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The Birds (film)

The Birds (1963) is a horror film by Alfred Hitchcock, based on a short story by Daphne Du Maurier. (Hitchcock also adapted Du Maurier's novel Rebecca into an acclaimed film) about birds mobbing humans.

The screenplay for The Birds was written by Evan Hunter, better known as crime fiction novelist Ed McBain. This film is notable in that it has no music score per se (other than brief source music); instead a montage of assorted bird calls and sound effects put together by perennial Hitchcock composer Bernard Herrmann provides the "incidental music".

In the film, various kinds of birds attack Bodega Bay, California, a seaside village. It may be noted that in Du Maurier's story, the birds attack Britain instead of California.


Synopsis

Spoiler warning: Plot or ending details follow.

A young lady (Hedren) visits a bird shop on a Friday afternoon. There, she meets Mitch (Taylor), a lawyer that is looking for two lovebirds for his little sister. She pretends to be the shopkeeper, showing him various species of birds, until she accidentally lets out a canary. When Mitch reveals after the incident that he knows her as Melanie Daniels, the daughter of a newspaper magnate, and tells her off for being a spoiled prankster, she decides to pay a visit to his house to get back at him and give his sister the lovebirds that he couldn't obtain. Outside, a flock of pigeons menacingly circle the sky.

When she arrives at the town of Bodega Bay, she seeks out Annie Hayworth (Suzanne Pleshette), the local teacher, in order to learn the name of Mitch's sister, Cathy (Veronica Cartwright). Then, she travels out by boat and stealthily enters Mitch's house, placing the present in the living room. On the way back, however, a seagull inexplicably swoops down and claws her.

Cleaning up her wounds, Melanie gives Mitch the alibi that Annie was an old friend of hers and she wanted to pay a visit. She then returns to Annie's house, rents out a room for the weekend, and heads over to Mitch's house for dinner. There, his mother, Lydia (Jessica Tandy), argues with someone over the phone that the chicken feed she bought was defective—her chickens wouldn't eat a bite—only to learn that the vendor's own fowl, who had been given a different brand, had the same problem. After dinner, Melanie returns to Annie's house and the two chat about their past, when a thud is heard against the front door. Opening the door, Melanie discovers a dead crow sprawled on the ground.

The next day, Cathy hosts a birthday party. A peaceful flock of birds make their way across the clear blue sky as Melanie and Mitch walk along the beach. As time goes on, however, the sound of bird calls grows louder, and a shadowy cloud appears over the festivities. All of a sudden, a bird swoops down and switches Cathy on the ear, and an attack on the party commences. Terrified guests rush into the house as birds scratch, peck, and bite at them ravenously and without motive.

From then on, things go from bad to worse as bird attacks increase, both in scope and in violence. Lydia drives over to the farmer who sold her the defective chicken feed and discovers a gory corpse with his eyes gouged out. After fleeing the scene in a hysteria, Lydia begs Melanie to keep watch over Cathy during school the next day. A flock of crows gather in the playground, and when Melanie evacuates the school, they viciously tear at the children, nearly killing one of them.

At a pub where a majority of the children have evacuated, Melanie bears witness to the death of a gas clerk across the street after a seagull attacks him. A trail of gasoline makes its way down the road, to where a man is lighting a cigarette. The cries of bystanders are in vain, and a shattering explosion alerts scores of birds, who attack those who rushed out to help the clerk. Melanie runs to assist, but quickly retreats to a phone booth as she is attacked. From that vantage point, she bears witness to the horrific spectacle as birds rush at her from all angles. The local fire department soon arrives to fight the fire and end up fighting the birds instead. A dying man leans against the booth, slowly collapsing and leaving a streak of blood on the glass, which begins to crack as birds endlessly peck and fly at it. Finally, Mitch ventures into the storm and brings her back into the pub, where a woman accuses her of being cursed.

At last, the screeching of the birds comes to an end. Melanie sets out in search of Annie and Cathy. Annie lies dead on her porch, while a terrified Cathy uncontrollably sobs. Melanie comforts Cathy and Mitch brings Annie inside, as the afternoon descends into dusk.

Cathy, Melanie, Mitch, and Lydia hole up in their house, boarding up all the windows, doors, and openings, with the exception of a single fireplace that has a fire going around the clock. In this claustrophobic environment, the four spend hours wondering when the next attack will come. Finally, a clamor erupts, and Mitch quickly checks and repairs openings while the rest look on, terrified out of their wits. The power goes out, and Mitch gets a flashlight from the basement.

