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Tom Waits

Thomas Alan Waits, (born December 7, 1949) is an American composer, singer, musician and actor.

Early Career

Born in Pomona, California, Waits' recording career began in 1971, after he relocated to Los Angeles and signed with Herb Cohen, manager of Frank Zappa, among others. After numerous abortive recording sessions, his first record, the melancholic, country-tinged Closing Time (1973) received warm reviews, but he first gained national attention when his "Ol' 55" was recorded by The Eagles in 1974. The Heart of Saturday Night showed his roots as a nightclub singer, half speaking and half crooning ballads, often with a soft jazz background. The 1975 album Nighthawks at the Diner, recorded in a studio but with a small audience to capture the ambience of a live show, captures this phase of his career, including the lengthy spoken interludes between songs that punctuated his live act.

Small Change (1976) featuring famed drummer Shelly Manne, was jazzier still, and songs such as "The Piano Has Been Drinking" and "Bad Liver and a Broken Heart" cemented his hard living reputation, with a lyrical style pitched somewhere between Raymond Chandler and Charles Bukowski. Foreign Affairs (1977) and Blue Valentine (1978) were in a similar vein, but showed further refinement of his artistic voice. 1980 saw the commencement of a long working relationship with Francis Ford Coppola, who asked him to provide music for his film One From The Heart. Waits would also act in Coppola's Rumblefish, The Outsiders, The Cotton Club and Dracula (as the insane Renfield), and work with such directors as Jim Jarmusch and Robert Altman. In August 1980, he married Kathleen Brennan, whom he had met on the set of One From The Heart. With his wife, he wrote and performed in Big Time, a slightly surreal concert movie. His wife is regularly credited as co-author of many songs on his later released albums, and is often cited by Waits as a major influence on his work.

1980s and later

After he left Asylum Records for Island Records in 1983, his music became less mainstream. His trio of albums from the mid-1980s, Swordfishtrombones, Rain Dogs and Frank's Wild Years, all featured some degree of eclectic instrumentation -- Waits' self described "Junkyard Orchestra"--often marrying soul music horn sections to avant-garde percussion reminiscent of Harry Partch's, or the distorted guitar of Marc Ribot. He also gradually altered his singing style, sounding less like the late-night crooner of the 70s, instead adopting a gravelly voice reminiscent of Howling Wolf and Captain Beefheart. The last of these albums -- an off-Broadway musical co-written with his wife -- and the later collaboration with William S. Burroughs on The Black Rider both demonstrated the increasing interest in theatre, which has resulted in a somewhat successful acting career as well as soundtrack work.

In the popular perception, however, he and his work remain mostly characterised by his rocky voice, his strong personality and theatrical presence on stage and the "late night smoky bars" humour of his texts ("I'd rather have a free bottle in front of me than a pre-frontal lobotomy."). Waits has been reported as having bipolar disorder. In essence, however, and despite his songs having been covered by famous stars such as Bruce Springsteen and Rod Stewart, Waits remains a cult performer, steadfastly outside the mainstream.

Lawsuits

Waits has steadfastly refused to allow the use of his songs in commercials and has filed several lawsuits against advertisers who used his material without permission. The first lawsuit was filed in 1988 against Frito Lay, and resulted in a US$2.6 million judgement in Waits' favor. Frito Lay had approached Waits to use one of his songs in an advertisement. Waits declined the offer, and Frito Lay hired a Waits soundalike to sing a jingle similar to "Step Right Up," which is, ironically, a song Waits has called "an indictment of advertising." [1] (http://www.joe.trussell.com/waits/frito_lay.html) ("Step Right Up" concludes with the lyric "What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away").

In 1993, Levi's used Screamin' Jay Hawkins' version of Waits' "Heartattack and Vine" in a commercial. Waits sued, and Levis agreed to cease all use of the song, and offered a full page apology in Billboard Magazine. [2] (http://www.keeslau.com/TomWaitsSupplement/Copyright/copyrightwaitslevis.htm)

In 2000, an Audi commercial broadcast in Spain featured music very similar to Waits' "Innocent When You Dream", after Waits first had declined when they approached him about using the original. A Spanish court recognized there had been a violation of Waits’s moral rights, in addition to the infringement of copyright [3] (http://www.anti.com/news.php?newsid=86715). The production company, Tandem Campany Guasch, was ordered to pay compensation to Waits through his Spanish publisher.

