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R.E.M. (band)

R.E.M. is a rock band formed in Athens, Georgia in 1980 by Michael Stipe (vocals), Bill Berry (drums), Peter Buck (guitar), and Mike Mills (bass). Throughout the 1980s, while signed to the independent label I.R.S., they achieved a growing cult status due mainly to Stipe's obscure (and sometimes inaudible and unintelligible) lyrics and the band's sound, most noticeably influenced by The Byrds. By the early '90s, R.E.M. was one of the world's most popular, respected, and influential bands.

The I.R.S. Years (1982-1987)

Their debut EP, Chronic Town (1982), illustrated R.E.M.'s signature musical style: jangling guitars, chords played in arpeggio, murmured vocals, and lyrics that completely avoid the standard topics of popular music - love and relationships. Their debut album, Murmur (1983), is held to be one of the best records of the 1980s. The album is stylistically unified. The jangling guitars, so prominent on Chronic Town, are used more sparingly. The melody is found in the bass notes, and the lyrics are practically indecipherable. The songs on the album blend together. Evocative words are used to create a mood instead of a narrative. The mood is grey - "Rest assured this will not last, take a turn for the worst", "martyred, misconstrued", "Not everyone can carry the weight of the world", "lies and conversation, fear". The dark mood is broken by two brighter, more hopeful songs, "Sitting Still," and "Shaking Through", marked by the return of arpeggio and jangling guitars.

R.E.M.'s second album, Reckoning (1984), explored a variety of musical styles. Song topics include cold weather, a fairy tale of brothers with magical powers and a flood, along with five laments of separation. The jangling guitars and beautiful melodies obscure the dark lyrics. The final song, "Little America," is written about driving through rural America ("another Greenville, another Magic Mart (http://www.magicmartstores.com/)"), and serves as a prelude to the Southern themes on the subsequent album.

Fables of the Reconstruction (1985) explores the mythology of the southern United States. A celebration of an eccentric individual is the subject of no less than four songs on the album ("Maps and Legends," "Life and How to Live It," "Old Man Kensey," "Wendell Gee"). "Driver 8" is a song about the scenery surrounding railroad tracks. Trains are a frequent topic of Southern music; they epitomize the freedom and promise of an escape from one's home environment. The source of the title of "Can't Get There from Here" is a curious phrase heard when asking directions in a rural area. "Kohoutek," their first song about a romantic relationship, compares the fizzled comet of 1973 to a fizzled romance. By the time this album was released, R.E.M. were critically acclaimed, and the video for "Can't Get There from Here" was played frequently on MTV. R.E.M. practically defined college rock by this time.

The next album, Lifes Rich Pageant (sic) (1986), takes its name from a Pink Panther movie ("You'll catch your death of cold!" "Yes, I probably will. But that's all part of life's rich pageant, you know."). The songs are upbeat, the tempo is fast; this is a fairly hard-rocking album. The lyrics were becoming both more intelligible and more direct, with political themes appearing more explicitly ("Begin the Begin," "Flowers of Guatemala," "Hyena"). "Cuyahoga" is about the river in Ohio that caught fire due to pollution. Ironically, the 'hit' from the album, "Superman," was a cover song that didn't appear on the original album cover. In many ways, this album marked the end of the first period in the band's history.

Document (1987) was their last album for the indie record label I.R.S., and provided their first major hit with "The One I Love," which reached No. 9 on the American pop charts. The popularity of this song of grim satisfaction over the end of an unhappy relationship was due mainly, however, to its misinterpretation as a love song. "It's the End of the World as We Know It (And I Feel Fine)" recalls the rapid-fire lyrical style of Bob Dylan's "Subterranean Homesick Blues" and can be described as pre-apocalyptic.

Dead Letter Office (1987) was a collection of B-sides and outtakes. Highlights include three Velvet Underground covers, an Aerosmith cover, an uncommissioned commercial for a barbecue restaurant in Athens, and a boozy version of "King of the Road." The CD also has the EP Chronic Town at the end. The album is described in the liner notes as "A little bit of uh-huh and a whole lot of oh-yeah." The band's early years are summarized in the compilation Eponymous, released in 1988. The compilation contains several alternative versions and mixes of songs.

Rock Superstars (1988-1996)

In 1988 R.E.M. signed to the major label Warner Brothers and released Green. This was the band's first time with heavy promotion, and they toured stadiums extensively in 1989. Some fans from the I.R.S. days complained that R.E.M. had become too commercial and that the quality of the music had decreased, but the band had now been brought to international attention. In 1990, most of R.E.M. recorded with Warren Zevon as the Hindu Love Gods.

