This page will contain images about Milwaukee, as they become available.

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Nickname: "The City of Festivals", "The Genuine American City", "Cream City", "Brewtown/Brew City"
Motto: "'"
Official website: http://www.city.milwaukee.gov
Location


Location of Milwaukee in
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

Government
County Milwaukee
Mayor Tom Barrett
Geographical characteristics
Area
Total 251.0 km²
Land 248.8 km²
Water 2.2 km²
Population
Total (2000) 596,974
Metro area 1,709,926
Density 2399.5/km²
Density {{{population_density_mi2}}}/mi²
Latitude {{{latitude}}}
Longitude {{{longitude}}}
Coordinates 43°03′00″ N
87°57′00″ W
Elevation m
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)

Milwaukee is the largest city in the state of Wisconsin, United States and the county of Milwaukee. The city's population is 592,765 (2005 estimate) with an estimated total of 1,709,926 in the Milwaukee metropolitan area (2005). The city of Milwaukee is the 22nd largest city in the United States. The city is located in the southeastern portion of the state on the western shore of Lake Michigan.

History

The Milwaukee area was originally inhabited by the Fox, Mascouten, Potawatomi, and Winnebago Indian tribes. Milwaukee received its name from the Indian word Millioke which means "The Good Land", or "gathering place by the water." French missionaries and traders passed through the area in the late 1600s and 1700s.

In 1818, Frenchman Solomon Juneau settled in the area. Juneau bought out his father-in-law's trading business, and in 1833 he founded a town on the east side of the Milwaukee River. In 1846, Juneau's town combined with two neighboring rival towns to incorporate as the City of Milwaukee: Kilbourntown to the west, which was founded by Byron Kilbourn, and Walker's Point to the south, founded by George H. Walker. Juneau was Milwaukee's first mayor. German immigrants helped increase the city's population during the 1840s and the following decades. Milwaukee still today has a large German-American population. The liberal tradition of these peoples led to decades of socialist government in Milwaukee during the twentieth century.

From the late 19th century until the 1950s, Milwaukee, like many northern industrial cities, saw tremendous growth from immigrants from Germany, Hungary, Poland and other central European nations, as well as the northward migration of African-Americans from southern U.S. states. This helped make Milwaukee one of the 15 largest cities in the nation, and by the mid-1960s, its population reached nearly 750,000. Starting in the late 1960s, however, like many cities in the Great Lakes "rust belt," Milwaukee saw its population start to decline due to various factors, ranging from the loss of blue collar jobs to the phenomenon of "white flight." However, in recent years, the city began to make strides in improving its economy, neighborhoods, and image, resulting in the revitalization of neighborhoods such as the Third Ward, east side,and more recently, Bay View, along with attracting new businesses to its downtown area. While the city still faces a shrinking population[1], it continues to make plans for increasing its future revitalization through various projects.

Geography and climate

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 251.0 km² (96.9 square miles). 248.8 km² (96.1 square miles) of it is land and 2.2 km² (0.9 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 0.88% water.

Cityscape

Milwaukee lies along the shores and bluffs of Lake Michigan at the confluence of three rivers: the Menomonee, the Kinnickinnic and the Milwaukee. It is crossed by Interstate 43 and Interstate 94, which come together downtown at the Marquette Interchange.

View of the Milwaukee River from downtown.

Climate

Milwaukee's proximity to Lake Michigan causes a convection current to form mid-afternoon, resulting in the so-called lake effect, causing the temperatures to be warmer in the winter, and cooler in the summer ("cooler by the lake" is practically boilerplate language for local meteorologists during the summer). Also, the relative humidity in the summer is far higher than that of comparable cities at the same latitude, meaning that it feels hotter than it really is.

Milwaukee's all-time record high temperature is 105°F (41°C) set on July 17, 1995. The coldest temperature ever experienced by the city was -26°F (-32°C) on both January 17, 1982 and February 4, 1996. The 1982 event, also known as Cold Sunday, featured temperatures as low as -40°F (-40°C) in some of the suburbs as little as 10 miles (16km) to the north of Milwaukee, although the city itself did not approach such cold temperatures.

Demographics

In the 2000 census, over a third (38 percent) of Milwaukeeans reported that they were of German descent. Other large population groups include Polish (12.7%), Irish (10%), English (5.1%), Italian (4.4%), French (3.9%), and Hispanic origin totaled 6.3%.

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there are 596,974 people, 232,188 households, and 135,133 families residing in the city. The population density is 2,399.5/km² (6,214.3 per square mile). There are 249,225 housing units at an average density of 1,001.7/km² (2,594.4 per square mile). The racial makeup of the city is 49.98% White, 37.34% African American, 0.87% Native American, 2.94% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 6.10% from other races, and 2.71% from two or more races. 12.00% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There are 232,188 households out of which 30.5% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.2% are married couples living together, 21.1% have a female householder with no husband present, and 41.8% are non-families. 33.5% of all households are made up of individuals and 9.5% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.50 and the average family size is 3.25.

