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The Birds (film)

The Birds (1963) is a horror film by Alfred Hitchcock, based on a short story by Daphne Du Maurier. (Hitchcock also adapted Du Maurier's novel Rebecca into an acclaimed film) about birds mobbing humans.

The screenplay for The Birds was written by Evan Hunter, better known as crime fiction novelist Ed McBain. This film is notable in that it has no music score per se (other than brief source music); instead a montage of assorted bird calls and sound effects put together by perennial Hitchcock composer Bernard Herrmann provides the "incidental music".

In the film, various kinds of birds attack Bodega Bay, California, a seaside village. It may be noted that in Du Maurier's story, the birds attack Britain instead of California.


Synopsis

Spoiler warning: Plot or ending details follow.

A young lady (Hedren) visits a bird shop on a Friday afternoon. There, she meets Mitch (Taylor), a lawyer that is looking for two lovebirds for his little sister. She pretends to be the shopkeeper, showing him various species of birds, until she accidentally lets out a canary. When Mitch reveals after the incident that he knows her as Melanie Daniels, the daughter of a newspaper magnate, and tells her off for being a spoiled prankster, she decides to pay a visit to his house to get back at him and give his sister the lovebirds that he couldn't obtain. Outside, a flock of pigeons menacingly circle the sky.

When she arrives at the town of Bodega Bay, she seeks out Annie Hayworth (Suzanne Pleshette), the local teacher, in order to learn the name of Mitch's sister, Cathy (Veronica Cartwright). Then, she travels out by boat and stealthily enters Mitch's house, placing the present in the living room. On the way back, however, a seagull inexplicably swoops down and claws her.

Cleaning up her wounds, Melanie gives Mitch the alibi that Annie was an old friend of hers and she wanted to pay a visit. She then returns to Annie's house, rents out a room for the weekend, and heads over to Mitch's house for dinner. There, his mother, Lydia (Jessica Tandy), argues with someone over the phone that the chicken feed she bought was defective—her chickens wouldn't eat a bite—only to learn that the vendor's own fowl, who had been given a different brand, had the same problem. After dinner, Melanie returns to Annie's house and the two chat about their past, when a thud is heard against the front door. Opening the door, Melanie discovers a dead crow sprawled on the ground.

The next day, Cathy hosts a birthday party. A peaceful flock of birds make their way across the clear blue sky as Melanie and Mitch walk along the beach. As time goes on, however, the sound of bird calls grows louder, and a shadowy cloud appears over the festivities. All of a sudden, a bird swoops down and switches Cathy on the ear, and an attack on the party commences. Terrified guests rush into the house as birds scratch, peck, and bite at them ravenously and without motive.

From then on, things go from bad to worse as bird attacks increase, both in scope and in violence. Lydia drives over to the farmer who sold her the defective chicken feed and discovers a gory corpse with his eyes gouged out. After fleeing the scene in a hysteria, Lydia begs Melanie to keep watch over Cathy during school the next day. A flock of crows gather in the playground, and when Melanie evacuates the school, they viciously tear at the children, nearly killing one of them.

At a pub where a majority of the children have evacuated, Melanie bears witness to the death of a gas clerk across the street after a seagull attacks him. A trail of gasoline makes its way down the road, to where a man is lighting a cigarette. The cries of bystanders are in vain, and a shattering explosion alerts scores of birds, who attack those who rushed out to help the clerk. Melanie runs to assist, but quickly retreats to a phone booth as she is attacked. From that vantage point, she bears witness to the horrific spectacle as birds rush at her from all angles. The local fire department soon arrives to fight the fire and end up fighting the birds instead. A dying man leans against the booth, slowly collapsing and leaving a streak of blood on the glass, which begins to crack as birds endlessly peck and fly at it. Finally, Mitch ventures into the storm and brings her back into the pub, where a woman accuses her of being cursed.

At last, the screeching of the birds comes to an end. Melanie sets out in search of Annie and Cathy. Annie lies dead on her porch, while a terrified Cathy uncontrollably sobs. Melanie comforts Cathy and Mitch brings Annie inside, as the afternoon descends into dusk.

Cathy, Melanie, Mitch, and Lydia hole up in their house, boarding up all the windows, doors, and openings, with the exception of a single fireplace that has a fire going around the clock. In this claustrophobic environment, the four spend hours wondering when the next attack will come. Finally, a clamor erupts, and Mitch quickly checks and repairs openings while the rest look on, terrified out of their wits. The power goes out, and Mitch gets a flashlight from the basement.

