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Sirius Satellite Radio

Sirius Satellite Radio NASDAQ: SIRI is a satellite radio (DARS) service in the United States that provides 68 streams (channels) of music and 55 streams of sports, news and entertainment. Music streams on Sirius carry a wide variety of music genres, broadcasting 24 hours a day, commercial free. With any Sirius-enabled radio, the user can see the artist and song information on display while listening to the stream. The streams are broadcast from three satellites in an elliptical geosynchronous orbit above North America. A subset of Sirius’ music channels are included as part of the DISH Network satellite television service. Sirius channels are identified by Arbitron with the label “XS” (e.g. “XS120”, “XS9”, “XS17”).

Sirius is based in New York City. Its business model is to provide pay-for-service radio, music channels being free of commercials, analogous to the business model for premium cable television. Subscription costs for Sirius range from $12.95/mo. to $499.99 for a lifetime subscription (of the receiver, not the subscriber). A $10 activation fee ($15 if activated by phone) is also required. Sirius currently lags behind competitor XM Satellite Radio in terms of subscribers with 3.3 million, well less than XM's current audience of more than 6 million subscribers (as of January 9, 2006). However, Sirius led the market in new satellite radio subscribers in 2005.

Sirius was previously known as CD Radio. The dog in the Sirius logo (Sirius is referred to as the "Dog Star") is unofficially named “Mongo,” a name garnered from the debut of Sirius Satellite Radio’s sponsorship on Casey Atwood’s and later Jimmy Spencer’s NASCAR entry, when the announcing cast voted on names. “Mongo” later became NASCAR driver Spencer’s nickname with the NASCAR Broadcasters in the following races.

Content

Howard Stern and other high profile content

Howard Stern Show.

A major component of Sirius’ business strategy has been to execute far-reaching and exclusive deals with big-name entertainers and personalities to create and build broadcast streams, from the ground up. Sirius has reached extensive deals with domestic diva Martha Stewart, E Street Band member Steven Van Zandt (aka Little Steven), Jimmy Buffett, and Eminem to executive produce streams on Sirius.

By far the biggest of these deals was announced on October 6, 2004 when Sirius announced that it signed a five-year, $500-million agreement with Howard Stern to move his radio show to Sirius starting on January 9, 2006. The deal, which gave Sirius exclusive rights to Stern’s radio show, also gave Stern the right to build at least two full-time programming channels. Stern stated that his move was forced by the stringent regulations of the FCC whose enforcement was intensified following the Super Bowl XXXVIII Halftime Show. Beginning with the announcement of his imminent departure, Stern began to complain of one of his employers, Infinity Broadcasting, as trying to impede the success of his departure.

In Howard Stern's first major hire for Sirius, Stern brought on board Tampa, FL based Bubba the Love Sponge, fired by Clear Channel due to a $750,000 fine proposed by the FCC Reuters, to do a show on Sirius.

In addition to the channel-programming deals, Sirius has also programmed a number of more conventional shows with well known personalities in a number of fields. These shows are hosted by personalities including skateboard legend Tony Hawk, seven-time Tour de France champion Lance Armstrong, The B-52's lead singer Fred Schneider, NBA Hall of Famer Bill Walton and longtime New York City DJ “Cousin Brucie”, who was dropped by WCBS-FM after the station changed to its format from an oldies station to a “Jack” format. Generally the personalities act as DJs hosting shows with music they personally like.

On November 18, 2004 the former COO and President of Viacom, Mel Karmazin, was named the CEO of Sirius. Stern worked under Karmazin at Infinity Radio and the two men have always had a great deal of mutual respect for each other. It was Karmazin who fiercely protected Stern in the wake of the Super Bowl XXXVIII Halftime Show (produced by MTV and aired by CBS, both co-owned with Infinity) and the FCC crackdown on shock jocks and obscenity, in general.

On October 25, 2005 Sirius announced that "E Street Radio", the exclusive channel of legendary artist Bruce Springsteen, would air from November 1, 2005 to January 31, 2006 on the Bridge - Channel 10.

Sports

NFL Radio.

Another cornerstone of Sirius’ business strategy has been to pursue exclusive sports content. Currently, Sirius has exclusive satellite radio broadcasting rights to all NFL and NBA games. Sirius also announced in December 2005 a multi-year deal with the NBA, which makes the satellite radio company the broadcaster of more live NBA games than any other radio outlet. The agreement also creates a 24-hour NBA Radio Channel, located on channel 127. NHL games will be shared with XM for the 2005–2006 season, after which XM will have exclusive broadcast rights. Starting in 2007, Sirius will have full NASCAR coverage.

Sirius also has rights to a number of major college sports conferences, including the Big Ten and the Southeastern Conference as well as schools like Notre Dame. Beginning in 2005 Sirius also has exclusive radio rights to cover the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament. In August 2004, Sirius launched NFL Radio, a 24-hour radio stream dedicated exclusively to covering the NFL. Sirius has also been aggressive in creating its own in-house produced studio sports radio content.

