This page will contain videos about Shimano, as they become available.

Shimano

Shimano ((OTCBB: SHMDF), FWB: SHM) is a Japanese manufacturer of cycling, fishing, snowboarding, and until 2005, golf components.

Cycling

Shimano products include drivetrain, brake, wheel and pedal components for leisure, road and mountain bikes. These components are generally organised and sold as groupsets intended to be supplied as a near complete collection of a bicycle's mechanical parts.

Groupsets commonly include: crankset comprising cranks and chainrings; bottom bracket; chain; rear gear cogs or cassette; front and rear wheel hubs; gear shift levers; brakes; brake levers; cables; front and rear gear mechanisms or derailleurs.

The Italian firm Campagnolo is a competitor as the other major manufacturer of road groupsets. SRAM is a competitor as the other major manufacturer of mountain bike groupsets, though they are now introducing a road groupset as well.

When the 1970s United States bike boom exceeded the capacity of the American and European bicycle component manufacturers, Japanese manufacturers SunTour and Shimano rapidly stepped in to fill the void. While both companies provided products for all price-ranges of the market, SunTour also focused on refinement of existing systems and designs for higher end products, while Shimano paid more attention to rethinking the basic systems and bringing out innovations such as index shifting and front freewheel systems. SunTour eventually lost the commercial battle. In contrast to the near-universal marketing technique of introducing innovations on the expensive side of the marketplace and relying on consumer demand to emulate early adopters along with economy of scale to bring them into the mass market, Shimano introduced new technologies at the lowest end of the bicycle market, using lower cost and often heavier and less durable materials and techniques, only moving them further upscale if they established themselves in the lower market segments.

Lance Armstrong's 1999 victory in the Tour de France on a Shimano Dura-Ace equipped Trek was the first time Shimano components had been used to win the grand tour. In 2002, Dura-Ace equipped bikes were ridden to victory in the Tour de France (Lance Armstrong), Giro d'Italia (Paolo Savoldelli), and Vuelta a España (Aitor González), marking the first time Shimano componentry had been used to win all three grand tours. World championships in both the road and time trial disciplines were won on Shimano equipment.

In 2003 Shimano introduced "Dual Control" to mountain bikes, where the gear shift mechanism is integrated into the brake levers, and reintroduced the "Rapid Rise" rear derailler which works in the opposite direction to traditional deraillers. This development was controversial: critics viewed it as an attempt to monopolise the mountain bike components market because the use of Dual Control integrated shifting requires the use of Shimano brakes, and the Rapid Rise derailler is believed to work more effectively with the Dual Control system. Shimano also introduced new proprietary standards for disc brakes and hubs, and for bottom brackets and cranksets, further fueling speculation about monopolistic intentions.

Many people believe that "VIA", which is stamped on all Shimano parts, is a form of corporate logo, since it does not appear on Campagnolo parts, for instance. In fact, VIA is an official approval stamp used to certify parts of Japanese vehicles - including bicycles.

Racing bicycle groupsets

Current road bicycle groupsets include:

  • Dura-Ace
  • Ultegra
  • 105
  • Tiagra
  • Sora

Mountain bike groupsets

Current mountain bicycle groupsets include:

  • Saint - This is the top of the range for DownHill(DH)/FreeRide(FR) bikes
  • Hone
  • XTR - This is the top of the range for CrossCountry(XC) mountain bikes
  • XT
  • LX
  • Deore
  • Alivio
  • Acera
  • Altus
  • Tourney - this includes several different levels of quality, and can be found on department-store bicycles.

This page about Shimano includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about Shimano
News stories about Shimano
External links for Shimano
Videos for Shimano
Wikis about Shimano
Discussion Groups about Shimano
Blogs about Shimano
Images of Shimano

Current mountain bicycle groupsets include:. The oldest centre for such studies it was founded in 1871. Current road bicycle groupsets include:. Stazione Bacologica Sperimentale is an Institute for Silkmoth Research in Italy. In fact, VIA is an official approval stamp used to certify parts of Japanese vehicles - including bicycles. Silk cloth is also used as a material to write on. Many people believe that "VIA", which is stamped on all Shimano parts, is a form of corporate logo, since it does not appear on Campagnolo parts, for instance. Chinese doctors have also used it to make prosthetic arteries.

