This page will contain images about The Butthole Surfers, as they become available.

Butthole Surfers

(Redirected from The Butthole Surfers)

The Butthole Surfers is an American indie and punk band. The band was founded by Gibby Haynes and Paul Leary in San Antonio, Texas in 1982; the pair met while students at Trinity University. Incorporating elements of hardcore, psychedelia, and performance art, their live shows also made heavy use of strobe lights, background films and naked dancers.

While their line-up changed frequently through the years, they had a core membership of Jeff Pinkus on bass, with King Coffey and Teresa Taylor on drums in addition to Haynes (vocals) and Leary (guitar). Mark Kramer (of Bongwater and Shimmy Disc) also briefly played bass.

They recorded their debut EP on Alternative Tentacles, before moving to Touch & Go to release their debut album Psychic...Powerless...Another Man's Sac. Along with The Teardrop Explodes in the UK this album might be said to have begun the psychedelic revival (psychedelia having been extremely unfashionable in the five years since punk). It also showed the influence of heavy metal (especially Black Sabbath), again, many years before this sound became fashionable: in marrying punk and heavy metal it might be seen as one of the first precursors of grunge. Their second album Rembrandt Pussyhorse showed the increased influence of the European avant-garde (e.g. bands such as Throbbing Gristle and Einsturzende Neubauten) as well as American eccentrics like Frank Zappa and The Residents. They recorded two more albums and numerous EPs for Touch and Go before leaving to record an album (Pioughd) for Rough Trade Records. In 1991 they were part of the first Lollapalooza tour. Soon afterwards they signed to Capitol Records and this one time underground band eventually became a mainstream commodity with songs on modern rock radio and Beavis and Butt-head. They also contributed songs to the soundtracks of Baz Luhrman's Romeo + Juliet and Mission Impossible around about this time.

The band's most famous song is "Pepper" from the album Electriclarryland in 1996, which recounted the somewhat sordid stories of several high school students in Texas. However, probably their best album is the critically lauded Locust Abortion Technician (Touch & Go - US/ Blast First - UK). The story of the creation of this album is told in Our Band Could Be Your Life by Michael Azerrad (Little, Brown) amidst other tales from the American underground in the 1980s.

In 1996 the band brought a legal action to recover rights from Touch and Go to their back catalogue, a case they eventually won in 1999. Those records are now in print on their own Latino Buggerveil record label. At the same time a huge legal battle with Capital records began which ended up with the band being kicked off the label and signing to Hollywood Records (a subsidiary of Disney).

In the early 'nineties Gibby Haynes and Jeff Pinkus released a side project (The Jackofficers) which produced a highly psychedelic take on House music. As the 'nineties went on, the band became increasingly influenced by electronica, with Gibby namechecking Massive Attack, Tricky, and The Chemical Brothers as influences. This culminated in 'The Weird Revolution' (a reworking of an aborted album recorded for Capital called 'After the Astronaut') their most electronic album to date.

Samples

  • Download sample of "Pepper" from Electriclarryland

Discography

  • Butthole Surfers EP (1983) (alternate title: "A Brown Reason To Live")
  • Live PCPPEP (1984)
  • Psychic... Powerless... Another Man's Sac (1984)
  • Cream Corn from the Socket of Davis EP (1985)
  • Rembrandt Pussyhorse (1986)
  • Locust Abortion Technician (1987)
  • Hairway to Steven (1988)
  • Widowermaker EP (1989)
  • Double Live (1989)
  • Pioughd (1990)
  • Independent Worm Saloon (1993)
  • Electric Larryland (1996)
  • After the Astronaut (unreleased) (1998)
  • Weird Revolution (2001)
  • Humpty Dumpty LSD (2002)

This page about The Butthole Surfers includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about The Butthole Surfers
News stories about The Butthole Surfers
External links for The Butthole Surfers
Videos for The Butthole Surfers
Wikis about The Butthole Surfers
Discussion Groups about The Butthole Surfers
Blogs about The Butthole Surfers
Images of The Butthole Surfers

This culminated in 'The Weird Revolution' (a reworking of an aborted album recorded for Capital called 'After the Astronaut') their most electronic album to date.
. As the 'nineties went on, the band became increasingly influenced by electronica, with Gibby namechecking Massive Attack, Tricky, and The Chemical Brothers as influences. You can add to this the fact that 5 of their records during this period were double-sided hits, with 3 of them in a row! Actually, as far as vocal groups go, the Clovers, Dominoes, Drifters, and Midnighters pretty much had the charts tied up during this period. In the early 'nineties Gibby Haynes and Jeff Pinkus released a side project (The Jackofficers) which produced a highly psychedelic take on House music. It’s true that “Sixty Minute Man,” “Honey Love,” and “Work With Me Annie” were bigger hits than any Clovers tune, but “Don’t You Know I Love You,” “Fool, Fool, Fool,” and “Lovey Dovey,” were each on the charts for over 20 weeks. At the same time a huge legal battle with Capital records began which ended up with the band being kicked off the label and signing to Hollywood Records (a subsidiary of Disney). And what about the Clovers? In the first 5 years of their existence, they had 17 R&B hits, for a total of 191 weeks on the charts.

