport (daily, sports only). Whether the flag has its origins in a divine sign, a banner of a military order, an ecclesiastical banner, or perhaps something entirely different, Danish literature is no help before the early 15th century. La Padania (daily). Danish literature of the 13th and 14th centuries remains suspiciously quiet about the national flag. Milano Finanza (daily).

Since King Valdamar II was married to the Portuguese princess, Berengaria, it is not unthinkable that the origin of the story, if not the flag, was the Spanish tale or a similar tale, which again might have been inspired by an even older legend. Il Sole 24 Ore (daily). Basically, these are all variations of the same legend. Libero (daily). In Estonia it is the Danish colours, and in Jerusalem the English colours. Il Giornale (daily). In Spain, the colours of the Pope appears in the sky, in Finland the Swedish colours. Il Giorno (daily).

The similarities to the legends is obvious. Corriere della Sera (daily). The English flag, the Saint George's Cross is also claimed to have appeared in the sky during a critical battle, in this case in Jerusalem during the crusades. Nuovo Giuriati - Rugby - 4,000. Probably a later invention to counter the legendary origins of the Danish flags, but never the less of the same nature. Agorà - Ice Hockey - 4,000. Likewise an almost identical Swedish tale from the 18th century about a yellow cross on blue appearing in 1157 during a Swedish battle in Finland. PalaLido - Basket - 5,000.

Bruhn mentions a battle (also mentioned by Fabricius) taking place on September 10, 1217 between Christian knights and Moor warriors on the Iberian Peninsula near the castle Alcazar, where it is said that a golden cross on white appeared in the sky, to bring victory to the Christians. Velodromo Vigorelli - Cycling, American Football - 12,000. Similar tales of appearances in the sky at critical moments, particularly of crosses, can be found all over Europe. MazdaPalace - Basket, Volley - 13,500. She claims that it is neither the battle nor the banner that is central to the tale, but rather the cross in the sky. Forum di Assago - Basket, Ice Hockey, Volley, Music - 13,000 to 16,000. A much different theory is briefly discussed by Fabricius and elaborated more by Helga Bruhn in a book from 1949. Ippodromo del Galoppo - Horse Racing - 15,000.

All these theories centre on two battles in Estonia, whether it is in Fellin (1208) or Lyndanisse (1219), and thus try to explain the origin in relation to the tale brought forth over 300 years after the event. Ippodromo del Trotter - Horse Racing - 16,000. He repeats the story about the flag being planted in front of Bishop Theodorik's tent which the enemy mistakenly attacks believing it to be the tent of the King. Brianteo - Athletic, Football - 18,568. The banner would then already be known in Estonia. Arena Civica - Athletic, Rugby, Football, 30,000. That is based on his tireless efforts to expand Christianity to the Baltic countries and that under his initiative and supervision several smaller crusades had already been conducted in Estonia. San Siro - only football - 85,700.

He says in this theory that it might have been Archbishop Andreas Sunesøn's personal ecclestical banner or perhaps even the flag of Archbishop Absalon. Autodromo Nazionale Monza - car and motorcycle racing - 137,000. In this study he put the location to 1208 Fellin and not the Battle of Lyndanisse in 1219, based on the earliest source available about the story.. Past winners include Tacchini, Kodes, Panatta, Barazzutti, Moreno, Borg, Smid, Lendl, Forget, Curier, Ivanisevic, Kafelnikov, and Coira. It is explained in his study of 1934, titled "Sagnet om Dannebrog og de ældste Forbindelser med Estland'". The central court has a capacity of 8000. Fabricius put up yet another theory. It is the most important youth tournament in the world, and is played at the Milan Tennis Club.

P. Every year, Milan hosts the Bonfiglio Trophy Under 18 Tennis Tournament. The Danish church-historian L. They play at the Agora Stadium (capacity 4,500) during the regular season, and at the Forum during playoffs . The white on red warrior-cloak cannot be traced until later. The Vipers Milano have won the last 4 national championships, the Alpenliga and several Coppa Italia, and are the leaders of that sport in Italy. The Knights Hospitaller is a monk-order and used black dresses. Different ice hockey teams from Milan have won 30 National Championships between them.

