This page will contain additional articles about Walter F. Mondale, as they become available.

Walter Mondale

(Redirected from Walter F. Mondale)

Walter Frederick "Fritz" Mondale (born January 5, 1928 in Ceylon, Minnesota) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party. He was the 42nd US Vice President (1977-1981) under President Jimmy Carter. He was also a two-term US Senator from Minnesota and the Democratic Party nominee for president in 1984 against the incumbent, Republican Ronald W. Reagan, who was reelected in a landslide when Mondale carried only his home state of Minnesota and the District of Columbia.

Early life

Mondale was born in Ceylon, Minnesota, the son of a Methodist minister. His half-brother was the Unitarian minister Lester Mondale. He was educated at Macalester College in St. Paul and the University of Minnesota, graduating in 1951. He then served two years at Fort Knox, in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. He graduated with a law degree from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1956 and began to practice law in Minneapolis.

Entry into politics and U.S. Senator

He managed the re-election campaign of Gov. Orville Freeman, who in return in 1960 appointed Mondale the state's attorney general. He spent two terms as attorney general. When Hubert H. Humphrey II was elected vice president in 1964, Mondale was appointed to Humphrey's seat in the Senate. Mondale was elected to the seat in 1966 and re-elected in 1972.

Mondale gained public notice for his role in the Apollo 1 investigation. He attempted to show that NASA was dangerous and a waste of taxpayer money. His ultimate goal was that this money should be directed into social services. Many people came away from the experience with the belief that Mondale was on a witch-hunt.

42nd Vice President

When Jimmy Carter won the Democratic nomination for president in 1976, he chose Mondale as his running mate. Mondale was inaugurated as vice president on 20 January 1977. He was the first vice president to reside at the official vice presidential residence, Number One Observatory Circle. Carter and Mondale were renominated at the 1980 Democratic National Convention, but lost to Ronald W. Reagan and George H. W. Bush. (See U.S. presidential election, 1976, U.S. presidential election, 1980.)

Presidential nominee of 1984

After a brief return to the practice of law, Mondale won the Democratic presidential nomination in the 1984 election. He chose U.S. Rep. Geraldine A. Ferraro of New York as his running mate, making her the first woman nominated for that position by a major party. Mondale ran a liberal campaign, supporting a nuclear freeze and the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). He spoke against what he considered to be unfairness in Reagan's economic policies and the need to reduce federal budget deficits.

Mondale shakes hands with Ronald Reagan before a debate in 1984.

When he made his acceptance speech at the Democratic Convention, Mondale said: "Let's tell the truth. Mr. Reagan will raise taxes, and so will I. He won't tell you. I just did." Although he intended this to demonstrate that he was honest while Reagan was hypocritical, it was widely remembered as simply a campaign pledge to raise taxes, and it hurt him in the end. In 1986, Reagan did sign into law a bill that raised taxes for corporations, but at the same time cut taxes further for individual taxpayers.

In the 1984 election, Mondale was defeated in a massive landslide, winning only the District of Columbia and his home state of Minnesota, thus securing only 13 electoral votes to Reagan's 525. Mondale's defeat was the worst for any Democratic Party candidate in history, and the worst for any major-party candidate since Alf Landon's loss to Roosevelt in 1936.

Private citizen and ambassador

Following the election, Mondale returned again to private law practice, with Dorsey & Whitney in Minnesota in 1987. From 1986 to 1993, Mondale was chairman of the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs.

Under the presidency of Bill Clinton, he was ambassador to Japan from 1993 to 1996, chaired a bipartisan group to study campaign finance reform, and was Clinton's representative in Indonesia in 1998.

2002 election

Mondale talks during a debate with Norm Coleman in 2002.

