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Toyota Hi-Lux

A Toyota Hi-Lux.

The Toyota Hi-Lux is a compact pickup truck built and marketed by the Toyota Motor Corporation. The Hi-Lux name was adopted as a replacement for the Stout in 1969, and remains in use worldwide. In the United States, the Hi-Lux name was retired in 1976 in favor of Truck or Compact Truck, and this name was replaced by Tacoma in 1995. One popular option package, SR5, also became synonymous with the truck, even though it was used on other Toyota models as well.

Please note, as the Hi-Lux name was dropped in the US in 1976, any details listed here purporting to relate to the Hi-Lux from that date may not be entirely correct when applied the the vehicle which continues to be marketed by Toyota as the Hi-Lux throughout the rest of the world. The product lines for the US and elsewhere diverged at that point and in many cases on a year for year basis the vehicles sold in the US only resemble the true Hi-Lux, with major mechanical/chassis differences.


1935

The original Toyota pickup was the 1935 G1. It shared many components with the company's A1 car, and was a 1.5 ton stake-bed commercial truck.

1947

After World War II, Toyota returned with a compact pickup truck, the Toyopet Model SB. This was the true ancestor of the Hi-Lux, and remained in production from 1947 through 1963.

Engine:

  • 995 cc I4, 27 hp (20 kW)

1964

Toyota entered the American market with the 1964 introduction of the Stout. It was larger than the similar Datsun and Mazda compact trucks, and looked like a Chevrolet C/K.

Engine:

  • 1964-1968 - 1.9 L (1897 cc) 3R I4, 85 hp (63 kW)

1969

The Hi-Lux name was coined in 1969, but it was a highly-luxurious vehicle only when compared to the Stout. The only body style was a regular cab short bed and all were rear wheel drive. It used a typical truck setup of A-arms and coil springs in front and a live axle with leaf springs in back. A 4-speed manual transmission was standard.

Engine:

  • 1969 - 1.9 L (1897 cc) 3R I4, 85 hp (63 kW)
  • 1970-1971 - 1.9 L (1858 cc) 8R SOHC I4, 97 hp (72 kW)
  • 1972 - 2.0 L (1968 cc) 18R SOHC I4, 108 hp (81 kW)

1973

In the middle of 1972, the 1973 Hi-Lux was released. A more-comfortable interior was specified along with exterior updates. A 7.5 ft (2.3 m) "long bed" was optional for the first time.

Engine:

  • 1973-1974 - 2.0 L (1968 cc) 18R SOHC I4, 108 hp (81 kW)

1975

The truck was radically redesigned in 1975. Larger and more luxurious in every way, the truck also introduced the 20R engine and SR5 upscale trim package. A 5-speed manual transmission was optional. The Hi-Lux name was dropped in America in favor of "Truck" the next year.

Engine:

  • 1975-1978 - 2.2 L (2189 cc) 20R SOHC I4, 96 hp (72 kW)

1979

The next generation appeared in 1979. This time, the SR5 package included an updated torsion bar suspension as well as the usual trim upgrades.

Another important addition was the a four wheel drive model. It used solid axles and leaf springs front and rear and skid plates to protect the transfer case and fuel tank.

Engine:

  • 1979-1980 - 2.0 L (2189 cc) 20R SOHC I4, 96 hp (72 kW)
  • 1981-1983 - 2.4 L (2366 cc) 22R SOHC I4, 96 hp (72 kW) at 4800 RPM and 129 ft.lbf (174 Nm) at 2800 RPM
  • 1981-1983 2.2 L L Diesel I4, 62 hp (46.2 kW) at 4200 RPM and 93 ft.lbf (126 Nm) (SR5 long bed only)

1981

The 1981 model year saw a vehicle development deal between Toyota and Winnebago (primarily) and two other aftermarket customizers. Toyota was attempting to enter the SUV market. The vehicles which resulted from this collaboration were the Toyota Trekker, Toyota Wolverine, and the Toyota Blazer. All 3 employed the Toyota Hi-Lux 4x4 RV cab and chassis, and an all-fiberglass rear section. There were at least 1,500 Trekkers and a much smaller, unknown number of the other two models sold in North America. Research and development work on the Trekker lead to the development of the Toyota 4Runner (called the Toyota Surf outside North America), which was released in 1984.

1984

The big news for the 1984 redesign was the introduction of the Xtracab two-row extended cab option. The next year saw the introduction of an optional fuel injected engine, the 22R-E, and a turbocharged option, the 22R-TE. The solid front axle was swapped out for an independent front suspension/ torsion bar setup in the 4x4 model in 1986, and optional automatic locking front hubs and an electronic transfer case was added as well. A V6 engine was introduced in 1988.