Adolf Ditlev Jørgensen does not give an explanation how the white Maltese cross on red of the Knights Hospitaller, found its way to the Danish flag of 1219, given the fact that in that time it was a white cross on black. The Amatory Rugby Club Milano have won 18 National Championships and are the most famous and important Rugby team in Italy. He claims that the origin of the legend of the falling flag comes from this confusion in the battle. Olimpia play at the Forum (capacity 14,000). Adolf Ditlev Jørgensen explains that it was Bishop Theodorik who carried the flag, well planted outside his tent, thus as an already well-known Knights Hospitaller symbol in Livonia, the enemy thought this was the King's symbol and mistakenly stormed Bishop Theodorik tent. It is the most important Italian team and one of the top 5 in Europe. In the contemporary writing of the priest Henry of Livonia from Riga it is said that Bishop Theodorik was killed during the 1219 battle, as the enemy stormed his tent, thinking it was the King's tent. Olimpia Milano is a successful European basketball team that have won 3 European Cups, a World Cup, 3 Winners' Cups, 2 Korac Cups and 25 National Championships.

Furthermore he claims that Bishop Theodorik, already a part initiator of the order in Livonia, the Livonian Brothers of the Sword, had the idea of starting a similar order in Estonia and that he was the original instigator of Bishop Albert of Buxhoeveden inquiry to King Valdemar II in 1218, that set the whole Danish participation in the Baltic crusades in motion. The capacity for the F1 races is around 137,000 spectators. He supports his theory with that the order came to Denmark in the latter half of the 12th century and during the next centuries spread to major cities, like Odense, Viborg, Horsens, Ribe and their headquarters in Slagelse, so by the time of the Baltic crusade, the symbol was already a known symbol in Denmark. It one of the world's oldest car racing circuits, and one of the most famous. A theory brought forth by the Danish historian Adolf Ditlev Jørgensen in 1875 in his book Danebroges Oprindelse, is that the Danish flag is the banner of the Knights Hospitaller. The famous Monza Formula One circuit is located in the suburbs. Moreover, it is unlikely that the pope would send such a banner, given the fact that they already had one, namely the banner of the Knights Hospitaller (Danish: "Johanitterne"). Milano Pioltello.

It is unlikely that the very fair and loyal archbishop would do such a thing behind the king's back. Milano Certosa and Milano/Rho Fiera (for the west). He suggested that it was not a pope banner to the King but a pope banner to the Churchly legate in the North, more specifically to archbishop Andreas Sunesøn, which he - without the knowledge of the King – brought with him on the King's crusade in the Baltic countries, in an effort to make the army take on a Christian symbol (over the king's symbol) and thereby strengthen the power of the church. Milano Rogoredo (for the south). A similar theory was suggested by Danish explorer, adventurer and Captain Johan Støckel in the early 20th century. Milano/Rho Fiera. On the other hand, the letter in question might simply have been lost. Milano Tibaldi.

Being granted a banner by the Pope would have been a great honour, but despite the many letters of the popes relating to the crusades, none of them mentions granting a banner to a King of Denmark. Milano Romolo. One would though imagine that if this story was true, some kind of record ought to exist of the event and presumably Danish historians would not have failed to mention it in some way. Milano Smistamento/Scalo Farini (cargo-trains). Other kings and lords certainly received such banners. Milano Certosa (passenger station). The Danish historian Caspar Paludan-Müller in 1873 in his book "Sagnet om den himmelfaldne Danebrogsfane" put forth the theory that it is a banner sent by the Pope to the Danish King to use in his crusades in the Baltic countries. Milano Porta Romana (passenger and cargo station).

Other origin theories have been put forth in the late 19th and early 20th century. Milano San Cristoforo (passenger and cargo station). Many of these legends are apparently built on earlier ones. Milano Greco (passenger station). If the flag of 1208 or 1219 ever existed. Milano Rogoredo (passenger station and cargo station). Historically, it is of course impossible to prove or disprove that these records speak of the same flag. Milano Lambrate (passenger station).

A historian from Slesvig, Ulrik Petersen (1656-1735), wrote in the late 17th century that the flag hung in Slesvig cathedral till about 1660 until it simply crumbled away, thus ending its more than 400-year-old story. Milano P.ta Garibaldi (passenger station). Henrik Rantzau states in his writing of 1576 that the flag was brought to Slesvig city and placed in the cathedral, following its return. Milano Centrale (passenger station - the second busiest Italian station). A priest and historian from Dithmarschen, Johan Neocorus, wrote in 1598 that the banner captured in 1500, was brought to the church in Wohrden and hung there for the next 59 years, until it was returned to the Danes as part of the peace settlement in 1559. I.S.E.F. This is however not the end of the story. Istituto Europeo di Design.