Other content

In June 2005, Sirius signed an agreement with BBC Radio 1 in the UK to rebroadcast the station to an American audience. Sirius also has exclusive satellite radio rights to National Public Radio, carrying two separate streams. The deal with NPR was the first high-profile deal entered into by Sirius.

With the launch of Sirius Canada in December 2005, American listeners gained five Canadian-produced stations including CBC Radio One, CBC Radio Three and Iceberg Radio in English, and Première Plus and Bandeapart in French. Iceberg Radio is programmed by Standard Broadcasting, which also provides a number of additional channels exclusive to Canada; the other four come from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

Sirius' Satellites

Sirius’ spacecraft Radiosat 1 through Radiosat 4 were manufactured by Space Systems/Loral. The first three of the series were orbited in 2000 by Proton-K Block-DM3 launch vehicles. Radiosat 4 is a ground spare, in storage at SS/Loral’s facility in Palo Alto, California. The series of satellites from which they come, the SS/Loral LS-1300, is known to have problems with their solar array cells — a similar but more severe issue affects the Boeing satellites belonging to competitor XM Radio.

Sirius Satellite in space, concept drawing.

Sirius' satellites are called Radiosat (instead of after the company name), due to there already being a previous fleet of satellites launched also named SIRIUS, launched by Sweden's NSAB (Nordiska Satellitaktiebolaget, or Nordic Satellite AB) and used for general telecommunications and satellite tv throughout Sweden and the rest of Scandinavia.

The Sirius uplink facility is located in Vernon, Sussex County, New Jersey.

Sirius does not use Geostationary satellites. Instead, its three SS/L-1300 satellites fly in geosynchronous (24-hour orbital period) inclined elliptical orbits. Sirius says the elliptical path of its satellite constellation ensures that each satellite spends about 16 hours a day over the continental United States, with at least one satellite over the country at all times. Sirius completed its three-satellite constellation on November 30, 2000. A fourth satellite will remain on the ground, ready to be launched if any of the three active satellites encounter transmission problems.

The Sirius system is similar to that of its competitor. Programs are beamed to one of the three Sirius satellites, which then transmit the signal to the ground, where your radio receiver picks up one of the channels within the signal. Signals are also beamed to ground repeaters for listeners in urban areas where the satellite signal can be interrupted.

Sirius offers car radios and home entertainment systems, as well as car and home kits for portable use. The Sirius receiver includes two parts -- the antenna module and the receiver module. The antenna module picks up signals from the ground repeaters or the satellite, amplifies the signal and filters out any interference. The signal is then passed on to the receiver module. Inside the receiver module is a chipset consisting of eight chips. The chipset converts the signals from 2.3 gigahertz (GHz) to a lower intermediate frequency. Sirius also offers an adapter that allows conventional car radios to receive satellite signals.

Receivers

SIRIUS Sportster Boombox

As of 2005, Sirius receivers are available for various new Audi, BMW, Chrysler, Dodge, Ford, Infiniti, Jaguar, Jeep, Land Rover, Lexus, Lincoln, Mazda, Mercedes-Benz, Mercury, Mini, Nissan, Scion, Toyota, Porsche, Volkswagen, and Volvo vehicles, and the service plans on adding availability for portable use. Starting in 2006, all Rolls-Royce vehicles sold in the United States will come with a Sirius radio and lifetime subscription as standard equipment.

They also make many receivers for aftermarket installs as well, including the Sportster Replay, Starmate Replay, Sirius S50 with built in 1GB MP3 player, and the Sirius One. Sirius' hardware lineup is available at Sirius.com

Some popular radios from Sirius:

  • SIRIUS S50
  • SIRIUS Sportster Exec. Docking Station Package
  • SIRIUS Sportster Radio with Boombox Package
  • Tivoli's SIRIUS Table Radio
  • Kenwood H2EV Radio with Car and Home Kits
  • Clarion Calypso SIRIUS Radio with Car Kit
  • XACT XTR1 Radio with Car Kit

Radio stations

  • List of Sirius Satellite Radio stations
  • Official Sirius Satellite Radio Stations List, Adobe Acrobat Reader Required
  • Black and white lineup from SiriusBackstage.com, Adobe Acrobat Reader Required

Sirius in Canada

In November, 2004, a partnership between Sirius, Standard Broadcasting and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation filed an application with the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission to introduce Sirius in Canada. The application was approved on June 16, 2005. The decision was appealed to the Canadian federal cabinet by a number of broadcasting, labour, and arts and culture organizations, including the Friends of Canadian Broadcasting, CHUM Limited, and the National Campus and Community Radio Association. The groups objected to Sirius’ approach to and reduced levels of Canadian content and French language programming, along with the exclusion of Canadian non-commercial broadcasting. After a lengthy debate, cabinet rejected the appeals on September 9, 2005.

Sirius Canada was officially launched December 1, 2005.