Their next records, Out of Time (1991) and Automatic for the People (1992), were both international hits, despite the fact that R.E.M. did not tour for either album. These two critically acclaimed albums featured hit singles including "Losing My Religion," "Shiny Happy People," "Everybody Hurts," and "The Sidewinder Sleeps Tonite." Out of Time also includes emotional, contemplative tracks such as "Belong," "Half A World Away," and "Country Feedback." On Automatic, the band developed a reserved, meditative sound that took them back to their roots, and the record's 15 million copies were sold in spite of such melancholy themes as death, suicide, and sexual jealousy.

The band's 1994 release, the grunge-influenced Monster, including "What's the Frequency, Kenneth?," proved to be a crossover hit and their best selling album to date, though many critics disliked the band's foray into glam rock. The album was followed by a massive tour during which drummer Bill Berry suffered a brain hemorrhage on stage, which would eventually lead to his leaving the band. While on this tour the band recorded the album New Adventures in Hi-Fi (1996), a long, roughly produced and decidedly bleak record which featured, in the seven-minute "Leave," perhaps the band's most intense song. Other notable tracks on that record include "E-Bow the Letter" (a collaboration with the legendary Patti Smith) and the intense western-themed rock of "Low Desert." The band re-signed with Warner Brothers in 1996 for the largest recording contract advance in history: 80 million dollars for 5 albums.

R.E.M. After Berry (1997-present)

After Berry's departure, the band returned with Krautrock-influenced Up (1998), another long and reflective record, with the lead single "Daysleeper." Many tracks contained drum machines, and Peter Buck played guitar only a little. The band was no longer selling well in United States, though in Europe they stayed popular. 2001's Reveal, confirms the return to an even mellower songwriting approach, with songs such as "Imitation of Life," "All The Way To Reno (You're Gonna Be A Star)," and "She Just Wants To Be" garnering some radio play. The album gained mixed reviews. Recent R.E.M. soundtrack appearances have found them revisiting some of their earliest material, hitherto available only on live bootlegs; their single, "Bad Day" (2003), was the prototype for "It's the End of the World As We Know It (And I Feel Fine)," with some of the same lyrics. In 2004, the band returned with Around the Sun, which once again met with generally only mild critical praise. Singles from this album include "Leaving New York" and "Aftermath". R.E.M.'s Around the Sun World Tour is the first tour since the infamous Monster Tour that R.E.M. needed to cancel shows, on account of Mike Mills's flu and ear infection. "Electron Blue," the third single from the Around the Sun album, has been getting much airplay in the UK.

The Future

In a recent interview, Peter Buck said that their next album would be very different from current R.E.M., and based on the single "I'm Gonna DJ", played live on the 2004-2005 world tour, we can expect it to be another rock album, which, if successful, could possibly lead to Warner resigning R.E.M. after the two albums left on their contract. In the same interview, Michael Stipe said he has lyrics to three new songs on his cell phone and one is almost complete and may be debuted live. Currently, there have been two songs played live supposedly on the next album, rumored for a 2006 release; "I'm Gonna D.J.", the catchy rocking song with multiple guitars, and "Weatherman", played once live and then stopped due to the 'lyrics not fitting the song'. Not replacing Berry, R.E.M. are currently using drummer Bill Rieflin on Around the Sun and the tour, and his drums may help a 2006 release. R.E.M. currently are touring outside of the United States on their world tour, which is currently to end in July 2005 at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff.

Trivia

  • The band members picked the name R.E.M. out of the dictionary. They liked the name because it was so ambiguous. They started out as Twisted Kites for the first show they played at a party, but, according to "It Crawled From the South," considered Negro Eyes, Slut Bank, and Cans of Piss before settling for R.E.M.
  • "Losing My Religion" may have been the biggest hit song that uses a mandolin as the main instrument.

Samples

  • Download sample of "What's the Frequency, Kenneth?" from Monster.

Discography

Studio Albums

  • Chronic Town EP (1982)
  • Murmur (1983); #178 US
  • Reckoning (1984); #27 US
  • Fables of the Reconstruction (1985) #28 US, #35 UK
  • Lifes Rich Pageant (1986) #21 US
  • Dead Letter Office (outtakes and b-sides, incl. Chronic Town EP) (1987) #52 US
  • Document (1987); #28 UK, #10 US
  • Green (1988); #27 UK, #12 US
  • Out of Time (1991); #1 UK, #1 US
  • Automatic for the People (1992); #1 UK, #2 US
  • Monster (1994); #1 UK, #1 US
  • New Adventures in Hi-Fi (1996); #1 UK, #2 US
  • Up (1998); #2 UK, #3 US
  • Reveal (2001); #1 UK, #6 US
  • Around the Sun (2004); #1 UK, #13 US