Discography

Major releases


+ Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Folk Album


^ Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Album

Collections

  • 1983 Anthology of Tom Waits (Elektra)
  • 1991 The Early Years, Volume One
  • 1993 The Early Years, Volume Two
  • 1998 Beautiful Maladies: The Island Years

Contributions

  • 1991 Sailing the Seas of Cheese, by Primus: Waits does character vocals on Tommy The Cat
  • 1992 Beautiful Mess, by Thelonious Monster: Waits appears as a guest singer on Adios Lounge
  • 1993 Jesus Blood Never Failed Me Yet, by Gavin Bryars: Waits appears as guest singer
  • 1999 Antipop, by Primus: Waits does vocals on Coattails of a Deadman
  • 2000 Helium, by Tin Hat Trio: Waits appears as guest singer on Helium Reprise
  • 2001 It's A Wonderful Life, by Sparklehorse: Waits does vocals on "Dog Door"
  • 2002 For the Kids by various artists: Waits performs the lullaby "Bring Down the Branches"
  • 2004 The Ride by Los Lobos: Waits does vocals on the track "Kitate"
  • 2004 The Late Great Daniel Johnston by various artists: Waits covers Johnston's "King Kong"

Tribute albums

  • 1995 Temptation, Holly Cole
  • 1995 Step Right Up, various artists
  • 2000 New Coat of Paint, various artists
  • 2001 Wicked Grin, John Hammond
  • 2004 Step Right Up: The Songs of Tom Waits, various artists

Filmography

  • 1978 Movie debut as 'Mumbles' in Paradise Alley.
  • 1980 Worked with Francis Ford Coppola on the soundtrack to One From The Heart.
  • 1982 Soundtrack of One From The Heart. Nominated for an Academy Award for best original score.
    • Played petrified man in carnival in The Stone Boy.
  • 1983 Played Buck Merrill in The Outsiders.
    • Played Bennie the pool hall owner in Rumble Fish.
  • 1984 Played Irving Stark in The Cotton Club.
  • 1986 Starred as Zack in Down by Law.
  • 1987 Played Rudy The Kraut in Ironweed.
    • Played Al Silk in Candy Mountain.
  • 1989 Played the 'Punch & Judy Man' in Bearskin: An Urban Fairytale.
    • Starred as Kenny the Hitman in Cold Feet.
    • Voice of the radio DJ in Mystery Train. Composer on Sea of Love
  • 1990 Played a plainclothes policeman in The Two Jakes.
  • 1991 Played Wolf in At Play in the Fields of the Lord.
    • Played a disabled Veteran beggar in The Fisher King.
    • Wrote the score of Night on Earth (With Kathleen Brennan).
    • Played Monte in Queens Logic.
  • 1992 Composer (With Kathleen Brennan) on American Heart.
    • Played R.M. Renfield in Bram Stoker's Dracula.
    • Played Earl Piggott in Short Cuts.
  • 1996 Composer on soundtrack of Dead Man Walking.
    • Composer on soundtrack of The End of Violence.
  • 1999 Mystery Men -- played an inventor who specialized in non-lethal weapons.
  • 2003 Appeared in conversation with Iggy Pop in Coffee and Cigarettes: Somewhere In America.
  • 2004 Composer (with Kathleen Brennan) on soundtrack of "Shrek 2"

Tours

  • 1973 Closing Time touring
  • 1974-1975 The Heart Of Saturday Night touring
  • 1975-1976 Small Change touring
  • 1977 Foreign Affairs touring
  • 1978-1979 Blue Valentine touring
  • 1980-1982 Heartattack and Vine touring
  • 1985 Rain Dogs touring
  • 1987 Big Time touring
  • 1999 Get Behind The Mule Tour
  • 2004 Real Gone Tour

See also:

  • Kazik Staszewski, Polish artist extensively covering Waits
  • Holly Cole, Canadian artist covering Waits' songs in jazz style