Engines:

  • 1984-1988 - 2.4 L (2366 cc) 22R SOHC I4, 96 hp (72 kW) at 4800 RPM and 129 ft.lbf (174 Nm) at 2800 RPM
  • 1984-1986 2.2 L L Diesel I4, 62 hp (46.2 kW) at 4200 RPM and 93 ft.lbf (126 Nm) (SR5 long bed only)
  • 1985-1988 - 2.4 L (2366 cc) 22R-E SOHC FI I4, 105 hp (78 kW) at 4800 RPM and 137 ft.lbf (185 Nm) at 2800 RPM
  • 1985-1987 - 2.4 L (2366 cc) 22R-TE SOHC FI turbo I4, 135 hp (101 kW) at 4800 RPM and 173 ft.lbf (234 Nm) at 2800 RPM
  • 1988 - 3.0 L 3VZ-E V6, 150 hp (112 kW)

1989

The next redesign, in 1989, saw a longer-wheelbase option, 122 in (309.9 cm) versus 103 in (261.6 cm) for the regular wheelbase. The V6 Xtracab SR5 earned Motor Trend magazine's Truck of the Year award that year. Production began at the NUMMI plant in Fremont, California in 1991.

Engines:

  • 1989-1988 - 2.4 L (2366 cc) 22R-E SOHC FI I4, 105 hp (78 kW) at 4800 RPM and 137 ft.lbf (185 Nm) at 2800 RPM
  • 1989 - 3.0 L 3VZ-E V6, 150 hp (112 kW)

1995

Part-way through 1995, Toyota introduced the new Tacoma in the United States. The origins of its name are supposedly unknown...

This, the ninth generation of compact pickup trucks from Toyota, was radically updated, with a new frame and body, new suspension, and new engines. All versions now featured coil springs in front with a live axle and leaf springs in back.

The Tacoma was restyled in 1998 when the front fascia and the frame were the primary changes as well as the addition of new badging. It was also restyled in 2001 when a new double cab (crew cab) option was added, and a flashy S-Runner was offered as well.

Engines:

  • 1995-2004 2.4 L (2438 cc) 2RZ-E 16-valve DOHC I4, 142 hp (106 kW) (4x2)
  • 1995-2004 2.7 L (2693 cc) 3RZ-E 16-valve DOHC I4, 150 hp (112 kW) (4x4)
  • 1995-2004 3.4 L 5VZ-FE 24-valve DOHC V6, 190 hp (142 kW)

2005

The Tacoma/Hi-Lux was updated in 2005.

This new version won the Canadian Car of the Year Best New Pick-up award and was Motor Trend magazine's Truck of the Year for 2005.

Engines (markets):

  • 2005 2.0 L gasoline VVT-i DOHC I4 (South Africa)
  • 2005 2.5 L diesel D-4D DOHC I4, 102 hp - 120 hp (Asia, Europe, South Africa, South America)
  • 2005 2.7 L gasoline VVT-i DOHC I4, 164 hp (Australia, South Africa, USA)
  • 2005 3.0 L diesel D-4D DOHC I4, 163 hp (Asia, South Africa, South America)
  • 2005 4.0 L gasoline VVT-i DOHC V6, 238 hp - 245 hp (Australia, South Africa, USA)

Reputation

The Toyota Hi-Lux has gained a reputation for exceptional sturdiness and reliability, even during sustained heavy use. This was only compounded when on the third series (programme five) of the revamped BBC motoring show Top Gear, a 13-year old Toyota Hi-Lux with 190,000 miles on the clock, was subjected to a number of extraordinary survival tests, which included driving it into a tree, tying it up to a jetty and letting it be washed out to sea by the incoming tide, dropping a caravan on it, setting the cab on fire, and placing it at the top of a 240-foot block of flats that was subsequently destroyed by a controlled demolition. Amazingly, although it was now suffering from severe structural (there was already significant body corrosion when it was purchased) and fire damage, the truck was still running after being repaired only with typical tools and equipment that would be found in a car's toolbox, such as spanners (wrenches), motor oil and a monkey wrench. These trucks have also been known to clock up more than 300,000 miles with regular maintenance.