Sirius Canada did not initially carry Howard Stern. Despite popular belief that Stern's broadcast was banned by the CRTC, this is not the case — Sirius Canada, in fact, voluntarily chose not to air the program at the time of its launch in Canada. A significant number of Canadians have purchased grey market subscriptions to Sirius' American service to listen to Stern, although owing to the nature of grey market economics a precise number is difficult to verify. Howard 100 News has stated on air that they estimate at least 60,000 grey market satellite subscriptions in Canada; in December, the Canadian newspaper The Globe and Mail reported that business analysts in Canada estimate a total of 60,000 grey market subscribers to both Sirius and XM combined. [1] (It should be noted that this figure also includes an unverified number of listeners who subscribed before the Canadian satellite radio services launched at all — the analysts' figures did not offer any estimate of how many Canadians chose a grey market subscription over Sirius Canada specifically because of Stern.)

On January 11, 2006, a Canadian writer interviewed on Stern's show announced an online petition to bring Stern to Sirius Canada.

On February 1, 2006, The Globe and Mail reported the announcement that Stern's show on Howard 100 would become available in Canada as of February 6, 2006. [2]

Sirius had previously disabled the Howard Stern channels on radios with a Canadian ESN number, even if they are subscribed to American content from an American address. Most of these radios have a 'C' suffix in the model name. For example, the Sirius ONE radio is model "SV1" in the United States, but "SV1C" in Canada. However, Sirius cannot stop grey market receivers from picking up the American programming. The blocking of the Howard Stern channels is anticipated to change once the announced return of Stern to Canada takes place.


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The blocking of the Howard Stern channels is anticipated to change once the announced return of Stern to Canada takes place. The interior design bears a likeness to the stores, furnished with dark wood and concrete floors, leather couches, and comfortably-worn rugs. However, Sirius cannot stop grey market receivers from picking up the American programming. The campus includes a mess hall, fire pits, trails, a recreational center, and an Abercrombie & Fitch store, where marketing and design elements are developed. For example, the Sirius ONE radio is model "SV1" in the United States, but "SV1C" in Canada. Set amid acres of forest, the compound features rustic, farm-styled structures with elements of modern architecture, a reflection of the company's outdoorsy roots. Most of these radios have a 'C' suffix in the model name. In 2003, the company expanded its New Albany, Ohio headquarters (a suburb of Columbus)[1].

Sirius had previously disabled the Howard Stern channels on radios with a Canadian ESN number, even if they are subscribed to American content from an American address. The company will also begin expanding the brands internationally, expanding to Europe by 2006 and Japan by 2007. [2]. and RUEHL concepts to act as its primary growth vehicles in the U.S. On February 1, 2006, The Globe and Mail reported the announcement that Stern's show on Howard 100 would become available in Canada as of February 6, 2006. As the Abercrombie & Fitch brand reaches its full growth potential in the U.S., the company is depending on the Hollister Co. On January 11, 2006, a Canadian writer interviewed on Stern's show announced an online petition to bring Stern to Sirius Canada. The company has expressed interest in developing a fifth concept, though there are no confirmed plans to introduce another brand to the market in the near future.

[1] (It should be noted that this figure also includes an unverified number of listeners who subscribed before the Canadian satellite radio services launched at all — the analysts' figures did not offer any estimate of how many Canadians chose a grey market subscription over Sirius Canada specifically because of Stern.). Abercrombie & Fitch operates three additional concept stores: abercrombie (Abercrombie Kids), a smaller version of the original chain which aims to attract patrons ages 7-14; Hollister Co., which sells California-inspired apparel to attract patrons 14-18; and RUEHL, which sells business casual and leather goods to target ages 22-30. Howard 100 News has stated on air that they estimate at least 60,000 grey market satellite subscriptions in Canada; in December, the Canadian newspaper The Globe and Mail reported that business analysts in Canada estimate a total of 60,000 grey market subscribers to both Sirius and XM combined. As part of the settlement terms, A&F agreed to pay $40 million to rejected applicants and affected employees, institute policies and programs that promote diversity in its workforce and advertising campaigns, appoint a Vice President of Diversity, hire 25 recruiters to seek minority employees, and discontinue the practice of recruiting employees at primarily white fraternities and sororities. A significant number of Canadians have purchased grey market subscriptions to Sirius' American service to listen to Stern, although owing to the nature of grey market economics a precise number is difficult to verify. The company agreed to an out of court settlement of the class action suit. Despite popular belief that Stern's broadcast was banned by the CRTC, this is not the case — Sirius Canada, in fact, voluntarily chose not to air the program at the time of its launch in Canada. Abercrombie & Fitch — accused the company of discriminating against minority employees by offering desirable positions to white employees.