Compilations

  • Eponymous (compilation) (1988) #44 US
  • The Best of R.E.M. (1991); #7 UK
  • Singles Collected (1994);
  • R.E.M. In The Attic (rarities compilation) (1997)
  • R.E.M.IX (Web Only Remixes)
  • In Time - The Best of R.E.M. 1988-2003 (compilation) (2003); #1 UK, #8 US

Hit Singles

  • 1983 "Radio Free Europe" #78 US
  • 1984 "South Central Rain (I'm Sorry)" #85 US
  • 1986 "Fall On Me" #94 US
  • 1987 "The One I Love" #9 US
  • 1989 "Stand" #6 US
  • 1989 "Orange Crush" #28 UK
  • 1989 "Pop Song 89" #86 US
  • 1991 "Losing My Religion" #4 US, #19 UK
  • 1991 "Shiny Happy People" #10 US; #6 UK
  • 1991 "Near Wild Heaven" #27 UK
  • 1991 "The One I Love" (re-issue) #16 UK
  • 1991 "Radio Song" #28 UK
  • 1991 "It's The End Of The World As We Know It" #39 UK; #69 US (1988)
  • 1992 "Drive" #28 US; #11 UK
  • 1993 "Man on the Moon" #30 US; #18 UK
  • 1993 "The Sidewinder Sleeps Tonite" #17 UK
  • 1993 "Everybody Hurts" #29 US; #7 UK
  • 1993 "Nightswimming" #27 UK
  • 1994 "What's the Frequency, Kenneth?" #21 US; #9 UK
  • 1994 "Bang and Blame" #19 US; #15 UK
  • 1995 "Crush with Eyeliner" #23 UK
  • 1995 "Strange Currencies" #47 US; #9 UK
  • 1995 "Tongue" #13 UK
  • 1996 "E-Bow the Letter" #4 UK
  • 1996 "Bittersweet Me" #46 US; #19 UK
  • 1996 "Electrolite" #96 US; #29 UK
  • 1998 "Daysleeper" #57 US; #6 UK
  • 1998 "Lotus" #26 UK
  • 1999 "At My Most Beautiful" #10 UK
  • 2000 "The Great Beyond" #57 US; #3 UK
  • 2001 "Imitation of Life" #83 US; #6 UK
  • 2001 "All the Way to Reno" #24 UK
  • 2001 "I'll Take the Rain" #51 UK
  • 2003 "Bad Day" #8 UK
  • 2004 "Animal" #33 UK
  • 2004 "Leaving New York" #5 UK
  • 2004 "Aftermath" #41 UK
  • 2005 "Electron Blue" #26 UK

External Links

  • Official R.E.M. website (http://www.remhq.com/)
  • Murmurs : R.E.M. news, multimedia, file sharing & largest R.E.M. forum (http://www.murmurs.com/)
  • R.E.M. fan site (http://www.rem-fan.com/)
  • R.E.M. news & multimedia (http://www.remison.com/)
  • The R.E.M. Collector's Guide (http://www.svs.com/rem/)
  • R.E.M. Rock (http://www.remrock.com/)
  • File Under R.E.M. - The RetroWeb R.E.M. Page (http://www.retroweb.com/rem.html)
  • 2nd Largest R.E.M. Forum (http://www.myrem.com)
  • rec.music.rem FAQ (http://people2.clarityconnect.com/webpages6/ronhenry/remfaq.htm)
  • R.E.M. Lyric Annotations FAQ (http://www.flim.com/remlafaq.html)



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. currently are touring outside of the United States on their world tour, which is currently to end in July 2005 at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff. Neil Peart has received the following awards in the Modern Drummer magazine reader's poll:. R.E.M. - Alex Lifeson won Best Rock Talent in 1983 (I assume that it's on the same mag), and he was inducted into the Guitar for the Practicing Musician Hall of Fame in May of 1991. are currently using drummer Bill Rieflin on Around the Sun and the tour, and his drums may help a 2006 release. - Geddy Lee won "best Rock Bass player" in the 1993 "Bass Player" readers' poll.

Not replacing Berry, R.E.M. - Geddy Lee is in the Bass Hall of Fame for Guitar Player Magazine
. Currently, there have been two songs played live supposedly on the next album, rumored for a 2006 release; "I'm Gonna D.J.", the catchy rocking song with multiple guitars, and "Weatherman", played once live and then stopped due to the 'lyrics not fitting the song'. Rush has been awarded the following Juno awards:. In the same interview, Michael Stipe said he has lyrics to three new songs on his cell phone and one is almost complete and may be debuted live. Rush has received many awards during their career. after the two albums left on their contract. Solo efforts of band members:.

