This page will contain wikis about Topaz, as they become available.

Topaz

This article is about the mineral or gemstone, for other uses see: Topaz (disambiguation).

Topaz 4 Carat Oval Shape Topaz Gemstone Ring Enhanced with Azotic(r)Treatment Heart Cut Sky Blue Topaz Ring

The mineral topaz is a silicate of aluminium and fluorine with the chemical formula Al2SiO4(F,OH)2. It crystallizes in the orthorhombic system and its crystals are mostly prismatic terminated by pyramidal and other faces, the basal pinacoid often being present. It has an easy and perfect basal cleavage and so gemstones or other fine specimens should be handled with care to avoid developing cleavage flaws. The fracture is conchoidal to uneven. Topaz has a hardness of 8, a specific gravity of 3.4-3.6, and a vitreous lustre. Pure topaz is transparent but is usually tinted by impurities; typical topaz is wine or straw-yellow. They may also be white, gray, green, blue, or reddish-yellow and transparent or translucent. When heated, yellow topaz often becomes reddish-pink. It can also be irradiated, turning the stone a light and distinctive shade of blue. A recent trend in jewelry is the manufacture of topaz specimens that display iridescent colors, by applying a thin layer of titanium oxide via physical vapor deposition.

Topaz is found associated with the more acid rocks of the granite and rhyolite type and may be found with fluorite and cassiterite. It can be found in the Ural and Ilmen mountains, Czech Republic, Saxony, Norway, Sweden, Japan, Brazil, Mexico, and the United States.

Etymology and historical/mythical usage

The name "topaz" is derived from the Greek topazos, "to seek," which was the name of an island in the Red Sea that was difficult to find and from which a yellow stone (now believed to be a yellowish olivine) was mined in ancient times. In the Middle Ages the name topaz was used to refer to any yellow gemstone, but now the name is only properly applied to the silicate described above.

According to Rebbenu Bachya, the word "Leshem" in the verse Exodus 28:19 means "Topaz" and was the stone on the Ephod representing the tribe of Dan.

Topaz is also the birthstone of November.

Example of Heat Treated Topaz-Pink Topaz Pear Cut Ring

References

  • Webmineral
  • Mindat with location data
  • Mineral galleries

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Topaz is also the birthstone of November. He loves feminine things, acts delicately, and often holds a hand mirror which he stares into at his reflection and kisses often. According to Rebbenu Bachya, the word "Leshem" in the verse Exodus 28:19 means "Topaz" and was the stone on the Ephod representing the tribe of Dan. Vanity Smurf, though male, is an effeminate and stylish smurf, the epitome of metrosexuality, most of the time wearing a pink flower on his hat. In the Middle Ages the name topaz was used to refer to any yellow gemstone, but now the name is only properly applied to the silicate described above. Such artistic works served to warn viewers of the ephemeral nature of youthful beauty, as well as the brevity of human life and the inevitability of death. The name "topaz" is derived from the Greek topazos, "to seek," which was the name of an island in the Red Sea that was difficult to find and from which a yellow stone (now believed to be a yellowish olivine) was mined in ancient times. Upon closer examination, it reveals itself to be a young woman gazing at her reflection in the mirror.

It can be found in the Ural and Ilmen mountains, Czech Republic, Saxony, Norway, Sweden, Japan, Brazil, Mexico, and the United States. An optical illusion, the painting depicts what appears to be a large grinning skull. Topaz is found associated with the more acid rocks of the granite and rhyolite type and may be found with fluorite and cassiterite. All is Vanity, by Charles Allan Gilbert (1873-1929), carries on this theme. A recent trend in jewelry is the manufacture of topaz specimens that display iridescent colors, by applying a thin layer of titanium oxide via physical vapor deposition. A young woman holds a balance, symbolizing justice; she does not look at the mirror or the skull on the table before her.[5] Vermeer's famous painting Girl with a Pearl Earring is sometimes believed to depict the sin of vanity, as the young girl has adorned herself before a glass without further positive allegorical attributes. It can also be irradiated, turning the stone a light and distinctive shade of blue. A painting attributed to Nicolas Tournier, which hangs in the Ashmolean Museum, is An Allegory of Justice and Vanity.

When heated, yellow topaz often becomes reddish-pink. Behind her is an open jewelry box. They may also be white, gray, green, blue, or reddish-yellow and transparent or translucent. In his table of the Seven Deadly Sins, Hieronymus Bosch depicts a bourgeois woman admiring herself in a mirror held up by a devil. Pure topaz is transparent but is usually tinted by impurities; typical topaz is wine or straw-yellow. She admires herself in the glass, while we treat the picture that purports to incriminate her as another kind of glass –a window- through which we peer and secretly desire her."[4] The theme of the recumbant woman often merged artistically with the non-allegorical one of a reclining Venus. Topaz has a hardness of 8, a specific gravity of 3.4-3.6, and a vitreous lustre. Often we find an inscription on a scroll that reads Omnia Vanitas ("All is Vanity"), a quote from the Book of Ecclesiastes.[3] "The artist invites us to pay lip-service to condemning her," writes Edwin Mullins, "while offering us full permission to drool over her.

The fracture is conchoidal to uneven. Other symbols of vanity include jewels, gold coins, a purse, and often by the figure of death himself. It has an easy and perfect basal cleavage and so gemstones or other fine specimens should be handled with care to avoid developing cleavage flaws. The mirror is sometimes held by a demon or a putto. It crystallizes in the orthorhombic system and its crystals are mostly prismatic terminated by pyramidal and other faces, the basal pinacoid often being present. She attends to her hair with comb and mirror. The mineral topaz is a silicate of aluminium and fluorine with the chemical formula Al2SiO4(F,OH)2. During the Renaissance, vanity was invariably represented as a naked woman, sometimes seated or reclining on a couch.

This article is about the mineral or gemstone, for other uses see: Topaz (disambiguation).. In secular allegory, vanity was considered one of the minor vices. Mineral galleries. In Western art, vanity was often symbolized by a peacock, and in Biblical terms, by the Whore of Babylon. Mindat with location data. Vanity hungry is spiteful."[2]. Webmineral. Friedrich Nietzsche wrote that "vanity is the fear of appearing original: it is thus a lack of pride, but not necessarily a lack of originality."[1] One of Mason Cooley's aphorisms is "Vanity well fed is benevolent.

In some religious teachings it is considered a sin, likely to cut the sinner off from the grace of God. Vanity (compare Pride) is the excessive belief in one's own abilities or attractiveness to others. ^  Edwin Mullins, The Painted Witch: How Western Artists Have Viewed the Sexuality of Women (New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1985), 62-3. ^  James Hall, Dictionary of Subjects & Symbols in Art (New York: Harper & Row, 1974), 318.

Essential Vermeer.

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