This "Danmarckis Hoffuitbanner" was probably nothing short of the "Banner of the Realm'" (Rigsbanner), the Dannebrog.. Verdi" di Milano. This young man was Peder Skram. Conservatorio Superiore "G. It was saved only by the combined efforts of the banner-carrier Mogens Gyldenstierne, taking multiple wounds, and a young man coming to his rescue. Accademia delle Belle Arti di Brera. He writes that the "Danish head banner" ("Danmarckis Hoffuitbanner") was nearly captured by the Swedes. Beato Angelico.

An indication that we are dealing with multiple flags, are the 1570 writings of Niels Hemmingsøn regarding a bloody battle between Danes and Swedes near the Swedish town of Uppsala in 1520. L.U.C. In fact, the entire letter gives the impression that the lost battle was noting more than an "unfortunate affair". Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele. In a letter dated 22 February 1500 to Oluf Stigsøn, King John describes the battle, but does not mention the loss of an important flag. Università C.Cattaneo L.I.U.C. However, it is more questionable if he indeed was carrying the "original" flag. Università I.U.L.M.

It is quite plausible that the king’s personal banner as well as the leading banner of the army were both lost, as the battle was led by the King himself. Scuola Superiore di Direzione Aziendale - Bocconi. Sources from Dithmarschen, written shortly after the battle of 1500, do mention banners, including the Royal banner, being captured from the Danes, but there is no mention of Dannebrog or the "original" flag. Università Bocconi. He notes that the flag was in a poor condition when returned. Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore. In 1576, the son of Johan Rantzau, Henrik Rantzau, also writes about the war and the fate of the flag. Università Statale Milano-Bicocca.

Both claims that this was the original flag, and consequently both writers knew the legend of the falling flag. Università Statale. This legend is found in two sources, Hans Svanning's History of King John from 1558-1559 and Johan Rantzau's History about the Last Dithmarschen War, from 1569. Politecnico di Milano. In the capitulation terms it is stated that all Danish banners lost in 1500 were to be returned. Verdi. In 1559, King Frederik II recaptured it during his own Dithmarschen campaign. Teatro Studio.

The flag was lost in a devastating defeat on 17 February 1500. Franco Parenti. According to tradition, the original flag from the Battle of Lyndanisse was used in the small campaign of 1500 when King Hans tried to conquer Dithmarschen (in western Holstein in north Germany). Porta Romana. The story of the original flag has a continuation that many Danes are not aware of. L'Elfo. Some historians believe that the story by Petrus Olai refers to a source from the first half of the 15th century, making this the oldest reference to the falling flag. Out Off.

Whether or not these records describe a truly old oral story in existents at that time, or a 16th century invented story, is not currently determined. Olmetto. In another record by Petrus Olai called "Danmarks Tolv Herligheder" (Twelve Splendours of Denmark), in splendour number nine, the same story is re-told almost to the word, however a paragraph has been inserted correcting the year to 1219. Litta. The Danes were all but defeated when a lamb-skin banner depicting a white cross falls from the sky and miraculously leads to a Danish victory. Filodrammatici. This record describes a battle in 1208 near a place called "Felin" during the Estonia campaign of King Valdemar II. Della 14a.

The second source is the writing of the Franciscan monk Petrus Olai (Peder Olsen) of Roskilde, from 1527. Ciak. He also mentions that this flag, falling from the sky during the Russian campaign of King Valdemar II, is the very same flag that King Eric of Pomerania took with him when he left the country in 1440 after being deposed as King. Smeraldo. It is not mentioned in connection to the campaign of King Valdemar II in Estonia, but in connection with a campaign in Russia. San Babila. The first is found in Christiern Pedersen's "Danske Krønike", which is a sequel to Saxo’s Gesta Danorum, written 1520-1523. Piccolo Teatro di Milano.

This story originates from two written sources from the early 16th century. Nuovo Piccolo Teatro. Though no historical support exists for the flag story in the Fellin battle either, it is not difficult to understand how a small and unknown place is replaced with the much grander battle of Reval from the Estonia campaign of King Valdemar II. Nuovo. The first record of the legend dates from more than 300 years after the campaign, and the first record connects the legend to a much smaller battle, though still in Estonia; the battle of Fellin (Viljandi) in 1208. Ventaglio Nazionale. No historical record supports this legend. Manzoni.

