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Shimano

Shimano ((OTCBB: SHMDF), FWB: SHM) is a Japanese manufacturer of cycling, fishing, snowboarding, and until 2005, golf components.

Cycling

Shimano products include drivetrain, brake, wheel and pedal components for leisure, road and mountain bikes. These components are generally organised and sold as groupsets intended to be supplied as a near complete collection of a bicycle's mechanical parts.

Groupsets commonly include: crankset comprising cranks and chainrings; bottom bracket; chain; rear gear cogs or cassette; front and rear wheel hubs; gear shift levers; brakes; brake levers; cables; front and rear gear mechanisms or derailleurs.

The Italian firm Campagnolo is a competitor as the other major manufacturer of road groupsets. SRAM is a competitor as the other major manufacturer of mountain bike groupsets, though they are now introducing a road groupset as well.

When the 1970s United States bike boom exceeded the capacity of the American and European bicycle component manufacturers, Japanese manufacturers SunTour and Shimano rapidly stepped in to fill the void. While both companies provided products for all price-ranges of the market, SunTour also focused on refinement of existing systems and designs for higher end products, while Shimano paid more attention to rethinking the basic systems and bringing out innovations such as index shifting and front freewheel systems. SunTour eventually lost the commercial battle. In contrast to the near-universal marketing technique of introducing innovations on the expensive side of the marketplace and relying on consumer demand to emulate early adopters along with economy of scale to bring them into the mass market, Shimano introduced new technologies at the lowest end of the bicycle market, using lower cost and often heavier and less durable materials and techniques, only moving them further upscale if they established themselves in the lower market segments.

Lance Armstrong's 1999 victory in the Tour de France on a Shimano Dura-Ace equipped Trek was the first time Shimano components had been used to win the grand tour. In 2002, Dura-Ace equipped bikes were ridden to victory in the Tour de France (Lance Armstrong), Giro d'Italia (Paolo Savoldelli), and Vuelta a España (Aitor González), marking the first time Shimano componentry had been used to win all three grand tours. World championships in both the road and time trial disciplines were won on Shimano equipment.

In 2003 Shimano introduced "Dual Control" to mountain bikes, where the gear shift mechanism is integrated into the brake levers, and reintroduced the "Rapid Rise" rear derailler which works in the opposite direction to traditional deraillers. This development was controversial: critics viewed it as an attempt to monopolise the mountain bike components market because the use of Dual Control integrated shifting requires the use of Shimano brakes, and the Rapid Rise derailler is believed to work more effectively with the Dual Control system. Shimano also introduced new proprietary standards for disc brakes and hubs, and for bottom brackets and cranksets, further fueling speculation about monopolistic intentions.

Many people believe that "VIA", which is stamped on all Shimano parts, is a form of corporate logo, since it does not appear on Campagnolo parts, for instance. In fact, VIA is an official approval stamp used to certify parts of Japanese vehicles - including bicycles.

Racing bicycle groupsets

Current road bicycle groupsets include:

  • Dura-Ace
  • Ultegra
  • 105
  • Tiagra
  • Sora

Mountain bike groupsets

Current mountain bicycle groupsets include:

  • Saint - This is the top of the range for DownHill(DH)/FreeRide(FR) bikes
  • Hone
  • XTR - This is the top of the range for CrossCountry(XC) mountain bikes
  • XT
  • LX
  • Deore
  • Alivio
  • Acera
  • Altus
  • Tourney - this includes several different levels of quality, and can be found on department-store bicycles.

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Current mountain bicycle groupsets include:. Used socks also seem to be a popular item for sale on the auction site eBay. Current road bicycle groupsets include:. The song claims that "The longer you wear them the blacker they get.". In fact, VIA is an official approval stamp used to certify parts of Japanese vehicles - including bicycles. It is said, for example, in a popular campfire song, that black socks never get dirty. Many people believe that "VIA", which is stamped on all Shimano parts, is a form of corporate logo, since it does not appear on Campagnolo parts, for instance. This continued into 2005 [3].

