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Nikon Corporation

Nikon Corporation (Nikon, Nikon Corp.) TYO: 7731 is a Japanese company specializing in optics and imaging. Its products include cameras, binoculars, microscopes, measurement instruments, and the steppers used in the photolithography steps of semiconductor fabrication. It was founded in 1917 as Nihon (Nippon) Kōgaku Kōgyō (日本光學工業株式會社); the company was renamed Nikon Corporation (株式会社ニコン), after its cameras, in 1988. As of 2002, it has about 14,000 employees. Nikon is one of the Mitsubishi companies.

The name Nikon, which dates from 1946, is a merging of Nippon Kōgaku ("Japan Optical") and an imitation of Zeiss Ikon.

Among its famous products are Nikkor camera lenses (notably those designed for the company's own F-mount SLR cameras), Nikonos underwater cameras, the Nikon F-series of professional 135 film SLR cameras, and the Nikon D-series digital SLRs. Nikon has helped lead the transition to digital photography with both the Coolpix line of consumer and prosumer cameras as well as system cameras like the Nikon D100, the more recent Nikon D70, D70s and the D50, and professional DSLRs including the D1 and D2 series (see below).

Nikon's main competitors include Canon, Konica Minolta, Leica, Pentax, and Olympus.

Nikon Corporation was established in 1917 when two leading optical manufacturers merged to form a comprehensive, fully integrated optical company known as Nippon Kogaku K.K. Over the next 60 years this growing company became a leading manufacturer of optical lenses and precision equipment used in cameras, binoculars, microscopes and inspection equipment. During World War II the company grew to 19 factories and 23,000 employees, supplying items such as binoculars, lenses, bomb sights and periscopes to the Japanese military. After the war it reverted to its civilian product range with a single factory and 1400 employees. By 1980, the first stepper, the NSR-1010G, was produced in Japan. Since then, Nikon has introduced over 50 models of stepper/scanners for the production of semiconductors and liquid crystal displays.

In 1982, Nikon Precision Inc. was established in the United States to sell and service Nikon stepper equipment. Fueled by a rapidly growing customer base, the company quickly expanded. In 1990, NPI opened its current Belmont, California headquarters. The facility now includes corporate offices, a fully equipped training center, and extensive applications, technology, service, sales and marketing departments.

In January 2006, Nikon announced that it would stop making most of its film camera models and focus on digital models. [1]

Shareholders

Nikon is listed in the Tokyo Stock Exchange under number 7731.

(As of September 2004)

  • The Master Trust Bank of Japan, Ltd. (8.5%)
  • Meiji Yasuda Life Insurance Company (5.6%)
  • The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi, Ltd. (3.3%)
  • Japan Trustee Services Bank, Ltd.(2.9%)
  • Tokio Marine & Nichido Fire Insurance Co., Ltd. (2.7%)
  • State Street Bank and Trust Company (2.7 %)
  • The Mitsubishi Trust and Banking Corporation (2.5%)
  • Nippon Life Insurance Company (2.4%)
  • The Joyo Bank, Ltd. (1.8%)
  • JP Morgan Chase Oppenheimer Funds (1.7%)

Holdings

The companies held by Nikon form the Nikon Group

Partial list of Nikon products

This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.

Cameras

Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Nikon cameras

In January 2006 Nikon announced [2] that they will stop the production of all but two models of their film cameras, focusing their efforts to the digital camera market. They will continue to produce the low-end FM10 and the high-end F6, and announced a commitment to service all of the film cameras for a period of ten years after production ceases. [3]

Film 35 mm SLR cameras without autofocus

  • Nikon FM3A
  • Nikon FM10
  • Nikon FE10
  • Nikon FA
  • Nikon FE
  • Nikon FE2
  • Nikon FG
  • Nikon FG20
  • Nikon FM
  • Nikon FM2
  • Nikon F series (known in Germany as Nikkor)
  • Nikon F2 series
  • Nikon F3 series
  • Nikkormat series (known in Japan as Nikomat)
  • Nikkorex series
  • Nikon EL2
  • Nikon EM
  • Nikon F301 (known in North America as the N2000)