In a recent interview, Peter Buck said that their next album would be very different from current R.E.M., and based on the single "I'm Gonna DJ", played live on the 2004-2005 world tour, we can expect it to be another rock album, which, if successful, could possibly lead to Warner resigning R.E.M. It is an issue that seems to be entirely between the Hall of Fame and Rush's fans, as Geddy Lee himself has noted that the issue "seems to be a lot more important to our fans than it does to us.". "Electron Blue," the third single from the Around the Sun album, has been getting much airplay in the UK. Nevertheless, the issue remains unresolved. needed to cancel shows, on account of Mike Mills's flu and ear infection. Additionally, these supporters note, Rush has influenced countless musicians and bands, from inspiring numerous people to learn to play their instruments to bands that have openly declared such influence, notably Metallica, Smashing Pumpkins, and Primus. Singles from this album include "Leaving New York" and "Aftermath". R.E.M.'s Around the Sun World Tour is the first tour since the infamous Monster Tour that R.E.M. They also point out that the critics seemingly ignore when Rush truly distinguished themselves, beginning with 1980's Permanent Waves and 1981's Moving Pictures, which they claim blended the virtuosity of talented players with strong song-writing skills in an accessible format.

In 2004, the band returned with Around the Sun, which once again met with generally only mild critical praise. Rush's supporters note that their music was only of the true "prog" school from 1975-1979, a small portion of their thirty year history. soundtrack appearances have found them revisiting some of their earliest material, hitherto available only on live bootlegs; their single, "Bad Day" (2003), was the prototype for "It's the End of the World As We Know It (And I Feel Fine)," with some of the same lyrics. Rush's detractors associate the band with the progressive rock era of the 1970s, which they view as overblown and pretentious. Indeed, many believe that era to be the nadir of rock and roll. Recent R.E.M. At one point, in an ESPN.com article introducing basketball star LeBron James to Cleveland just before James' rookie season in 2004, the writer suggested James be up to speed on the latest rumblings from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: "U2-definitely yes, REM-maybe, Rush-definitely no.". The album gained mixed reviews. The debate has become one of the hot debates involving the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, as fans clammer extensively for the band's induction while the Hall of Fame voters steadfastly refuse.

2001's Reveal, confirms the return to an even mellower songwriting approach, with songs such as "Imitation of Life," "All The Way To Reno (You're Gonna Be A Star)," and "She Just Wants To Be" garnering some radio play. Since that time, the Hall of Fame has not nominated Rush for induction, causing more and more frustration as time goes by. The band was no longer selling well in United States, though in Europe they stayed popular. With such a fan base, it is not surprising that they were not pleased to learn that the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame passed over Rush for induction in 1999, Rush's first year of eligibility. After Berry's departure, the band returned with Krautrock-influenced Up (1998), another long and reflective record, with the lead single "Daysleeper." Many tracks contained drum machines, and Peter Buck played guitar only a little. The subsequent Vapor Trails tour grossed over $24 million and included the largest audience ever to see a Rush show - 60,000 fans in Sao Paulo. The following year, the band released Rush in Rio, which the RIAA has certified gold, marking the fourth decade in which a Rush album had been released and certified at least gold. Other notable tracks on that record include "E-Bow the Letter" (a collaboration with the legendary Patti Smith) and the intense western-themed rock of "Low Desert." The band re-signed with Warner Brothers in 1996 for the largest recording contract advance in history: 80 million dollars for 5 albums. Despite having completely dropped out of the public eye for five years following the loss of Peart's wife and daughter, and despite being relegated almost solely to classic rock stations in the U.S., their 2002 Vapor Trails release shot up to #6 on the Billboard Chart in its first week of release.

While on this tour the band recorded the album New Adventures in Hi-Fi (1996), a long, roughly produced and decidedly bleak record which featured, in the seven-minute "Leave," perhaps the band's most intense song. The result is strong detractors and an intensely loyal fan base. The album was followed by a massive tour during which drummer Bill Berry suffered a brain hemorrhage on stage, which would eventually lead to his leaving the band. Rush themselves have noted that people "either love Rush or hate Rush." There doesn't seem to be much middle ground. The band's 1994 release, the grunge-influenced Monster, including "What's the Frequency, Kenneth?," proved to be a crossover hit and their best selling album to date, though many critics disliked the band's foray into glam rock. The band has so far had three Grammy Award nominations, all for Best Rock Instrumental Performance. These two critically acclaimed albums featured hit singles including "Losing My Religion," "Shiny Happy People," "Everybody Hurts," and "The Sidewinder Sleeps Tonite." Out of Time also includes emotional, contemplative tracks such as "Belong," "Half A World Away," and "Country Feedback." On Automatic, the band developed a reserved, meditative sound that took them back to their roots, and the record's 15 million copies were sold in spite of such melancholy themes as death, suicide, and sexual jealousy. O'Leary's Cow".