Shimano also introduced new proprietary standards for disc brakes and hubs, and for bottom brackets and cranksets, further fueling speculation about monopolistic intentions. In 2004 and the early 1980s, mismatched socks were a fashion statement[2]. This development was controversial: critics viewed it as an attempt to monopolise the mountain bike components market because the use of Dual Control integrated shifting requires the use of Shimano brakes, and the Rapid Rise derailler is believed to work more effectively with the Dual Control system. Some with a less ruthless but still logical outlook on life will simply buy multiple pairs of the exact same kind of sock, down to any pattern the sock may exhibit. In 2003 Shimano introduced "Dual Control" to mountain bikes, where the gear shift mechanism is integrated into the brake levers, and reintroduced the "Rapid Rise" rear derailler which works in the opposite direction to traditional deraillers. Some with a ruthlessly logical approach to life may solve this problem by taking every sock in the house to a local charity and then purchasing a sufficient number of replacement socks in a limited number of styles and colors, thus maximizing the odds of finding matching socks in the laundry. World championships in both the road and time trial disciplines were won on Shimano equipment. It has also been noted that disposing of a lonesome sock virtually guarantees that its long-lost mate will re-appear the next day.

In 2002, Dura-Ace equipped bikes were ridden to victory in the Tour de France (Lance Armstrong), Giro d'Italia (Paolo Savoldelli), and Vuelta a España (Aitor González), marking the first time Shimano componentry had been used to win all three grand tours. There are any number of humorous theories to "explain" the disappearance. Lance Armstrong's 1999 victory in the Tour de France on a Shimano Dura-Ace equipped Trek was the first time Shimano components had been used to win the grand tour. In western culture one of a pair of socks is popularly understood to disappear, usually at some point during the washing and drying process, leaving the owner with many socks without mates. In contrast to the near-universal marketing technique of introducing innovations on the expensive side of the marketplace and relying on consumer demand to emulate early adopters along with economy of scale to bring them into the mass market, Shimano introduced new technologies at the lowest end of the bicycle market, using lower cost and often heavier and less durable materials and techniques, only moving them further upscale if they established themselves in the lower market segments. However, in dustier climes, wearing no shoes inside is considered an acceptable alternative to sweeping the floor. SunTour eventually lost the commercial battle. Since socks can be somewhat wet from sweat, especially right after shoes are taken off, the problem can be compounded.

While both companies provided products for all price-ranges of the market, SunTour also focused on refinement of existing systems and designs for higher end products, while Shimano paid more attention to rethinking the basic systems and bringing out innovations such as index shifting and front freewheel systems. When socks are worn by themselves, without shoes, they pick up dust and dirt on the ground or floor. When the 1970s United States bike boom exceeded the capacity of the American and European bicycle component manufacturers, Japanese manufacturers SunTour and Shimano rapidly stepped in to fill the void. White socks can also become very dirty, especially in the soles, but this is typically not a result of wearing them with shoes. SRAM is a competitor as the other major manufacturer of mountain bike groupsets, though they are now introducing a road groupset as well. If the elastic is over-stretched and loses its elasticity the sock may be considered unwearable. The Italian firm Campagnolo is a competitor as the other major manufacturer of road groupsets. Too tight, and the sock is uncomfortable; too loose and the sock slips down the leg, also causing discomfort.

Groupsets commonly include: crankset comprising cranks and chainrings; bottom bracket; chain; rear gear cogs or cassette; front and rear wheel hubs; gear shift levers; brakes; brake levers; cables; front and rear gear mechanisms or derailleurs. The elastic at the top of the sock is crucial for the sock. These components are generally organised and sold as groupsets intended to be supplied as a near complete collection of a bicycle's mechanical parts. Some find this size too small, and have to stretch out the sock to barely cover their enormous feet. Shimano products include drivetrain, brake, wheel and pedal components for leisure, road and mountain bikes. Many find this size too big, and have to bunch up the sock in front of their toes to keep the heel from crawling up the back of their leg. . Another problem is that socks usually come in only one size, typically designated "Fits All" or "Fits Sizes 6-13".

Shimano ((OTCBB: SHMDF), FWB: SHM) is a Japanese manufacturer of cycling, fishing, snowboarding, and until 2005, golf components. It may just be better to forget about the sock. Tourney - this includes several different levels of quality, and can be found on department-store bicycles. What one has to do to retrieve his or her sock is disassemble the dryer. Altus. The missing socks seem to vanish to nowhere, but they really go to the inside of the dryer, behind the drum. Acera. This leads to the famous "one-sock question": does one toss the mate, only (per Murphy's Law) to have the lost footwear reappear days later, or does one hold onto the mate, thinking that by some twist of fate, the wanderer will return?.

