This page will contain images about Topaz, as they become available.

Topaz

This article is about the mineral or gemstone, for other uses see: Topaz (disambiguation).

Topaz 4 Carat Oval Shape Topaz Gemstone Ring Enhanced with Azotic(r)Treatment Heart Cut Sky Blue Topaz Ring

The mineral topaz is a silicate of aluminium and fluorine with the chemical formula Al2SiO4(F,OH)2. It crystallizes in the orthorhombic system and its crystals are mostly prismatic terminated by pyramidal and other faces, the basal pinacoid often being present. It has an easy and perfect basal cleavage and so gemstones or other fine specimens should be handled with care to avoid developing cleavage flaws. The fracture is conchoidal to uneven. Topaz has a hardness of 8, a specific gravity of 3.4-3.6, and a vitreous lustre. Pure topaz is transparent but is usually tinted by impurities; typical topaz is wine or straw-yellow. They may also be white, gray, green, blue, or reddish-yellow and transparent or translucent. When heated, yellow topaz often becomes reddish-pink. It can also be irradiated, turning the stone a light and distinctive shade of blue. A recent trend in jewelry is the manufacture of topaz specimens that display iridescent colors, by applying a thin layer of titanium oxide via physical vapor deposition.

Topaz is found associated with the more acid rocks of the granite and rhyolite type and may be found with fluorite and cassiterite. It can be found in the Ural and Ilmen mountains, Czech Republic, Saxony, Norway, Sweden, Japan, Brazil, Mexico, and the United States.

Etymology and historical/mythical usage

The name "topaz" is derived from the Greek topazos, "to seek," which was the name of an island in the Red Sea that was difficult to find and from which a yellow stone (now believed to be a yellowish olivine) was mined in ancient times. In the Middle Ages the name topaz was used to refer to any yellow gemstone, but now the name is only properly applied to the silicate described above.

According to Rebbenu Bachya, the word "Leshem" in the verse Exodus 28:19 means "Topaz" and was the stone on the Ephod representing the tribe of Dan.

Topaz is also the birthstone of November.

Example of Heat Treated Topaz-Pink Topaz Pear Cut Ring

References

  • Webmineral
  • Mindat with location data
  • Mineral galleries

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Topaz is also the birthstone of November. [5]. According to Rebbenu Bachya, the word "Leshem" in the verse Exodus 28:19 means "Topaz" and was the stone on the Ephod representing the tribe of Dan. High demand for UCLA apparel has inspired the licensing of its trademark to UCLA brand stores throughout East Asia. In the Middle Ages the name topaz was used to refer to any yellow gemstone, but now the name is only properly applied to the silicate described above. This trend may arise from the school's academic reputation and popular images of the Southern California lifestyle, emphasizing freedom in a land of perpetual sunshine. The name "topaz" is derived from the Greek topazos, "to seek," which was the name of an island in the Red Sea that was difficult to find and from which a yellow stone (now believed to be a yellowish olivine) was mined in ancient times. The UCLA name also doubles as an overseas clothing and accessories brand; in certain Asian countries, it is considered fashionable to adorn oneself with the UCLA brand name.

It can be found in the Ural and Ilmen mountains, Czech Republic, Saxony, Norway, Sweden, Japan, Brazil, Mexico, and the United States. This is a peripheral enterprise, as UCLA does not have a hotel management program, so it serves no direct educational purpose. Topaz is found associated with the more acid rocks of the granite and rhyolite type and may be found with fluorite and cassiterite. Besides operating the usual dormitories and apartment buildings, UCLA also runs a small, full-service, on-campus hotel, the UCLA Guest House, and a full-service conference center, the UCLA Conference Center, in the San Bernardino Mountains near Lake Arrowhead. A recent trend in jewelry is the manufacture of topaz specimens that display iridescent colors, by applying a thin layer of titanium oxide via physical vapor deposition. [4]. It can also be irradiated, turning the stone a light and distinctive shade of blue. News and World Report has ranked UCLA Medical Center as the best hospital in the Western United States for 16 consecutive years, and placed it among its honor roll of best hospitals in the United States.