Their next records, Out of Time (1991) and Automatic for the People (1992), were both international hits, despite the fact that R.E.M. did not tour for either album. Rush was nominated for a Best Rock Instrumental Performance Grammy Award in 2005 for Neil Peart's drum solo, “O Baterista” from the album Rush in Rio, but lost to Brian Wilson's "Mrs. recorded with Warren Zevon as the Hindu Love Gods. It is rumored that the band is to go back into the studio to record a new album in early 2005. In 1990, most of R.E.M. In the summer of 2004, Rush again hit the road for a successful 30th Anniversary Tour, playing dates in the United States, Canada, the UK, Germany, Italy, Sweden, the Czech Republic, and the Netherlands. had become too commercial and that the quality of the music had decreased, but the band had now been brought to international attention. June 2004 saw the release of Feedback, a studio EP featuring eight covers of such artists as Cream and The Who.

days complained that R.E.M. The companion DVD won the 2004 Juno for best music DVD. Some fans from the I.R.S. A live album, Rush in Rio, was released in late October 2003. This was the band's first time with heavy promotion, and they toured stadiums extensively in 1989. Also in 2003, Alex Lifeson appeared in the highy successful Canadian mockumentary Trailer Park Boys. Rush also played for CBC's 2004 tsunami relief telethon, along with Ed Robertson (of the Barenaked Ladies) and Mike Smith (Bubbles) from Trailer Park Boys. signed to the major label Warner Brothers and released Green. The band was one of a number of hometown favourites to play the SARS relief concert (dubbed SARStock) at Downsview Park in Toronto in August 2003, with an attendance of over half a million people.

In 1988 R.E.M. It debuted to moderate praise and was supported by the band's first tour in six years, including first-ever concerts in Mexico City and Brazil. The compilation contains several alternative versions and mixes of songs. The album contains the song "Ghost Rider", describing Peart's motorcycle journey. The album is described in the liner notes as "A little bit of uh-huh and a whole lot of oh-yeah." The band's early years are summarized in the compilation Eponymous, released in 1988. The band returned in 2002 with a surprisingly heavy and modern Vapor Trails album, their first without keyboards in over twenty years. Highlights include three Velvet Underground covers, an Aerosmith cover, an uncommissioned commercial for a barbecue restaurant in Athens, and a boozy version of "King of the Road." The CD also has the EP Chronic Town at the end. Rush later said that they came very close to disbanding during this period.

Dead Letter Office (1987) was a collection of B-sides and outtakes. He subsequently wrote about his travels in his book Ghost Rider: Travels on the Healing Road. "It's the End of the World as We Know It (And I Feel Fine)" recalls the rapid-fire lyrical style of Bob Dylan's "Subterranean Homesick Blues" and can be described as pre-apocalyptic. Peart embarked on a self-described "healing journey" by motorcycle in which he travelled thousands of miles across North America. The popularity of this song of grim satisfaction over the end of an unhappy relationship was due mainly, however, to its misinterpretation as a love song. After 1996's Test for Echo, the band entered a six-year hiatus due mainly to personal tragedies in Peart's life. Peart's daughter Selena died in a car accident in August 1997, followed by his wife Jacqueline's death from cancer in June 1998. 9 on the American pop charts. Each of the three individual artists has produced and released work independent of the band's structure, to varying degrees of commercial and critical success.

Document (1987) was their last album for the indie record label I.R.S., and provided their first major hit with "The One I Love," which reached No. From that point on, their albums of the 1980s tended to incorporate more keyboards and stuck to accessible style that began with Permanent Waves, even to the point that their recordings in the later 1980s and 1990s have sometimes been derided as being too mainstream. In many ways, this album marked the end of the first period in the band's history. Tom Sawyer can be heard frequently on American classic rock stations to this day. Ironically, the 'hit' from the album, "Superman," was a cover song that didn't appear on the original album cover. The lead track, Tom Sawyer, is perhaps the band's best known song, and Geddy Lee has referred to it as "the quintessential Rush song." Moving Pictures shot up to #3 on the Billboard Album Chart and has been certified quadruple platinum by the RIAA. "Cuyahoga" is about the river in Ohio that caught fire due to pollution. Rush's popularity hit its zenith with the release of Moving Pictures in 1981.