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These trucks have also been known to clock up more than 300,000 miles with regular maintenance. The W8 uses two four-cylinder VR engines mated together, and the W16 uses two eight-cylinder VR banks. Amazingly, although it was now suffering from severe structural (there was already significant body corrosion when it was purchased) and fire damage, the truck was still running after being repaired only with typical tools and equipment that would be found in a car's toolbox, such as spanners (wrenches), motor oil and a monkey wrench. W8 and W16 designs were developed in a similar fashion. This was only compounded when on the third series (programme five) of the revamped BBC motoring show Top Gear, a 13-year old Toyota Hi-Lux with 190,000 miles on the clock, was subjected to a number of extraordinary survival tests, which included driving it into a tree, tying it up to a jetty and letting it be washed out to sea by the incoming tide, dropping a caravan on it, setting the cab on fire, and placing it at the top of a 240-foot block of flats that was subsequently destroyed by a controlled demolition. For example, two VR6 engines mated together at 72 degrees result in a W12 configuration, which is significantly shorter than a V12 engine but only marginally wider. The Toyota Hi-Lux has gained a reputation for exceptional sturdiness and reliability, even during sustained heavy use. Volkswagen has also developed a series of engines which use narrow angle designs mated together at 72 degrees.

Engines (markets):. The Porsche Cayenne, which shares its chassis with the VW Touareg, also uses the 3.2 L VR6 as its base engine. This new version won the Canadian Car of the Year Best New Pick-up award and was Motor Trend magazine's Truck of the Year for 2005. The VR6 is also used in other Volkswagen Group products, namely:. The Tacoma/Hi-Lux was updated in 2005. The VR6 was used by Volkswagen in:. Engines:. The 3.2 and 3.6 litre VR6s will also be used to power a new MKV platform R32 (for Europe) and a new R36 model (North America).

It was also restyled in 2001 when a new double cab (crew cab) option was added, and a flashy S-Runner was offered as well. The introduction of the Passat VR6 also marked the first time a VR6 powered vehicle was made available in North American before Europe. The Tacoma was restyled in 1998 when the front fascia and the frame were the primary changes as well as the addition of new badging. Both the 3.2 and 3.6 feature FSI direct injection. All versions now featured coil springs in front with a live axle and leaf springs in back. For North American, the Passat receives a new 3.6 L VR6 with a narrower 10.6 degree cylinder angle, producing 280 PS (276 hp/206 kW). This, the ninth generation of compact pickup trucks from Toyota, was radically updated, with a new frame and body, new suspension, and new engines. In 2005, the European market version of Volkswagen's fifth generation Passat went on sale with a revised version of the 3.2 L VR6 as its top-spec motor.

The origins of its name are supposedly unknown... The 3.2 is now used as a range-topper in Audi A3 or as an entry level version in the VW Touareg and Porsche Cayenne, although the version used in the Cayenne features modifications to the heads as well as the intake and timing systems. Part-way through 1995, Toyota introduced the new Tacoma in the United States. This variant produced 250 PS (247 hp/184 kW) and 320 Nm (236 ft•lbf) of torque in TT trim and 241 PS(238 hp/177 kW) in R32 trim. Engines:. In 2003, a high performance 3.2 L version of the engine was introduced to power VW's limited-production Golf R32 and a new range-topping variant of the Audi TT. Production began at the NUMMI plant in Fremont, California in 1991. The multivalve V6 was only introduced in North America in 2002 (where it retained the VR6 name).

The V6 Xtracab SR5 earned Motor Trend magazine's Truck of the Year award that year. The corresponding multivalve V5 was only released in 2001, with a 20 PS power increase, to 170 PS (168 hp/125 kW). The next redesign, in 1989, saw a longer-wheelbase option, 122 in (309.9 cm) versus 103 in (261.6 cm) for the regular wheelbase. The VR6 name was dropped as a commercial designation, and the 4WD system (4Motion) was now standard on the V6 in Europe. Engines:. The new version was not available in the Passat (as it was incompatible with the then-current generation's longitudinal layout), but was introduced as the range topper in the Golf and Bora. A V6 engine was introduced in 1988. This engine produced 204 PS (201 hp/150 kW) and 265 Nm (195 lb.ft) of torque.

The solid front axle was swapped out for an independent front suspension/ torsion bar setup in the 4x4 model in 1986, and optional automatic locking front hubs and an electronic transfer case was added as well. For 1999, VW added further modifications to the design, with the introduction of the 24-valve 2.8 L VR6. The next year saw the introduction of an optional fuel injected engine, the 22R-E, and a turbocharged option, the 22R-TE. It was introduced in the Passat in 1997, and later in the Golf and Bora in 1999. The big news for the 1984 redesign was the introduction of the Xtracab two-row extended cab option. This version, which had a 2.3 L capacity, was capable of 150 PS (148 hp/110 kW) and had a maximum torque of 209 Nm (154 lb.ft). Research and development work on the Trekker lead to the development of the Toyota 4Runner (called the Toyota Surf outside North America), which was released in 1984. In 1997, VW removed a cylinder from the VR6, creating the VR5, the first block to use an uneven number of cylinders in a V design.