Later on, Melanie wakes up with the intuition that something is terribly wrong. She grabs Mitch's flashlight and carefully examines the rooms, then cautiously treads the stairs, opens a door, and goes inside. Birds attack her from all sides as she gazes at a gigantic hole in the ceiling. Unable to fight, she collapses onto the floor, nearly dying before Mitch comes and rescues her. Realizing that she needs to get to a hospital, he tells the others that they have to leave, and daringly ventures outside to get the car. Here, Hitchcock offers one of the most surreal and apocalyptic scenes to appear on film, as a sea of birds move under a cloudy twilight. Mitch quietly enters the garage and turns on the car radio, which reports that bird attacks have occurred further inland, mentioning the town of Santa Rosa, about thirty miles away. He brings the car around front and helps Cathy, Melanie, and Lydia inside, then drives away, parting waves of birds that seem to lie in anticipation of something...

The ending to this movie is purposefully abrupt in order to allow the audience to make their own guesses as to why these birds attacked. One reason could be revenge/uprising. The caged lovebirds brought along throughout the movie serve as a subtle justification to the bird attacks. Could the birds be getting back at mankind for all the abuse, exploiting and hunting they have been through?


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Could the birds be getting back at mankind for all the abuse, exploiting and hunting they have been through?. It differs from most films released since the late 1980s in that it took fifteen weeks for its weekly gross to drop by 50%. Typically films drop by about 40% a week. The caged lovebirds brought along throughout the movie serve as a subtle justification to the bird attacks. Similar figures for the global box office are not readily available, but the international box office grew in significance for Hollywood movies in the 20 years between Star Wars and Titanic, and it is at least plausible that its worldwide gross of $1.8 billion is the largest all time even if inflation were accounted for. One reason could be revenge/uprising. domestic gross is actually the sixth highest of all time, immediately behind The Ten Commandments (The Movie Times (http://www.the-movie-times.com/thrsdir/alltime.mv?adjusted+ByAG)). The ending to this movie is purposefully abrupt in order to allow the audience to make their own guesses as to why these birds attacked. When corrected for inflation, the U.S.

He brings the car around front and helps Cathy, Melanie, and Lydia inside, then drives away, parting waves of birds that seem to lie in anticipation of something... It also received the following nominations:. Mitch quietly enters the garage and turns on the car radio, which reports that bird attacks have occurred further inland, mentioning the town of Santa Rosa, about thirty miles away. It was at the time also the only movie of which both two people playing the same person (Kate Winslet and Gloria Stuart as Rose and Old Rose) were nominated (remarkably, the second film to be so nominated, Iris, also starred Winslet):. Here, Hitchcock offers one of the most surreal and apocalyptic scenes to appear on film, as a sea of birds move under a cloudy twilight. Titanic was nominated in 14 categories and won 11, being the second movie to win that number (the first was Ben-Hur). Realizing that she needs to get to a hospital, he tells the others that they have to leave, and daringly ventures outside to get the car. Titanic won Oscars in just about every category except for the acting and screenplay categories.

Unable to fight, she collapses onto the floor, nearly dying before Mitch comes and rescues her. The song was also a hit worldwide, going to the top of the pop charts around the world, another stellar financial success of its own. Birds attack her from all sides as she gazes at a gigantic hole in the ceiling. Cameron changed his mind when Horner presented what he proposed and the song won a Best Original Song Oscar. She grabs Mitch's flashlight and carefully examines the rooms, then cautiously treads the stairs, opens a door, and goes inside. At first, Cameron did not want a song sung over the film's credits, but Horner disagreed, and without telling Cameron, went ahead and wrote one anyway, and recorded Dion singing it. Later on, Melanie wakes up with the intuition that something is terribly wrong. CÚline Dion, who was no stranger to movie songs in the 1990s, sang "My Heart Will Go On", the film's signature song written by James Horner and Will Jennings.

The power goes out, and Mitch gets a flashlight from the basement. Horner composed the soundtrack having in mind Enya's style. Finally, a clamor erupts, and Mitch quickly checks and repairs openings while the rest look on, terrified out of their wits. Their relations were cold after their first cooperation in Aliens, but the soundtrack of Braveheart made Cameron overlook it. In this claustrophobic environment, the four spend hours wondering when the next attack will come. Cameron originally intended Enya to compose the music, but after she declined, he approached James Horner. Cathy, Melanie, Mitch, and Lydia hole up in their house, boarding up all the windows, doors, and openings, with the exception of a single fireplace that has a fire going around the clock. It is true that lower percentage of third class passengers survived, but that could be simply because they had farther to go to get to the lifeboats.