When heated, yellow topaz often becomes reddish-pink. As of 2005, U.S. They may also be white, gray, green, blue, or reddish-yellow and transparent or translucent. In 1981, the UCLA Medical Center made history when an assistant professor named Michael Gottlieb first diagnosed an unknown affliction later to be called AIDS. Pure topaz is transparent but is usually tinted by impurities; typical topaz is wine or straw-yellow. In addition, the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine uses two Los Angeles County hospitals as teaching hospitals: Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and Olive View-UCLA Medical Center. Topaz has a hardness of 8, a specific gravity of 3.4-3.6, and a vitreous lustre. The UCLA Medical Center is actually part of a larger healthcare system, UCLA Healthcare, which also operates a hospital in Santa Monica and seven primary care clinics throughout Los Angeles County.

The fracture is conchoidal to uneven. The UCLA Dance Marathon is an annual event on campus with hundreds of student dancers committed to raising money and joining together to support the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation. It has an easy and perfect basal cleavage and so gemstones or other fine specimens should be handled with care to avoid developing cleavage flaws. Spring Sing is an annually held show of student talent at the Los Angeles Tennis Center on campus. It crystallizes in the orthorhombic system and its crystals are mostly prismatic terminated by pyramidal and other faces, the basal pinacoid often being present. The annual event is planned and predominately staffed by the Cultural Affairs Commission (CAC) of the Undergraduate Students Association Council (USAC),a branch of ASUCLA. The mineral topaz is a silicate of aluminium and fluorine with the chemical formula Al2SiO4(F,OH)2. The UCLA Jazz Reggae Festival gathers musicians from both genres for a two day concert held every year over the Memorial Day weekend.

This article is about the mineral or gemstone, for other uses see: Topaz (disambiguation).. The Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, a two-day book fair held the last weekend of April, is the largest annual gathering of publishers and authors in the country and free to the public. Mineral galleries. The Lexus Gauntlet is the name given to a competition between UCLA and USC in the 18 varsity sports that both compete in head-to-head; in 2005, UCLA won the Lexus Gauntlet Trophy. Mindat with location data. UCLA shares a traditional sports rivalry with the nearby University of Southern California. Webmineral. In the 2004 Athens games, UCLA sent 56 athletes, more than any other university, who won 19 medals.

UCLA has medaled in every Olympics they have participated in. Women's sports: Golf (2), Gymnastics (5), Softball (10), Track & Field (5), Volleyball (3), Water Polo (3). Men's sports: Football (1), Golf (1), Gymnastics (2), Soccer (4), Swimming (1), Tennis (16), Track & Field (8), Volleyball (18), Water Polo (8). In addition to its basketball championships, UCLA has won NCAA Division I championships in the following events:.

Past rosters of UCLA basketball teams have been filled with such greats such as Jackie Robinson, Gail Goodrich, Kareem Abdul Jabbar, Bill Walton, Baron Davis and Reggie Miller. From 1971 to 1974, UCLA men's basketball won an unprecedented 88 consecutive games. Under legendary coach John Wooden, UCLA men's basketball teams won 10 NCAA championships in 1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, and 1975, and an 11th was added under then-coach Jim Harrick in 1995. Among these championships, some of the more notable victories are in men's basketball.

As of 2005, UCLA has won 118 national championships, including 97 NCAA championships, more than any other university. He would dub the baby blue uniform "Powder Keg Blue," powder blue with an explosive kick. Sanders figured that the baby blue would look better on the field and in film. The navy blue was changed to a lighter shade of blue.