The lyrics were becoming both more intelligible and more direct, with political themes appearing more explicitly ("Begin the Begin," "Flowers of Guatemala," "Hyena"). One song in particular, Spirit of Radio (named for the Toronto-local groundbreaking radio station, CFNY), went on to become a huge hit on the alternative circuit. The songs are upbeat, the tempo is fast; this is a fairly hard-rocking album. As a result, the album cracked Billboard's Top 10 and went platinum. But that's all part of life's rich pageant, you know."). With Permanent Waves, Rush began to receive frequent airtime on rock radio stations. The next album, Lifes Rich Pageant (sic) (1986), takes its name from a Pink Panther movie ("You'll catch your death of cold!" "Yes, I probably will. Beginning with Permanent Waves, their music maintained certain progressive aspects, such as an emphasis on playing and time signature changes, but melded those elements into a more accessible format that placed more emphasis on songwriting.

practically defined college rock by this time. The themes of the songs changed dramatically, and became far more in common with alternative rock than prog-rock. R.E.M. Although the music was still based on heavy-metal style, more and more keyboards were introduced. were critically acclaimed, and the video for "Can't Get There from Here" was played frequently on MTV. Rush felt they had taken the genre of lengthy, progressive-influenced music as far as they could or wanted, and began to opt for shorter, more compact compositions. By the time this album was released, R.E.M. Permanent Waves changed things dramatically.

"Kohoutek," their first song about a romantic relationship, compares the fizzled comet of 1973 to a fizzled romance. The lyrics of that time were heavily influenced by science fiction and, in a few cases, the writings and philosophy of Ayn Rand, as exhibited most prominently by 1975's Anthem (named after Rand's novel) 1976's 2112 and 1978's Hemispheres. Many of their early songs received limited airplay because of their extended length (in some cases exceeding ten minutes) which were deemed unprofitable by station managers. The source of the title of "Can't Get There from Here" is a curious phrase heard when asking directions in a rural area. Albums prior to 1980's Permanent Waves are a mix of heavy metal and progressive rock similar to Yes or Genesis. Demonstrating their birth within the short-lived era of glitter rock bands, such as Alice Cooper or Ziggy Stardust, Rush were known to have flashy costumes and stage shows. Trains are a frequent topic of Southern music; they epitomize the freedom and promise of an escape from one's home environment. Rush's musical style has changed greatly over the lifetime of the group. "Driver 8" is a song about the scenery surrounding railroad tracks. Rush have been awarded the Juno Award (Canada's equivalent of the Grammy Award) on numerous occasions, and all three individuals are Members of the Order of Canada.

A celebration of an eccentric individual is the subject of no less than four songs on the album ("Maps and Legends," "Life and How to Live It," "Old Man Kensey," "Wendell Gee"). They take an attitude of perfectionism into the studio, and this fact is made clear by the crispness and superb engineering evident on most of their studio albums. Fables of the Reconstruction (1985) explores the mythology of the southern United States. Often considered the musician's musicians, Rush is known for their professional prowess on each respective instrument that they have mastered. The final song, "Little America," is written about driving through rural America ("another Greenville, another Magic Mart (http://www.magicmartstores.com/)"), and serves as a prelude to the Southern themes on the subsequent album. Fans of the band argue that Rush displays a virtuosity and longevity rarely achieved in hard rock circles. The jangling guitars and beautiful melodies obscure the dark lyrics. Lee and Lifeson usually write the music and Peart writes the lyrics, although every once in a while they will collaborate on lyrics or music.

Song topics include cold weather, a fairy tale of brothers with magical powers and a flood, along with five laments of separation. Since Peart joined in 1974, they have remained intact. R.E.M.'s second album, Reckoning (1984), explored a variety of musical styles. The band was formed in the summer of 1968, in Toronto by Lifeson, Lee, and John Rutsey (who played drums for Rush on the first album but resigned for health concerns shortly thereafter). The dark mood is broken by two brighter, more hopeful songs, "Sitting Still," and "Shaking Through", marked by the return of arpeggio and jangling guitars. Rush is an award-winning Canadian progressive rock band comprised of bassist/keyboardist/vocalist Geddy Lee, guitarist Alex Lifeson, and drummer Neil Peart (pronounced: 'Peert') that has been consistently recording since 1973. The mood is grey - "Rest assured this will not last, take a turn for the worst", "martyred, misconstrued", "Not everyone can carry the weight of the world", "lies and conversation, fear". All Music Guide (http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=11:4ubyxd0bjolk).

Evocative words are used to create a mood instead of a narrative. Rush MIDI (http://www.jgeoff.com/rush/). The songs on the album blend together. RushRadio.org (http://www.rushradio.org/) - a 24/7 Rush Internet radio station. The melody is found in the bass notes, and the lyrics are practically indecipherable. Rush @  (http://www.music-wiki.org/Rush)MusicWiki. The jangling guitars, so prominent on Chronic Town, are used more sparingly. Rush Tablature Project (http://www.cygnusproductions.com/rtp/).