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^ Grammy Award for Best Alternative Music Album. He has also appeared in cartoons such as EEK! The Cat, The Simpsons, The Brak Show, Johnny Bravo and The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy, lending his voice to that of the Squid Hat, a parody of the Sorting Hat in the Harry Potter series.
+ Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Folk Album. He currently plays a role in the "Haunted Lighthouse 4-D" Show at the Busch Gardens Williamsburg theme park. A Spanish court recognized there had been a violation of Waits’s moral rights, in addition to the infringement of copyright [3] (http://www.anti.com/news.php?newsid=86715). The production company, Tandem Campany Guasch, was ordered to pay compensation to Waits through his Spanish publisher. Al has also made a number of cameo film appearances, including all three Naked Gun films. In 2000, an Audi commercial broadcast in Spain featured music very similar to Waits' "Innocent When You Dream", after Waits first had declined when they approached him about using the original. He and his wife, Suzanne, recently had a daughter, Nina.

[2] (http://www.keeslau.com/TomWaitsSupplement/Copyright/copyrightwaitslevis.htm). However, since the taping, Al has married. Waits sued, and Levis agreed to cease all use of the song, and offered a full page apology in Billboard Magazine. (Also, the commercial failures of UHF and Polka Party). In 1993, Levi's used Screamin' Jay Hawkins' version of Waits' "Heartattack and Vine" in a commercial. Al is so clean-cut that the producers couldn't find any of the typical angst-laced problems that make many rock stars' stories compelling (as Al noted in an interview with BTM), so their angle was on Al's life as a bachelor and (what they presumed was) his loneliness. Waits declined the offer, and Frito Lay hired a Waits soundalike to sing a jingle similar to "Step Right Up," which is, ironically, a song Waits has called "an indictment of advertising." [1] (http://www.joe.trussell.com/waits/frito_lay.html) ("Step Right Up" concludes with the lyric "What the large print giveth, the small print taketh away"). VH1 produced a Behind the Music episode on Al.

Frito Lay had approached Waits to use one of his songs in an advertisement. The most popular part of AL-TV is Al manipulating interviews especially commissioned for AL-TV by the network for comic effect. The first lawsuit was filed in 1988 against Frito Lay, and resulted in a US$2.6 million judgement in Waits' favor. For Poodle Hat, however, AL-TV appeared on VH1. Waits has steadfastly refused to allow the use of his songs in commercials and has filed several lawsuits against advertisers who used his material without permission. Al has hosted AL-TV on MTV many years, generally coinciding with the release of each new album. In essence, however, and despite his songs having been covered by famous stars such as Bruce Springsteen and Rod Stewart, Waits remains a cult performer, steadfastly outside the mainstream. Though the show appeared to be geared at children, the humor was really more for adult fans of Al.

Waits has been reported as having bipolar disorder. Weird Al had a short-lived TV series called The Weird Al Show, which aired from September 1997 to January 1998 on CBS. In the popular perception, however, he and his work remain mostly characterised by his rocky voice, his strong personality and theatrical presence on stage and the "late night smoky bars" humour of his texts ("I'd rather have a free bottle in front of me than a pre-frontal lobotomy."). Originals such as "Melanie" and "Albuquerque" are favorites of many of his fans. The last of these albums -- an off-Broadway musical co-written with his wife -- and the later collaboration with William S. Burroughs on The Black Rider both demonstrated the increasing interest in theatre, which has resulted in a somewhat successful acting career as well as soundtrack work. In addition to parodies such as these, most of Al's albums include a medley of popular songs played in polka style, as well as original songs with his own lyrics and words. He also gradually altered his singing style, sounding less like the late-night crooner of the 70s, instead adopting a gravelly voice reminiscent of Howling Wolf and Captain Beefheart. The following is a comprehensive list of his albums to 2003:.