Film 35 mm SLR cameras with autofocus

  • Nikon F50 (known in the U.S. as the N50)
  • Nikon F60 (known in the U.S. as the N60)
  • Nikon F70 (known in the U.S. as the N70)
  • Nikon F401 (known in the U.S. as the N4004)
  • Nikon F401S (known in theU.S. as the N4004s)
  • Nikon F401X (known in the U.S. as the N5005)
  • Nikon F501 (known in North America as the N2020)
  • Nikon F601 (known in the U.S. as the N6006)
  • Nikon F801 (known in the U.S. as the N8008)
  • Nikon F801S (known in the U.S. as the N8008s)
  • Nikon F90 (known in the U.S. as the N90)
  • Nikon F90x (known in the U.S. as the N90s)
  • Nikon F55 (known in the U.S. as the N55)
  • Nikon F65 (known in the U.S. as the N65)
  • Nikon F75 (known in the U.S. as the N75)
  • Nikon F80 (known in the U.S. as the N80)
  • Nikon F100
  • Nikon F4
  • Nikon F5
  • Nikon F6


Film APS SLR cameras

  • Nikon Pronea S (1997) [4]
  • Nikon Pronea 600i also known as the Pronea 6i (1996) [5]

Rangefinder cameras

Nikon F5 Nikon F6 Nikon D70
  • Nikon I (1948)
  • Nikon M (1949)
  • Nikon S (1951)
  • Nikon S2 (1954)
  • Nikon SP (1957)
  • Nikon S3 (1958)
  • Nikon S4 (1959)
  • Nikon S3M (1960)
  • Nikonos line of underwater cameras

Digital compact cameras

  • Nikon Coolpix series

Digital SLR cameras

  • Nikon D1
  • Nikon D1H
  • Nikon D1X
  • Nikon D100
  • Nikon D200
  • Nikon D50
  • Nikon D70
  • Nikon D70s
  • Nikon D2H
  • Nikon D2X
  • Nikon D2Hs

Nikon's raw image format format is named NEF, for Nikon Electric File. The "DSCN" prefix for image files stands for "Digital Still Camera - Nikon."

Lenses

Lens acronyms

Nikon Lenses have designated acronyms used in their names (for example, the lens AF-S 18-70 mm f/3.5-4.5G DX ED IF). These help consumers know what features the lens has. Some common designations are listed below with the descriptions of each.

  • AF - Autofocus.
  • AF-S - Autofocus-Silent. Uses SWM, Silent Wave Motor, to focus quietly and faster; similar to Canon's USM, Ultrasonic Motor technology. First introduced in 1996.
  • AF-I - Autofocus- Internal Coreless DC motor. Used only in long telephoto lenses (300mm f/2.8 thru 600mm f/4.0) starting in 1992. Replaced with AF-S starting in 1996.
  • ED - Extra-low Dispersion glass. Reduces chromatic aberration. More recently, Super ED glass has been introduced.
  • IF - Internal Focus. Focussing moves only internal lenses, meaning that the lens does not change in length during focussing.
  • DX - Lens designed for Nikon's DX format sensors; the image circle is reduced in size by 1.5× to fit the smaller sensor in Nikon's digital SLRs. A circular image is produced if used with a 35mm camera. Although use with 35mm cameras is generally not advised, some DX Nikkor lenses can actually cover the full 35mm frame at some focal length settings.
  • VR - Vibration Reduction. Uses special VR lens unit to reduce camera shake evident in photographs. Some VR lenses also support panning shot mode, detecting the horizontal movement of the lens and minimizing the vertical vibration. Equivalent to Canon's IS (Image Stabilizer) and Minolta's AS (Anti-shake, although this is embedded into the body of the camera).
  • D - Distance/Dimension. Indicated after the f-stop number. It means that the lens is capable using of Nikon's RGB Matrix Metering. The lens carries the information of the distance between the camera and the subject.
  • G - Indicated after the f-number, and tells that the lens does not have an aperture ring, but instead that aperture value is controlled by the body. Since the body needs to control the lens aperture, these type lenses only work with automatic bodies. It has the same characteristics with the D lens.
  • Micro - Indicates that the lens is capable of macro photography - subjects which appear as large or larger than they are at the film plane, not necessarily at close distances, such as with the 200mm Micro-Nikkor.
  • PC - Perspective Control. Lens has the ability to shift and/or tilt the lens to correct perspective and adjust depth of field. These include the shift-only 28mm and 35mm PC nikkors, and the tilt/shift 85mm f/2.8D PC Micro Nikkor.
  • IX - Lenses optimised for use with the Pronea Advanced Photo System SLR. These lenses are all auto focus zoom lenses and are not compatible with other bodies. [6]
  • DC - Indicates that the lens has controls for adjusting the shape and effect of the out-of-focus elements, also known as bokeh.
  • AI/AI-S - Auto (aperture) Indexing. The lens has a notch on the aperture ring that allows the camera to sense the current aperture. AI-S added a tab to the back of the lens which affected metering on certain older cameras. Generally used to refer to manual focus lenses, however all Nikon autofocus lenses with aperture rings are also AI-S.