In 2002, Democratic US Senator Paul Wellstone of Minnesota, who was running for re-election, died in a plane crash just 11 days before the Nov. 5 election. Mondale, at age 74, replaced Wellstone on the ballot, but narrowly lost the election to the conservative Republican opponent Norm Coleman. Upon conceding the election, Mondale said, "At the end of what will be my last campaign, I want to say to Minnesota, you always treated me well, you always listened to me". Mondale finished with 1,067,246 votes (47.34%) to Coleman's 1,116,697 (49.53%) out of 2,254,639 votes cast. Mondale set a political record of sorts as a result of this loss, becoming the only major party candidate in U.S. history to lose statewide elections in all 50 states (having won only Minnesota in the 1984 election).

Norwegian ancestry

Mondale has always maintained strong ties to his ancestral Norway. Coincidentally, when he entered the Senate in 1964 he took over the seat of vice president Hubert Humphrey, another Norwegian-American. In later years Mondale has served on the executive committee of the Peace Prize Forum, an annual conference co-sponsored by the Norwegian Nobel Institute and five Midwestern colleges of Norwegian heritage. In connection with Norway's Centennial Celebration in 2005, he chairs the committee to promote and develop cultural activities between Norway and Norwegian-American organizations. During the 1984 Presidential election he was even nicknamed "Norwegian wood", a play on the Beatles song, his ancestory and his appearance.

Mondale's 45 year old daughter, Eleanor, is a television personality, who is currently battling brain cancer.


This page about Walter F. Mondale includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about Walter F. Mondale
News stories about Walter F. Mondale
External links for Walter F. Mondale
Videos for Walter F. Mondale
Wikis about Walter F. Mondale
Discussion Groups about Walter F. Mondale
Blogs about Walter F. Mondale
Images of Walter F. Mondale

Mondale's 45 year old daughter, Eleanor, is a television personality, who is currently battling brain cancer. He is of Manx descent, as evidenced by his surname. During the 1984 Presidential election he was even nicknamed "Norwegian wood", a play on the Beatles song, his ancestory and his appearance. He particularly enjoys watching his children as they participate in team sports. In connection with Norway's Centennial Celebration in 2005, he chairs the committee to promote and develop cultural activities between Norway and Norwegian-American organizations. Quayle enjoys golf, tennis, basketball, skiing, horseback riding, fly fishing, and reading. In later years Mondale has served on the executive committee of the Peace Prize Forum, an annual conference co-sponsored by the Norwegian Nobel Institute and five Midwestern colleges of Norwegian heritage. They are the parents of three children: Tucker, Benjamin, and Corinne.

Coincidentally, when he entered the Senate in 1964 he took over the seat of vice president Hubert Humphrey, another Norwegian-American. In November 1972, Quayle married the former Marilyn Tucker of Indianapolis. Mondale has always maintained strong ties to his ancestral Norway. He is the son of Jim and Corinne Quayle of Huntington, Indiana. history to lose statewide elections in all 50 states (having won only Minnesota in the 1984 election). Quayle, the oldest of four children, has two brothers and a sister: Chris, Mike, and Martha. Mondale set a political record of sorts as a result of this loss, becoming the only major party candidate in U.S. The former vice president also writes a nationally syndicated newspaper column, serves on a number of corporate boards, chairs several business ventures, and was chairman of Campaign America, a national political action committee.

Mondale finished with 1,067,246 votes (47.34%) to Coleman's 1,116,697 (49.53%) out of 2,254,639 votes cast. His second book, The American Family: Discovering the Values that Make Us Strong, came out in the spring of 1996 and Worth Fighting For came out in 1999. Upon conceding the election, Mondale said, "At the end of what will be my last campaign, I want to say to Minnesota, you always treated me well, you always listened to me". Dan Quayle is the author of Standing Firm, a vice-presidential memoir that became a nationwide bestseller. Mondale, at age 74, replaced Wellstone on the ballot, but narrowly lost the election to the conservative Republican opponent Norm Coleman. He is an Honorary Trustee Emeriti of the Hudson Institute. 5 election. Former Vice President Dan Quayle is an advisor to the firm Cerberus Capital Management and president of Quayle and Associates.