Later on, Melanie wakes up with the intuition that something is terribly wrong. She grabs Mitch's flashlight and carefully examines the rooms, then cautiously treads the stairs, opens a door, and goes inside. Birds attack her from all sides as she gazes at a gigantic hole in the ceiling. Unable to fight, she collapses onto the floor, nearly dying before Mitch comes and rescues her. Realizing that she needs to get to a hospital, he tells the others that they have to leave, and daringly ventures outside to get the car. Here, Hitchcock offers one of the most surreal and apocalyptic scenes to appear on film, as a sea of birds move under a cloudy twilight. Mitch quietly enters the garage and turns on the car radio, which reports that bird attacks have occurred further inland, mentioning the town of Santa Rosa, about thirty miles away. He brings the car around front and helps Cathy, Melanie, and Lydia inside, then drives away, parting waves of birds that seem to lie in anticipation of something...

The ending to this movie is purposefully abrupt in order to allow the audience to make their own guesses as to why these birds attacked. One reason could be revenge/uprising. The caged lovebirds brought along throughout the movie serve as a subtle justification to the bird attacks. Could the birds be getting back at mankind for all the abuse, exploiting and hunting they have been through?


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Could the birds be getting back at mankind for all the abuse, exploiting and hunting they have been through?. The screen fades to white for a few seconds (the "white light" of heaven?) and returns to the shot of Malcolm and Anna kissing at their wedding. The caged lovebirds brought along throughout the movie serve as a subtle justification to the bird attacks. He tells Anna that he thinks he can "go now", and that he needed to help someone, and that he thinks he did, and that he needed to tell her that she was never second, and that he loves her. One reason could be revenge/uprising. We flash back to Crowe's murder, and we now see the blood from his exit wound and that it is much more severe than we originally were led to believe. The ending to this movie is purposefully abrupt in order to allow the audience to make their own guesses as to why these birds attacked. Crowe walks about his house, and finally he realizes: he himself is a dead person.

He brings the car around front and helps Cathy, Melanie, and Lydia inside, then drives away, parting waves of birds that seem to lie in anticipation of something... Crowe begins to recall that Cole told him, that dead people "only see what they want to see...they don't know they're dead". Mitch quietly enters the garage and turns on the car radio, which reports that bird attacks have occurred further inland, mentioning the town of Santa Rosa, about thirty miles away. She asks why did he leave her, and he says he didn't leave her, and his wedding ring falls to the ground and rolls away. Here, Hitchcock offers one of the most surreal and apocalyptic scenes to appear on film, as a sea of birds move under a cloudy twilight. He tries to start "Anna", and she says "I miss you". Realizing that she needs to get to a hospital, he tells the others that they have to leave, and daringly ventures outside to get the car. Anna is sleeping on the couch.

Unable to fight, she collapses onto the floor, nearly dying before Mitch comes and rescues her. Crowe returns to his house. Birds attack her from all sides as she gazes at a gigantic hole in the ceiling. He adds that at her grave, she asked a question, and the answer is "Every day" - the question being whether she makes her mother proud. She grabs Mitch's flashlight and carefully examines the rooms, then cautiously treads the stairs, opens a door, and goes inside. But, she sat in the back row, and she saw. Later on, Melanie wakes up with the intuition that something is terribly wrong. They had a fight before the recital and that she thought her mother didn't come to watch her.

The power goes out, and Mitch gets a flashlight from the basement. He tells her that her mother saw her dance at her dance recital when she was younger. Finally, a clamor erupts, and Mitch quickly checks and repairs openings while the rest look on, terrified out of their wits. He adds "Grandma says hi, and she's sorry for taking the bumblebee pendant". In this claustrophobic environment, the four spend hours wondering when the next attack will come. He tells his mother the whole story. Cathy, Melanie, Mitch, and Lydia hole up in their house, boarding up all the windows, doors, and openings, with the exception of a single fireplace that has a fire going around the clock. "A lady, she died...she's standing next to my window".

Melanie comforts Cathy and Mitch brings Annie inside, as the afternoon descends into dusk. He tells his mother that someone got hurt in the accident. Annie lies dead on her porch, while a terrified Cathy uncontrollably sobs. Cole tells his mother that he is "ready to communicate" with her now. Melanie sets out in search of Annie and Cathy. On the way home, Cole and his mother are in a car, but there is a traffic jam. At last, the screeching of the birds comes to an end. Cole also says that "he's not going to see him [Crowe] again", suggesting that his problems and need for Crowe in his life are over.

Finally, Mitch ventures into the storm and brings her back into the pub, where a woman accuses her of being cursed. Cole lets him know that he may be able to talk to his wife when she is asleep. A dying man leans against the booth, slowly collapsing and leaving a streak of blood on the glass, which begins to crack as birds endlessly peck and fly at it. Cole and Crowe talk again. The local fire department soon arrives to fight the fire and end up fighting the birds instead. Cole acts in another school play, as the lead role of King Arthur. From that vantage point, she bears witness to the horrific spectacle as birds rush at her from all angles. Cole is much happier now, and is much more at ease with talking to the dead people, and is on better grounds with his teacher Stanley.