In the city the population is spread out with 28.6% under the age of 18, 12.2% from 18 to 24, 30.2% from 25 to 44, 18.1% from 45 to 64, and 10.9% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 31 years. For every 100 females there are 91.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 87.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city is $32,216, and the median income for a family is $37,879. Males have a median income of $32,244 versus $26,013 for females. The per capita income for the city is $16,181. 21.3% of the population and 17.4% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 31.6% of those under the age of 18 and 11.0% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line.

Transportation

Milwaukee uses the Interstate Highways for its main transportation. I-94 comes up from Chicago to enter Milwaukee continues to Madison I-43 also enters Milwaukee from the south and continues to Green Bay where it ends. Milwaukee also has many internal freeways as well. Residents may also use the Milwaukee County Transit System to get around the city as well as the county via the bus.

Economy

Although most people associate Milwaukee with beer, today companies like Miller Brewing employ less than one percent of the city's workers. Milwaukee's reputation as a blue collar town is more accurate, however, with 22 percent of the workforce involved in manufacturing — second only to San Jose, CA and far higher than the national average of 16.5%. Service and managerial jobs are the fastest growing segments of the Milwaukee economy, and healthcare makes up 27% of all service jobs in the city.

Milwaukee is headquarters to six Fortune 1000 manufacturers and six Fortune 1000 service companies. Among these are Briggs & Stratton, Harley-Davidson, Johnson Controls, Manpower Inc., Marshall & Ilsley, Northwestern Mutual, Rockwell Automation, Roundy's Supermarkets, Metavante, Kohl's, and Wisconsin Energy. The Milwaukee area ranked number five in the nation when measuring the number of Fortune 500 companies as a share of the population, just behind the number four Minneapolis-St. Paul region. Milwaukee also has a large number of financial service firms, particularly those specializing in mutual funds and transaction processing systems, and a disproportionate number of publishing and printing companies.

Culture and sports

Culture

The Milwaukee Art Museum

Milwaukee's most visually prominent cultural attraction is the Milwaukee Art Museum, especially its new $100 million wing designed by Santiago Calatrava in his first American commission. The museum includes a "brise soleil," a moving sunscreen that quite literally unfolds like the wing of a bird. The Milwaukee Public Museum, Mitchell Park Horticultural Conservatory and Milwaukee County Zoo are also notable public attractions.

Milwaukee is home to the Florentine Opera, the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, the Milwaukee Ballet, Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, Skylight Opera Theatre, First Stage Children's Theater,Milwaukee Youth Theatre, and a number of other arts organizations. Additionally, Milwaukee is home to artistic performance venues such as the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, Pabst Theatre, Riverside Theatre, and Milwaukee Theatre. The Milwaukee Youth Arts Center, a first-of-its-kind Arts-in-education facility, is a national model.

Milwaukee, "A Great Place on a Great Lake" and "Genuine American," has also advertised itself as the "City of Festivals," emphasizing an annual lakefront fair called Summerfest. Listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the largest music festival in the world, Summerfest attracts around 900,000 visitors a year to its twelve stages. Smaller festivals througout the year celebrate the city's German, Native American, African-American, Italian, Irish, Asian, Arab, and Polish heritage.

Due in large part to its brewery history, the city has been called "the nation's watering hole" with more bars per capita than any other large city in the country (one bar for every 1600 people or approximately 375 bars, four bars for every square mile). Along the same lines, the tradition of tailgating (for almost any event, but especially Brewers games), where copious amounts of beer and other potent potables are ceremoniously consumed, is deeply engrained in culture of the city and its residents both young and old.

Although Milwaukee isn't known historically as a club scene music mecca, it does have a vibrant history of rock, blues, punk, ska, industrial music, goth and pop music bands. A range of musicians have called Milwaukee home, including Hildegarde, Woody Herman, Liberace, blues giant Hubert Sumlin, the BoDeans, Violent Femmes, Citizen King, The Gufs, The Promise Ring, Oil Tasters, Die Kruezen, Boy Dirt Car, Shiverhead, among others. Local hip-hop action includes acts like Rusty Ps and Black Elephant. Coo Coo Cal gave Milwaukee a national foothold in the hip-hop market with his hit single "My Projects". Beer City Skateboards is not only a skateboard company, but a punk rock label as well, home to DRI and Millions of Dead Cops. Venues such as Pabst Theater and The Rave bring internationally-known and critically acclaimed acts to Milwaukee every day.

Milwaukee is also home to a vibrant club scene booking regular international DJs such as Richie Hawtin, LTJ Bukem, Mark Farina, Derrick Carter and others. Milwaukee was home to a vibrant rave scene in the early Nineties, especially fostering hardcore techno, thanks to Drop Bass; but the scene moved south to Chicago after reaction by city authorities. Milwaukee was also an epicenter of the breakcore scene in early 2000s with labels like Addict Records and Zod Records.

Sports

It is also home to a number of professional sports teams including:

The Milwaukee Mile auto racing facility, the oldest active auto race track in the United States, is located on the Wisconsin State Fair Grounds in West Allis. The Mile is not far from the Pettit National Ice Center, a U.S. Olympic Team training facility for speed skating.

Previous sports teams to play in Milwaukee have included:

In addition, the Green Bay Packers played a portion of their home schedule in Milwaukee from 1933 through 1994:

The 1939 Championship between the Packers and the New York Giants was played at State Fair Park. The Packers won, 27-0.