AF Prime lenses

  • 14 mm f/2.8D ED AF
  • 16 mm f/2.8D AF Fisheye
  • 18 mm f/2.8D AF
  • 20mm f/2.8D AF
  • 24 mm f/2.8D AF
  • 28 mm f/1.4D AF
  • 28 mm f/2.8D AF
  • 35 mm f/2D AF
  • 50 mm f/1.4D AF
  • 50 mm f/1.8D AF
  • 85 mm f/1.4D AF
  • 85 mm f/1.8D AF
  • 105 mm f/2D AF DC
  • 135 mm f/2D AF DC
  • 180 mm f/2.8D ED-IF AF
  • 200 mm f/2G ED-IF AF-S VR
  • 300 mm f/2.8G ED-IF AF-S VR
  • 300 mm f/2.8D ED-IF AF-S II
  • 300 mm f/4D ED-IF AF-S
  • 400 mm f/2.8D ED-IF AF-S II
  • 500 mm f/4D ED-IF AF-S II
  • 600 mm f/4D ED-IF AF-S II

Consumer AF zoom lenses

  • 18-35 mm f/3.5-4.5D ED-IF AF
  • 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6 G ED-IF AF-S VR DX
  • 24-85 mm f/2.8-4D IF AF
  • 24-85 mm f/3.5-4.5G ED-IF AF-S
  • 24-120 mm f/3.5-5.6G ED-IF AF-S VR
  • 28-80 mm f/3.3-5.6G AF
  • 28-100 mm f/3.5-5.6G AF
  • 28-105 mm f/3.5-4.5D AF
  • 28-200 mm f/3.5-5.6G ED-IF AF
  • 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6D ED AF
  • 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6G AF

Professional AF zoom lenses

  • 17-35 mm f/2.8 ED-IF AF-S
  • 28-70 mm f/2.8D ED-IF AF-S
  • 35-70 mm f/2.8D AF
  • 70-200 mm f/2.8G ED-IF AF-S VR
  • 80-200 mm f/2.8D ED AF
  • 80-400 mm f/4.5-5.6D ED AF VR
  • 200-400 mm f/4G ED-IF AF-S VR


DX (Digital APS-C sized sensor cameras only) Lenses

  • 10.5 mm f/2.8G ED AF DX
  • 12-24 mm f/4G ED-IF AF-S DX
  • 17-55 mm f/2.8G ED-IF AF-S DX
  • 18-70 mm f3.5-4.5G ED-IF AF-S DX
  • 18-55 mm f/3.5-5.6G ED AF-S DX
  • 55-200 mm f/4-5.6G ED AF-S DX
  • 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6G ED AF-S VR DX

Micro AF Lenses (also known as Macro)

  • 60 mm f/2.8D AF Micro
  • 105 mm f/2.8D AF Micro
  • 200 mm f/4D ED-IF AF Micro
  • 70-180 mm f/4.5-5.6 ED AF-D Micro


Currently Produced Manual Focus Lenses

  • 85mm f/2.8D PC Micro Nikkor

Lenses for other camera models

  • Lenses for Nikon S-series rangefinder cameras
  • Screwmount lenses for Leica rangefinder cameras
  • Lenses for Bronica medium-format cameras
  • Lens for Plaubel Makina medium-format camera

Flash guns

Nikon use the term Speedlight for their flash guns. Models offered include:

  • SB-800,
  • SB-600,
  • SU-800 (slave trigger),
  • SB-R200 (remote flash),
  • R1 Wireless Close Up Speedlight Flash System (2 SB-R200s and accessories) ,
  • R1C1 Wireless Close Up Speedlight Flash System (2 SB-R200s, SU-800, and accessories),
  • SB-80DX,
  • SB-50DX,
  • SB-30,
  • SB-29s,
  • SB-24,
  • SB-22s,
  • SB-23,
  • SB-27,
  • SB-16B, and
  • SB-16A.