In 2002, Democratic US Senator Paul Wellstone of Minnesota, who was running for re-election, died in a plane crash just 11 days before the Nov. He is sometimes mentioned as a possible presidential candidate in 2008. Under the presidency of Bill Clinton, he was ambassador to Japan from 1993 to 1996, chaired a bipartisan group to study campaign finance reform, and was Clinton's representative in Indonesia in 1998. He withdrew from the race the following month. From 1986 to 1993, Mondale was chairman of the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs. In the first contest among the Republican candidates, the Iowa straw poll of August 1999, he finished 8th. Following the election, Mondale returned again to private law practice, with Dorsey & Whitney in Minnesota in 1987. In April 1999 he announced his candidacy for the Republican nomination for the 2000 Presidential Election.

Mondale's defeat was the worst for any Democratic Party candidate in history, and the worst for any major-party candidate since Alf Landon's loss to Roosevelt in 1936. However, it was ultimately a minor factor in the election, which Bush and Quayle went on to lose. In the 1984 election, Mondale was defeated in a massive landslide, winning only the District of Columbia and his home state of Minnesota, thus securing only 13 electoral votes to Reagan's 525. Republicans were largely relieved and pleased, and Quayle's camp hailed his performance as an upset triumph against a veteran debater. In 1986, Reagan did sign into law a bill that raised taxes for corporations, but at the same time cut taxes further for individual taxpayers. Quayle faced off against Gore in the vice-presidential debate, and, due in part to exceeding low expectations and staying on the offensive by tactics such as criticizing passages in Gore's book Earth in the Balance [During planning negotiations for the upcoming televised debates, Vice-President Quayle's team insisted that he be able to hold a copy of Gore's book for dramatic effect- the Gore team retorted that Gore ought to be able to hold up a potato.] Quayle was generally seen to have at least tied Gore, faring much better than he had against Bentsen four years earlier. I just did." Although he intended this to demonstrate that he was honest while Reagan was hypocritical, it was widely remembered as simply a campaign pledge to raise taxes, and it hurt him in the end. Al Gore.

He won't tell you. Bill Clinton and Sen. Reagan will raise taxes, and so will I. During the 1992 election, Bush and Quayle were challenged in their bid for reelection by Democrats Gov. Mr. In 2002, Candice Bergen, the actress, made the comment, "I never have really said much about the whole episode, which was endless, but his speech was a perfectly intelligent speech about fathers not being dispensable and nobody agreed with that more than I did.". When he made his acceptance speech at the Democratic Convention, Mondale said: "Let's tell the truth. In the 1992-93 season premiere of Murphy Brown, Brown, the character, watched Quayle's comments on television and responded on the show.

He spoke against what he considered to be unfairness in Reagan's economic policies and the need to reduce federal budget deficits. The "Murphy Brown speech" and the resulting media coverage damaged the Republican ticket in the 1992 presidential election and became one of the most memorable incidents of the 1992 campaign. Mondale ran a liberal campaign, supporting a nuclear freeze and the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). In an aside, he specifically cited the fictional title character in the television program Murphy Brown as an example of how popular culture contributes to this "poverty of values", saying: "[i]t doesn't help matters when primetime TV has Murphy Brown—a character who supposedly epitomizes today's intelligent, highly paid, professional woman—mocking the importance of fathers, by bearing a child alone, and calling it just another 'lifestyle choice.'" Quayle drew a firestorm of criticism from feminist and liberal organizations and was widely ridiculed by late night talk show hosts for this remark. Ferraro of New York as his running mate, making her the first woman nominated for that position by a major party. on a decay of moral values and family structure in American society. Geraldine A. In this speech Quayle blamed the violence in L.A.