Sirius Canada did not initially carry Howard Stern. A 2004 lawsuit — Gonzales v. Sirius Canada was officially launched December 1, 2005. For several years, Abercrombie & Fitch has faced accusations of discrimination against minority employees. After a lengthy debate, cabinet rejected the appeals on September 9, 2005. In November 2005, the Women & Girls Foundation of Southwest Pennsylvania launched a "girl-cott" of the store for selling T-shirts bearing phrases like "Who needs a brain when you have these?" The campaign went national on NBC's Today Show, and the company pulled the shirts from stores on November 5, 2005. The groups objected to Sirius’ approach to and reduced levels of Canadian content and French language programming, along with the exclusion of Canadian non-commercial broadcasting. The company stopped selling the shirt in October of 2004 after USA Gymnastics president Bob Colarossi announced a boycott of Abercrombie & Fitch for mocking the sport.

The decision was appealed to the Canadian federal cabinet by a number of broadcasting, labour, and arts and culture organizations, including the Friends of Canadian Broadcasting, CHUM Limited, and the National Campus and Community Radio Association. The second incident involved another t-shirt with the phrase "L is for Loser" written next to a picture of a male gymnast on the rings. The application was approved on June 16, 2005. West Virginia governor Bob Wise spoke out against the company for depicting "an unfounded, negative stereotype of West Virginia," but the shirts were not removed. In November, 2004, a partnership between Sirius, Standard Broadcasting and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation filed an application with the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission to introduce Sirius in Canada. The first incident involved a shirt featuring the phrase, "It's All Relative in West Virginia," an apparent jab at incest relations in the rural South. Some popular radios from Sirius:. More T-shirt controversy occurred twice in 2004.

Sirius' hardware lineup is available at Sirius.com. The underwear included phrases like "Eye Candy" and "Wink Wink" printed on the front. They also make many receivers for aftermarket installs as well, including the Sportster Replay, Starmate Replay, Sirius S50 with built in 1GB MP3 player, and the Sirius One. That same year, the children's clothing division removed a line of thong underwear sold for girls in pre-teen children's sizes after parents mounted nationwide storefront protests. Starting in 2006, all Rolls-Royce vehicles sold in the United States will come with a Sirius radio and lifetime subscription as standard equipment. The company discontinued the designs and apologized after a boycott by Asian-American student groups. As of 2005, Sirius receivers are available for various new Audi, BMW, Chrysler, Dodge, Ford, Infiniti, Jaguar, Jeep, Land Rover, Lexus, Lincoln, Mazda, Mercedes-Benz, Mercury, Mini, Nissan, Scion, Toyota, Porsche, Volkswagen, and Volvo vehicles, and the service plans on adding availability for portable use. One shirt featured the slogan "Wong Brothers Laundry Service—Two Wongs Can Make It White" with smiling figures in conical hats, a 1900s popular-culture depiction of Chinese immigrants.

Sirius also offers an adapter that allows conventional car radios to receive satellite signals. In 2002, controversy erupted over shirts featuring caricatures of Asians and other ethnic groups. The chipset converts the signals from 2.3 gigahertz (GHz) to a lower intermediate frequency. The company's clothing has also been the subject of criticism. Inside the receiver module is a chipset consisting of eight chips. In 2004, "A&F Magazine", a comparatively tame collection of photos and essays about rising celebrities, replaced the publication altogether. The signal is then passed on to the receiver module. In 2003, an array of religious organizations, women's rights activists, and Asian-American groups organized boycotts and protests over the publication, and the "Christmas Edition" of the catalog was removed from stores.

The antenna module picks up signals from the ground repeaters or the satellite, amplifies the signal and filters out any interference. The publication was also criticized on moral grounds, for featuring sexually explicit interviews with porn stars, and articles that, according to critics, glamorized alcohol consumption, group sex, homosexuality, and self-performed oral sex. The Sirius receiver includes two parts -- the antenna module and the receiver module. Several states threatened to pursue legal action, though the company was never charged with violating any related statutes. Sirius offers car radios and home entertainment systems, as well as car and home kits for portable use. Despite a company policy restricted sale of the publication to adults, critics charged that the publication was readily sold to minors. Signals are also beamed to ground repeaters for listeners in urban areas where the satellite signal can be interrupted. It featured photographs of attractive young male and female models, often partially or scantily dressed, posing in pairs or groups, which many likened to softcore pornography.

Programs are beamed to one of the three Sirius satellites, which then transmit the signal to the ground, where your radio receiver picks up one of the channels within the signal. The A&F Quarterly became a lightning rod for controversy shortly after it was published. The Sirius system is similar to that of its competitor. The company's playful, homoerotic marketing made Abercrombie & Fitch a destination for the gay market in the late 1990s, though the company denies that it ever made a concerted effort to market to gay customers. A fourth satellite will remain on the ground, ready to be launched if any of the three active satellites encounter transmission problems. A&F TV was originally developed to run on cable television and on monitors in Abercrombie & Fitch stores, but currently is offered only on the company's website. Sirius completed its three-satellite constellation on November 30, 2000. In 1999, the company rolled out "A&F TV", a feature that spotlights young people engaged in sports and leisure activities.