Sanders added a gold loop on the shoulders -- the UCLA Stripe. When Red Sanders came to UCLA to coach football in 1949 he redesigned the uniforms. The Bruin mascots are Joe and Josephine Bruin, and the fight songs are Sons of Westwood and The Mighty Bruins. The men's and women's basketball and volleyball teams play at Pauley Pavilion on campus.

The Bruin football team plays home games at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California; the team won a national title in 1954. Two notable sports facilities serve as home venues for UCLA sports. The Bruins participate in NCAA Division I-A as part of the Pacific Ten Conference. The school's sports teams are called the Bruins, with colors true-blue and gold.

In the 1990s, student activists tended to focus on university and statewide concerns, such as union recognition, the expansion of the Chicano/a Studies Center, Proposition 187, which denied social services to undocumented immigrants, and Proposition 209, which ended affirmative action in California. Campus political debate in the 1980s centered primarily on the South African government's apartheid policies, the U.S.'s Central American policy, as well as the implementation of affirmative action in the state. This demonstration and many others at UC campuses throughout the state caused then-Governor Ronald Reagan to shut down the state's colleges and universities for the first time in California's history. Chancellor Young declared a State of Emergency and summoned the LAPD on campus; 74 arrests were made and 12 people reported injuries.

A fire caused $5,000 worth of damage, destroying part of Murphy Hall. On May 5, 1970 students protesting the Kent State shootings marched through campus and vandalized several buildings, including an ROTC building. Eight months later, the regents again dismissed Davis from the UCLA faculty.[3]. Young complied a state superior court order overruling the regents' decision by restoring course credit to Davis's class.

On October 22, Vice Chancellor Charles E. The overflowing audience gave the 25-year-old professor a standing ovation. Outraged faculty threatened to withhold grades if Davis was not reinstated, and nearly 2,000 students crammed into Royce Hall's auditorium when Davis delivered her first lecture despite the regents' decision to remove credit for the class. Later in 1969, the UC regents fired Angela Davis, a radical feminist and lecturer in the Philosophy Department, for openly identifying as a member of the Communist Party.

Later, it was reported that members of the FBI had infiltrated both groups and exacerbated tensions between them as part of the COINTELPRO program. On January 17, 1969 UCLA students and Black Panther Party members John Huggins, 23, and Bunchy Carter, 26, were slain in Campbell Hall by members of United Slaves, a rival black power organization headed by Maulana Karenga. During the 1969-1970 academic year, various activist organizations were infiltrated by federal agents who provoked conflicts between them. The protests escalated as the war continued.

The protests at UCLA began in 1967, when over 500 students protested the recruitment of graduates by Dow Chemicals, which produced napalm, an incendiary chemical used in the war. While student activism at UCLA in the 1940s demonstrated support for the Allied effort in World War II, in the 1960s the UCLA campus emerged as a staging area for massive protests against the Vietnam War. The crowd dispersed before any arrests were made, and University President Robert Sproul later reinstated the students.[2]. The activist tradition of UCLA can be traced to 1934, when Provost Ernest Moore declared UCLA "the worst hotbed of communism in the U.S," and suspended 5 members of the student government for allegedly “using their offices to assist the revolutionary activities of the National Student League, a Communist organization which has bedeviled the University for some months.” Over 3,000 students gathered to protest in Royce Quad, and campus police officers, attempting to silence the speakers, were thrown into some bushes.

In 1995, 2001, and 2004, Mother Jones magazine named UCLA in its annual listing of the Top 10 Activist Campuses, reflecting the rallying spirit of its student bodies over the years. [1] Gore would also later join the faculty of UCLA as a visiting professor in the School of Public Policy and Social Research, Department of Policy Studies, family-centered community building, in 2001. On January 11, 1994, then-Vice-President Al Gore further articulated the goals of the Clinton administration in the development of the "Information Superhighway" at UCLA's Royce Hall. This act would prove pivotal towards the development of the Internet during the 1990s; in particular it led to the development of the MOSAIC web browser, which was funded by the High-Performance Computing and Communications Initiative.