The legend says that during the Battle of Lyndanisse, also known as the Battle of Valdemar (Danish: "Volmerslaget"), near Reval (Tallinn) in Estonia, on 15 June 1219, the flag fell from the sky during a critical stage, resulting in Danish victory. CRT - Teatro dell'Arte. The legend of the flag is very popular among Danes, but most consider it to be a legend though a beautiful one. Teatro Carcano. . Teatro Lirico. The royal Danish yacht is named after the flag. Piccolo teatro.

During the Danish-Norwegian personal union, the Dannebrog was also the flag of Norway and continued to be, with slight modifications, until Norway adopted its current flag in 1821. Arcimboldi. The cross design of the Danish flag was subsequently adopted by the other Nordic countries: Sweden, Norway, Finland, and Iceland. Teatro alla Scala. The national flag of Denmark, the Dannebrog, is red with a white Scandinavian cross that extends to the edges of the flag; the vertical part of the cross is shifted to the hoist side. Museo del Risorgimento. DS 359:2005 ’Flagdug’, Dansk Standard, 2005. Museo di Storia Contemporanea.

Hagerups, Copenhagen 1919. Museo di Milano. Lund, Forlaget H. Museo Archeologico. D. Museo delle Arti Decorative. Danebrog - Danmarks Palladium, E. Museo degli Strumenti Musicali.

Dannebrog, Helga Bruhn, Forlaget Jespersen og Pios, Copenhagen 1949. Museo Bagatti Valsecchi. Dannebrog - Vort Flag, Lieutenant Colonel Thaulow, Forlaget Codan, Copenhagen 1943. Galleria Vinciana. Museo della Scienza e della Tecnica "Leonardo da Vinci". Museo di Storia Naturale.

Padiglione di Arte Contemporanea. Museo Teatro alla Scala. Palazzo Reale. Museo d’Arte Antica.

Museo della Preistoria e Protostoria. Museo Poldi Pezzoli. Museo Egizio. Castello Sforzesco.

Triennale di Milano. Galleria d'Arte Moderna. Pinacoteca Ambrosiana. Pinacoteca di Brera.

Fuksas (in Rho-Pero). New Milan Fair Complex of M. Pirelli Tower (seat of Lombardy Region and the highest italian skyscraper). Velasca Tower.

Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II. Palazzo Serbelloni. Central Station (the biggest Italian station). Teatro alla Scala.

Palazzo Reale. Palazzo della Ragione. Ca' Granda (University of Milan). Castello Sforzesco (Sforza Castle).

Duomo. "The Needle and the Yarn" in Piazza Cadorna. Leonardo da Vinci's Horse Statue at Hippodrome. Archi di Porta Nuova.

Roman amphitheatre (scant remains). Leonardo's monument in Piazza della Scala. San Carlo Borromeo in Piazza Borromeo. Oldrado da Trasseno del Palazzo della Ragione.

Napoleone of Canova in Brera. Monumento Cinque Giornate. Mazzini's monument in Piazza della Repubblica. Fontana del Piermarini in Piazza Fontana.

Disc of Pomodoro. Colonne di San Lorenzo. Alessandro Manzoni in Piazza San Fedele. Santo Stefano Maggiore.

San Simpliciano. San Sebastiano. Santa Maria presso San Satiro. Basilica di San Nazaro Maggiore.

Santa Maria del Carmine. Santuario di Santa Maria dei Miracoli. San Marco. Basilica di San Lorenzo Pirelli Tower, Milan .

Basilica di Sant'Eustorgio. San Bernardino alle Ossa. San Babila. Santa Maria delle Grazie (with Leonardo's "Last Supper").

Basilica di Sant'Ambrogio. Sant'Alessandro. Duomo (Milan cathedral). Aermacchi.

Mediobanca. Banca Intesa. Ferrovie Nord Milano. Eni.

Arnoldo Mondadori Editore. Giangiacomo Feltrinelli Editore. Corriere della Sera/RCS. Bugatti.

Mediaset. Motta. Alfa Romeo. Alemagna.

Fiera Milano. Telecom Italia. Pirelli. Gianni Versace.

Prada. Dolce & Gabbana. Giorgio Armani.

10-21-14 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php PAD File Directory Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Display all your websites in one place HereIam.tv Celebrity Homepages Charity Directory Google+ Directory Move your favorite Unsigned Artist to the Top of the List