The cries of bystanders are in vain, and a shattering explosion alerts scores of birds, who attack those who rushed out to help the clerk. Melanie runs to assist, but quickly retreats to a phone booth as she is attacked. Her mother was presumably suffering from Munchausen syndrome by proxy. A trail of gasoline makes its way down the road, to where a man is lighting a cigarette. The girl's mother arrives, causing the girl to quickly hide, leaving the tape still recording and showing the girl's mother, mixing some sort of poison into her soup (presumably causing or prolonging the girl's illness). At a pub where a majority of the children have evacuated, Melanie bears witness to the death of a gas clerk across the street after a seagull attacks him. He watches what is recorded on the videotape and shows the whole of the congregation a recording of a puppet play with the girl's dolls. A flock of crows gather in the playground, and when Melanie evacuates the school, they viciously tear at the children, nearly killing one of them. In it is a videotape.

After fleeing the scene in a hysteria, Lydia begs Melanie to keep watch over Cathy during school the next day. Her father opens the box. Lydia drives over to the farmer who sold her the defective chicken feed and discovers a gory corpse with his eyes gouged out. She wanted to tell you something". From then on, things go from bad to worse as bird attacks increase, both in scope and in violence. Cole presents the box to Kyra's father, saying, "It's for you. Terrified guests rush into the house as birds scratch, peck, and bite at them ravenously and without motive. The apparition of the girl returns, and she pushes him a box.

All of a sudden, a bird swoops down and switches Cathy on the ear, and an attack on the party commences. In the house, Cole and Crowe make their way up to the girl Kyra's room, where they find several dolls and many videotapes. As time goes on, however, the sound of bird calls grows louder, and a shadowy cloud appears over the festivities. Cole notices the dead girl's younger sister, mournfully sitting on a swing. A peaceful flock of birds make their way across the clear blue sky as Melanie and Mitch walk along the beach. They arrive at a funeral in the suburbs, where mourners are passing. The next day, Cathy hosts a birthday party. The next day, Cole is on a bus, talking to Crowe about the previous night.

Opening the door, Melanie discovers a dead crow sprawled on the ground. Cole tentatively asks the girl if she has something that she wants to tell him. After dinner, Melanie returns to Annie's house and the two chat about their past, when a thud is heard against the front door. The girl, finished being sick, says "I'm feeling much better now". There, his mother, Lydia (Jessica Tandy), argues with someone over the phone that the chicken feed she bought was defective—her chickens wouldn't eat a bite—only to learn that the vendor's own fowl, who had been given a different brand, had the same problem. Initially frightened, he runs away, but returns. She then returns to Annie's house, rents out a room for the weekend, and heads over to Mitch's house for dinner. Cole then encounters another dead person; this time, a sick girl who is vomiting appears in his cubby.

Cleaning up her wounds, Melanie gives Mitch the alibi that Annie was an old friend of hers and she wanted to pay a visit. So, the following night, Cole is woken by his mother's cries; she is having a nightmare. On the way back, however, a seagull inexplicably swoops down and claws her. Crowe suggests that he tries to help them, in order to make them go away, finishing their last tasks on earth, allowing them to finally move on. Then, she travels out by boat and stealthily enters Mitch's house, placing the present in the living room. Crowe returns to Cole and asks him what he thinks the dead people want, that he believes that the dead people want Cole to help them. When she arrives at the town of Bodega Bay, she seeks out Annie Hayworth (Suzanne Pleshette), the local teacher, in order to learn the name of Mitch's sister, Cathy (Veronica Cartwright). Crowe realises that Cole was telling the truth.

Outside, a flock of pigeons menacingly circle the sky. Crowe listens to the recorded silence from when Crowe had left Vincent alone; he hears the dead people. When Mitch reveals after the incident that he knows her as Melanie Daniels, the daughter of a newspaper magnate, and tells her off for being a spoiled prankster, she decides to pay a visit to his house to get back at him and give his sister the lovebirds that he couldn't obtain. Crowe listens closely and realises a similarity to Cole's description of when he sees the dead people. She pretends to be the shopkeeper, showing him various species of birds, until she accidentally lets out a canary. Crowe returns to analyzing Vincent's session tapes. There, she meets Mitch (Taylor), a lawyer that is looking for two lovebirds for his little sister. Cole knows that Crowe does not believe him.

A young lady (Hedren) visits a bird shop on a Friday afternoon. Believing Cole is severely disturbed and that he cannot help Cole, Crowe tells Cole that he can't be his doctor any more and says that he'll transfer Cole to another doctor.
. Crowe's situation with his wife has reached a culmination. It may be noted that in Du Maurier's story, the birds attack Britain instead of California. When the boy turns away, we see the back of his head has a severe gunshot wound. In the film, various kinds of birds attack Bodega Bay, California, a seaside village. He starts off, but a kid spontaneously appears, who invites Cole to see his father's gun.