Alivio. Socks also have an alarming propensity to lose their mates in the laundry. Deore. A pair of shoes will often outlast a pair of socks. LX. Socks tend to wear out quickly, especially thinner dress socks. XT. A common complaint is the fact that socks often develop holes, especially in the heel, which quickly grow in size.

XTR - This is the top of the range for CrossCountry(XC) mountain bikes. This word was probably derived from some Asian language. Hone. The Latin word may have derived from the ancient Greek sukkhos which was a Phrygian shoe. Saint - This is the top of the range for DownHill(DH)/FreeRide(FR) bikes. It then passed through Old English socc and Middle English socke. Sora. The word sock comes from the Latin word soccus, which was a type of low-heeled loose-fitting shoe or slipper, used by the Greeks and also by Roman comedians.

Tiagra. . 105. A sock is also the term given to the layer of leather or other materials covering the insole of a shoe, some times only part of the insole is covered leaving the forepart visible, this is known as a half-sock. Ultegra. Socks can also be used for alternative purposes, including:. Dura-Ace. Wearing white socks with a dark suit is a sterotypical fashion mistake of those wearing suits infrequently.

With formal or semiformal wear (such as a suit) the sock colour should match the colour of the shoes and/or pants. Mismatched socks were stereotypically the symbol of someone who was absent-minded. Although socks are sold in pairs, contrary to shoes (which are made specifically for the right and left foot), the two socks are usually the same. In the United States, shorter socks such as quarter socks, low-cut socks or "no-show" socks have become more popular for wear with athletic shoes, especially by teenagers and young adults, as someone who wears high socks with shorts (outside of a sporting context) may be the subject of ridicule.

A toe sock[1] wraps each toe individually. There are the just-below-the-knee socks used by soccer and football players (and some fashionable basketball players as well), crew socks, mid-calf and bare socks, and even extra-long over-the-knee socks worn by many sport fencers. Sock lengths vary, from covering only the foot, to knee level. A teammate’s leg can be distinguished from the legs of an opposing player legs based on the color and pattern of their socks.

For example, different colored socks come in handy when struggling for a ball in a soccer match at times when several players become bunched. Colored socks may be a key part of a sport team's uniform. They come in many colors, though are typically dark for formal attire and white for athletic or casual attire. Socks are usually made from cotton, wool, or nylon.

Without socks, the moisture given off by ones feet will build up and could freeze, leading to frostbite. Socks not only help with sweat, they also help keep feet warm and dry in cold environments where frostbite can be a common problem. Socks help to absorb this sweat and draw it to areas where air can wick the perspiration away. The average foot has 250,000 sweat glands and the average pair gives off about half a pint (almost 250mL) of perspiration per day.

The most commonly known "Tube Socks" were invented by Thomas Kelly and Hugh Ryan, in 1875. Socks are also frequently worn without shoes, typically indoors. They are sometimes worn with open-toed shoes, such as sandals, but the practice is considered somewhat unfashionable (and can earn the wearer the label of shoebie). Socks are designed for wear with footwear that covers the entire foot, such as athletic shoes, boots, or dress shoes.

A sock is a baglike covering for the human foot and/or lower leg, which is designed to:. A socks link is a string with clips on both ends that clip socks together while they are in the washers and dryers. A socks bag is a permeable bag that holds socks together while they are in the washer and dryer. Socks are by nature cannibalistic, but they only eat their mates.

This neatly explains why there are always too few socks and too many coathangers. Socks are the larval form of the coathanger. wormholes open in the dryer, sucking socks into a different part of the universe, a planet that closely resembles ours except that socks mysteriously appear out of nowhere, while coat hangers vanish. As a warmer alternative to a snowball.

When filled with rocks, or other hard objects, as a rudimentary weapon. As a mitten, albeit with no thumb opening. As a sock puppet. absorb sweat from the feet.

keep feet warm, and. ease chafing between the foot and footwear,.

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