To this day, the Packers maintain two separate season ticket plans, reflecting their time in Milwaukee: the Gold package, made up primarily of former Milwaukee season ticket holders, have a three-game package consisting of the annual Midwest Shrine preseason contest plus the second and fifth regular-season home games each year, and the Green package (made up of original Green Bay ticket holders) attend the annual Bishop's Charities preseason game and the remaining six regular-season contests.

Education

Milwaukee maintains Milwaukee Public Schools, the largest school district in Wisconsin. As of 2006, it has an enrolment of 95,600 students and employs 6,100 full-time and substitute teachers in 223 schools.

Colleges and universities

High schools

Media

Newspapers serving Milwaukee include:

Broadcast media:

Airports

Colloquialisms


This page about Milwaukee includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about Milwaukee
News stories about Milwaukee
External links for Milwaukee
Videos for Milwaukee
Wikis about Milwaukee
Discussion Groups about Milwaukee
Blogs about Milwaukee
Images of Milwaukee

Broadcast media:. List Format:. Newspapers serving Milwaukee include:. [20]. As of 2006, it has an enrolment of 95,600 students and employs 6,100 full-time and substitute teachers in 223 schools. Out of these two groups, several notable individuals have immerged. Milwaukee maintains Milwaukee Public Schools, the largest school district in Wisconsin. In addition, the university employees 1825 part and full time faculty members.

To this day, the Packers maintain two separate season ticket plans, reflecting their time in Milwaukee: the Gold package, made up primarily of former Milwaukee season ticket holders, have a three-game package consisting of the annual Midwest Shrine preseason contest plus the second and fifth regular-season home games each year, and the Green package (made up of original Green Bay ticket holders) attend the annual Bishop's Charities preseason game and the remaining six regular-season contests. NC State has conferred 185,663 degrees (as of 2005) since opening its doors and has an estimated 145,000 living alumni. The Packers won, 27-0. A great number of people have made their way through NC State University. The 1939 Championship between the Packers and the New York Giants was played at State Fair Park. The property borders the North Carolina State Fair to the North and hosts tailgating parties before NC State football games. In addition, the Green Bay Packers played a portion of their home schedule in Milwaukee from 1933 through 1994:. Aside from the two stadiums, the property is mainly open space used for event parking.

Previous sports teams to play in Milwaukee have included:. Both Carter-Finley Stadium and the RBC Center are located there. Olympic Team training facility for speed skating. The Stadium property is 3.4 miles (5.5 km) northwest of the Memorial Bell Tower. The Mile is not far from the Pettit National Ice Center, a U.S. Since most of the campus is rolling pastoral land, part of it is converted to parking space during the North Carolina State Fair and NC State football games. The Milwaukee Mile auto racing facility, the oldest active auto race track in the United States, is located on the Wisconsin State Fair Grounds in West Allis. Situated on this campus is the University Club and North Carolina’s only Veterinary School.

It is also home to a number of professional sports teams including:. The campus’s 182 acres (0.73 km²) is bordered by the stadiums and the North Carolina State Fairgrounds to the west and Meredith College to the east. Milwaukee was also an epicenter of the breakcore scene in early 2000s with labels like Addict Records and Zod Records. West Campus is located 2.5 miles (4 km) west of the Memorial Bell Tower. Milwaukee was home to a vibrant rave scene in the early Nineties, especially fostering hardcore techno, thanks to Drop Bass; but the scene moved south to Chicago after reaction by city authorities. The offices of Red Hat and the Raleigh branch of the National Weather Service are also on the Centennial Campus, as well as Centennial Campus Middle School. Milwaukee is also home to a vibrant club scene booking regular international DJs such as Richie Hawtin, LTJ Bukem, Mark Farina, Derrick Carter and others. The College of Textiles is based on this campus and long-term plans have the majority of the College of Engineering relocating to the new campus.

Venues such as Pabst Theater and The Rave bring internationally-known and critically acclaimed acts to Milwaukee every day. Located 1 mile (1.6 Km) south of the Memorial Bell Tower, this campus houses university, corporate, and government research, in addition to classrooms and non-student residences. Beer City Skateboards is not only a skateboard company, but a punk rock label as well, home to DRI and Millions of Dead Cops. NC State's main campus is augmented by the 1,334 acre (5.4 km²) mixed-use Centennial Campus. Coo Coo Cal gave Milwaukee a national foothold in the hip-hop market with his hit single "My Projects". NC State plans to reopen the Tunnel around March 2006. Local hip-hop action includes acts like Rusty Ps and Black Elephant. The tunnel was closed in June 2005 and has been partially demolished, to be rebuilt with wheelchair accessibility.