Sirius says the elliptical path of its satellite constellation ensures that each satellite spends about 16 hours a day over the continental United States, with at least one satellite over the country at all times. Print advertisements for the A&F Quarterly appeared in Interview and Out magazines in addition to Rolling Stone and Vanity Fair. Instead, its three SS/L-1300 satellites fly in geosynchronous (24-hour orbital period) inclined elliptical orbits. The racy publication made a splash with young customers and had one of the highest circulation rates among young adults of any magazine in the late 1990s. Sirius does not use Geostationary satellites. The publication was a hybrid magazine and catalog (company officials referred to it as a "magalog".) and featured advice columns, articles about college life, and—most famously—the highly sexual fine art work of photographer Bruce Weber. The Sirius uplink facility is located in Vernon, Sussex County, New Jersey. The most conspicuous of the company's lifestyle branding efforts was its now-defunct magazine, A&F Quarterly, which the company published from 1997 to 2003.

Sirius' satellites are called Radiosat (instead of after the company name), due to there already being a previous fleet of satellites launched also named SIRIUS, launched by Sweden's NSAB (Nordiska Satellitaktiebolaget, or Nordic Satellite AB) and used for general telecommunications and satellite tv throughout Sweden and the rest of Scandinavia. For years, brand representatives were required to wear only Abercrombie & Fitch clothing, but such regulations have been loosened following lawsuits. The series of satellites from which they come, the SS/Loral LS-1300, is known to have problems with their solar array cells — a similar but more severe issue affects the Boeing satellites belonging to competitor XM Radio. The stores are also staffed with attractive "brand representatives", young salespeople who embody the Abercrombie & Fitch lifestyle: attractive, athletic, popular, enthusiastic, and outgoing. Radiosat 4 is a ground spare, in storage at SS/Loral’s facility in Palo Alto, California. The stores are plastered with photos of physically attractive young models, blast loud dance music through powerful speakers, and smell of the company's signature cologne. The first three of the series were orbited in 2000 by Proton-K Block-DM3 launch vehicles. Abercrombie & Fitch aggressively positions itself as a "lifestyle brand"—a brand that embodies the values and appeal of a desirable way of living.

Sirius’ spacecraft Radiosat 1 through Radiosat 4 were manufactured by Space Systems/Loral. The company will add additional stores in Canada during the next several years and plans to open stores in Europe and Asia by 2007. Iceberg Radio is programmed by Standard Broadcasting, which also provides a number of additional channels exclusive to Canada; the other four come from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. stores in that country. With the launch of Sirius Canada in December 2005, American listeners gained five Canadian-produced stations including CBC Radio One, CBC Radio Three and Iceberg Radio in English, and Première Plus and Bandeapart in French. The company marked its expansion into Canada in January of 2006, opening two Abercrombie & Fitch stores and three Hollister Co. The deal with NPR was the first high-profile deal entered into by Sirius. The company is currently expanding its Los Angeles flagship store at The Grove at Farmers Market.

Sirius also has exclusive satellite radio rights to National Public Radio, carrying two separate streams. The four-level store is the largest in the chain and is located on 56th street and 5th Avenue, alongside boutiques by luxury retailers such as Fendi, Prada, and Chanel. In June 2005, Sirius signed an agreement with BBC Radio 1 in the UK to rebroadcast the station to an American audience. In November of 2005, the company completed construction of its flagship Fifth Avenue location in New York City. Sirius has also been aggressive in creating its own in-house produced studio sports radio content. Such efforts appear to be working: Abercrombie & Fitch logged an impressive 29% increase in same-store sales in December 2005, while most other specialty retailers experienced only moderate advances. In August 2004, Sirius launched NFL Radio, a 24-hour radio stream dedicated exclusively to covering the NFL. In order to fend off what analysts often called the "cannibalizing" effect that Hollister is having on the flagship chain, Abercrombie & Fitch has attempted to differentiate itself from its sister brand by raising price-points, introducing a line of higher-end merchandise called "Ezra Fitch," and establishing strategies to limit the intrusion of Hollister into key Abercrombie & Fitch markets.

Beginning in 2005 Sirius also has exclusive radio rights to cover the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament. The rapid expansion of the chain from 1999-2003, in addition to the introduction of the company’s more moderately-priced concept Hollister Co., arguably contributed to a decrease in same-store sales (an important measure of retail performance) across the chain during that time period. Sirius also has rights to a number of major college sports conferences, including the Big Ten and the Southeastern Conference as well as schools like Notre Dame. As of 2003, sales were $345/ft² ($3700/m²). Starting in 2007, Sirius will have full NASCAR coverage. Throughout the 1990s, Abercrombie & Fitch enjoyed sales of over $400/ft² ($4300/m²) —high by retail standards—but that number has dropped significantly in recent years. NHL games will be shared with XM for the 2005–2006 season, after which XM will have exclusive broadcast rights. The company has opted to build only large stores, averaging 8,000 to 20,000 square feet (700 to 2,000 m²) in high-volume retail centers around the country.