This report was presented to Congress and was so influential on then-Senator Al Gore that it proved to be the foundation for what would be passed as the High Performance Computing Act of 1991, written and developed by Gore. In 1988, Kleinrock also chaired a group which produced the report Toward a National Research Network. This work proved foundational for their later development of the Transmission Control Protocol - TCP/IP protocol. He would later team with Bob Kahn in the writing of the seminal 1974 paper A Protocol for Packet Network Intercommunication.

Turing Award laureate Vinton Cerf was a doctoral student in the computer science department under Kleinrock in early 1970s and also worked on the ARPANET. Kleinrock's lab in Boelter Hall sent the first online message ever. Interface Message Processors at both sites served as the backbone of the first Internet. ARPANET, the world's first electronic computer network, was established on November 21, 1969 between nodes at Leonard Kleinrock's lab at UCLA and Douglas Engelbart's lab at Stanford Research Institute, in Menlo Park, CA.

The average weighted GPA and SAT score for an admitted freshman was 4.25 and 1347, respectively. In 2004, 42,207 prospective students applied to UCLA for the 2005-2006 academic year, more than any other American university, and 11,338 applicants were accepted - a 26.9% acceptance rate. News and World Report, America's Best Graduate Schools. UCLA's oldest operating unit, the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies (GSEIS), was ranked 2nd among American graduate schools of education in the 2006 edition of U.S.

The UCLA Library, which holds over 8 million volumes, ranks among the top 10 in the United States. In addition, the Washington Monthly ranked UCLA 2nd in its 2005 rankings of the Top National Universities. In 2005, UCLA was ranked 14th in the world and 12th in North America by an annual listing of the Top 500 World Universities published by the Institute of Higher Education in Shanghai, China. Twelve departments were ranked in the top 10:.

programs examined by the National Research Council, UCLA had 31 ranked in the top 20 in terms of overall academic quality, third best in the United States. Of the 36 Ph.D. UCLA has a very distinguished academic program; in most surveys, it is invariably ranked among the best institutions of higher education on a national and global scale. The California NanoSystems Institute is another project that was created out of a partnership with the University of California, Santa Barbara to pioneer innovations in the field of nanotechnology.

In 2005, UCLA announced its five-year plan to establish the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Medicine; the state of California is rare in its public funding of research with new embryonic stem cell lines. The health-related schools, with the UCLA Medical Center and associated research centers, are collectively known as the UCLA Center for Health Sciences. UCLA is organized into the following schools and colleges:. There are many facilities with local buses.

The university has given priority in allocation of parking spaces to staff and some students, regardless of living distances. Yet, the university continues to suffer from a severe parking shortage which is further compounded by Southern California's regional housing shortage. The campus has a large number of parking garages, both above-ground and below-ground. He was the first individual of non-European background and the first UCLA alumnus to be so honored in the history of the Prize.

A bust of him, on the entrance to Bunche Hall, overlooks the Sculpture Garden. The tallest building on campus is named after Ralph Bunche, an African-American alumnus, who received the 1950 Nobel Peace Prize for negotiating an armistice agreement between the Jews and Arabs in Palestine. In order to accommodate UCLA's rapidly growing student population, multiple construction and renovation projects are in progress, including expansions of the life sciences and engineering research complexes. The Hill is linked to the remainder of campus by a heavily traveled pathway called Bruin Walk, which bisects the campus.

Morgan Center, the James West Alumni Center, and Pauley Pavilion stand at the center of the campus. Ackerman Union, the John Wooden Center, the Arthur Ashe Health and Wellness Center, the Student Activities Center, Kerckhoff Hall, the J.D. Weyburn Terrace enables UCLA to provide housing to approximately fifty percent of incoming graduate and professional students. The new complex is located on the western edge of Westwood, a few blocks from the main UCLA campus, and was completed before the Fall term in 2005.