There were at least 1,500 Trekkers and a much smaller, unknown number of the other two models sold in North America. The corresponding Vento/Jetta VR6 versions appeared in the same years. All 3 employed the Toyota Hi-Lux 4x4 RV cab and chassis, and an all-fiberglass rear section. North America only received this engine in 1995, at the same time the European model started to use the 2.9 L in the VR6 Syncro model. The vehicles which resulted from this collaboration were the Toyota Trekker, Toyota Wolverine, and the Toyota Blazer. In 1992, with the introduction of the Golf's third generation, a six-cylinder engine was available for the first time in a lower-midsize segment hatchback in Europe. Toyota was attempting to enter the SUV market. This version also had a free flowing 6 cm (2.5 in) catalytic converter, enlarged inlet manifold and larger throttle body.

The 1981 model year saw a vehicle development deal between Toyota and Winnebago (primarily) and two other aftermarket customizers. The Passat, Passat Variant wagon and US-spec Corrado used the original 2.8 L design, while the Euro-spec Corrado and the 4WD Passat Syncro received a 2.9 L version with 190 PS (187 hp/140 kW). Engine:. The VR6 engine was introduced in Europe in 1991 in the Passat and Corrado, and in North America the following year. It used solid axles and leaf springs front and rear and skid plates to protect the transfer case and fuel tank. These engines produced 174 PS (172 hp/128 kW) and 240 Nm (177 ft·lbf) of torque. Another important addition was the a four wheel drive model. The original VR6 engine displaced 2.8 L and featured a 12 valve design.

This time, the SR5 package included an updated torsion bar suspension as well as the usual trim upgrades. There are several different variants of the VR6 engine. The next generation appeared in 1979. This is most similar to a DOHC Inline-6 engine. Engine:. However, later (24 valve) VR6 engines use one camshaft for all intake valves and one camshaft for all exhaust valves. The Hi-Lux name was dropped in America in favor of "Truck" the next year. This is most similar to the operation of a SOHC V6 engine.

A 5-speed manual transmission was optional. In early (12 valve) VR6 engines, one camshaft is used per bank of cylinders. Larger and more luxurious in every way, the truck also introduced the 20R engine and SR5 upscale trim package. This simplifies engine construction and reduces costs. The truck was radically redesigned in 1975. The narrow angle between cylinder banks also allows just two camshafts to drive all of the valves, and a single cylinder head to be used. Engine:. As a result, it is nearly as smooth as an Inline-6.

A 7.5 ft (2.3 m) "long bed" was optional for the first time. In addition, the VR6 is able to use the firing interval of an Inline-6 engine. A more-comfortable interior was specified along with exterior updates. A wider V6 engine of conventional design would have required lengthening existing vehicles to provide enough crumple zone between the front of the vehicle and the engine, and between the engine and the passenger cell. In the middle of 1972, the 1973 Hi-Lux was released. By using the narrow 15° VR6 engine, it was possible to install a six-cylinder engine in existing Volkswagen models. Engine:. The VR6 was specifically designed for transverse installation in front wheel drive vehicles.

A 4-speed manual transmission was standard. The combination of the two can be roughly translated as "in-line Vee.". It used a typical truck setup of A-arms and coil springs in front and a live axle with leaf springs in back. The name, VR6 comes from a combination of Vee and the German word Reihenmotor (straight engine). The only body style was a regular cab short bed and all were rear wheel drive. It is similar to the V engine, but with the cylinders offset from each other and tilted by 15° instead of the usual 60°. The Hi-Lux name was coined in 1969, but it was a highly-luxurious vehicle only when compared to the Stout. VR6 is an engine configuration developed by the Volkswagen Group.

Engine:. . It was larger than the similar Datsun and Mazda compact trucks, and looked like a Chevrolet C/K. SEAT Leon Cupra. Toyota entered the American market with the 1964 introduction of the Stout. Audi TT. Engine:. Audi A3 Mk.II.