Those records are now in print on their own Latino Buggerveil record label. Even the Orioles, who were no longer a force to be reckoned with by this time, had had only 62 weeks of chart hits in their first 5 years. The Ravens had had a dismal 34. In 1996 the band brought a legal action to recover rights from Touch and Go to their back catalogue, a case they eventually won in 1999. However, in their first 5 years, they placed only 7 songs on the charts for a total of 69 weeks (although “Work With Me Annie” was there for 26 of them). The story of the creation of this album is told in Our Band Could Be Your Life by Michael Azerrad (Little, Brown) amidst other tales from the American underground in the 1980s. Using that method, there were 15 charted songs, for a grand total of 124 weeks; this includes 23 weeks for “Honey Love.”) The only other group that had any similar impact during this period was the Midnighters. However, probably their best album is the critically lauded Locust Abortion Technician (Touch & Go - US/ Blast First - UK). (However, since the Drifters weren’t formed until May 1953, let’s bend the rules a bit and compute totals for the first 5 years of their existence.

The band's most famous song is "Pepper" from the album Electriclarryland in 1996, which recounted the somewhat sordid stories of several high school students in Texas. The Drifters had 10 songs, for a total of 107 weeks. They also contributed songs to the soundtracks of Baz Luhrman's Romeo + Juliet and Mission Impossible around about this time. (This really should be computed by assigning points for how long a record stays at which position on the charts, but the following is a reasonable approximation.) The Dominoes, who started at almost the exact same time as the Clovers, managed to place 11 tunes on the R&B charts from 1951 to 1955; the combined time on the charts was 103 weeks (including 30 weeks for “Sixty Minute Man”). Soon afterwards they signed to Capitol Records and this one time underground band eventually became a mainstream commodity with songs on modern rock radio and Beavis and Butt-head. One measure of popularity is how long a record remains on the charts. In 1991 they were part of the first Lollapalooza tour. In fact, the Clovers were the most popular group between 1951 and 1955.

They recorded two more albums and numerous EPs for Touch and Go before leaving to record an album (Pioughd) for Rough Trade Records. They continually played the theater circuits, and were in demand to appear in the package shows which toured the country. bands such as Throbbing Gristle and Einsturzende Neubauten) as well as American eccentrics like Frank Zappa and The Residents. In addition, the Clovers were also one of the most popular live acts during the early to mid 50s. Their second album Rembrandt Pussyhorse showed the increased influence of the European avant-garde (e.g. Not only were they favorites of record buyers, but also of their peers. It also showed the influence of heavy metal (especially Black Sabbath), again, many years before this sound became fashionable: in marrying punk and heavy metal it might be seen as one of the first precursors of grunge. Jive). Extremely successful in the early- and mid-50s, the Clovers placed 21 tunes on the R&B charts, 19 of them in the top 10.

Along with The Teardrop Explodes in the UK this album might be said to have begun the psychedelic revival (psychedelia having been extremely unfashionable in the five years since punk).
One of the most enduringly popular R&B groups has been the “Mighty Clovers” (as they were tagged by Dr. They recorded their debut EP on Alternative Tentacles, before moving to Touch & Go to release their debut album Psychic...Powerless...Another Man's Sac. Please format this article according to the guidelines laid out at Wikipedia:How to edit a page, then remove this notice. Mark Kramer (of Bongwater and Shimmy Disc) also briefly played bass. This article needs to be wikified. While their line-up changed frequently through the years, they had a core membership of Jeff Pinkus on bass, with King Coffey and Teresa Taylor on drums in addition to Haynes (vocals) and Leary (guitar).

Incorporating elements of hardcore, psychedelia, and performance art, their live shows also made heavy use of strobe lights, background films and naked dancers. The band was founded by Gibby Haynes and Paul Leary in San Antonio, Texas in 1982; the pair met while students at Trinity University. The Butthole Surfers is an American indie and punk band. Humpty Dumpty LSD (2002).

Weird Revolution (2001). After the Astronaut (unreleased) (1998). Electric Larryland (1996). Independent Worm Saloon (1993).

Pioughd (1990). Double Live (1989). Widowermaker EP (1989). Hairway to Steven (1988).

Locust Abortion Technician (1987). Rembrandt Pussyhorse (1986). Cream Corn from the Socket of Davis EP (1985). Another Man's Sac (1984).

Powerless.. Psychic.. Live PCPPEP (1984). Butthole Surfers EP (1983) (alternate title: "A Brown Reason To Live").

Download sample of "Pepper" from Electriclarryland.

10-22-14 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php PAD File Directory Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Display all your websites in one place HereIam.tv Celebrity Homepages Charity Directory Google+ Directory Move your favorite Unsigned Artist to the Top of the List