External links

  • Official websites:
    • Nikon Corp. website
    • Nikon Corp. USA website
    • Nikon Precision Inc. - Semiconductor Photolithography USA website
    • NIKON NEWS - Magazine on Nikon products and photography published by Nikon Switzerland in German and French
  • Data:
    • Nikon Digital Camera Resources - Custom tone curves
    • Yahoo! - Nikon Corporation Company Profile
    • Nikon Historical Society
    • Nikon Field Guide and Nikon Flash Guide support at bythom.com
    • Photography in Malaysia - Nikon Pictorial History
  • Fansites and forums:
    • Nikonians - see also Nikonian
    • Photosapien Photography Forum
    • Nikon mailing list

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Models offered include:.
. Nikon use the term Speedlight for their flash guns. -Roger Clemens, pitcher.
.
If he would act his age, there might be a few records left for me..
. -Reggie Jackson, Hall of Fame slugger.

Some common designations are listed below with the descriptions of each. That's how you feel when Ryan's throwing balls by you.. These help consumers know what features the lens has. But you don't like it when someone's stuffing it into you by the gallon. Nikon Lenses have designated acronyms used in their names (for example, the lens AF-S 18-70 mm f/3.5-4.5G DX ED IF). Every hitter likes fastballs just like everybody likes ice cream. The "DSCN" prefix for image files stands for "Digital Still Camera - Nikon.". The wags at ESPN suggested that the Astros might have needed to pull Nolan out of retirement if the game went much longer.

Nikon's raw image format format is named NEF, for Nikon Electric File. He threw out the first pitch of Game 3 of the 2005 World Series, the first World Series game ever played in Texas, and ultimately the longest in terms of time.
. He also appeared in TV ads for Advil for a number of years, a pain medication that he recommended for his own arm, and perhaps also for many opposing batters who found his pitching to be a headache. [3]. Both teams are affiliates of the Houston Astros. They will continue to produce the low-end FM10 and the high-end F6, and announced a commitment to service all of the film cameras for a period of ten years after production ceases. His current business interests include ownership of two minor league teams – the Corpus Christi Hooks, which play in the Class AA Texas League, and the Round Rock Express, a Class AAA team in the Pacific Coast League.

In January 2006 Nikon announced [2] that they will stop the production of all but two models of their film cameras, focusing their efforts to the digital camera market. He was inducted into the Texas Rangers Hall of Fame in 2003. The companies held by Nikon form the Nikon Group. That same year, he ranked Number 41 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players, and was elected to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. (As of September 2004). Nolan Ryan was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1999, in his first year of eligibility. Nikon is listed in the Tokyo Stock Exchange under number 7731. Since Ryan played more seasons than any other player in baseball history, and only one pitcher in history at the end of his career has more strikeouts per nine innings (Randy Johnson), his career strikeout mark is considered one of the most invulnerable records in baseball.

. Also he is ninth all-time in hit batsmen. [1]. He also ranks high on the list for four "negative" records; because he was wild as a young pitcher, he piled up the walks and ranks first all-time in walks allowed with 2795, in wild pitches with 277, and he also ranks third all-time in losses, with 292. In January 2006, Nikon announced that it would stop making most of its film camera models and focus on digital models. Ryan ranks first all-time in strikeouts (5714), fewest hits allowed per nine innings (6.56), fifth in innings pitched (5386), second in games started (773), seventh in shutouts (61) and tied for 13th in wins (324). The facility now includes corporate offices, a fully equipped training center, and extensive applications, technology, service, sales and marketing departments. Nonetheless, both stand out as the premier "power pitchers" of their time, if not all-time.

In 1990, NPI opened its current Belmont, California headquarters. Most importantly, thanks to a strong arm that could handle a lot of work, Ryan had one of the longest careers of any player, whereas Koufax's sterling career was cut short in its prime by arthritis and arm trouble. Fueled by a rapidly growing customer base, the company quickly expanded. Koufax was blessed to play on some championship Dodgers teams, whereas Ryan found himself on mostly mediocre teams. was established in the United States to sell and service Nikon stepper equipment. But there are many differences too: Koufax pitched left-handed and Ryan right-handed; despite his early troubles, Koufax played his entire career with one team whereas Ryan played for several. In 1982, Nikon Precision Inc. The numerous times he would try to beanball a player would be a unique part of his legacy.

Since then, Nikon has introduced over 50 models of stepper/scanners for the production of semiconductors and liquid crystal displays. Ryan would also be remembered by many players and fans as a rough neck pitcher that did not take failure lightly. By 1980, the first stepper, the NSR-1010G, was produced in Japan. An astute businessman, Ryan readily admitted that the money was a large part of the reason he played as long as he did. After the war it reverted to its civilian product range with a single factory and 1400 employees. They were also both very conscious of their value, and had occasional contract disputes with their owners. During World War II the company grew to 19 factories and 23,000 employees, supplying items such as binoculars, lenses, bomb sights and periscopes to the Japanese military. Koufax once admitted that he began every game with the intention of throwing a perfect game, and failing that, a shutout.