Melanie comforts Cathy and Mitch brings Annie inside, as the afternoon descends into dusk. There is controversy on this point. Annie lies dead on her porch, while a terrified Cathy uncontrollably sobs. Another aspect of the film, the way in which the third–class passengers were completely fenced in below decks, has been described as a myth. Melanie sets out in search of Annie and Cathy. In the film he is portrayed as taking a bribe, shooting passengers dead and finally shooting himself. 20th Century Fox admitted that the baseless slurs on his character were included only as story decisions, and contributed $8,000 to the prize fund. At last, the screeching of the birds comes to an end. In his home town of Dalbeattie in Scotland there is a memorial to his heroism and a charitable prize has been established in his name.

Finally, Mitch ventures into the storm and brings her back into the pub, where a woman accuses her of being cursed. The film was criticised for its portrayal of a historical character, the ship's First Officer, William McMaster Murdoch [1] (http://www.titanic-titanic.com/titanic%20memorial%20william%20murdoch.shtml) [2] (http://www.greenspun.com/bboard/q-and-a-fetch-msg.tcl?msg_id=00045O). A dying man leans against the booth, slowly collapsing and leaving a streak of blood on the glass, which begins to crack as birds endlessly peck and fly at it. The film was made in 1958 and at that point it was believed that the ship sank as a whole, and the film's sinking is depicted thus. The local fire department soon arrives to fight the fire and end up fighting the birds instead. The 1958 William MacQuitty and Roy Ward Baker film A Night to Remember starring Kenneth More as Second Officer Charles Lightoller is considered by some to be a more historically accurate film, praised for its documentary-style quality. From that vantage point, she bears witness to the horrific spectacle as birds rush at her from all angles. Some contend that the film ended up with anti-British elements, portraying the British officers and crew as unethical and the Americans as heroic.

The cries of bystanders are in vain, and a shattering explosion alerts scores of birds, who attack those who rushed out to help the clerk. Melanie runs to assist, but quickly retreats to a phone booth as she is attacked. The "romantic" story is improbable as class distinction at the time meant complete class segregation except during the Sunday morning service in the first class dining saloon (which conversely is shown in the film as segregated). A trail of gasoline makes its way down the road, to where a man is lighting a cigarette. There are some factual inaccuracies in the script: for example, the designer, Thomas Andrews, claims the ship to be built of iron in the film whereas she was actually built of steel. At a pub where a majority of the children have evacuated, Melanie bears witness to the death of a gas clerk across the street after a seagull attacks him. They kiss as the crowd applauds at the couple, now together forever. A flock of crows gather in the playground, and when Melanie evacuates the school, they viciously tear at the children, nearly killing one of them. At the top of the staircase, Jack turns and smiles at Rose, a young girl of 17 again, smiling back as he helps her up the last few steps.

After fleeing the scene in a hysteria, Lydia begs Melanie to keep watch over Cathy during school the next day. A young gentleman opens the doors to the Grand Staircase, where we find all those who died on the ship all those years ago smile in greeting. Lydia drives over to the farmer who sold her the defective chicken feed and discovers a gory corpse with his eyes gouged out. We follow the corridors to the dining room. From then on, things go from bad to worse as bird attacks increase, both in scope and in violence. Underwater, the Titanic looms out of the darkness and everything turns new again. Terrified guests rush into the house as birds scratch, peck, and bite at them ravenously and without motive. She lies still in her bed, possibly asleep, but more likely something else.

All of a sudden, a bird swoops down and switches Cathy on the ear, and an attack on the party commences. Back in Rose's room we see pictures of her life's achievements, including a photograph of her riding a horse at the Santa Monica Pier, just as she and Jack had planned to do together. As time goes on, however, the sound of bird calls grows louder, and a shadowy cloud appears over the festivities. As an old woman in 1996, Rose now goes onto the deck of the salvage ship and throws the Heart of the Ocean into the ocean where Jack died. A peaceful flock of birds make their way across the clear blue sky as Melanie and Mitch walk along the beach. Upon arrival at New York, Rose discovers she still has the Heart of the Ocean tucked into the pocket of Caledon's coat. The next day, Cathy hosts a birthday party. She bids him goodbye, then manages to get the lifeboat's attention to come back and rescue her. The survivors in the lifeboats wait for hours until the RMS Carpathia, the closest ship to answer and heed the Titanic's radio distress signals, arrives to save them.