Shimano also introduced new proprietary standards for disc brakes and hubs, and for bottom brackets and cranksets, further fueling speculation about monopolistic intentions. Silk undergoes a special manufacturing process to make it adequate for its use in surgery as non-absorbable sutures. This development was controversial: critics viewed it as an attempt to monopolise the mountain bike components market because the use of Dual Control integrated shifting requires the use of Shimano brakes, and the Rapid Rise derailler is believed to work more effectively with the Dual Control system. Early bulletproof vests were also made from silk in the era of blackpowder weapons until roughly World War I. In 2003 Shimano introduced "Dual Control" to mountain bikes, where the gear shift mechanism is integrated into the brake levers, and reintroduced the "Rapid Rise" rear derailler which works in the opposite direction to traditional deraillers. In addition to clothing manufacture and other handicrafts, silk is also used for items like parachutes, bicycle tires, comforter filling and artillery gunpowder bags. World championships in both the road and time trial disciplines were won on Shimano equipment. Silk has recently come under fire from animal rights activists who maintain that the common practice of boiling silkworms alive in their cocoons is cruel.

In 2002, Dura-Ace equipped bikes were ridden to victory in the Tour de France (Lance Armstrong), Giro d'Italia (Paolo Savoldelli), and Vuelta a España (Aitor González), marking the first time Shimano componentry had been used to win all three grand tours. http://www.islamonline.net/fatwa/english/FatwaDisplay.asp?hFatwaID=61261. Lance Armstrong's 1999 victory in the Tour de France on a Shimano Dura-Ace equipped Trek was the first time Shimano components had been used to win the grand tour. While the command is given without justification, many jurists believe the reasoning behind the prohibition lies in avoiding clothing for men that can be feminine or extravagant and luxurious. In contrast to the near-universal marketing technique of introducing innovations on the expensive side of the marketplace and relying on consumer demand to emulate early adopters along with economy of scale to bring them into the mass market, Shimano introduced new technologies at the lowest end of the bicycle market, using lower cost and often heavier and less durable materials and techniques, only moving them further upscale if they established themselves in the lower market segments. In Islamic law, there is a prohibition upon Muslim men from wearing silk (as well as gold). SunTour eventually lost the commercial battle. Synthetic silks have also been made from lyocell, a type of cellulose fiber, and are often difficult to distinguish from real silk.

While both companies provided products for all price-ranges of the market, SunTour also focused on refinement of existing systems and designs for higher end products, while Shimano paid more attention to rethinking the basic systems and bringing out innovations such as index shifting and front freewheel systems. Silk prices increased dramatically and US industry begun to look for substitutes, which led to the use of synthetics like nylon. When the 1970s United States bike boom exceeded the capacity of the American and European bicycle component manufacturers, Japanese manufacturers SunTour and Shimano rapidly stepped in to fill the void. World War II interrupted the silk trade from Japan. SRAM is a competitor as the other major manufacturer of mountain bike groupsets, though they are now introducing a road groupset as well. In the 1800s a new attempt at a silk industry began with European-born workers in Paterson, New Jersey, and the city became a US silk centre, although Japanese imports were still more important. The Italian firm Campagnolo is a competitor as the other major manufacturer of road groupsets. Only the Shakers in Kentucky adopted the practice.

Groupsets commonly include: crankset comprising cranks and chainrings; bottom bracket; chain; rear gear cogs or cassette; front and rear wheel hubs; gear shift levers; brakes; brake levers; cables; front and rear gear mechanisms or derailleurs. James I of England introduced silk growing to the American colonies around 1619, ostensibly to discourage tobacco planting. These components are generally organised and sold as groupsets intended to be supplied as a near complete collection of a bicycle's mechanical parts. The French Revolution interrupted production before Napoleon took power. Shimano products include drivetrain, brake, wheel and pedal components for leisure, road and mountain bikes. Italian silk was so popular in Europe that Francis I of France invited Italian silkmakers to France to create a French silk industry, especially in Lyon. . By the 13th century Italian silk was a significant source of trade.