A range of musicians have called Milwaukee home, including Hildegarde, Woody Herman, Liberace, blues giant Hubert Sumlin, the BoDeans, Violent Femmes, Citizen King, The Gufs, The Promise Ring, Oil Tasters, Die Kruezen, Boy Dirt Car, Shiverhead, among others. This particular tunnel is the site of sanctioned graffiti; anyone may paint there, and it is often the place for political statements, personal messages, and unique art. Although Milwaukee isn't known historically as a club scene music mecca, it does have a vibrant history of rock, blues, punk, ska, industrial music, goth and pop music bands. The Free Expression Tunnel functions as one of three pedestrian tunnels underneath the railroad tracks separating North Main Campus and Central Main Campus. Along the same lines, the tradition of tailgating (for almost any event, but especially Brewers games), where copious amounts of beer and other potent potables are ceremoniously consumed, is deeply engrained in culture of the city and its residents both young and old. Southwest of the Court of North Carolina is another landmark, the Free Expression Tunnel. Due in large part to its brewery history, the city has been called "the nation's watering hole" with more bars per capita than any other large city in the country (one bar for every 1600 people or approximately 375 bars, four bars for every square mile). Some replanting has occurred, but the Court's former appearance is far from being restored.

Smaller festivals througout the year celebrate the city's German, Native American, African-American, Italian, Irish, Asian, Arab, and Polish heritage. It was once home to 100 trees (one for every county in North Carolina), but damage caused by Hurricane Fran in 1996 reduced the number significantly, including the destruction of a particularly old and large tree which was some 12 feet in diameter. Listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the largest music festival in the world, Summerfest attracts around 900,000 visitors a year to its twelve stages. The Court of North Carolina, just West of the Memorial Bell Tower, is surrounded by the 1911 Building; the College of Humanities and Social Sciences in Tompkins, Caldwell, Winston Halls and Poe Hall; Page Hall, home to College of Engineering offices; and Leazar Hall, location of the Computer Science Teaching Labs. Milwaukee, "A Great Place on a Great Lake" and "Genuine American," has also advertised itself as the "City of Festivals," emphasizing an annual lakefront fair called Summerfest. As a tradition, the Bell Tower is lighted in red at night immediately following athletic victories and certain academic achievements.[19]. The Milwaukee Youth Arts Center, a first-of-its-kind Arts-in-education facility, is a national model. The granite tower, completed in 1937, is 115 feet (35 meters) tall.

Additionally, Milwaukee is home to artistic performance venues such as the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, Pabst Theatre, Riverside Theatre, and Milwaukee Theatre. It was constructed as a monument to alumni killed in World War I. Milwaukee is home to the Florentine Opera, the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, the Milwaukee Ballet, Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, Skylight Opera Theatre, First Stage Children's Theater,Milwaukee Youth Theatre, and a number of other arts organizations. The Memorial Bell Tower, located in the Northeast corner of North Main Campus, serves as the signature of NC State and appears in the NC State Official Seal. The Milwaukee Public Museum, Mitchell Park Horticultural Conservatory and Milwaukee County Zoo are also notable public attractions. These sidewalks are also dotted with white brick mosaics. The museum includes a "brise soleil," a moving sunscreen that quite literally unfolds like the wing of a bird. "the brickyard"), and most sidewalks are also made with brick.

Milwaukee's most visually prominent cultural attraction is the Milwaukee Art Museum, especially its new $100 million wing designed by Santiago Calatrava in his first American commission. Due to oversupply, odd brick statues dot the landscape, a large section of main campus is paved over with brick (University Plaza, a.k.a. Milwaukee also has a large number of financial service firms, particularly those specializing in mutual funds and transaction processing systems, and a disproportionate number of publishing and printing companies. Architecturally, Main Campus is known for its distinctive red brick buildings. Paul region. Greek Court and a large conference center are found on South Main Campus. The Milwaukee area ranked number five in the nation when measuring the number of Fortune 500 companies as a share of the population, just behind the number four Minneapolis-St. Western Boulevard separates Central and South Main Campuses.

Among these are Briggs & Stratton, Harley-Davidson, Johnson Controls, Manpower Inc., Marshall & Ilsley, Northwestern Mutual, Rockwell Automation, Roundy's Supermarkets, Metavante, Kohl's, and Wisconsin Energy. Pedestrian and road tunnels are used to cross the tracks. Milwaukee is headquarters to six Fortune 1000 manufacturers and six Fortune 1000 service companies. North and Central Main Campus are separated by a rail road track. Service and managerial jobs are the fastest growing segments of the Milwaukee economy, and healthcare makes up 27% of all service jobs in the city. Central Main Campus is mainly dormitories, cafeterias, gymnasiums and student support departments. Milwaukee's reputation as a blue collar town is more accurate, however, with 22 percent of the workforce involved in manufacturing — second only to San Jose, CA and far higher than the national average of 16.5%. North Main Campus is the oldest part of NC State and is home to most academic departments and a few dorms.

Although most people associate Milwaukee with beer, today companies like Miller Brewing employ less than one percent of the city's workers. NC State’s Main Campus has three general areas: North Main Campus, Central Main Campus, and South Main Campus. Residents may also use the Milwaukee County Transit System to get around the city as well as the county via the bus. The campus is divided into four sections:. Milwaukee also has many internal freeways as well. NC State has a sprawling, urban 2,139 acre (8.65 km²) campus. I-94 comes up from Chicago to enter Milwaukee continues to Madison I-43 also enters Milwaukee from the south and continues to Green Bay where it ends. Other sports supported at NC State are cheerleading, cross country, dance, golf, rifle, soccer, sailing, swimming and diving, and track and field.

