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Shimano

Shimano ((OTCBB: SHMDF), FWB: SHM) is a Japanese manufacturer of cycling, fishing, snowboarding, and until 2005, golf components.

Cycling

Shimano products include drivetrain, brake, wheel and pedal components for leisure, road and mountain bikes. These components are generally organised and sold as groupsets intended to be supplied as a near complete collection of a bicycle's mechanical parts.

Groupsets commonly include: crankset comprising cranks and chainrings; bottom bracket; chain; rear gear cogs or cassette; front and rear wheel hubs; gear shift levers; brakes; brake levers; cables; front and rear gear mechanisms or derailleurs.

The Italian firm Campagnolo is a competitor as the other major manufacturer of road groupsets. SRAM is a competitor as the other major manufacturer of mountain bike groupsets, though they are now introducing a road groupset as well.

When the 1970s United States bike boom exceeded the capacity of the American and European bicycle component manufacturers, Japanese manufacturers SunTour and Shimano rapidly stepped in to fill the void. While both companies provided products for all price-ranges of the market, SunTour also focused on refinement of existing systems and designs for higher end products, while Shimano paid more attention to rethinking the basic systems and bringing out innovations such as index shifting and front freewheel systems. SunTour eventually lost the commercial battle. In contrast to the near-universal marketing technique of introducing innovations on the expensive side of the marketplace and relying on consumer demand to emulate early adopters along with economy of scale to bring them into the mass market, Shimano introduced new technologies at the lowest end of the bicycle market, using lower cost and often heavier and less durable materials and techniques, only moving them further upscale if they established themselves in the lower market segments.

Lance Armstrong's 1999 victory in the Tour de France on a Shimano Dura-Ace equipped Trek was the first time Shimano components had been used to win the grand tour. In 2002, Dura-Ace equipped bikes were ridden to victory in the Tour de France (Lance Armstrong), Giro d'Italia (Paolo Savoldelli), and Vuelta a España (Aitor González), marking the first time Shimano componentry had been used to win all three grand tours. World championships in both the road and time trial disciplines were won on Shimano equipment.

In 2003 Shimano introduced "Dual Control" to mountain bikes, where the gear shift mechanism is integrated into the brake levers, and reintroduced the "Rapid Rise" rear derailler which works in the opposite direction to traditional deraillers. This development was controversial: critics viewed it as an attempt to monopolise the mountain bike components market because the use of Dual Control integrated shifting requires the use of Shimano brakes, and the Rapid Rise derailler is believed to work more effectively with the Dual Control system. Shimano also introduced new proprietary standards for disc brakes and hubs, and for bottom brackets and cranksets, further fueling speculation about monopolistic intentions.

Many people believe that "VIA", which is stamped on all Shimano parts, is a form of corporate logo, since it does not appear on Campagnolo parts, for instance. In fact, VIA is an official approval stamp used to certify parts of Japanese vehicles - including bicycles.

Racing bicycle groupsets

Current road bicycle groupsets include:

  • Dura-Ace
  • Ultegra
  • 105
  • Tiagra
  • Sora

Mountain bike groupsets

Current mountain bicycle groupsets include:

  • Saint - This is the top of the range for DownHill(DH)/FreeRide(FR) bikes
  • Hone
  • XTR - This is the top of the range for CrossCountry(XC) mountain bikes
  • XT
  • LX
  • Deore
  • Alivio
  • Acera
  • Altus
  • Tourney - this includes several different levels of quality, and can be found on department-store bicycles.

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Current mountain bicycle groupsets include:. a tube top cannot have a collar. Current road bicycle groupsets include:. Some combinations are not applicable, of course, e.g. In fact, VIA is an official approval stamp used to certify parts of Japanese vehicles - including bicycles. one can disinguish:. Many people believe that "VIA", which is stamped on all Shimano parts, is a form of corporate logo, since it does not appear on Campagnolo parts, for instance. For such clothing, including vests, sweaters, jackets, etc.