Over the next 60 years this growing company became a leading manufacturer of optical lenses and precision equipment used in cameras, binoculars, microscopes and inspection equipment. It was said of Ryan that he started every game with the intention of striking everyone out. Nikon Corporation was established in 1917 when two leading optical manufacturers merged to form a comprehensive, fully integrated optical company known as Nippon Kogaku K.K. There are many similarities; both started in the majors at a very young age and struggled early in their careers, both were primarily "extreme fastball" pitchers noted for achieving previously unprecedented strikeout totals and multiple no-hitters, and both were very closed and private away from the game (though Koufax more so than Ryan). Nikon's main competitors include Canon, Konica Minolta, Leica, Pentax, and Olympus. Given that he broke many of Sandy Koufax's records previously thought to be untouchable, Ryan is frequently compared to him much in the way that Hank Aaron is to Babe Ruth or Pete Rose to Ted Williams and Ty Cobb. Nikon has helped lead the transition to digital photography with both the Coolpix line of consumer and prosumer cameras as well as system cameras like the Nikon D100, the more recent Nikon D70, D70s and the D50, and professional DSLRs including the D1 and D2 series (see below). While Ventura was immediately ejected, Ryan--who barely moved from his spot on the mound in the fracas--was allowed to remain in the game.

Among its famous products are Nikkor camera lenses (notably those designed for the company's own F-mount SLR cameras), Nikonos underwater cameras, the Nikon F-series of professional 135 film SLR cameras, and the Nikon D-series digital SLRs. Ryan was widely credited as coming out ahead in the fight, planting those "noogies" on Ventura. The name Nikon, which dates from 1946, is a merging of Nippon Kōgaku ("Japan Optical") and an imitation of Zeiss Ikon. Videos of the confrontation were played on sports highlight reels that evening throughout the country. Nikon is one of the Mitsubishi companies. The 46-year-old Ryan – a rancher in the offseason and highly dedicated to workouts during the season – promptly subdued the 26-year-old Ventura in a headlock with his left arm, pummelling Ventura's head with his right fist seven times before catcher Iván Rodríguez was able to pull Ventura away from Ryan. As of 2002, it has about 14,000 employees. Ryan famously defended himself, perhaps better than any other known pitcher in a similar situation.

It was founded in 1917 as Nihon (Nippon) Kōgaku Kōgyō (日本光學工業株式會社); the company was renamed Nikon Corporation (株式会社ニコン), after its cameras, in 1988. The normally unflappable Ventura angrily charged the pitching mound in order to fight Ryan, who was twenty years his senior. Its products include cameras, binoculars, microscopes, measurement instruments, and the steppers used in the photolithography steps of semiconductor fabrication. He had just hit Robin Ventura of the Chicago White Sox with a slow moving curveball. Nikon Corporation (Nikon, Nikon Corp.) TYO: 7731 is a Japanese company specializing in optics and imaging. However, on August 4, just before the end, Ryan confirmed his reputation as a strong, competitive Texan in one bizarre moment. Nikon mailing list. His seemingly bionic arm finally gave out in Seattle on September 22, 1993, when he tore a tendon, ending his career two starts earier than planned.

Photosapien Photography Forum. Before the 1993 season, Ryan announced his retirement, effective at the end of that season. Nikonians - see also Nikonian. Earlier in the same day Rickey Henderson broke Lou Brock's career stolen base record with his 939th stolen base. Fansites and forums:

    . Coincidentally, Ryan's second baseman in his first two no-hitters was Alomar's father, Sandy Sr. Photography in Malaysia - Nikon Pictorial History. He pitched his seventh no-hitter on May 1, 1991, striking out Roberto Alomar of the Toronto Blue Jays for the final out.

    Nikon Field Guide and Nikon Flash Guide support at bythom.com. He threw his sixth no-hitter and earned his 300th win in 1990 on July 30th against the Milwaukee Brewers. Nikon Historical Society. Two years later, at 44, he finished fifth in the league in ERA (2.91) and third in strikeouts (203), to again earn Cy Young Award votes. Yahoo! - Nikon Corporation Company Profile. Against the Oakland Athletics on August 22, Ryan struck out Rickey Henderson in the fifth inning to become the first pitcher ever to record 5,000 career strikeouts. Nikon Digital Camera Resources - Custom tone curves. In 1989, he won 16 games and led the league with 301 strikeouts.