Milwaukee uses the Interstate Highways for its main transportation. Both men's and women's tennis compete out of this facility. Out of the total population, 31.6% of those under the age of 18 and 11.0% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line. Isenhouser Tennis Complex in early 2005. 21.3% of the population and 17.4% of families are below the poverty line. The University completed the J.W. The per capita income for the city is $16,181. The baseball team plays its games out of Doak Field, at the western edge of Main Campus.

Males have a median income of $32,244 versus $26,013 for females. Completed in the 1949, Reynolds was once the heart of NC State, hosting many University sports. The median income for a household in the city is $32,216, and the median income for a family is $37,879. Volleyball, women's basketball, wrestling, and gymnastics are all still hosted in historic Reynolds Coliseum. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 87.2 males. These two facilities are located roughly three miles to the west of NC State's Main Campus. For every 100 females there are 91.6 males. This new arena is located next to Carter-Finley Stadium, where the football team plays its games.

The median age is 31 years. For the Fall of 1999 the Wolfpack men's basketball program opened play in the RBC Center. In the city the population is spread out with 28.6% under the age of 18, 12.2% from 18 to 24, 30.2% from 25 to 44, 18.1% from 45 to 64, and 10.9% who are 65 years of age or older. Coach Kay Yow, head coach of the women's basketball program and member of the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame, has led the Wolfpack Women to more than 600 wins and approaches 700 for her career. The average household size is 2.50 and the average family size is 3.25. They also won the championship in 1983 under coach Jim Valvano. 33.5% of all households are made up of individuals and 9.5% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The men's team won the NCAA Championship in 1974 under coach Norm Sloan after ending UCLA's seven year reign.

There are 232,188 households out of which 30.5% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.2% are married couples living together, 21.1% have a female householder with no husband present, and 41.8% are non-families. The men's basketball team has made four consecutive trips and a recent Sweet Sixteen appearance in the NCAA Tournament under the guidance of coach Herb Sendek. 12.00% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. Chuck Amato, the head football coach, has led the Wolfpack to five bowl games while at NC State. The racial makeup of the city is 49.98% White, 37.34% African American, 0.87% Native American, 2.94% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 6.10% from other races, and 2.71% from two or more races. NC State participates in the NCAA's Division I-A in the Atlantic Coast Conference. There are 249,225 housing units at an average density of 1,001.7/km² (2,594.4 per square mile). Athletic teams at NC State are known as the Wolfpack.

The population density is 2,399.5/km² (6,214.3 per square mile). (Demographics last updated Dec 6, 2005). As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there are 596,974 people, 232,188 households, and 135,133 families residing in the city. The station host several formats run by student disc jockies. Other large population groups include Polish (12.7%), Irish (10%), English (5.1%), Italian (4.4%), French (3.9%), and Hispanic origin totaled 6.3%. The radio station broadcasts at 25,000 watts and reaches around 200,000 people. In the 2000 census, over a third (38 percent) of Milwaukeeans reported that they were of German descent. It does seek sponsors, who can be acknowledged on the air, but 90% of the station's funding is from the university.

The 1982 event, also known as Cold Sunday, featured temperatures as low as -40°F (-40°C) in some of the suburbs as little as 10 miles (16km) to the north of Milwaukee, although the city itself did not approach such cold temperatures. WKNC is a non-commercial station and cannot run traditional advertisements. The coldest temperature ever experienced by the city was -26°F (-32°C) on both January 17, 1982 and February 4, 1996. NC State has its own student-run radio station, WKNC. Milwaukee's all-time record high temperature is 105°F (41°C) set on July 17, 1995. Each year, nearly 1,000 copies are printed and sold. Also, the relative humidity in the summer is far higher than that of comparable cities at the same latitude, meaning that it feels hotter than it really is. The Agromeck serves as a historian of campus and is a reminder of the way things used to be.

Milwaukee's proximity to Lake Michigan causes a convection current to form mid-afternoon, resulting in the so-called lake effect, causing the temperatures to be warmer in the winter, and cooler in the summer ("cooler by the lake" is practically boilerplate language for local meteorologists during the summer). It acts as a compendium of student life on campus including sporting events, social activities, and day-to-day living. It is crossed by Interstate 43 and Interstate 94, which come together downtown at the Marquette Interchange. NC State’s oldest student publication, the Agromeck yearbook, celebrated its 100th birthday with the 2002 edition. Milwaukee lies along the shores and bluffs of Lake Michigan at the confluence of three rivers: the Menomonee, the Kinnickinnic and the Milwaukee. The paper is funded by advertisement and the student government; it is distributed for free at numerous locations on campus and at area merchants. The total area is 0.88% water. Technician is published Monday through Friday when school is in session with a circulation of about 15,000.