The album is stylistically unified. The Rush Forum (http://www.therushforum.com). Their debut album, Murmur (1983), is held to be one of the best records of the 1980s. By-Tor.com (http://www.by-tor.com). Their debut EP, Chronic Town (1982), illustrated R.E.M.'s signature musical style: jangling guitars, chords played in arpeggio, murmured vocals, and lyrics that completely avoid the standard topics of popular music - love and relationships. www.rushmessageboard.com (requires registration). was one of the world's most popular, respected, and influential bands. Counterparts Rush Fan Website (http://www.rushweb.net).

By the early '90s, R.E.M. Power Windows (http://www.2112.net/powerwindows/) - a Rush tribute site. Throughout the 1980s, while signed to the independent label I.R.S., they achieved a growing cult status due mainly to Stipe's obscure (and sometimes inaudible and unintelligible) lyrics and the band's sound, most noticeably influenced by The Byrds. www.rush.com. R.E.M. is a rock band formed in Athens, Georgia in 1980 by Michael Stipe (vocals), Bill Berry (drums), Peter Buck (guitar), and Mike Mills (bass). 1986 Honor Roll: Rock Drummer, Multi-Percussion. Lyric Annotations FAQ (http://www.flim.com/remlafaq.html). 1992: Roll The Bones.

R.E.M. 1990: Presto. rec.music.rem FAQ (http://people2.clarityconnect.com/webpages6/ronhenry/remfaq.htm). 1989: A Show of Hands. Forum (http://www.myrem.com). 1988: Hold Your Fire. 2nd Largest R.E.M. 1986: Power Windows.

Page (http://www.retroweb.com/rem.html). 1985: Grace Under Pressure. - The RetroWeb R.E.M. 1983: Signals. File Under R.E.M. Stage Left. Rock (http://www.remrock.com/). 1982: Exit..

R.E.M. Best Recorded Performance: 1981: Moving Pictures. Collector's Guide (http://www.svs.com/rem/). Best All Around: 1986. The R.E.M. Most Promising New Drummer: 1980. news & multimedia (http://www.remison.com/). Best Percussion Instrumentalist: 1982.

R.E.M. Best Multi-Percussionist: 1983,1984,1985,1986. fan site (http://www.rem-fan.com/). Best Rock Drummer: 1980,1981,1982,1983,1984,1985. R.E.M. Hall of Fame: 1983. forum (http://www.murmurs.com/). O'Leary's Cow".

news, multimedia, file sharing & largest R.E.M. "O Baterista" from Rush In Rio Lost to Brian Wilson's "Mrs. Murmurs : R.E.M. 2004 Nomination in Best Rock Instrumental Performance

    . website (http://www.remhq.com/). "Where's My Thing" - beat by Eric Johnson's "Cliffs of Dover". Official R.E.M. 1992 Runner-up in Best Rock Instrumental
      .

      2005 "Electron Blue" #26 UK. "YYZ" - beat by The Police's "Behind My Camel". 2004 "Aftermath" #41 UK. 1982 Runner-up in Best Rock Instrumental

        . 2004 "Leaving New York" #5 UK. 2004 Music DVD of the year - "Rush in Rio". 2004 "Animal" #33 UK. 1992 Best album cover - Roll the Bones.

        2003 "Bad Day" #8 UK. 1992 Best Hard Rock Album. 2001 "I'll Take the Rain" #51 UK. 1991 Best album cover - Presto. 2001 "All the Way to Reno" #24 UK. 1991 Best Heavy Metal Album. 2001 "Imitation of Life" #83 US; #6 UK. 1978 Group of the year.

        2000 "The Great Beyond" #57 US; #3 UK. 1977 Group of the year. 1999 "At My Most Beautiful" #10 UK. 1974 Most promising group of the year. 1998 "Lotus" #26 UK. Traveling Music: Playing Back the Soundtrack to My Life and Times – Peart (2004) – ISBN 1550226649. 1998 "Daysleeper" #57 US; #6 UK. Rush: Success Under Pressure – Steve Gett (1984) – ISBN 0895242303.

        1996 "Electrolite" #96 US; #29 UK. Rush: Merely Players – Telleria (2002) – ISBN 1550822713. 1996 "Bittersweet Me" #46 US; #19 UK. Ghost Rider: Travels on the Healing Road – Peart (2002) – ISBN 1550225464 (hardcover), ISBN 1550225480 (paperback). 1996 "E-Bow the Letter" #4 UK. The Masked Rider: Cycling in West Africa – Peart (1999) – ISBN 1895900026. 1995 "Tongue" #13 UK. Mystic Rhythms: The Philosophical Vision of Rush – Price, et al. (1999) – ISBN 1587151022.