    Data:

      . With more run support than he had in 1987, Ryan had a number of fine seasons for the Rangers. NIKON NEWS - Magazine on Nikon products and photography published by Nikon Switzerland in German and French. Others predicted he would do well as American League batters hadn't faced "The Express" since 1979. - Semiconductor Photolithography USA website. Many observers, keeping in mind that the aging Ryan had been pitching home games in the air-conditioned Astrodome, thought he would struggle by having to pitch outdoors in the oppressive Texas heat. Nikon Precision Inc. He left Houston in a contract dispute after the 1988 season and joined the Texas Rangers, back in the American League.

      USA website. The poor record most likely cost him the Cy Young Award, an honor he contended for many times but never won. Nikon Corp. However, Ryan received horrendous offensive support all season, and finished with a record of 8-16. website. He was by far the most dominant pitcher in the National League, leading the league in ERA (2.76) and strikeouts (270) at the age of 40. Nikon Corp. In 1987, Ryan had one of the most bizarre seasons in baseball history.

      Official websites:

        . After that, Ryan then settled into having a long string of good, but not great seasons, highlighted by his breaking Walter Johnson's all-time strikeout record on April 27, 1983, with his 3,509th whiff. SB-16A. That season, he won the National League ERA title with a miserly 1.69. SB-16B, and. On September 26, 1981, Ryan threw his fifth no-hitter to finally break Koufax's mark. SB-27,. He got his second taste of postseason play in 1980, but the Astros were stopped one game short of the World Series.

        SB-23,. It was the first home run of his career (he only hit one more), and garnered 3 of the 6 RBI's he would get that year. SB-22s,. The normally light-hitting Ryan got his 'Stros years started with a bang in a nationally televised game against the Los Angeles Dodgers on April 12, 1980, in which he hit a 3-run home run off future fellow Hall of Famer Don Sutton. SB-24,. Ryan signed a lucrative free-agent contract with the Houston Astros after the 1979 season, in which he became the first player to make $1 million a year. SB-29s,. His fastball was "officially" clocked by the Guinness Book of World Records at 100.9 miles per hour in a game played on August 20, 1974 versus the Chicago White Sox.

        SB-30,. The most widely quoted response is Nolan Ryan. SB-50DX,. Fans, researchers, historians and even the players argue all the time about who was the fastest pitcher of all-time. SB-80DX,. In 1974 he twice struck out 19 batters, a record which wasn't broken until Roger Clemens struck out 20 in a 1986 game. R1C1 Wireless Close Up Speedlight Flash System (2 SB-R200s, SU-800, and accessories),. He led the league in strikeouts seven times in the 1970s.

        R1 Wireless Close Up Speedlight Flash System (2 SB-R200s and accessories) ,. He threw two no-hitters in 1973, added a third in 1974 and a fourth in 1975, tying another of Koufax' records. SB-R200 (remote flash),. This record was made even more impressive by the fact that he achieved it in the first year of the designated hitter in the American League; if AL pitchers had still been hitting, Ryan would almost certainly have topped 400 strikeouts that season. SU-800 (slave trigger),. In 1973, he set his first record when he struck out 383 batters in one season, eclipsing Sandy Koufax's old mark by one. SB-600,. Even though the Angels were a sub-.500 team and remained one for most of his time there, he began winning between 19 and 22 games a season regularly.

        SB-800,. Ryan truly blossomed as a pitcher after being traded to the California Angels in 1972. Lens for Plaubel Makina medium-format camera. A videotape of that game, which has occasionally been played on ESPN Classic, reveals that Ryan's mechanics, with the trademark high trailing leg kick, were already firmly established at that young age. Lenses for Bronica medium-format cameras. Ryan's work enabled the Mets to hang on to win that game, and they went on to upset the Orioles in five games. Screwmount lenses for Leica rangefinder cameras. Ryan did, however, give people a taste of what was to come in the 1969 World Series, when he entered Game 3 in relief of a struggling starter and shut down the powerful Baltimore Orioles for nearly three innings.