His trio of albums from the mid-1980s, Swordfishtrombones, Rain Dogs and Frank's Wild Years, all featured some degree of eclectic instrumentation -- Waits' self described "Junkyard Orchestra"--often marrying soul music horn sections to avant-garde percussion reminiscent of Harry Partch's, or the distorted guitar of Marc Ribot. Since Al got a record contract in 1983, he has released many albums and parodies. After he left Asylum Records for Island Records in 1983, his music became less mainstream. It has been argued that this not only deprives the real artists involved of credit for their creations, but sometimes associates Al's name with types of music he would never produce and would not want to be known for. His wife is regularly credited as co-author of many songs on his later released albums, and is often cited by Waits as a major influence on his work. One major victim of this seems to be Bob Rivers, but so many wrongly attributed tracks exist that several fans have set up websites attempting to list such tracks along with their real artists. With his wife, he wrote and performed in Big Time, a slightly surreal concert movie. The popularity of Al's music among users of Internet file sharing networks has led to many parody or comedy songs shared in this manner being identified as "Weird Al" tracks which in fact have no connection to him.

In August 1980, he married Kathleen Brennan, whom he had met on the set of One From The Heart. The article also referred to one real-life indication of Yankovic's status: Kurt Cobain, the lead singer for Nirvana stated that he felt that he had "made it" after Yankovic recorded "Smells Like Nirvana" (parodying Cobain's "Smells Like Teen Spirit"). Waits would also act in Coppola's Rumblefish, The Outsiders, The Cotton Club and Dracula (as the insane Renfield), and work with such directors as Jim Jarmusch and Robert Altman. Yankovic has been called a "cultural barometer" by The Onion's recurring fictitious dweeb character Larry Groznic (10 November 2004), who called Weird Al's music "the consummate pastiche of popular songwriting styles for our times". 1980 saw the commencement of a long working relationship with Francis Ford Coppola, who asked him to provide music for his film One From The Heart. Yankovic has received three Grammy Awards and became eligible for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2004, although he says, "I think my chances of ever making it into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame are about as good as Milli Vanilli's.". Foreign Affairs (1977) and Blue Valentine (1978) were in a similar vein, but showed further refinement of his artistic voice. He also directed the title sequence to Spy Hard, in which he sang the title song.

Small Change (1976) featuring famed drummer Shelly Manne, was jazzier still, and songs such as "The Piano Has Been Drinking" and "Bad Liver and a Broken Heart" cemented his hard living reputation, with a lyrical style pitched somewhere between Raymond Chandler and Charles Bukowski. Weird Al has directed many of his own music videos, as well as several by such artists as Hanson, The Black Crowes, Ben Folds, and The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion. The 1975 album Nighthawks at the Diner, recorded in a studio but with a small audience to capture the ambience of a live show, captures this phase of his career, including the lengthy spoken interludes between songs that punctuated his live act. He also contributed the song "Dare to Be Stupid" to Transformers: The Movie. The Heart of Saturday Night showed his roots as a nightclub singer, half speaking and half crooning ballads, often with a soft jazz background. He has contributed songs to several films, including the original song "This Is The Life", featured on the soundtrack for Johnny Dangerously; the title track to his own movie, UHF; and a parody of the James Bond title sequences in "Spy Hard", the title track to a 1996 Leslie Nielsen movie directed by Rick Friedberg. After numerous abortive recording sessions, his first record, the melancholic, country-tinged Closing Time (1973) received warm reviews, but he first gained national attention when his "Ol' 55" was recorded by The Eagles in 1974. Examples include "Alternative Polka", "Angry White Boy Polka" and "Polka Power.".

Born in Pomona, California, Waits' recording career began in 1971, after he relocated to Los Angeles and signed with Herb Cohen, manager of Frank Zappa, among others. In addition to his parodies, Al also includes a medley of various songs on most albums, each one reinterpreted as a polka, with the choruses of various songs juxtaposed for humourous effect. Thomas Alan Waits, (born December 7, 1949) is an American composer, singer, musician and actor. Popeil"), Talking Heads ("Dog Eat Dog"), Nine Inch Nails ("Germs"), The Beach Boys ("Trigger Happy"), Oingo Boingo ("You Make Me"), The Police ("Velvet Elvis"), James Taylor ("The Good Old Days"), The Beastie Boys ("Twister"), and They Might Be Giants ("Everything You Know is Wrong"). Holly Cole, Canadian artist covering Waits' songs in jazz style. Some of his original songs are pastiches or "style parodies," where he chooses a band's entire body of work to honor/parody rather than any single hit by that band; some bands so honored have been Devo ("Dare to Be Stupid"), The B-52's ("Mr. Kazik Staszewski, Polish artist extensively covering Waits. Yankovic's humor lies more in creating unexpected incongruity between an artist's image and the topic of the song, contrasting the style of the song with its content, or in pointing out trends or works which have become pop culture cliches.