Rep. On May 19, 1992 Quayle gave a speech to the Commonwealth Club of California on the subject of the Los Angeles riots. He chose U.S. The misspelling remains a source of intense criticism of Quayle's leadership abilities. After a brief return to the practice of law, Mondale won the Democratic presidential nomination in the 1984 election. It was widely lambasted by comedians and commentators, and purportedly demonstrated defective execution of official duties. presidential election, 1980.). The event became the single most memorable and lasting part of Quayle's career.

presidential election, 1976, U.S. Quayle was allegedly relying on a spelling-bee card on which the word had been misspelled by the teacher. (See U.S. Most famous was his correcting a student's spelling of potato as potatoe at an elementary school spelling bee in Trenton, New Jersey on June 15, 1992. Bush. Other critics facetiously remarked that he was a good reason for even Bush's critics to pray for his health and that he was only Vice President to make Bush "impeachment-proof". W. He received the satirical Ig Nobel Prize for "demonstrating, better than anyone else, the need for science education" in 1991.

Reagan and George H. Bush. Carter and Mondale were renominated at the 1980 Democratic National Convention, but lost to Ronald W. [1] Some of the comments he actually did make have been attributed to other politicians, such as George W. He was the first vice president to reside at the official vice presidential residence, Number One Observatory Circle. One reason was that he sometimes made confused or garbled statements, although this tendency led to his being "credited" with apocryphal quotations. Mondale was inaugurated as vice president on 20 January 1977. Throughout his time as Vice President, Quayle was widely ridiculed in the media and by some of the general public as a mental lightweight.

When Jimmy Carter won the Democratic nomination for president in 1976, he chose Mondale as his running mate. On February 9, 1989, President Bush named Quayle head of the Council on Competitiveness. Many people came away from the experience with the belief that Mondale was on a witch-hunt. As Vice President, Quayle was the first chairman of the National Space Council, a space policy body reestablished by statute in 1988. His ultimate goal was that this money should be directed into social services. Quayle was the 44th Vice President of the United States from January 20, 1989, to January 20, 1993. He attempted to show that NASA was dangerous and a waste of taxpayer money. Although Republicans were trailing by up to 15 points in public opinion polls taken prior to the convention, the Bush/Quayle ticket went on to win the November election by a convincing 54-46 margin, sweeping 40 states and capturing 426 electoral votes.

Mondale gained public notice for his role in the Apollo 1 investigation. The ads, however, seemed to have little effect. Mondale was elected to the seat in 1966 and re-elected in 1972. Ads supporting Michael Dukakis and Bentsen showed a beeping heart monitor and an announcer saying, "Quayle: just a heartbeat away," with the implication that Quayle was not up to the job of the presidency should he have to assume it. Humphrey II was elected vice president in 1964, Mondale was appointed to Humphrey's seat in the Senate. Senator, you're no Jack Kennedy." Quayle sheepishly responded, "That was uncalled for, Senator," in one of the defining moments of the 1988 campaign. When Hubert H. Jack Kennedy was a friend of mine.

He spent two terms as attorney general. I knew Jack Kennedy. Orville Freeman, who in return in 1960 appointed Mondale the state's attorney general. Democratic candidate Lloyd Bentsen said in rebuttal, "Senator, I served with Jack Kennedy. He managed the re-election campaign of Gov. This came to a head in the 1988 vice-presidential debate, in which Quayle compared his experience to that of John Kennedy when he became president. He graduated with a law degree from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1956 and began to practice law in Minneapolis. Many in the media also portrayed him as a lightweight unable to handle the job.

Army during the Korean War. Questions were raised about Quayle's apparent use of family connections to get into the Indiana National Guard and thus avoid possible combat service in the Vietnam War. He then served two years at Fort Knox, in the U.S. This decision was criticized by many who felt that Quayle did not have enough experience to be president should something happen to Bush. Paul and the University of Minnesota, graduating in 1951. Bush called on Quayle to be his running mate in the general election. He was educated at Macalester College in St. W.

