This page will contain external links about Shimano, as they become available.

Shimano

Shimano ((OTCBB: SHMDF), FWB: SHM) is a Japanese manufacturer of cycling, fishing, snowboarding, and until 2005, golf components.

Cycling

Shimano products include drivetrain, brake, wheel and pedal components for leisure, road and mountain bikes. These components are generally organised and sold as groupsets intended to be supplied as a near complete collection of a bicycle's mechanical parts.

Groupsets commonly include: crankset comprising cranks and chainrings; bottom bracket; chain; rear gear cogs or cassette; front and rear wheel hubs; gear shift levers; brakes; brake levers; cables; front and rear gear mechanisms or derailleurs.

The Italian firm Campagnolo is a competitor as the other major manufacturer of road groupsets. SRAM is a competitor as the other major manufacturer of mountain bike groupsets, though they are now introducing a road groupset as well.

When the 1970s United States bike boom exceeded the capacity of the American and European bicycle component manufacturers, Japanese manufacturers SunTour and Shimano rapidly stepped in to fill the void. While both companies provided products for all price-ranges of the market, SunTour also focused on refinement of existing systems and designs for higher end products, while Shimano paid more attention to rethinking the basic systems and bringing out innovations such as index shifting and front freewheel systems. SunTour eventually lost the commercial battle. In contrast to the near-universal marketing technique of introducing innovations on the expensive side of the marketplace and relying on consumer demand to emulate early adopters along with economy of scale to bring them into the mass market, Shimano introduced new technologies at the lowest end of the bicycle market, using lower cost and often heavier and less durable materials and techniques, only moving them further upscale if they established themselves in the lower market segments.

Lance Armstrong's 1999 victory in the Tour de France on a Shimano Dura-Ace equipped Trek was the first time Shimano components had been used to win the grand tour. In 2002, Dura-Ace equipped bikes were ridden to victory in the Tour de France (Lance Armstrong), Giro d'Italia (Paolo Savoldelli), and Vuelta a España (Aitor González), marking the first time Shimano componentry had been used to win all three grand tours. World championships in both the road and time trial disciplines were won on Shimano equipment.

In 2003 Shimano introduced "Dual Control" to mountain bikes, where the gear shift mechanism is integrated into the brake levers, and reintroduced the "Rapid Rise" rear derailler which works in the opposite direction to traditional deraillers. This development was controversial: critics viewed it as an attempt to monopolise the mountain bike components market because the use of Dual Control integrated shifting requires the use of Shimano brakes, and the Rapid Rise derailler is believed to work more effectively with the Dual Control system. Shimano also introduced new proprietary standards for disc brakes and hubs, and for bottom brackets and cranksets, further fueling speculation about monopolistic intentions.

Many people believe that "VIA", which is stamped on all Shimano parts, is a form of corporate logo, since it does not appear on Campagnolo parts, for instance. In fact, VIA is an official approval stamp used to certify parts of Japanese vehicles - including bicycles.

Racing bicycle groupsets

Current road bicycle groupsets include:

  • Dura-Ace
  • Ultegra
  • 105
  • Tiagra
  • Sora

Mountain bike groupsets

Current mountain bicycle groupsets include:

  • Saint - This is the top of the range for DownHill(DH)/FreeRide(FR) bikes
  • Hone
  • XTR - This is the top of the range for CrossCountry(XC) mountain bikes
  • XT
  • LX
  • Deore
  • Alivio
  • Acera
  • Altus
  • Tourney - this includes several different levels of quality, and can be found on department-store bicycles.

This page about Shimano includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about Shimano
News stories about Shimano
External links for Shimano
Videos for Shimano
Wikis about Shimano
Discussion Groups about Shimano
Blogs about Shimano
Images of Shimano

Current mountain bicycle groupsets include:. Also, the police may fine you during a Pink slip race. Current road bicycle groupsets include:. Crashing during the race will either total your car, or requre you to pay a fee in order to get it fixed. In fact, VIA is an official approval stamp used to certify parts of Japanese vehicles - including bicycles. When the race starts, the player must wait for a signal to be given to go or else they forfeit the race. Many people believe that "VIA", which is stamped on all Shimano parts, is a form of corporate logo, since it does not appear on Campagnolo parts, for instance. Wagers on the races can be set from "Just for fun!" (no wager) to cash to "Pink Slips" (the winner recieves the loser's car).