Shimano ((OTCBB: SHMDF), FWB: SHM) is a Japanese manufacturer of cycling, fishing, snowboarding, and until 2005, golf components. Venetian merchants traded extensively in silk and encouraged silk growers to settle in Italy. Tourney - this includes several different levels of quality, and can be found on department-store bicycles. Nowadays, it is mainly sought after for the highest-quality saris given as presents to brides in India. Altus. In addition, it absorbs moisture better than ordinary silk and is, therefore, more comfortable to wear. Acera. Garments made of it outlast those made of ordinary silk — commonly lasting fifty years or more.

Alivio. This silk has always been highly prized — not only for its beautiful natural golden sheen, which actually improves with aging and washing — but for the fact that it is the strongest natural fiber known. Deore. Muga: The beautiful and expensive golden-coloured "wild" silk called "Muga" is produced only in the Brahmaputra Valley — mainly Assam and adjoining parts of Burma. LX. There is ample evidence that small quantities of wild silk were already being produced in the Mediterranean and Middle East by the time the superior, and stronger, cultivated silk from China began to be imported. XT. Wild silks also tend to be more difficult to dye than silk from the cultivated silkworm.

XTR - This is the top of the range for CrossCountry(XC) mountain bikes. This allows a much stronger cloth to be woven from the silk. Hone. Commercially reared silkworms are killed before the pupae emerge by dipping them in boiling water or with a needle, thus allowing the whole cocoon to be unravelled as one continuous thread. Saint - This is the top of the range for DownHill(DH)/FreeRide(FR) bikes. The term "wild" implies that these silkworms are not capable of being domesticated and artificially cultivated like the mulberry worms. Sora. Wild silks are produced by caterpillars other than the mulberry silkworm (Bombyx mori).

Tiagra. A variety of wild silks have been known and used in China, India and Europe from early times, although the scale of production has always been far smaller than that of cultivated silks. 105. The cocoons, which are gathered in the wild, have usually already been chewed through by the pupa or caterpillar ("silkworm") before the cocoons are gathered and thus the single thread which makes up the cocoon has been cut into shorter lengths. Ultegra. Aside from differences in colours and textures, they all differ in one major respect from the domesticated varieties. Dura-Ace. "Wild silks" are produced by a number of undomesticated silkworms.

The remainder was sold at exorbitant prices. The Byzantines were equally secretive, and for many centuries the weaving and trading of silk fabric was a strict imperial monopoly; all top-quality looms and weavers were located inside the Palace complex in Constantinople and the cloth produced was used in imperial robes or in diplomacy, as gifts to foreign dignitaries. Legend has it that the monks working for the emperor Justinian were the first to bring silkworm eggs to Constantinople in hollow canes. Although the Roman Empire knew of and traded in silk, the secret was only to reach Europe around AD 550, via the Byzantine Empire.

Sericulture reached Korea around 200 BC with Chinese settlers, about the first half of the 1st century AD in Khotan, and by 300 AD the practice had been established in India. This effort had mixed success. The Emperors of China strove to keep the knowledge of sericulture secret from other nations, in order to maintain the Chinese monopoly on its production. This trade was so extensive that the major set of trade routes between Europe and Asia has become known as the Silk Road.

In subsequent centuries, the silk trade reached as far as the Indian subcontinent, the Middle East, Europe, and North Africa. Perhaps the first evidence of the silk trade is that of an Egyptian mummy of 1070 BC. Because of the high demand for the fabric, silk was one of the staples of international trade prior to industrialization. Silk rapidly became a popular luxury fabric in the many areas accessible to Chinese merchants, because of its texture and lustre.

From there, silken garments began to reach regions throughout Asia. Though first reserved for the Emperors of China, its use spread gradually through Chinese culture both geographically and socially. Legend gives credit to a Chinese Empress Xi Ling-Shi. Silk was first developed in early China, possibly as early as 6000 BC and definitely by 3000 BC.

. The shimmering appearance for which it is prized comes from the fibers' triangular prism-like structure, which allows silk cloth to refract incoming light at different angles. It is obtained from the cocoon of the silkworm larva, in the process known as sericulture, which kills the larvae. Silk is a natural protein fibre that can be woven into textiles.

12-20-14 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php PAD File Directory Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Display all your websites in one place HereIam.tv Celebrity Homepages Charity Directory Google+ Directory Move your favorite Unsigned Artist to the Top of the List