2004 Real Gone Tour. Although many of his songs are parodies of contemporary radio hits, it is rare that the song's primary topic of lampooning is that artist. 1999 Get Behind The Mule Tour. Yankovic's work depends largely on the satirizing of popular culture, including television, movies, food, popular music, and sometimes issues in contemporary news. 1987 Big Time touring. Though he is best known for his song parodies, Yankovic has recorded a greater number of original humorous songs, such as "Why Does This Always Happen to Me?" and "Hardware Store". 1985 Rain Dogs touring. The night after their bodies were found, Al went on with his concert in Mankato, Minnesota, saying that since his music had helped many of his fans through tough times, maybe it would work for him as well.

1980-1982 Heartattack and Vine touring. On April 9, 2004, Al's parents, Nick Louis Yankovic, 86, and Mary, 81, were found dead in their Fallbrook, California home, apparently the victims of carbon monoxide poisoning. 1978-1979 Blue Valentine touring. In January 1998, Yankovic had LASIK eye surgery and shaved off his mustache, radically changing his trademark look. 1977 Foreign Affairs touring. Since the mid-1990s, Al has performed annually at the Minnesota State Fair. 1975-1976 Small Change touring. Al claims to have been inspired by Allan Sherman, whose portrait in miniature (with name) can be found by the observant on the cover of Al's first album.

1974-1975 The Heart Of Saturday Night touring. The movie was co-directed by Jay Levey, who would direct UHF (see below) three years later. 1973 Closing Time touring. In 1985, Al co-wrote and starred in a mockumentary of his own life entitled The Compleat Al that intertwined fact and fiction of his life up to that point. 2004 Composer (with Kathleen Brennan) on soundtrack of "Shrek 2". The live version of "School Cafeteria" is also to be found on Dr. Demento's Basement Tapes. 2003 Appeared in conversation with Iggy Pop in Coffee and Cigarettes: Somewhere In America. Yankovic's vaults, such as "Pacman", "It's Still Billy Joel To Me", or the demos for "I Love Rocky Road".

1999 Mystery Men -- played an inventor who specialized in non-lethal weapons. Demento Society, which issues yearly Christmas re-releases of material from Dr. Demento's Basement Tapes, often includes among these unreleased tracks from Mr. Composer on soundtrack of The End of Violence. The Dr. 1996 Composer on soundtrack of Dead Man Walking.

    . With Jon "Bermuda" Schwartz on drums, the band was complete. Played Earl Piggott in Short Cuts. Steve Jay became Al's bass player, and Jim West the lead guitarist.

    Renfield in Bram Stoker's Dracula. Jay insisted that the act would sound better if Al had a full band, so he held auditions. Played R.M. His stage act caught the eye of manager Jay Levey, who loved it and became Al's manager. 1992 Composer (With Kathleen Brennan) on American Heart.

      . His performances were particularly interesting as few, if any, people at the time were doing parodies of rock and roll songs on accordion. Played Monte in Queens Logic. Demento's act.

      Wrote the score of Night on Earth (With Kathleen Brennan). 1981 brought Al on tour for the first time as part of Dr. Played a disabled Veteran beggar in The Fisher King. The rare 1981 Placebo EP release of this song has as its B-Side the subtle track "Happy Birthday.". 1991 Played Wolf in At Play in the Fields of the Lord.

        . The resulting performance of "Another One Rides the Bus" was a parody of a Queen hit, "Another One Bites the Dust". 1990 Played a plainclothes policeman in The Two Jakes. Jon Schwartz was also there, and he was a percussionist, so he was recruited to bang on Al's accordion case.

        Composer on Sea of Love. Demento's radio network at the time, when he announced he had another parody. Voice of the radio DJ in Mystery Train. In 1980, Al was working the mail room at Westwood One, Dr. Starred as Kenny the Hitman in Cold Feet. Demento's listeners put this track atop his "Funny Five" list. 1989 Played the 'Punch & Judy Man' in Bearskin: An Urban Fairytale.