248.8 km² (96.1 square miles) of it is land and 2.2 km² (0.9 mi²) of it is water. It employs more than 100 students throughout the year and reports on campus news, sports, entertainment, and state and national news. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 251.0 km² (96.9 square miles). Technician has been North Carolina State University’s student-run newspaper since 1920. While the city still faces a shrinking population[1], it continues to make plans for increasing its future revitalization through various projects. Besides fraternities and sororities, there are multicultural groups, arts groups, political and social action groups, service and professional groups, religious groups, sports and recreation groups, academic and professional groups, and special interest groups such as the Clogging Team, the Film Society, the Judo Club, the Equestrian Club, and the Black Finesse Modeling Troupe. Starting in the late 1960s, however, like many cities in the Great Lakes "rust belt," Milwaukee saw its population start to decline due to various factors, ranging from the loss of blue collar jobs to the phenomenon of "white flight." However, in recent years, the city began to make strides in improving its economy, neighborhoods, and image, resulting in the revitalization of neighborhoods such as the Third Ward, east side,and more recently, Bay View, along with attracting new businesses to its downtown area. Student life at North Carolina State University includes opportunities in a diverse range of activities and organizations.

This helped make Milwaukee one of the 15 largest cities in the nation, and by the mid-1960s, its population reached nearly 750,000. There is also a multicultural student affairs office. states. The student center of the University includes an African-American Cultural Center which has an art gallery and a library. From the late 19th century until the 1950s, Milwaukee, like many northern industrial cities, saw tremendous growth from immigrants from Germany, Hungary, Poland and other central European nations, as well as the northward migration of African-Americans from southern U.S. Most students are North Carolina residents, so on the weekends the campus is empty. The liberal tradition of these peoples led to decades of socialist government in Milwaukee during the twentieth century. By far the largest party and social events are those associated with sporting events.

Milwaukee still today has a large German-American population. While Greeks do offer some social events, many dormitories host their own parties, though alcohol policies are strictly enforced. German immigrants helped increase the city's population during the 1840s and the following decades. NC State has a relatively small Greek presence, and few Greeks actually live in their fraternity or sorority houses. Juneau was Milwaukee's first mayor. Freshman dorms provide academic and social events that acclimate incoming students to the college experience. Walker. Thirty-three percent of all students live on campus in one of twenty different dormitories.

In 1846, Juneau's town combined with two neighboring rival towns to incorporate as the City of Milwaukee: Kilbourntown to the west, which was founded by Byron Kilbourn, and Walker's Point to the south, founded by George H. [17] NC State as a member of the Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN), has interlibrary loan services with Duke University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and North Carolina Central University.[18]. Juneau bought out his father-in-law's trading business, and in 1833 he founded a town on the east side of the Milwaukee River. Hill Library, located on Main Campus is over 11 stories tall and covers over 119 thousand square feet (11 thousand square meters). In 1818, Frenchman Solomon Juneau settled in the area. The largest library, D.H. Milwaukee received its name from the Indian word Millioke which means "The Good Land", or "gathering place by the water." French missionaries and traders passed through the area in the late 1600s and 1700s. The NC State Library, ranked 27th out of 113 North American research libraries, includes 3.4 million volumes and 54 thousand journal subscriptions (as of 2005).[15][16] The library system has an annual budget of over $20 million and consists of 5 libraries.

The Milwaukee area was originally inhabited by the Fox, Mascouten, Potawatomi, and Winnebago Indian tribes. The administration of NC State claims that this rate is a product of high participation in the cooperative education program (which adds a year to an undergraduate’s tenure) and the difficulty of the engineering degrees.[8] [9]. . NC State’s rankings are significantly hurt by its 29.7% four year graduation rate (for freshmen entering in 1998), as compared to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s 66.7% rate for the same class. The city is located in the southeastern portion of the state on the western shore of Lake Michigan. NC State includes the following academic units:. The city of Milwaukee is the 22nd largest city in the United States. Areas of Study:.

The city's population is 592,765 (2005 estimate) with an estimated total of 1,709,926 in the Milwaukee metropolitan area (2005).
. Milwaukee is the largest city in the state of Wisconsin, United States and the county of Milwaukee. Only the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences offers associate's degrees.
Location of Milwaukee in
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. NC State offers bachelor's degrees in 100 areas of study, master's degrees in 109 areas and doctorate degrees in 55 areas. Some Milwaukeeans use the unique expression "ainahey", short for "ain't it, hey?" to reaffirm something obvious, used in the same way as "of course", and similar to the colloquial "don'chaknow", short for "don't you know?". NC State also provides a First Year Program for incoming freshmen to give incoming freshmen an opportunity to experience several disciplines before selecting a major.

It is also common for people to refer to ATMs as a "Tyme Machine," referring to the name of the dominant debit card in Wisconsin. Students can alternate semesters in the cooperative program, which gives them college credit for time-spent working on-site. One well known colloquialism common to Milwaukee and the surrounding area, is the word "bubbler," which refers to a drinking fountain. The textile and paper science programs are notable, given the University’s location near active textile and paper producers. Timmerman Airport. NC State is known for its programs in engineering and design. Lawrence J. State law limits the admission of student from outside North Carolina, so there is strong competition among non-residents for admissions.

General Mitchell International Airport. Twenty-five percent were in both categories. List of Milwaukee area radio stations. Out of the 3,175 students in the 2004 freshmen class, 43% were ranked in the top 10% of their high school class and 48% scored greater than 1200 on the SAT. List of Milwaukee area television stations. Considered a more selective university, NC State accepts fewer than 60% of those who apply. Vital Source Magazine. It is also widely recognized as one of the three anchors of North Carolina's Research Triangle, together with Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.[7].