The agreement also creates a 24-hour NBA Radio Channel, located on channel 127. (Women's retail normally outperforms men's by a ratio of about 2:1, though in certain markets the difference is greater or less.) The company designates Volume A stores, usually in major cities and tourist destinations, as "elite" or "super-elite." There are three super elite (AA) stores (Ala Moana in Hawaii, Aventura in Florida, and South Street Seaport in New York City) and less than thirty elite (A) stores in the chain. Sirius also announced in December 2005 a multi-year deal with the NBA, which makes the satellite radio company the broadcaster of more live NBA games than any other radio outlet. A store can have different tier designations for its men's and women's sides. Currently, Sirius has exclusive satellite radio broadcasting rights to all NFL and NBA games. Some small stores are relatively high volume, but lack the floor space needed to support the entire line. Another cornerstone of Sirius’ business strategy has been to pursue exclusive sports content. A store's tier level is independent of its volume, since allocation is often dependent on available area of selling space.

On October 25, 2005 Sirius announced that "E Street Radio", the exclusive channel of legendary artist Bruce Springsteen, would air from November 1, 2005 to January 31, 2006 on the Bridge - Channel 10. Tier 1 stores receive all of the current items in all styles and colors, for example, while lower tier stores are sent less merchandise in a smaller range of sizes and colors. It was Karmazin who fiercely protected Stern in the wake of the Super Bowl XXXVIII Halftime Show (produced by MTV and aired by CBS, both co-owned with Infinity) and the FCC crackdown on shock jocks and obscenity, in general. Tier level determines what selection of the current clothing line is sent to a store. Stern worked under Karmazin at Infinity Radio and the two men have always had a great deal of mutual respect for each other. The company manages merchandising, distribution, and sales by assigning each store a tier level (1, 2, 3, 4, or 5) and a volume level (A, B, C, D, E, or F). On November 18, 2004 the former COO and President of Viacom, Mel Karmazin, was named the CEO of Sirius. Apparel is laid out so that customers can feel the fabrics, contributing to the sensory experience offered in-store.

Generally the personalities act as DJs hosting shows with music they personally like. Older merchandise is shuffled around to provide a different presentation for frequent customers each time they enter the store, while new items are generally placed out in the front rooms for display. These shows are hosted by personalities including skateboard legend Tony Hawk, seven-time Tour de France champion Lance Armstrong, The B-52's lead singer Fred Schneider, NBA Hall of Famer Bill Walton and longtime New York City DJ “Cousin Brucie”, who was dropped by WCBS-FM after the station changed to its format from an oldies station to a “Jack” format. Every week, each store is sent a booklet—often over 100 pages long—detailing the exact specifications for placing merchandise on the sale floor. In addition to the channel-programming deals, Sirius has also programmed a number of more conventional shows with well known personalities in a number of fields. Merchandising is managed in a similar fashion. In Howard Stern's first major hire for Sirius, Stern brought on board Tampa, FL based Bubba the Love Sponge, fired by Clear Channel due to a $750,000 fine proposed by the FCC Reuters, to do a show on Sirius. Abercrombie & Fitch has become notorious for loud, pulsing dance music, often eliciting complaints from mall operators and tenants for disrupting other customers and stores.

Beginning with the announcement of his imminent departure, Stern began to complain of one of his employers, Infinity Broadcasting, as trying to impede the success of his departure. Every store plays the same pre-produced music segment for a period of four to five weeks and has instructions on how loud the music is to be played at certain times of the day or week. Stern stated that his move was forced by the stringent regulations of the FCC whose enforcement was intensified following the Super Bowl XXXVIII Halftime Show. Each store is spritzed daily with men’s cologne in order to ensure a pleasant sensory experience. The deal, which gave Sirius exclusive rights to Stern’s radio show, also gave Stern the right to build at least two full-time programming channels. The company also specifies in painstaking detail how lighting, layout, visual displays, marketing, and fixtures are to be placed and used in every store. By far the biggest of these deals was announced on October 6, 2004 when Sirius announced that it signed a five-year, $500-million agreement with Howard Stern to move his radio show to Sirius starting on January 9, 2006. Factors such as visual presentation, music, and fragrance are not left to chance.

Sirius has reached extensive deals with domestic diva Martha Stewart, E Street Band member Steven Van Zandt (aka Little Steven), Jimmy Buffett, and Eminem to executive produce streams on Sirius. The company strictly regulates the store environment in an effort to provide a consistent, pleasureful experience for customers in a manner that can be replicated in each store. A major component of Sirius’ business strategy has been to execute far-reaching and exclusive deals with big-name entertainers and personalities to create and build broadcast streams, from the ground up. Because it spends little on external advertising, the company depends upon the store experience to help define the brand. . Abercrombie & Fitch has complete control over the design and production of its merchandise, stores, and marketing. “Mongo” later became NASCAR driver Spencer’s nickname with the NASCAR Broadcasters in the following races. The company is in the process of converting all of its chain store concepts into canoe stores.