          . Dr.

          Played Al Silk in Candy Mountain. Since "My Sharona" by The Knack was on the charts and The Knack was going to play at Cal Poly, Al took his accordion into the bathroom across from the listening booth and recorded a parody entitled "My Bologna", with a B-side called "School Cafeteria". The Knack thought it was funny, and arranged for the song to be released on their label, Capitol Records, which gave Al a six-month contract. 1987 Played Rudy The Kraut in Ironweed.

            . Three years later, Al was an architecture student at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and a disc jockey at the university's radio station (KCPR). 1986 Starred as Zack in Down by Law. Al was a senior at Lynwood High School in Lynwood, California at the time, but that tape was the start of his eventual career. 1984 Played Irving Stark in The Cotton Club. Demento's radio show (a comedy radio program featuring humorous music), Al sent the Doctor a tape of a song entitled "Belvedere Cruising" in 1976.

            Played Bennie the pool hall owner in Rumble Fish. After hearing Dr. 1983 Played Buck Merrill in The Outsiders.

              . Alfred Matthew "Weird Al" Yankovic, the son of Nick & Mary Yankovic, first started playing the accordion one day before his seventh birthday, mastering the instrument by age ten. Played petrified man in carnival in The Stone Boy. His works include four gold and four platinum records. Nominated for an Academy Award for best original score.
                . He is known in particular for humorous songs which satirize popular culture and/or parody specific songs by contemporary musical acts.

                1982 Soundtrack of One From The Heart. Alfred Matthew "Weird Al" Yankovic (born October 23, 1959) is an American musician, parodist and accordion player. 1980 Worked with Francis Ford Coppola on the soundtrack to One From The Heart. Because of the potentially crippling amount of royalties requred for this, Weird Al's record labels have had to engage in endless negotiation and diplomacy. 1978 Movie debut as 'Mumbles' in Paradise Alley. Because of his polka-medleys, Wierd Al can wind up performing works by dozens of artists on a single album. 2004 Step Right Up: The Songs of Tom Waits, various artists. Licensing issues for Weird Al's works are some of the most complicated in the music industry.

                2001 Wicked Grin, John Hammond. He only asks for permission to maintain good relationships and avoid nuissance law suits. 2000 New Coat of Paint, various artists. Because parody is recognized as fair use by copyright laws, Wierd Al is actually free to make fun of any artist's work without permision. 1995 Step Right Up, various artists. Interestingly, Weird Al has only backed down from artists like Prince and Eminem out of courtesy and convenience. 1995 Temptation, Holly Cole. Says Al: "Last year, Eminem forced me to halt production on the video for my 'Lose Yourself' parody because he somehow thought that it would be harmful to his image or career ...".

                2004 The Late Great Daniel Johnston by various artists: Waits covers Johnston's "King Kong". Al was also requested to change the video for his remake of Eminem's "Lose yourself". 2004 The Ride by Los Lobos: Waits does vocals on the track "Kitate". Also, Prince has refused to allow parodies, though Weird Al has stated that he continues to "check back with him to see if he has developed a sense of humor" in interviews. 2002 For the Kids by various artists: Waits performs the lullaby "Bring Down the Branches". Al apologized for the misunderstanding. 2001 It's A Wonderful Life, by Sparklehorse: Waits does vocals on "Dog Door". Coolio was very displeased since his management told Weird Al to go ahead with the parody without consulting him.

                2000 Helium, by Tin Hat Trio: Waits appears as guest singer on Helium Reprise. While artists are generally pleased with Weird Al, there are three notable exceptions. 1999 Antipop, by Primus: Waits does vocals on Coattails of a Deadman. On November 10, 2004, The Onion published an editorial titled "I Must Take Issue With The Wikipedia Entry For Weird Al Yankovic.". 1993 Jesus Blood Never Failed Me Yet, by Gavin Bryars: Waits appears as guest singer. Examples are Al wearing a 27 on the cover of the Running With Scissors album and including 27 photos in the photo gallery on the "Weird Al Yankovic Live!" DVD. 1992 Beautiful Mess, by Thelonious Monster: Waits appears as a guest singer on Adios Lounge. Al often hides the number 27 somewhere in his songs, album art, and memorabilia.