This film is notable in that it has no music score per se (other than brief source music); instead a montage of assorted bird calls and sound effects put together by perennial Hitchcock composer Bernard Herrmann provides the "incidental music". His mother gets upset and tells him to go to his room. The screenplay for The Birds was written by Evan Hunter, better known as crime fiction novelist Ed McBain. Cole's mother believes that Cole moves the pendant, but Cole denies it. (Hitchcock also adapted Du Maurier's novel Rebecca into an acclaimed film) about birds mobbing humans. Later, Cole and his mother have a disagreement about his grandmother's bumblebee pendant which has moved its location. The Birds (1963) is a horror film by Alfred Hitchcock, based on a short story by Daphne Du Maurier. Crowe says he sees nothing, but Cole tells him "You ever feel the prickly things on the back of your neck? And the tiny hairs on your arm, when they stand up? That's them.".

He sees three people, hanging from nooses. Cole, after seeing the school play, walks with Crowe, but suddenly he stops in his tracks. Cole runs, frightened, into a little cubby he has constructed in the apartment, filled with religious statues. A woman with cuts on her wrists screams, "No, dinner is not ready!" and "You can't hurt me any more!", "Lenny, you're a terrible husband! Look what you made me do!".

The lights in the kitchen are on. The temperature drops suddenly, and we see a woman walk past. Later that night, Cole awakens, clearly needs to go to the bathroom, and runs to the toilet. His mother is distraught; believing that the bullies hurt Cole, she telephones the mother of one of the bullies and complains.

Cole is taken home by his mother, who finds numerous scratches on his body. Crowe however, believes Cole's mental condition is even more severe than he has earlier thought. Cole decides to tell Crowe his secret:. Crowe attempts to tell a bedtime story, but on Cole's prompting to tell him "why he is sad", he pours his heart out about the victim and his growing distance from his wife and how he met Cole.

Cole is in the hospital after his traumatic experience. He becomes very distraught, screaming and shouting, yet the children and their parents do nothing to help him. Some bullies follow him up the stairs, and decide to stuff him in the small room. But on following it, he hears phrases such as "I swear I will break through this door", "Open this door, I can't breathe in here", coming from a small room at the top of the staircase, with the door clearly open.

A balloon drifts away, and Cole decides to find it. Cole however, is invited to a schoolmate's birthday, to a large house, with many children. They hardly speak to each other, and seem to be going about their lives separately, but in the same house, with a wistful sadness. Crowe and his wife appear to be growing more and more distant.

The enraged teacher thumps his hand on Cole's desk, telling him to "Shut up, you f-f-freak!". On viewing this, one must wonder how Cole knew how to rattle the teacher so much, and how he knew that the schoolhouse was used for hanging people, instead of being a courthouse. In one memorable scene, where his teacher asks a question about the previous nature of the schoolhouse, Cole corrects the teacher (Cole has some insight which is gradually revealed throughout the movie), who initially dismisses Cole, but Cole gradually becomes more insistent, shouting at the end of the scene "STUTTERING STANLEY!" over and over, which clearly distresses the teacher. At school, Cole is an outcast.

Cole tells Crowe, "You're nice, but you can't help me.". They don't have meetings about rainbows", Cole says, about him drawing the picture of a man getting attacked in the neck by another with a screwdriver at school. "I draw people smiling, dogs running, rainbows,.. Concurrently, Crowe tries to aid Cole, but fails.

We initially see Cole and his mother (a single mother), who lead a difficult life (for one, they are of a lower socioeconomic status than Crowe and his wife) with some paranormal occurrences occurring throughout the movie, centered around Cole. Crowe with insight on Vincent's problem. He also picks up a new patient, Cole Sear (played by Haley Joel Osment), a boy whose case gradually begins to provide Dr. While Crowe is researching this old case, he and his wife appear to grow increasingly distant from each other.

Crowe, filled with guilt and puzzled as to how he might have "failed" Vincent, pores over his old notes and audio tapes of sessions conducted when Vincent was a boy. Crowe is shot early on in the film by former patient Vincent Gray (Donnie Wahlberg), who then commits suicide. Bruce Willis stars as a loving but childless husband named Malcolm Crowe, a devoted and award-winning child psychologist. Night Shyamalan, who also wrote the story).

The movie was nominated for several Academy Awards, including Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Haley Joel Osment), Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Toni Collette, who played Osment's mother) and Best Director (M. Night Shyamalan and helped propel him to stardom. It was written and directed by M.
The Sixth Sense (1999) is a film that tells the fictional story of a troubled, isolated boy (played by Haley Joel Osment) and a child psychologist (played by Bruce Willis) who tries to help him.

For the 1970s television series, see The Sixth Sense (TV series)..

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