Opening the door, Melanie discovers a dead crow sprawled on the ground. Rose is heartbroken to realize that Jack has succumbed, as well. After dinner, Melanie returns to Annie's house and the two chat about their past, when a thud is heard against the front door. By the time one of the officers decides to row back and help those in need, almost all of the passengers have died of hypothermia in the freezing Atlantic. There, his mother, Lydia (Jessica Tandy), argues with someone over the phone that the chicken feed she bought was defective—her chickens wouldn't eat a bite—only to learn that the vendor's own fowl, who had been given a different brand, had the same problem. Rose and Jack stick together and wait with the hundreds of other passengers thrashing helplessly in the water, shouting desperately for those in lifeboats to row back and rescue them. She then returns to Annie's house, rents out a room for the weekend, and heads over to Mitch's house for dinner. The bow of the ship sinks deeper and deeper until the pressure on the hull causes the ship to split completely in half, before the two halves finally go under at 2:20 AM on April 15.

Cleaning up her wounds, Melanie gives Mitch the alibi that Annie was an old friend of hers and she wanted to pay a visit. They finally make their way to the top deck, but the lifeboats are gone and they, along with hundreds of terrified passengers, have no choice but to try to stay on the ship for as long as possible before the titan sinks completely into the water. On the way back, however, a seagull inexplicably swoops down and claws her. They find many obstacles, including locked gates that are used to keep the third-class passengers from reaching the upper decks to safety, as well as Caledon's violent temper that forces them back to the lower decks. Then, she travels out by boat and stealthily enters Mitch's house, placing the present in the living room. She frees Jack and they try desperately to make their way back above decks to escape the rapidly sinking ship. When she arrives at the town of Bodega Bay, she seeks out Annie Hayworth (Suzanne Pleshette), the local teacher, in order to learn the name of Mitch's sister, Cathy (Veronica Cartwright). Even though she has the chance to escape the sinking ship early on with her mother, Rose runs away from Caledon -- and her chance at getting into a lifeboat -- to find Jack.

Outside, a flock of pigeons menacingly circle the sky. Caledon discovers the relationship between Jack and Rose and gets even by framing Jack for stealing his diamond. When Mitch reveals after the incident that he knows her as Melanie Daniels, the daughter of a newspaper magnate, and tells her off for being a spoiled prankster, she decides to pay a visit to his house to get back at him and give his sister the lovebirds that he couldn't obtain. Despite the many efforts of the crew and engineers, the ship strikes the massive berg, flooding the lower compartments past their "unsinkable" capacity and causing the ship to begin its unstoppable descent to disaster. She pretends to be the shopkeeper, showing him various species of birds, until she accidentally lets out a canary. On the night of April 14, 1912, the two lookouts see an iceberg directly in the Titanic's path. There, she meets Mitch (Taylor), a lawyer that is looking for two lovebirds for his little sister. Bruce Ismay even as the ship heads into the night.

A young lady (Hedren) visits a bird shop on a Friday afternoon. Smith and his crew have been seemingly ignoring many warnings about upcoming ice fields in the ship's path, and the Titanic maintains the high speed suggested by White Star Line managing director J.
. In the meantime, Captain Edward J. It may be noted that in Du Maurier's story, the birds attack Britain instead of California. They later consummate their relationship in the backseat of a car in one of the ship's cargo holds. In the film, various kinds of birds attack Bodega Bay, California, a seaside village. Rose asks Jack to sketch her wearing nothing but the Heart of the Ocean diamond, the same portrait the treasure hunters will find 84 years later.

This film is notable in that it has no music score per se (other than brief source music); instead a montage of assorted bird calls and sound effects put together by perennial Hitchcock composer Bernard Herrmann provides the "incidental music". But eventually she decides to throw caution to the wind and offer her heart to Jack. The screenplay for The Birds was written by Evan Hunter, better known as crime fiction novelist Ed McBain. Jack is clearly falling in love with Rose, but Rose is inclined to ignore their growing affection due to her engagement and their different social standings. (Hitchcock also adapted Du Maurier's novel Rebecca into an acclaimed film) about birds mobbing humans. Their bond deepens when they later ditch the first-class formal dinner party for a much livelier gathering belowdecks in third-class. The Birds (1963) is a horror film by Alfred Hitchcock, based on a short story by Daphne Du Maurier. In the meantime, Rose and Jack soon strike up a tentative friendship as he shares tales of his adventures in traveling and she expresses her own hopes, and he shows her his sketchbook of artwork.