Shimano also introduced new proprietary standards for disc brakes and hubs, and for bottom brackets and cranksets, further fueling speculation about monopolistic intentions. Races take place on either a dragstrip, Mulholland drive, or in an aquaduct. This development was controversial: critics viewed it as an attempt to monopolise the mountain bike components market because the use of Dual Control integrated shifting requires the use of Shimano brakes, and the Rapid Rise derailler is believed to work more effectively with the Dual Control system. The player will proceed from the garage to the local diner in order to find some competiton to race. In 2003 Shimano introduced "Dual Control" to mountain bikes, where the gear shift mechanism is integrated into the brake levers, and reintroduced the "Rapid Rise" rear derailler which works in the opposite direction to traditional deraillers. While racing, the car will eventually run out of fuel, which the payer must obtain from the gas station. World championships in both the road and time trial disciplines were won on Shimano equipment. To install tires, the car must be jacked up.

In 2002, Dura-Ace equipped bikes were ridden to victory in the Tour de France (Lance Armstrong), Giro d'Italia (Paolo Savoldelli), and Vuelta a España (Aitor González), marking the first time Shimano componentry had been used to win all three grand tours. Then, these parts must be re-installed in order and the screws replaced, otherwise the car will be undrivable. Lance Armstrong's 1999 victory in the Tour de France on a Shimano Dura-Ace equipped Trek was the first time Shimano components had been used to win the grand tour. New parts that are purchased must be installed by the player by entering the hood of or going under the car and then removing a series of screws to remove parts of the engine and transmission. In contrast to the near-universal marketing technique of introducing innovations on the expensive side of the marketplace and relying on consumer demand to emulate early adopters along with economy of scale to bring them into the mass market, Shimano introduced new technologies at the lowest end of the bicycle market, using lower cost and often heavier and less durable materials and techniques, only moving them further upscale if they established themselves in the lower market segments. The player starts off on the garage, where cars and parts may be purchased from the newspaper. SunTour eventually lost the commercial battle. Using money you earn through races you can modify your car and eventually winning enough races earns you the right to challenge the king for his position.

While both companies provided products for all price-ranges of the market, SunTour also focused on refinement of existing systems and designs for higher end products, while Shimano paid more attention to rethinking the basic systems and bringing out innovations such as index shifting and front freewheel systems. Equipped with a garage and a small amount of cash, you buy a used car out of the paper and embark on a journey to rise through the ranks by winning races against other racers. When the 1970s United States bike boom exceeded the capacity of the American and European bicycle component manufacturers, Japanese manufacturers SunTour and Shimano rapidly stepped in to fill the void. You start the game as a protagonist that seeks to usurp the throne and claim the girlfriend of the local king of the streets. SRAM is a competitor as the other major manufacturer of mountain bike groupsets, though they are now introducing a road groupset as well. . The Italian firm Campagnolo is a competitor as the other major manufacturer of road groupsets. Street Rod exclusively feaured Muscle Cars, specifically those from GM, Ford, and Chrysler.

Groupsets commonly include: crankset comprising cranks and chainrings; bottom bracket; chain; rear gear cogs or cassette; front and rear wheel hubs; gear shift levers; brakes; brake levers; cables; front and rear gear mechanisms or derailleurs. Street Rod is a racing video game series developed by Logical Design Works and published by California Dreams for DOS, Amiga, and Commodore 64. These components are generally organised and sold as groupsets intended to be supplied as a near complete collection of a bicycle's mechanical parts. Street Rod 3 is an unoffical sequel to the series that is being developed for Windows with the aim of recreating a game similar to Street Rod 2 with more cars and parts, as well as transitioning the series from 2D to 3D grahpics. Shimano products include drivetrain, brake, wheel and pedal components for leisure, road and mountain bikes. Street Rod 2 was modeled on the same engine as the first game, which yielded an almost identical game with different cars, more parts, an additional track, and improved graphics. . Street Rod 2 was released in 1990 and takes place in the year 1971.

Shimano ((OTCBB: SHMDF), FWB: SHM) is a Japanese manufacturer of cycling, fishing, snowboarding, and until 2005, golf components. Street Rod was released in 1989 and takes place in the year 1965. Tourney - this includes several different levels of quality, and can be found on department-store bicycles. Altus. Acera.

Alivio. Deore. LX. XT.

XTR - This is the top of the range for CrossCountry(XC) mountain bikes. Hone. Saint - This is the top of the range for DownHill(DH)/FreeRide(FR) bikes. Sora.

Tiagra. 105. Ultegra. Dura-Ace.

11-29-14 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php PAD File Directory Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Display all your websites in one place HereIam.tv Celebrity Homepages Charity Directory Google+ Directory Move your favorite Unsigned Artist to the Top of the List