The dog in the Sirius logo (Sirius is referred to as the "Dog Star") is unofficially named “Mongo,” a name garnered from the debut of Sirius Satellite Radio’s sponsorship on Casey Atwood’s and later Jimmy Spencer’s NASCAR entry, when the announcing cast voted on names. Unlike the chain store, which typically has a wider storefront and two entrances, the canoe store has one main entrance and is walled off into at least five rooms. Sirius was previously known as CD Radio. A moose head is mounted above the cashwrap and a canoe is mounted in the main room of each canoe store. However, Sirius led the market in new satellite radio subscribers in 2005. The interior features gray walls, white molding, polished concrete and black wood floors, metal fixtures, and large pictures of scantily-clad models. Sirius currently lags behind competitor XM Satellite Radio in terms of subscribers with 3.3 million, well less than XM's current audience of more than 6 million subscribers (as of January 9, 2006). The canoe store is recognized by a white facade, navy blue awnings, and solid metal and glass doors.

A $10 activation fee ($15 if activated by phone) is also required. However, the company introduced a new store concept (referred to as the "canoe store" concept) in the late 1990s to accommodate its rapid growth. to $499.99 for a lifetime subscription (of the receiver, not the subscriber). The store resembled a hunting lodge, with plaid carpeting, dark wood fixtures, and antler chandeliers. Subscription costs for Sirius range from $12.95/mo. The original store concept (referred to as the "chain store" concept) hearkened back to the outdoorsy image of company's early years. Its business model is to provide pay-for-service radio, music channels being free of commercials, analogous to the business model for premium cable television. In 1996, The Limited took Abercrombie & Fitch public on the New York Stock Exchange and gradually phased out its ownership of the company.

Sirius is based in New York City. Careful marketing made the brand synonymous with wealth and status among young patrons. “XS120”, “XS9”, “XS17”). The store quickly became successful, and by the mid-1990s, there were dozens of Abercrombie & Fitch stores in the United States. Sirius channels are identified by Arbitron with the label “XS” (e.g. The clothing produced in the 1990s was fairly consistent with the brand's preppy image and tended to be less trend-driven than today's offerings, which bear significantly less resemblence to traditional Northeastern prep school apparel. A subset of Sirius’ music channels are included as part of the DISH Network satellite television service. Labels on clothing reinforce the company’s image as a casual luxury merchandiser and emphasize the quality and durability of the product.

The streams are broadcast from three satellites in an elliptical geosynchronous orbit above North America. Much like Ralph Lauren (whose style is frequently evoked in Abercrombie & Fitch’s apparel), the clothing is fairly predictable: woven shirts, denim, miniskirts, cargo shorts, wool sweaters, polo shirts, and t-shirts can be found in most collections. With any Sirius-enabled radio, the user can see the artist and song information on display while listening to the stream. Abercrombie & Fitch is a self-proclaimed "casual luxury" retailer. Music streams on Sirius carry a wide variety of music genres, broadcasting 24 hours a day, commercial free. The company began opening stores in upscale malls across America in the early 1990s, targeting teenagers and college students aged 18-24 from higher-income families. Sirius Satellite Radio NASDAQ: SIRI is a satellite radio (DARS) service in the United States that provides 68 streams (channels) of music and 55 streams of sports, news and entertainment. Over the next decade, Abercrombie & Fitch was carefully rebuilt as a teen apparel merchandiser.

Black and white lineup from SiriusBackstage.com, Adobe Acrobat Reader Required. The Limited had been successful in rolling out new concept stores, such as Express, which sold women's clothing, and Victoria's Secret, which sold lingerie and beauty products. Official Sirius Satellite Radio Stations List, Adobe Acrobat Reader Required. (now called Limited Brands) acquired Abercrombie & Fitch, determined to reinvigorate the ailing brand. List of Sirius Satellite Radio stations. In 1988, The Limited Inc. XACT XTR1 Radio with Car Kit. Oshman's, a sporting goods retailer, acquired Abercrombie soon thereafter, but the company continued to struggle.

Clarion Calypso SIRIUS Radio with Car Kit. Despite the chain's apparent success, the company began to falter financially in the 1960s and went bankrupt in 1977. Kenwood H2EV Radio with Car and Home Kits. The expansion continued through the 1960s, when the company opened new stores in Colorado Springs, Colorado; Short Hills, New Jersey; Bal Harbour, Florida; and Detroit, Michigan. Tivoli's SIRIUS Table Radio. In 1939, it adopted the slogan, "The Greatest Sporting Goods Store in the World." By 1958, the company operated stores in Chicago and San Francisco, wintertime-only stores in Palm Beach and Sarasota, Florida; and summertime-only stores in Bayhead, New Jersey; and Southampton, New York. SIRIUS Sportster Radio with Boombox Package. Despite the change in ownership, Abercrombie & Fitch continued to expand.

Docking Station Package. In 1928, Ezra Fitch retired from the company. SIRIUS Sportster Exec. Talking was their pleasure and selling was performed only at the customers' insistence. SIRIUS S50. The clerks hired at Abercrombie & Fitch were not professional salesmen, but rugged outdoorsmen. The fishing section of the store alone was stocked with over 48,000 flies and over 18,000 fishing lures.