        1995 "Strange Currencies" #47 US; #9 UK. More Drum Techniques of Rush – Peart, Wheeler (1989) – ISBN 0769250513. 1995 "Crush with Eyeliner" #23 UK. Drum Techniques of Rush – Peart (1985) – ISBN 0769250556. 1994 "Bang and Blame" #19 US; #15 UK. My Favorite Headache – (Solo), Lee, et al (November 2000). 1994 "What's the Frequency, Kenneth?" #21 US; #9 UK. Victor – (Solo), Lifeson, et al (1996).

        1993 "Nightswimming" #27 UK. Burning for Buddy, Volume 2 (Buddy Rich tribute album) – (Solo), Peart, et al (1994/-5?). 1993 "Everybody Hurts" #29 US; #7 UK. Burning for Buddy, Volume 1 (Buddy Rich tribute album) – (Solo), Peart, et al (1994). 1993 "The Sidewinder Sleeps Tonite" #17 UK. The Spirit of Radio: Greatest Hits 1974-1987 (February 2003) – Repackaging of Mercury/Polygram-held songs up to Hold Your Fire (1987), not endorsed by band. 1993 "Man on the Moon" #30 US; #18 UK. Retrospective II 1981-1987 (1997) – Repackaging of best songs from their second decade.

        1992 "Drive" #28 US; #11 UK. Retrospective I 1974-1980 (1997) – Repackaging of best songs from their first decade. 1991 "It's The End Of The World As We Know It" #39 UK; #69 US (1988). The Interviews - Vol 2 (October 1995) – Interview with Geddy Lee. 1991 "Radio Song" #28 UK. The Story of Kings - Interview (1992) – Interview with Alex Lifeson. 1991 "The One I Love" (re-issue) #16 UK. Chronicles (September 1990) – Essentially a "Greatest Hits" release.

        1991 "Near Wild Heaven" #27 UK. Archives (April 1978) – Repackage of the first three albums (Rush, Fly by Night and Caress of Steel). 1991 "Shiny Happy People" #10 US; #6 UK. Rush in Rio (October 2003). 1991 "Losing My Religion" #4 US, #19 UK. Different Stages (November 1998). 1989 "Pop Song 89" #86 US. A Show of Hands (December 1988).

        1989 "Orange Crush" #28 UK. Exit...Stage Left (October 1981). 1989 "Stand" #6 US. All The World's a Stage (September 1976). 1987 "The One I Love" #9 US. Feedback (June 29, 2004). 1986 "Fall On Me" #94 US. Vapor Trails (May 2002).

        1984 "South Central Rain (I'm Sorry)" #85 US. Test for Echo (September 1996). 1983 "Radio Free Europe" #78 US. Counterparts (October 1993). 1988-2003 (compilation) (2003); #1 UK, #8 US. Roll the Bones (September 1991). In Time - The Best of R.E.M. Presto (November 1989).

        R.E.M.IX (Web Only Remixes). Hold Your Fire (September 1987). In The Attic (rarities compilation) (1997). Power Windows (October 1985). R.E.M. Grace Under Pressure (April 1984). Singles Collected (1994);. Signals (September 1982).

        The Best of R.E.M. (1991); #7 UK. Moving Pictures (January 1981). Eponymous (compilation) (1988) #44 US. Permanent Waves (January 1980). Around the Sun (2004); #1 UK, #13 US. Hemispheres (October 1978). Reveal (2001); #1 UK, #6 US. A Farewell to Kings (September 1977).

        Up (1998); #2 UK, #3 US. 2112 (February 1976). New Adventures in Hi-Fi (1996); #1 UK, #2 US. Caress of Steel (September 1975). Monster (1994); #1 UK, #1 US. Fly by Night (February 1975). Automatic for the People (1992); #1 UK, #2 US. Rush (March 1974).

        Out of Time (1991); #1 UK, #1 US. Not Fade Away (1973 - 7" single). Green (1988); #27 UK, #12 US. Document (1987); #28 UK, #10 US. Chronic Town EP) (1987) #52 US.

        Dead Letter Office (outtakes and b-sides, incl. Lifes Rich Pageant (1986) #21 US. Fables of the Reconstruction (1985) #28 US, #35 UK. Reckoning (1984); #27 US.

        Murmur (1983); #178 US. Chronic Town EP (1982). Download sample of "What's the Frequency, Kenneth?" from Monster. "Losing My Religion" may have been the biggest hit song that uses a mandolin as the main instrument.

        They started out as Twisted Kites for the first show they played at a party, but, according to "It Crawled From the South," considered Negro Eyes, Slut Bank, and Cans of Piss before settling for R.E.M. They liked the name because it was so ambiguous. out of the dictionary. The band members picked the name R.E.M.

10-01-14 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php PAD File Directory Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Display all your websites in one place HereIam.tv Celebrity Homepages Charity Directory Google+ Directory Move your favorite Unsigned Artist to the Top of the List