Shimano also introduced new proprietary standards for disc brakes and hubs, and for bottom brackets and cranksets, further fueling speculation about monopolistic intentions. These can be screen printed or embroidered. This development was controversial: critics viewed it as an attempt to monopolise the mountain bike components market because the use of Dual Control integrated shifting requires the use of Shimano brakes, and the Rapid Rise derailler is believed to work more effectively with the Dual Control system. Recently, (late 20th century) it has become common to use tops to carry messages or advertising. In 2003 Shimano introduced "Dual Control" to mountain bikes, where the gear shift mechanism is integrated into the brake levers, and reintroduced the "Rapid Rise" rear derailler which works in the opposite direction to traditional deraillers. The smallest differences may have significance to a cultural or occupational group. World championships in both the road and time trial disciplines were won on Shimano equipment. Many terms are used to describe and differentiate types of shirts and their construction.

In 2002, Dura-Ace equipped bikes were ridden to victory in the Tour de France (Lance Armstrong), Giro d'Italia (Paolo Savoldelli), and Vuelta a España (Aitor González), marking the first time Shimano componentry had been used to win all three grand tours. Other tops which are not generally referred to as shirts include vests, sweaters, jackets and coats. Lance Armstrong's 1999 victory in the Tour de France on a Shimano Dura-Ace equipped Trek was the first time Shimano components had been used to win the grand tour. Tops which would generally not be called shirts:. In contrast to the near-universal marketing technique of introducing innovations on the expensive side of the marketplace and relying on consumer demand to emulate early adopters along with economy of scale to bring them into the mass market, Shimano introduced new technologies at the lowest end of the bicycle market, using lower cost and often heavier and less durable materials and techniques, only moving them further upscale if they established themselves in the lower market segments. Some common types or synonyms of shirts and tops:. SunTour eventually lost the commercial battle. In the US it tends to have a vaguer meaning, being applied to many types of (mainly men's) tops, leaving the word "top" generally for ladieswear.

While both companies provided products for all price-ranges of the market, SunTour also focused on refinement of existing systems and designs for higher end products, while Shimano paid more attention to rethinking the basic systems and bringing out innovations such as index shifting and front freewheel systems. In the UK, it refers most often to what Americans call a dress shirt or tailored shirt, i.e., a garment with a collar, cuffs, and a full vertical opening with buttons. When the 1970s United States bike boom exceeded the capacity of the American and European bicycle component manufacturers, Japanese manufacturers SunTour and Shimano rapidly stepped in to fill the void. A shirt is a piece of clothing for the trunk of the body. SRAM is a competitor as the other major manufacturer of mountain bike groupsets, though they are now introducing a road groupset as well. With or without hood. The Italian firm Campagnolo is a competitor as the other major manufacturer of road groupsets. With regard to pockets: how many (if any), where, and with regard to closure: not closable, just a flap, or with a button or zipper.

Groupsets commonly include: crankset comprising cranks and chainrings; bottom bracket; chain; rear gear cogs or cassette; front and rear wheel hubs; gear shift levers; brakes; brake levers; cables; front and rear gear mechanisms or derailleurs. without collar. These components are generally organised and sold as groupsets intended to be supplied as a near complete collection of a bicycle's mechanical parts. turtle neck collar A collar that covers most of the throat. Shimano products include drivetrain, brake, wheel and pedal components for leisure, road and mountain bikes. Also casual. . Rarely seen in modern fashion.

Shimano ((OTCBB: SHMDF), FWB: SHM) is a Japanese manufacturer of cycling, fishing, snowboarding, and until 2005, golf components. band collar — essentially the lower part of a normal collar, first used as the original collar to which a separate collarpiece was attached. Tourney - this includes several different levels of quality, and can be found on department-store bicycles. The most casual of collars worn with a tie. Altus. button-down collar — A collar with buttons that fasten the points or tips to a shirt. Acera. A moderate dress collar.

Alivio. straight collar — or point collar, a version of the windsor collar that is distinguished by a narrower spread to better accommodate the four-in-hand knot, pratt knot, and the half-windsor knot. Deore. wing collar — best suited for the bow tie, often only worn for very formal occaisions. LX. tab collar — a collar with two small fabric tabs that fasten together behind a tie to maintain collar spread. XT. The standard business collar.

XTR - This is the top of the range for CrossCountry(XC) mountain bikes. windsor collar— or spread collar, a dressier collar designed with a wide distance between points (the spread) to accommodate the windsor knot tie. Hone. with collar

    . Saint - This is the top of the range for DownHill(DH)/FreeRide(FR) bikes. with open or tassel neck. Sora. with plunging neck.