In 2002, the university began building a new graduate housing complex, Weyburn Terrace, in order to recruit top graduate students from around the world because there had been no university-operated graduate housing on or near the main campus since 2001. Students are currently guaranteed three years of on-campus housing, but the Housing Master Plan aims to guarantee housing to all undergraduates for four years by 2010. Housing facilities also include four restaurants and three boutique-style eateries. Undergraduate housing for nearly 8,000 residents is spread across 14 complexes on a ridge on the western side of the campus, which is called "the Hill." Student life on the Hill is under the care of the Office of Residential Life (ORL).

The campus is in a constant state of change with multiple construction projects, including new residence areas, teaching and laboratory space, and a new hospital. South Campus is home to the physical sciences, life sciences, engineering, psychology, mathematical sciences, all health-related fields, and the UCLA Medical Center. North Campus is centered around oak tree-lined Dickson Court. North Campus is home to the arts, humanities, social sciences, law, and business programs.

North Campus is the original campus core with its buildings being more old-fashioned in appearance and clad in imported Italian brick. The campus is informally divided into North Campus and South Campus, which are both on the eastern half of the university's land. It is located in the residential area of Westwood and bordered by Bel Air, Beverly Hills, and Brentwood. The University campus offers broads, green lawns, sculpture gardens and fountains, museums, and a mix of architectural styles.

The campus is quite close, but not adjacent to the San Diego Freeway. The campus currently comprises 163 buildings across 419 acres (1.7 km²) in the western part of Los Angeles, north of the Westwood shopping district and just south of Sunset Boulevard. The rare books and manuscripts collection includes some of the world's largest collections of English literature, history, and fine printing. In 1934, upon the death of William Andrews Clark, Jr., UCLA received its first major bequest, and still one of the most generous in its history, the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library.

In 1933, UCLA was permitted to award the master's degree, and in 1936, the doctorate. The first classes on the new 400 acre (1.6 km²) campus were held in 1929 in its four original buildings. It has since simply been known around the world as "UCLA." Also in 1927, the state broke ground at a new campus on the chaparral-covered hills of a real estate development called Westwood. In 1927, the school was renamed the "University of California at Los Angeles." The word 'at' was officially replaced by a comma in 1958, in line with other UC campuses.

Appropriate legislation was signed into law on May 23, 1919 which turned the school into the Southern Branch of the University of California (SBUC) and added its general undergraduate program, the College of Letters and Science. In 1917, Director Ernest Carroll Moore suggested that the State Normal School at Los Angeles should be added as the second campus of the University of California. In 1914, the school moved to a new campus on Vermont Avenue in Hollywood. The new facility included an elementary school where teachers-in-training could practice their teaching technique on real children.

The State Normal School at Los Angeles opened on August 29, 1882, on what is now the site of the Central Library of the Los Angeles Public Library system. In March 1881, after heavy lobbying by Los Angeles residents, the California Legislature authorized the creation of a second State Normal School in downtown Los Angeles to train teachers for the growing population of Southern California. . University of California, Los Angeles.

It is the second-oldest campus in the University of California system and the largest university in terms of enrollment in the state of California. The University of California, Los Angeles, popularly known as UCLA, is a public, coeducational university located in the residential area of Westwood within the city of Los Angeles. Notable UCLA faculty. Notable UCLA alumni.

Aerospace Engineering (10). Classics (9). Chemistry (9). Anthropology (8).

Political Science (8). Geography (8). Philosophy (6). History (6).

Sociology (5). Physiology (4). Psychology (4). Linguistics (3).

School of Public Health. School of Dentistry. School of Nursing. Neuropsychiatric Institute.

Jules Stein Eye Institute. David Geffen School of Medicine. School of Theater Film and Television. School of Public Affairs.

Anderson School of Management. School of Law. The Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science. Graduate School of Education and Information Studies.

School of the Arts and Architecture. The Graduate Division of Letters and Sciences. College of Letters and Sciences.

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