This was the true ancestor of the Hi-Lux, and remained in production from 1947 through 1963. VW Sharan/SEAT Alhambra/Ford Galaxy. After World War II, Toyota returned with a compact pickup truck, the Toyopet Model SB. VW Transporter T4 and T5. It shared many components with the company's A1 car, and was a 1.5 ton stake-bed commercial truck. VW Touareg. The original Toyota pickup was the 1935 G1. VW Phaeton.

. VW Corrado.
. VW Bora/VW Jetta Mk.IV. The product lines for the US and elsewhere diverged at that point and in many cases on a year for year basis the vehicles sold in the US only resemble the true Hi-Lux, with major mechanical/chassis differences. VW Vento/VW Jetta Mk.III. Please note, as the Hi-Lux name was dropped in the US in 1976, any details listed here purporting to relate to the Hi-Lux from that date may not be entirely correct when applied the the vehicle which continues to be marketed by Toyota as the Hi-Lux throughout the rest of the world. VW Passat (B3, B4, and B6 chassis).

One popular option package, SR5, also became synonymous with the truck, even though it was used on other Toyota models as well. Golf R32 MK.IV and Mk.V. In the United States, the Hi-Lux name was retired in 1976 in favor of Truck or Compact Truck, and this name was replaced by Tacoma in 1995. VW Golf Mk.III and Mk.IV. The Hi-Lux name was adopted as a replacement for the Stout in 1969, and remains in use worldwide. The Toyota Hi-Lux is a compact pickup truck built and marketed by the Toyota Motor Corporation.

2005 4.0 L gasoline VVT-i DOHC V6, 238 hp - 245 hp (Australia, South Africa, USA). 2005 3.0 L diesel D-4D DOHC I4, 163 hp (Asia, South Africa, South America). 2005 2.7 L gasoline VVT-i DOHC I4, 164 hp (Australia, South Africa, USA). 2005 2.5 L diesel D-4D DOHC I4, 102 hp - 120 hp (Asia, Europe, South Africa, South America).

2005 2.0 L gasoline VVT-i DOHC I4 (South Africa). 1995-2004 3.4 L 5VZ-FE 24-valve DOHC V6, 190 hp (142 kW). 1995-2004 2.7 L (2693 cc) 3RZ-E 16-valve DOHC I4, 150 hp (112 kW) (4x4). 1995-2004 2.4 L (2438 cc) 2RZ-E 16-valve DOHC I4, 142 hp (106 kW) (4x2).

1989 - 3.0 L 3VZ-E V6, 150 hp (112 kW). 1989-1988 - 2.4 L (2366 cc) 22R-E SOHC FI I4, 105 hp (78 kW) at 4800 RPM and 137 ft.lbf (185 Nm) at 2800 RPM. 1988 - 3.0 L 3VZ-E V6, 150 hp (112 kW). 1985-1987 - 2.4 L (2366 cc) 22R-TE SOHC FI turbo I4, 135 hp (101 kW) at 4800 RPM and 173 ft.lbf (234 Nm) at 2800 RPM.

1985-1988 - 2.4 L (2366 cc) 22R-E SOHC FI I4, 105 hp (78 kW) at 4800 RPM and 137 ft.lbf (185 Nm) at 2800 RPM. 1984-1986 2.2 L L Diesel I4, 62 hp (46.2 kW) at 4200 RPM and 93 ft.lbf (126 Nm) (SR5 long bed only). 1984-1988 - 2.4 L (2366 cc) 22R SOHC I4, 96 hp (72 kW) at 4800 RPM and 129 ft.lbf (174 Nm) at 2800 RPM. 1981-1983 2.2 L L Diesel I4, 62 hp (46.2 kW) at 4200 RPM and 93 ft.lbf (126 Nm) (SR5 long bed only).

1981-1983 - 2.4 L (2366 cc) 22R SOHC I4, 96 hp (72 kW) at 4800 RPM and 129 ft.lbf (174 Nm) at 2800 RPM. 1979-1980 - 2.0 L (2189 cc) 20R SOHC I4, 96 hp (72 kW). 1975-1978 - 2.2 L (2189 cc) 20R SOHC I4, 96 hp (72 kW). 1973-1974 - 2.0 L (1968 cc) 18R SOHC I4, 108 hp (81 kW).

1972 - 2.0 L (1968 cc) 18R SOHC I4, 108 hp (81 kW). 1970-1971 - 1.9 L (1858 cc) 8R SOHC I4, 97 hp (72 kW). 1969 - 1.9 L (1897 cc) 3R I4, 85 hp (63 kW). 1964-1968 - 1.9 L (1897 cc) 3R I4, 85 hp (63 kW).

995 cc I4, 27 hp (20 kW).

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