It also included a desk that belonged to a fly- and bait-casting instructor who gave lessons at the pool, which was located on the roof. The eighth floor was dedicated solely to fishing, camping, and boating. The seventh floor included a gun room, stuffed game heads, and about seven hundred shot guns and rifles. On the sixth floor, there was a picture gallery and a bookstore that focused on sporting themes, a watch repair facility and a golf school, fully equipped with a resident professional.

The second through the fifth floors were reserved for clothing that was suitable for any climate or terrain. In the basement there was a shooting range, on the mezzanine there was paraphernalia for skiing, archery, skin-diving, and lawn games. The flagship store included many different amenities. Outside, a sign proclaimed, "Where the Blazed Trail Crosses the Boulevard.".

The store occupied the entire available space, making it the world's largest sporting goods store. moved yet again to a twelve-story building on Madison Avenue. In 1917, Abercrombie & Fitch Co. A&F became the first store in New York to supply such clothing to women as well as men.

By 1913, the store moved to a more fashionable and easily accessible midtown address just off Fifth Avenue, expanding its inventory to include sport clothing. In 1909, Abercrombie & Fitch mailed out over its 456 page catalog, which included outdoor clothing, camping gear, articles, and advice columns, to 50,000 customers worldwide. Part of Fitch's strategy to expand the company was the creation of a mail-order catalog. A campfire blazed in one corner, where an experienced guide was always in attendance, imparting valuable information to interested customers.

He set up a tent and equipped it as if it were out in the middle of the wilds of the Adirondacks. Instead, it was displayed as if in use. Stock was not hidden behind glass cabinets. Fitch determined that the store ought to have an outdoor feeling.

Fitch continued the business with other partners and was, for the first time, able to direct the company in a manner to his pleasing. In 1907, Abercrombie sold his share in the company to Fitch and returned to manufacturing outdoor goods. The two quarrelled frequently, often violently, even as the company grew increasingly successful. He was positive that the future of the business lay in expansion, selling the outdoors and its delights to more of the general public.

Fitch, on the other hand, was more of a visionary. Abercrombie was more conservative, content to continue the store as it was, selling professional gear to professional outdoorsmen. David Abercrombie and Ezra Fitch were stubborn, hot-tempered men, and both had vastly differing opinions on how best to run the establishment. The partnership, however, was ill-fated.

In 1904, the store became incorporated and the official name of the company was changed to Abercrombie & Fitch Co. Soon thereafter, the shop moved to a larger location at 314 Broadway St. Abercrombie accepted his offer, and Fitch joined as a partner. In 1900, Ezra Fitch, a wealthy New York lawyer and loyal customer, expressed a desire to buy into the growing company.

His clientele consisted mostly of professional hunters, explorers and trappers. It was his love of the great outdoors that inspired him to begin Abercrombie & Co., a shop dedicated to selling only the highest-quality camping, fishing and hunting gear. He was also an inventor, an ingenious designer of tents, rucksacks and other camping equipment. David Abercrombie, born and raised in Baltimore, Maryland, was a former trapper, prospector, topographer and railroad surveyor.

Abercrombie & Fitch began as a small waterfront shop and factory in lower Manhattan in June 4, 1892. Other famous people to pass through Abercrombie & Fitch's doors include Charles Lindbergh, Amelia Earhart, Greta Garbo, Katharine Hepburn, Clark Gable, and author Ernest Hemingway, who killed himself using a shotgun purchased at an Abercrombie & Fitch store. Every president from Theodore Roosevelt to Gerald Ford is said to have been outfitted by the company in some capacity (Teddy Roosevelt was an especially enthusiastic outdoorsman and Abercrombie & Fitch customer, and he frequently visited the store in preparation for his famous African safaris). Abercrombie & Fitch not only outfitted wealthy people, it also outfitted some of America's most influential leaders and celebrities on their excursions.

The company's clientele consisted of mainly big-game hunters, fishermen, and outdoorsmen. was one of the most popular retail stores for America's sporting elite. During the beginning of the 20th century, Abercrombie & Fitch Co. .

states (except Wyoming) and in the District of Columbia, and 3 stores in Canada. As of 2006, the company operated 351 Abercrombie & Fitch stores in all U.S. The merchandise is sold in retail stores throughout the United States, in catalogs, and online. Abercrombie & Fitch is a specialty retailer encompassing four concepts: Abercrombie & Fitch, abercrombie (Abercrombie Kids), Hollister Co., and Ruehl no.925.

Leino. VP of Stores — David L. Sr. VP of Sourcing — Diane Chang.

Exec. Lennox. Communications — Thomas D. Director of Investor Relations of Corp.

COO — Mike Kramer and John Lough (temporary, as of August 31 2005). VP of Logistics and Store Operations — John Lough. Exec. CFO — Mike Kramer.

Chairman & CEO — Michael Jeffries.

08-31-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/browse2000.php Business Search Directory Real Estate Database WebExposure.us Google+ Directory Dan Schmidt is a keyboardist, composer, songwriter, and producer.