His half-brother was the Unitarian minister Lester Mondale. In August 1988, at the 1988 Republican National Convention in New Orleans, Louisiana, George H. Mondale was born in Ceylon, Minnesota, the son of a Methodist minister. The nomination was later withdrawn. . It was later revealed that Manion was a member of the John Birch Society and that the American Bar Association had evaluated him as unqualified. Reagan, who was reelected in a landslide when Mondale carried only his home state of Minnesota and the District of Columbia. In 1986, Quayle received much criticism from his fellow Senators for championing the cause of Daniel Manion, who was a candidate to be a federal judge.

He was also a two-term US Senator from Minnesota and the Democratic Party nominee for president in 1984 against the incumbent, Republican Ronald W. This was the only major legislation that ever bore Quayle's name the entire time he served in both the House and the Senate. He was the 42nd US Vice President (1977-1981) under President Jimmy Carter. In 1982, working with Senator Edward Kennedy, Quayle authored the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA). Walter Frederick "Fritz" Mondale (born January 5, 1928 in Ceylon, Minnesota) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party. With his service on the Armed Services Committee, the Budget Committee, and the Labor and Human Resources Committee, he became an effective Senator, respected by colleagues on both sides of the aisle. Senate, Quayle became widely known for his legislative work in the areas of defense, arms control, labor, and human resources.

During his tenure in the U.S. Making Indiana political history again, Quayle was reelected to the Senate in 1986 with the largest margin ever achieved to that date by a candidate in a statewide Indiana race. Senate from the State of Indiana, defeating three-term incumbent Democrat Birch Bayh. In 1980, at age 33, Quayle became the youngest person ever elected to the U.S.

He won reelection in 1978 by the greatest percentage margin ever achieved to that date in the northeast Indiana district. Congress from Indiana's Fourth Congressional District, defeating an eight-term incumbent Democrat. In 1976, Quayle was elected to the U.S. Upon receiving his law degree, Quayle worked as associate publisher of his family's newspaper, the Huntington Herald-Press, and practiced law with his wife in Huntington.

From 1973-1974, he was the Director of the Inheritance Tax Division of the Indiana Department of Revenue. Later that year, he became an administrative assistant to Governor Edgar Whitcomb. Quayle's public service began in July 1971 when he became an investigator for the Consumer Protection Division of the Indiana Attorney General's Office. While serving in the Guard, he earned a Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree in 1974 at Indiana University School of Law Indianapolis through an experimental program intended to offer "equal opportunity" to minorities, the economically disadvantaged and other students of different viewpoints and backgrounds.

After receiving his degree, Quayle joined the Indiana National Guard and served from 1969-1975. degree in political science in 1969, and where he was a member of the fraternity Delta Kappa Epsilon. He then matriculated at DePauw University, where he received his B.A. After spending much of his youth in Arizona, he graduated from Huntington High School in Huntington, Indiana in 1965.

Quayle moved his family to Arizona in 1955 to run a branch of family's publishing empire. James C. Pulliam, was a wealthy and influential publishing magnate who founded Central Newspapers, Inc., owner of over a dozen major newspapers such as the Arizona Republic and The Indianapolis Star. His maternal grandfather, Eugene C.

In his memoirs, Dan Quayle points out that his birth name was simply James Danforth Quayle. He has often been incorrectly referred to as James Danforth Quayle III. Quayle and Corrine Pulliam Quayle. Quayle was born in Indianapolis, Indiana to James C.

. In 2000, he was an unsuccessful candidate to win the Republican nomination for President of the United States. Bush (1989-1993). W.

James Danforth Quayle (born February 4, 1947) was the 44th Vice President of the United States under George H. hardcover, ISBN 0060177586; mass market paperback, May, 1995; ISBN 0061093904; Limited edition, 1994, ISBN 0060176016. Dan Quayle, Standing Firm: A Vice-Presidential Memoir, Harper Collins, May 1994.

09-01-14 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php PAD File Directory Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Display all your websites in one place HereIam.tv Celebrity Homepages Charity Directory Google+ Directory Move your favorite Unsigned Artist to the Top of the List