    Tiagra. with v-neck. 105. with polo-neck. Ultegra. With regard to the neck:

      . Dura-Ace. men's shirts are often buttoned on the right whereas women's are often buttoned on the left.

      vertical opening on the upper front side with buttons or zipper

        . no opening at the upper front side. V-shaped permanent opening on the top of the front side. left and right front side not separable, put on over the head; with regard to upper front side opening:
          .

          When fastened with buttons, this opening is often called the placket front. vertical opening on the front side, all the way down, with buttons or zipper. With regard to opening or front:

            . covering part of the legs (essentially this is a dress; however, a piece of clothing is either perceived as a shirt (worn with trousers) or as a dress (in Western culture mainly worn by women)).

            covering the crotch. until the waist. See halfshirt. leaving the belly button area bare (much more common for women than for men.

            With regard to level of the lower edge:

              . A link cuff is fastened like a french cuff, except is not folded over, but instead hemmed, at the edge of the sleeve. More formally, a link cuff is worn. This type of cuff has four buttons and a short placket.

              Typically a french cuff, where the end half of the cuff is folded over the cuff itself and fastened with a cufflink. buttonholes only for use with cufflinks.

                . Multiple buttons aligned perpendicular to the cuff hem, or parallel to the placket constitute a barrel cuff. A single button or pair aligned parallel with the cuff hem is considered a button cuff.

                buttons — single or multiple. See closed placket cuff. no buttons. with long sleeves, may further be distinguished by the cuffs:

                  .

                  with half-long sleeves. with short sleeves. covering the shoulders, but without sleeves. with only bands on the shoulders.

                  with no covering of the shoulders or arms — a tube top (not reaching higher than the armpits, staying in place by elasticity, see e.g [3]). With regard to covering the shoulders and arms:

                    . diaper shirt — a shirt for infants which includes a long tail that is wrapped between the legs and buttoned to the front of the shirt. It is mechanically analogous to an apron with a string around the back of the neck and across the lower back holding it in place.

                    halter top — a shoulderless, sleeveless, backless garment for women. see e.g [2]). tube top or boob tube — a shoulderless, sleeveless "tube" that wraps the torso (not reaching higher than the armpits, staying in place by elasticity or by a single strap that is attached to the front of the tube. [1].

                    See e.g. fishnet shirt, transparent, initially popular fashion item of punk culture or goth culture. baseball shirt — usually distinguished by a three quarters sleeve, team insignia, and flat waistseam. halfshirt — a high-hemmed t-shirt.

                    Often worn with a sweater vest. golf shirt — same as polo shirt, typically embroidered with club or designer insignia; maybe be short or long-sleeved. guayabera — an embroidered dress shirt with four pockets. Actually called an Aloha shirt, but is often also called a "tropical shirt," hawaiian shirts are often not fitted and are woven from very light fabric.

                    Hawaiian shirt — a colourful short-sleeve dress shirt. rugby shirt — typically a rugged long-sleeved polo shirt, of thick cotton or wool. sweatshirt — cotton or synthetic athletic shirt, with or without hood. nightshirt — often oversized, ruined or inexpensive light cloth undergarment shirt for sleeping.

                    blouse — lady's shirt; the term is also used for some men's military uniform shirts. Initially a men's garment, is normally seen in modern times being worn by women. tunic — primitive shirt, distinguished by two-piece construction. Also referred to as a cami, shelf top, spaghetti straps or strappy top.

                    camisole — woman's undershirt with narrow straps, or a similar garment worn alone (often with bra). Often worn by construction workers for increased movability. construction shirt — essentially a sleeveless t-shirt with large armholes. wife beater — a tank top worn as an outer layer, also called an "A-shirt" or athletic shirt.

                    tank top — a sleeveless T-shirt.

                      . shirt or dress shirt — a shirt with collar and full vertical opening with buttons; left and right sides of this shirt meet with the placket front. Short or long sleeve. polo shirt — a v-neck shirt with a full collar; opening often closed with buttons or zipper.

                      T-shirt — a casual shirt without a collar or buttons, usually short-sleeved.

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