Rose's company finds the two and Caledon reluctantly invites Jack to dine with their party the following evening in the first-class dining saloon as a thank you. Jack sees her and intervenes to prevent her suicide. Rose is so unhappy about her forced engagement, as well as her endlessly shallow life, that she attempts to kill herself by jumping off the back of the ship. Meanwhile, a drifter and artist named Jack Dawson wins third-class tickets to the ship in a poker game.

Rose clearly does not feel very much for Caledon, but her mother pushes for the marriage for financial security, to maintain their current lavish lifestyle and bolster their social cachet among Philadelphia elite. Rose, just 17 years old in April of 1912, boards the ship with the upper-class passengers with her mother and her fiance, Caledon Hockley. The woman in the picture is me." Rose, accompanied by her granddaughter, flies out to the recovery site and proceeds to tell the treasure hunters of her experiences on the Titanic. She phones the treasure hunter Brock Lovett and informs him that she knows of the diamond, the Heart of the Ocean, and also the identity of the beautiful young girl in the portrait: "Oh yes.

Rose DeWitt Bukater, an ancient but still lively woman of 101 years, watches a CNN report of the treasure hunt and sees the nude portrait. On a necklace around her neck is the diamond they seek: The Heart of the Ocean. It shows a beautiful young girl reclining with casual modesty on a couch. One of them is a nude pencil portrait dated April 14, 1912, and signed "JD".

It contains, not the fabled treasure the adventurers had hoped for, but only papers. A safe is brought to the surface and is opened. It is 1996, and a treasure hunter and his team explore the wreck of the RMS Titanic in their submersible.
.

Cameron, who fought tooth and nail to finish the film, was rewarded with an Academy Award for Best Director. It held a virtual lock on first place at the box office for nearly four months and would become the highest grossing film of all-time with more than $1.8 billion in ticket sales worldwide. By New Year's Day, the film had hit $100 million and showed no sign of slowing down. Moved to a crowded release date of December 19, 1997, the film opened with little promotion, but brought in a weak $28 million in ticket sales for the weekend. Within a week the gross tripled.

But Cameron stood his ground and threatened edit-happy studio executives with the message: "You will cut my film over my dead body.". When director James Cameron finally delivered the film to Paramount, it ran over 3 hours and it was anyone's guess whether he would ever work in Hollywood again. By the middle of 1997 Titanic had become the most costly film ever made (its reported cost hovered in the $200 million range) and the bills were still coming in. rights) panicked.

The two releasing studios, 20th Century Fox (which handled the international distribution and actually had movie rights to the Titanic name) and Paramount Pictures (which had the U.S. When this epic disaster film was not finished in time for its scheduled July 1997 release date, it sent shockwaves throughout Hollywood: studio execs began wondering if they might have another Heaven's Gate on their hands. The film was directed by James Cameron and starred Leonardo DiCaprio, Kate Winslet, Billy Zane, Frances Fisher, Kathy Bates, Eric Braeden, David Warner, Danny Nucci, Gloria Stuart, Victor Garber, Bernard Hill, Jonathan Hyde, Bernard Fox, Ioan Gruffudd, Suzy Amis and Bill Paxton. The 1997 film should not be confused with the Titanic movie made in 1953.

As of 2005, Titanic has the highest box office take in movie history. The movie won 11 Academy Awards on March 23, 1998 including best picture of 1997. The bulk of the plot is set aboard the ill-fated RMS Titanic during her fateful maiden voyage in 1912. Titanic is a 1997 dramatic movie released by Paramount Pictures and 20th Century Fox.

Best Makeup — Tina Earnshaw, Greg Cannom, Simon Thompson. Best Actress in a Supporting Role — Gloria Stuart. Best Actress in a Leading Role — Kate Winslet. Fisher, Michael Kanfer.

Visual Effects — Robert Legato, Mark Lasoff, Thomas L. Sound Effects Editing — Tom Bellfort, Christopher Boyes. Sound — Gary Rydstrom, Tom Johnson, Gary Summers, Mark Ulano. Best Picture — James Cameron and Jon Landau, Producers.

Music (Original Song) — "My Heart Will Go On," music by James Horner; lyric by Will Jennings. Music (Original Dramatic Score) — James Horner. Harris. Film Editing — Conrad Buff, James Cameron, Richard A.

Direction — James Cameron. Scott. Costume Design — Deborah L. Cinematography — Russell Carpenter.

Art direction — Art Direction: Peter Lamont; Set Decoration: Michael Ford.

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