        Lenses for Nikon S-series rangefinder cameras. He didn't make the majors for good until the 1968 season, and even then was unable to crack an outstanding Mets pitching staff led by Tom Seaver and Jerry Koosman. 85mm f/2.8D PC Micro Nikkor. However, Ryan struggled for a number of years and was even sent back to the minor leagues a few times because of his inability to find the strike zone. 70-180 mm f/4.5-5.6 ED AF-D Micro. He developed his dazzling fastball as a high school pitcher in Texas, which impressed the New York Mets enough to draft him in 1965 and promote him to the major leagues late in 1966. 200 mm f/4D ED-IF AF Micro. Ryan was born in Refugio, Texas, but his family moved to the Houston suburb of Alvin when he was six weeks old; he has lived there to this day.

        105 mm f/2.8D AF Micro. . 60 mm f/2.8D AF Micro. Only Smokey Joe Wood, Walter Johnson, Satchel Paige, and Sandy Koufax are thought to have nearly equalled his velocity; the strikeout king to this day. 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6G ED AF-S VR DX. He is considered by many to have been the fastest pitcher of all time. 55-200 mm f/4-5.6G ED AF-S DX. The media tagged him with the nickname "The Ryan Express", referencing a 1965 action-adventure film called Von Ryan's Express.

        18-55 mm f/3.5-5.6G ED AF-S DX. He was most noted for his blazing fastball and his longevity, routinely throwing pitches exceeding 100 mph, even into his forties. 18-70 mm f3.5-4.5G ED-IF AF-S DX. Lynn Nolan Ryan, Jr. (born January 31, 1947) is a former pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for 27 years and still holds many major league pitching records, some of which are so far beyond previous marks that they are likely to stand for years and generations of pitchers to come. 17-55 mm f/2.8G ED-IF AF-S DX. 12-24 mm f/4G ED-IF AF-S DX.

        10.5 mm f/2.8G ED AF DX. 200-400 mm f/4G ED-IF AF-S VR. 80-400 mm f/4.5-5.6D ED AF VR. 80-200 mm f/2.8D ED AF.

        70-200 mm f/2.8G ED-IF AF-S VR. 35-70 mm f/2.8D AF. 28-70 mm f/2.8D ED-IF AF-S. 17-35 mm f/2.8 ED-IF AF-S.

        70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6G AF. 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6D ED AF. 28-200 mm f/3.5-5.6G ED-IF AF. 28-105 mm f/3.5-4.5D AF.

        28-100 mm f/3.5-5.6G AF. 28-80 mm f/3.3-5.6G AF. 24-120 mm f/3.5-5.6G ED-IF AF-S VR. 24-85 mm f/3.5-4.5G ED-IF AF-S.

        24-85 mm f/2.8-4D IF AF. 18-200 mm f/3.5-5.6 G ED-IF AF-S VR DX. 18-35 mm f/3.5-4.5D ED-IF AF. 600 mm f/4D ED-IF AF-S II.

        500 mm f/4D ED-IF AF-S II. 400 mm f/2.8D ED-IF AF-S II. 300 mm f/4D ED-IF AF-S. 300 mm f/2.8D ED-IF AF-S II.

        300 mm f/2.8G ED-IF AF-S VR. 200 mm f/2G ED-IF AF-S VR. 180 mm f/2.8D ED-IF AF. 135 mm f/2D AF DC.

        105 mm f/2D AF DC. 85 mm f/1.8D AF. 85 mm f/1.4D AF. 50 mm f/1.8D AF.

        50 mm f/1.4D AF. 35 mm f/2D AF. 28 mm f/2.8D AF. 28 mm f/1.4D AF.

        24 mm f/2.8D AF. 20mm f/2.8D AF. 18 mm f/2.8D AF. 16 mm f/2.8D AF Fisheye.

        14 mm f/2.8D ED AF. Generally used to refer to manual focus lenses, however all Nikon autofocus lenses with aperture rings are also AI-S. AI-S added a tab to the back of the lens which affected metering on certain older cameras. The lens has a notch on the aperture ring that allows the camera to sense the current aperture.

        AI/AI-S - Auto (aperture) Indexing. DC - Indicates that the lens has controls for adjusting the shape and effect of the out-of-focus elements, also known as bokeh. [6]. These lenses are all auto focus zoom lenses and are not compatible with other bodies.

        IX - Lenses optimised for use with the Pronea Advanced Photo System SLR. These include the shift-only 28mm and 35mm PC nikkors, and the tilt/shift 85mm f/2.8D PC Micro Nikkor. Lens has the ability to shift and/or tilt the lens to correct perspective and adjust depth of field. PC - Perspective Control.