UWM Post. Currently, NC State has over 7,000 employees, over 30,000 students, an $820 million annual budget, and a $300 million endowment. The Leader. [5] [6]. Marquette Tribune. There are 61 private and government agency partners located here as well. Shepherd Express. Over $620 million has been invested in facilities and infrastructure at the new campus with 2.7 million square feet of space being constructed.

MKE (magazine). Over the next decade and a half, NC State has focused on developing is new Centennial Campus. Milwaukee Magazine. Also in this year, it gained 700 acres of land that would later become the Centennial Campus. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. School of Engineering to the College of Engineering). Wisconsin Lutheran High School. NC State celebrated its centennial in 1987 and reorganized its internal structure renaming all is schools to colleges (e.g.

Washington High School. The 1970s saw enrollment surpass 19,000 and the addition of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences. Vincent High School. In 1966 single year enrollment reached 10,000. Thomas More. Convention ignores the "at Raleigh" part of the name, but it is still in the official name. South Division High School. Still not satisfied, protest and letter writing campaigns continued until 1965 when the university received the present name North Carolina State University at Raleigh.

Rufus King High School. Instead the General Assembly changed the name to North Carolina State of the University of North Carolina at Raleigh in 1963. Riverside University High School. The name was never adopted. Reagan College Preparatory. Faculty, students and alumni immediately launched a bitter opposition campaign, arguing that the name would cause the university to lose its identity and to appear to be a branch of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Pulaski High School. In 1962, administrators tried to change State College to North Carolina State University, but Governor Terry Sanford and other UNC system officials proposed The University of North Carolina at Raleigh for consistency.

Professional Learning Institute. The period also saw the first admission of African-Americans. Pius XI High School. The 1950s saw many building projects and national recognition of its academic programs. North Division Virtual University High School. By 1947 enrollment was over 5,000 and the university expanded to accommodate the new students. New School for Community Service. Bill.

Milwaukee School of Languages. After the end of World War II, State College experienced rapid growth due to the G.I. Milwaukee School of Entrepreneurship. By 1937 enrollment rebounded to over 2,000, but World War II caused enrollment to drop below 1,000. Milwaukee Lutheran High School. The Consolidated University of North Carolina lasted until 1972 when it was remade into the University of North Carolina system. Milwaukee High School of the Arts. This move also brought another name – North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering of the University of North Carolina.

Metropolitan High School. This administratively combined the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Women’s College at Greensboro, and State College. Marquette University High School. To address issues institutional inefficiencies, the State of North Carolina established the Consolidated University of North Carolina in 1931. Madison University High School. The Great Depression brought many challenges to State College when economic hardships caused enrollment to suffer. Rufus King International Baccalaureate High School. In 1927, the first women graduated from the university.

Juneau Business High School. In 1920 enrollment reached 1,000 and by 1929 enrollment doubled to 2,000. John Marshall High School. School of Agriculture, Textile School…). Hamilton High School. In the 1920s, many of the university’s educational units were organized into schools (e.g. Divine Savior Holy Angels High School. By the end of World War I, State College experienced many institutional changes and fluctuating enrollment.

Custer High School. [4]. Bradley (Lynde & Harry) Technology & Trade High School. By 1918 the college had an enrollment over 700 students and it had a new name—North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering. Bay View High School. These two new programs allowed the university’s knowledge resources to directly benefit the people of North Carolina, not just those students who walked its halls. Wisconsin Lutheran College. In 1914 the federal Smith-Lever Act enabled the university to establish state, county, and local extension programs.

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Along with United State Department of Agriculture, State College created the Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs in 1909 (which later became 4-H in 1926). Mount Mary College. Between 1889 to the end of World War I, the college experienced growth and expansion of purpose. Milwaukee School of Engineering. [1] [2] [3]. Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design. Construction began on the Main Building (now called Holladay Hall) in 1888 and the college formally opened on October 3, 1889.

Milwaukee Area Technical College. Stanhope Pullen gave land towards the establishment of the new college in Raleigh. Medical College of Wisconsin. R. Marquette University. The state also budgeted money for the new college and transferred North Carolina's land-grant endowment to it as well. Cardinal Stritch University. On March 7, 1887 the North Carolina General Assembly authorized the establishment of North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts.

Alverno College. In the mid 1880s both state farmers and business leaders claimed that the Chapel Hill’s elitist education did not meet the mandate set forth by the Morrill Land-Grant Act. Milwaukee County Stadium, 1953-1994. For two decades that university received $7,500 annually from the endowment. Marquette Stadium, 1952. During Reconstruction, North Carolina allocated its endowment to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Wisconsin State Fair Park, 1934-51. This Act created endowments that were to be used in the establishment of colleges that would provide a “liberal and practical education” while focusing on military tactics, agriculture and the mechanical arts without excluding classical studies.

Borchert Field, 1933. Although established in 1887, the North Carolina State University story begins in 1862 when President Lincoln signed the federal Morrill Land-Grant Act. Milwaukee Wave United (Outdoor Soccer) 2003 - They only played one season. . Milwaukee Rampage (Outdoor Soccer) 1994 - 2002. While NC State has historical strengths in design, agriculture, engineering, and textiles, it offers over 100 Bachelor degree areas of study including meteorology, economics, political science, forestry, and education. Milwaukee Mustangs (American football—Arena Football League), played at the Bradley Center from 1994 to 2001. Today, NC State has an enrollment of over 30,000, making it the largest university in North Carolina.

