This page will contain news stories about Topaz, as they become available.

Topaz

This article is about the mineral or gemstone, for other uses see: Topaz (disambiguation).

Topaz 4 Carat Oval Shape Topaz Gemstone Ring Enhanced with Azotic(r)Treatment Heart Cut Sky Blue Topaz Ring

The mineral topaz is a silicate of aluminium and fluorine with the chemical formula Al2SiO4(F,OH)2. It crystallizes in the orthorhombic system and its crystals are mostly prismatic terminated by pyramidal and other faces, the basal pinacoid often being present. It has an easy and perfect basal cleavage and so gemstones or other fine specimens should be handled with care to avoid developing cleavage flaws. The fracture is conchoidal to uneven. Topaz has a hardness of 8, a specific gravity of 3.4-3.6, and a vitreous lustre. Pure topaz is transparent but is usually tinted by impurities; typical topaz is wine or straw-yellow. They may also be white, gray, green, blue, or reddish-yellow and transparent or translucent. When heated, yellow topaz often becomes reddish-pink. It can also be irradiated, turning the stone a light and distinctive shade of blue. A recent trend in jewelry is the manufacture of topaz specimens that display iridescent colors, by applying a thin layer of titanium oxide via physical vapor deposition.

Topaz is found associated with the more acid rocks of the granite and rhyolite type and may be found with fluorite and cassiterite. It can be found in the Ural and Ilmen mountains, Czech Republic, Saxony, Norway, Sweden, Japan, Brazil, Mexico, and the United States.

Etymology and historical/mythical usage

The name "topaz" is derived from the Greek topazos, "to seek," which was the name of an island in the Red Sea that was difficult to find and from which a yellow stone (now believed to be a yellowish olivine) was mined in ancient times. In the Middle Ages the name topaz was used to refer to any yellow gemstone, but now the name is only properly applied to the silicate described above.

According to Rebbenu Bachya, the word "Leshem" in the verse Exodus 28:19 means "Topaz" and was the stone on the Ephod representing the tribe of Dan.

Topaz is also the birthstone of November.

Example of Heat Treated Topaz-Pink Topaz Pear Cut Ring

References

  • Webmineral
  • Mindat with location data
  • Mineral galleries

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Topaz is also the birthstone of November. Virtuoso players:. According to Rebbenu Bachya, the word "Leshem" in the verse Exodus 28:19 means "Topaz" and was the stone on the Ephod representing the tribe of Dan. The oud's fretless fingerboard allows players to more freely play the untempered intervals that are common to many maqams. In the Middle Ages the name topaz was used to refer to any yellow gemstone, but now the name is only properly applied to the silicate described above. The oud plays an important role in most Arab and Turkish classical music because of its ability to beautifully express music in the Arabic system of maqam. The name "topaz" is derived from the Greek topazos, "to seek," which was the name of an island in the Red Sea that was difficult to find and from which a yellow stone (now believed to be a yellowish olivine) was mined in ancient times. Traditionally it is made from a bird's feather, but these days plastic picks are used more often.

It can be found in the Ural and Ilmen mountains, Czech Republic, Saxony, Norway, Sweden, Japan, Brazil, Mexico, and the United States. Arabic players refer to it as a reeshe or risha, while Turkish players refer to it as a mizrap. Topaz is found associated with the more acid rocks of the granite and rhyolite type and may be found with fluorite and cassiterite. The pick for the oud is usually about the length of an index-finger. A recent trend in jewelry is the manufacture of topaz specimens that display iridescent colors, by applying a thin layer of titanium oxide via physical vapor deposition. Turkish-style ouds have a brighter sound than Arabic ouds. It can also be irradiated, turning the stone a light and distinctive shade of blue. Arabic ouds are somewhat deeper, have a longer neck, and are usually tuned differently than their Turkish-style counterparts.

When heated, yellow topaz often becomes reddish-pink. Arabic ouds are constructed somewhat differently than those found in Turkey, Greece, and Armenia. They may also be white, gray, green, blue, or reddish-yellow and transparent or translucent. The soundbox of the oud is parabolic or pear shaped, that is, it doesn't have a straight back like the guitar. Pure topaz is transparent but is usually tinted by impurities; typical topaz is wine or straw-yellow. knotted at the bridge. Topaz has a hardness of 8, a specific gravity of 3.4-3.6, and a vitreous lustre. The bridge and the strings are attached to the instrument in a similar fashion to the flamenco or classical guitar, i.e.

The fracture is conchoidal to uneven. The oud's features are similar to the guitar: a sound box (on acoustic versions, but there are also solid body electric versions), five to eight courses (with an additional lower string which is usually just a single string) which are called awtar (singular watar), a shorter neck (relative to the guitar) called al-raqeba, at least one hole (some have several) called al-qamaria, a bridge called al-ghazala, and keys for tuning the strings called mafateeh. It has an easy and perfect basal cleavage and so gemstones or other fine specimens should be handled with care to avoid developing cleavage flaws. The oud was introduced into Europe by Ziryab, where it evolved into the lute. It crystallizes in the orthorhombic system and its crystals are mostly prismatic terminated by pyramidal and other faces, the basal pinacoid often being present. Ancient texts, however, state that the oud was invented by the Mesopotamians between 200 and 300 AD [1]. The mineral topaz is a silicate of aluminium and fluorine with the chemical formula Al2SiO4(F,OH)2. The first oud was inspired by the shape of his son's bleached skeleton.

This article is about the mineral or gemstone, for other uses see: Topaz (disambiguation).. The legend tells that the grieving Lamak hung the body of his dead son from a tree. Mineral galleries. According to legend, the oud was invented by Lamak, the sixth grandson of Adam. Mindat with location data. (The Arabic name, with the definite article, is the source of the word 'lute'.). Webmineral. Regarded as a precursor to the European lute, its name is derived from the Arabic word العود al-‘ūd 'the wood', which is probably the name of tree from which the oud was made.

The oud, 'oud, or 'ud (Arabic: عود) is a small, pear-shaped, stringed musical instrument, still in use in many Arab musical traditions. Mohammad Reza Ebrahimi (Iran). Arsalan Kamkar (Iran). Ahmed El bidaoui (Morocco).

Said Chraybi (Morocco). Simon Shaheen (Palestine). Naseer Shamma (Iraq). Charbel Rouhana (Lebanon).

Rabih Abou-Khalil (Lebanon). Marcel Khalife (Lebanon). Udi Hrant Kenkulian (Turkey). Wissam Joubran.

Samir Joubran (Egypt). Adnan Joubran. Richard Hagopian (Armenia). Driss El Maloumi (Morocco).

Hamza El Din (Egypt). Yair Dalal (Israel/Iraq). Anouar Brahem (Tunis). John Bilezikjian (United States, of Armenian descent).

Munir Bashir (Iraq). Jamil Bashir (Iraq).

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