                1991 Sailing the Seas of Cheese, by Primus: Waits does character vocals on Tommy The Cat. Al has put two backwards messages into his songs: the first, in Nature Trail to Hell, said "Satan Eats Cheez Whiz"; the second, in I Remember Larry, said "Wow, you must have an awful lot of free time on your hands." [1] (http://www.al-oholicsanonymous.com/faq/#secret). 1998 Beautiful Maladies: The Island Years. Side two of the album is "Carnival of the Animals, Part II" which is a sort of homage to The Carnival of the Animals by Camille Saint-Saens, with Weird Al taking the role of Edward Lear in writing humorous poems about the slug, the shark, etc. 1993 The Early Years, Volume Two. Don Ameche! What? He can't make it?", while the music features various innovations by Wendy Carlos over the original by Sergei Prokofiev. 1991 The Early Years, Volume One. Weird Al's text modifies the original story considerably: "The Grandfather will be played by..

                1983 Anthology of Tom Waits (Elektra). Peter and the Wolf - 1988: "This warped classical children's record featuring narration and poems written by "Weird Al" Yankovic and music arranged, composed and performed by synthesizer whiz Wendy Carlos" - WeirdAl.com (http://weirdal.com/). Babalu Music - 1991: A collection of I Love Lucy music. UHF- 1989: A commercially unsuccessful movie satirizing the television industry, starring Yankovic, Michael Richards, Fran Drescher and Victoria Jackson. "It's All About the Pentiums" (Parody of Puff Daddy's "It's All About The Benjamins").

                "Amish Paradise" (Parody of Coolio's "Gangsta's Paradise"). "Living with a Hernia" (Parody of James Brown's "Living In America"). "Fat" (Parody of the title track from Michael Jackson's Bad album). "Grapefruit Diet" (Parody of Cherry Poppin' Daddies' "Zoot Suit Riot").

                "Like A Surgeon" (Parody of Madonna's "Like a Virgin"). "Phony Calls" (Parody of TLC's "Waterfalls"). "Bedrock Anthem" (Parodies of Red Hot Chili Peppers' "Under The Bridge" and "Give It Away"). "Gump" (Parody of the Presidents of the United States of America's "Lump").

                "Theme from Rocky XIII" (Parody of Survivor's "Eye of the Tiger"). "Jerry Springer" (Parody of Barenaked Ladies' "One Week"). "Cavity Search" (Parody of U2's "Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me"). "Smells Like Nirvana" (Parody of Nirvana's "Smells Like Teen Spirit").

                "Pretty Fly for a Rabbi" (Parody of The Offspring's "Pretty Fly (For A White Guy)"). "I Love Rocky Road" (Parody of Joan Jett's "I Love Rock N' Roll"). "Eat It" (Parody of Michael Jackson's "Beat It"). "The Saga Begins" (Parody of Don McLean's "American Pie"; tells the story of Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace).

                "Couch Potato" (Eminem's "Lose Yourself" from the movie 8 Mile). "Ricky" (a parody of "Mickey" by Toni Basil, humorous lyrics themed from I Love Lucy; a parody of and tribute to the series). "Albuquerque" an extremely funny, but long, song, about Al's weird ventures into the city of Albuquerque - it's 11 and a half minutes long!. "Headline News" (Parody of "Mmm Mmm Mmm Mmm" by Crash Test Dummies) - 1994.

                Theme from "Spy Hard" (Spy Hard soundtrack - 1996). "Polkamon" (Pokémon The Movie 2000 (soundtrack) - 2000). The Saga Begins - 1999. The TV Album - 1995.

                Greatest Hits - Volume II - 1994. Permanent Record - Al in the Box - 1994. The Food Album - 1993. The Best Of Yankovic - 1992 (Korean LP).

                Greatest Hits - 1988. Poodle Hat - 2003. Running With Scissors - 1999. Bad Hair Day - 1996.

                Alapalooza - 1994. Off the Deep End - 1992. UHF (movie soundtrack) - 1989. Even Worse - 1988.

                Polka Party - 1986. Dare to Be Stupid - 1985. "Weird Al" Yankovic in 3-D - 1984. Weird Al Yankovic - 1983.

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