Milwaukee Does (Basketball—Women's Pro Basketball League), played at MECCA Arena from 1978 to 1980. The North Carolina General Assembly founded NC State in 1887 as a land-grant college. The Milwaukee Braves won the National League pennant in 1957 and 1958, and won the World Series in 1957. Also known as NC State, the university is the principal technological institute of the University of North Carolina. Milwaukee Braves (Baseball—MLB), played at Milwaukee County Stadium from 1953-1965. North Carolina State University at Raleigh is a public, coeducational, extensive research university located in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. Louis. JC Raulston Arboretum.

Milwaukee Hawks (Basketball—NBA) played at the Milwaukee Arena from 1951 to 1955 before moving to St. Armed Forces Joint Chiefs of Staff. Milwaukee Brewers (Baseball—Minor League Baseball), member of the American Association from 1902 through 1952, played at Borchert Field. Hugh Shelton (Bachelors 1963) Former chairman of the U.S. Milwaukee Badgers (American football—NFL), played from 1922 to 1926. Gen. Cellular Arena. Burley Mitchell (Bachelors 1966) North Carolina Supreme Court Chief Justice.

Milwaukee Wave (Indoor Soccer) playing at the U.S. Jones (Bachelors 1965) Member, United States Congress, 3rd District, North Carolina. Milwaukee Admirals (Ice hockey) playing at the Bradley Center. Walter B. Milwaukee Bucks (Basketball—NBA) playing at the Bradley Center. (Bachelors 1959, Masters 196?) 4-term Governor of North Carolina. Milwaukee Brewers (Baseball—MLB) playing at Miller Park. Hunt Jr.

Average July high/low temperatures: 79°F/62°F (26°C/17°C). James B. Average January high/low temperatures: 26°F/11°F (-3°C/-12°C). Hayworth (Bachelors 1980) Member, United States Congress, 6th District, Arizona. J.D. Senator and vice-presidential candidate.

John Edwards (Bachelors 1974) U.S. John Tesh (Attended circa 1975, expelled for cheating(?)) Musician. Jerry Punch (Bachelors 1975) Sideline reporter & auto racing analyst for ESPN and ABC. Park (Bachelors 1931) Communications executive.

Roy H. Terry Gannon Bachelors 1985) ABC Sports commentator. Richard Curtis (Bachelors 1972) A founder and managing editor of graphics and photography for USA TODAY. David Thompson (Bachelors 2003 played for NCSU from 1971 to 1975)) basketball player.

Philip Rivers (Bachelors 2003) football player. Nate McMillan (Attended 1985-1986) Basketball, head coach of the Portland Trail Blazers and past Head Coach Seattle SuperSonics. Torry Holt (Attended 1995-1998) football player. Terrence Holt (Attended 1999-2001) football player.

Roman Gabriel (Bachelors 1962) football player. David Fox (Bachelor 1994) 1996 Summer Olympics Swimming gold medalist. Bill Cowher (Bachelors 1979) football, head coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers. 1972, Faculty member 1972-1976) CEO of SAS Institute.

1968, Ph.D. 1965, M.S. James Goodnight (B.S. Marshall Brain (Masters 1989, Instructor 1986-1992) Founder of HowStuffWorks.

Donald Bitzer (Professor 1989-Present) Father of Plasma Television. Young (Professor 19??-present) Renaissance English literature scholar and co-founder of the John Donne Journal. V. R.

John Kessel (Professor 1982-Present) science-fiction author. George Kennedy (Professor 1976-Present) Entomologist. Thomas Hester (Professor 19??-Present) Renaissance English literature scholar and co-founder of the John Donne Journal. M.

Tom Regan (Professor 1967-Present) Philosopher and animal rights activist. Friday (Bachelors 1941) Former President of the University of North Carolina. William C. 1966, Faculty member 1962-1969) UCLA Chancellor.

Albert Carnesale (PhD. William Brantley Aycock (Bachelors 1936) former University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chancellor. Stadiums—Located further West of Main Campus than West Campus, it is the location of the basketball and football stadiums. West Campus—Located two miles West of Main Campus, it is the home of the veterinary School.

Centennial Campus—Located South of Main Campus, it is home to some academic departments, in particular those related to science and engineering, but most activity here is concerned with public/private cooperation and research. Location of most academic studies and student dormitories. Main Campus—Oldest campus of NC State. Among America's Best Value Colleges by Princeton Reviews.[14].

3rd in the nation in the total number of engineering degrees conferred in 2004.[13]. 28th best value in education by Kiplinger in 2006.[12]. [11]. 34th in US News and World Report's Best Graduate Engineering Programs.

78th out of all national universities by US News and World Report in 2006.[10]. List of graduate degrees. List of bachelor degrees.

11-26-14 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php PAD File Directory Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Display all your websites in one place HereIam.tv Celebrity Homepages Charity Directory Google+ Directory Move your favorite Unsigned Artist to the Top of the List