        Micro - Indicates that the lens is capable of macro photography - subjects which appear as large or larger than they are at the film plane, not necessarily at close distances, such as with the 200mm Micro-Nikkor. It has the same characteristics with the D lens. Since the body needs to control the lens aperture, these type lenses only work with automatic bodies. G - Indicated after the f-number, and tells that the lens does not have an aperture ring, but instead that aperture value is controlled by the body.

        The lens carries the information of the distance between the camera and the subject. It means that the lens is capable using of Nikon's RGB Matrix Metering. Indicated after the f-stop number. D - Distance/Dimension.

        Equivalent to Canon's IS (Image Stabilizer) and Minolta's AS (Anti-shake, although this is embedded into the body of the camera). Some VR lenses also support panning shot mode, detecting the horizontal movement of the lens and minimizing the vertical vibration. Uses special VR lens unit to reduce camera shake evident in photographs. VR - Vibration Reduction.

        Although use with 35mm cameras is generally not advised, some DX Nikkor lenses can actually cover the full 35mm frame at some focal length settings. A circular image is produced if used with a 35mm camera. DX - Lens designed for Nikon's DX format sensors; the image circle is reduced in size by 1.5× to fit the smaller sensor in Nikon's digital SLRs. Focussing moves only internal lenses, meaning that the lens does not change in length during focussing.

        IF - Internal Focus. More recently, Super ED glass has been introduced. Reduces chromatic aberration. ED - Extra-low Dispersion glass.

        Replaced with AF-S starting in 1996. Used only in long telephoto lenses (300mm f/2.8 thru 600mm f/4.0) starting in 1992. AF-I - Autofocus- Internal Coreless DC motor. First introduced in 1996.

        Uses SWM, Silent Wave Motor, to focus quietly and faster; similar to Canon's USM, Ultrasonic Motor technology. AF-S - Autofocus-Silent. AF - Autofocus. Nikon D2Hs.

        Nikon D2X. Nikon D2H. Nikon D70s. Nikon D70.

        Nikon D50. Nikon D200. Nikon D100. Nikon D1X.

        Nikon D1H. Nikon D1. Nikon Coolpix series. Nikonos line of underwater cameras.

        Nikon S3M (1960). Nikon S4 (1959). Nikon S3 (1958). Nikon SP (1957).

        Nikon S2 (1954). Nikon S (1951). Nikon M (1949). Nikon I (1948).

        Nikon Pronea 600i also known as the Pronea 6i (1996) [5]. Nikon Pronea S (1997) [4]. Nikon F6. Nikon F5.

        Nikon F4. Nikon F100. as the N80). Nikon F80 (known in the U.S.

        as the N75). Nikon F75 (known in the U.S. as the N65). Nikon F65 (known in the U.S.

        as the N55). Nikon F55 (known in the U.S. as the N90s). Nikon F90x (known in the U.S.

        as the N90). Nikon F90 (known in the U.S. as the N8008s). Nikon F801S (known in the U.S.

        as the N8008). Nikon F801 (known in the U.S. as the N6006). Nikon F601 (known in the U.S.

        Nikon F501 (known in North America as the N2020). as the N5005). Nikon F401X (known in the U.S. as the N4004s).

        Nikon F401S (known in theU.S. as the N4004). Nikon F401 (known in the U.S. as the N70).

        Nikon F70 (known in the U.S. as the N60). Nikon F60 (known in the U.S. as the N50).

        Nikon F50 (known in the U.S. Nikon F301 (known in North America as the N2000). Nikon EM. Nikon EL2.

        Nikkorex series. Nikkormat series (known in Japan as Nikomat). Nikon F3 series. Nikon F2 series.

        Nikon F series (known in Germany as Nikkor). Nikon FM2. Nikon FM. Nikon FG20.

        Nikon FG. Nikon FE2. Nikon FE. Nikon FA.

        Nikon FE10. Nikon FM10. Nikon FM3A. JP Morgan Chase Oppenheimer Funds (1.7%).

        (1.8%). The Joyo Bank, Ltd. Nippon Life Insurance Company (2.4%). The Mitsubishi Trust and Banking Corporation (2.5%).

        State Street Bank and Trust Company (2.7 %). (2.7%). Tokio Marine & Nichido Fire Insurance Co., Ltd. Japan Trustee Services Bank, Ltd.(2.9%).

        (3.3%). The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi, Ltd. Meiji Yasuda Life Insurance Company (5.6%). (8.5%).

        The Master Trust Bank of Japan, Ltd.

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