This page will contain images about Milwaukee, as they become available.

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Nickname: "The City of Festivals", "The Genuine American City", "Cream City", "Brewtown/Brew City"
Motto: "'"
Official website: http://www.city.milwaukee.gov
Location


Location of Milwaukee in
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

Government
County Milwaukee
Mayor Tom Barrett
Geographical characteristics
Area
Total 251.0 km²
Land 248.8 km²
Water 2.2 km²
Population
Total (2000) 596,974
Metro area 1,709,926
Density 2399.5/km²
Density {{{population_density_mi2}}}/mi²
Latitude {{{latitude}}}
Longitude {{{longitude}}}
Coordinates 43°03′00″ N
87°57′00″ W
Elevation m
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)

Milwaukee is the largest city in the state of Wisconsin, United States and the county of Milwaukee. The city's population is 592,765 (2005 estimate) with an estimated total of 1,709,926 in the Milwaukee metropolitan area (2005). The city of Milwaukee is the 22nd largest city in the United States. The city is located in the southeastern portion of the state on the western shore of Lake Michigan.

History

The Milwaukee area was originally inhabited by the Fox, Mascouten, Potawatomi, and Winnebago Indian tribes. Milwaukee received its name from the Indian word Millioke which means "The Good Land", or "gathering place by the water." French missionaries and traders passed through the area in the late 1600s and 1700s.

In 1818, Frenchman Solomon Juneau settled in the area. Juneau bought out his father-in-law's trading business, and in 1833 he founded a town on the east side of the Milwaukee River. In 1846, Juneau's town combined with two neighboring rival towns to incorporate as the City of Milwaukee: Kilbourntown to the west, which was founded by Byron Kilbourn, and Walker's Point to the south, founded by George H. Walker. Juneau was Milwaukee's first mayor. German immigrants helped increase the city's population during the 1840s and the following decades. Milwaukee still today has a large German-American population. The liberal tradition of these peoples led to decades of socialist government in Milwaukee during the twentieth century.

From the late 19th century until the 1950s, Milwaukee, like many northern industrial cities, saw tremendous growth from immigrants from Germany, Hungary, Poland and other central European nations, as well as the northward migration of African-Americans from southern U.S. states. This helped make Milwaukee one of the 15 largest cities in the nation, and by the mid-1960s, its population reached nearly 750,000. Starting in the late 1960s, however, like many cities in the Great Lakes "rust belt," Milwaukee saw its population start to decline due to various factors, ranging from the loss of blue collar jobs to the phenomenon of "white flight." However, in recent years, the city began to make strides in improving its economy, neighborhoods, and image, resulting in the revitalization of neighborhoods such as the Third Ward, east side,and more recently, Bay View, along with attracting new businesses to its downtown area. While the city still faces a shrinking population[1], it continues to make plans for increasing its future revitalization through various projects.

Geography and climate

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 251.0 km² (96.9 square miles). 248.8 km² (96.1 square miles) of it is land and 2.2 km² (0.9 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 0.88% water.

Cityscape

Milwaukee lies along the shores and bluffs of Lake Michigan at the confluence of three rivers: the Menomonee, the Kinnickinnic and the Milwaukee. It is crossed by Interstate 43 and Interstate 94, which come together downtown at the Marquette Interchange.

View of the Milwaukee River from downtown.

Climate

Milwaukee's proximity to Lake Michigan causes a convection current to form mid-afternoon, resulting in the so-called lake effect, causing the temperatures to be warmer in the winter, and cooler in the summer ("cooler by the lake" is practically boilerplate language for local meteorologists during the summer). Also, the relative humidity in the summer is far higher than that of comparable cities at the same latitude, meaning that it feels hotter than it really is.

Milwaukee's all-time record high temperature is 105°F (41°C) set on July 17, 1995. The coldest temperature ever experienced by the city was -26°F (-32°C) on both January 17, 1982 and February 4, 1996. The 1982 event, also known as Cold Sunday, featured temperatures as low as -40°F (-40°C) in some of the suburbs as little as 10 miles (16km) to the north of Milwaukee, although the city itself did not approach such cold temperatures.

Demographics

In the 2000 census, over a third (38 percent) of Milwaukeeans reported that they were of German descent. Other large population groups include Polish (12.7%), Irish (10%), English (5.1%), Italian (4.4%), French (3.9%), and Hispanic origin totaled 6.3%.

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there are 596,974 people, 232,188 households, and 135,133 families residing in the city. The population density is 2,399.5/km² (6,214.3 per square mile). There are 249,225 housing units at an average density of 1,001.7/km² (2,594.4 per square mile). The racial makeup of the city is 49.98% White, 37.34% African American, 0.87% Native American, 2.94% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 6.10% from other races, and 2.71% from two or more races. 12.00% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There are 232,188 households out of which 30.5% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.2% are married couples living together, 21.1% have a female householder with no husband present, and 41.8% are non-families. 33.5% of all households are made up of individuals and 9.5% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.50 and the average family size is 3.25.

In the city the population is spread out with 28.6% under the age of 18, 12.2% from 18 to 24, 30.2% from 25 to 44, 18.1% from 45 to 64, and 10.9% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 31 years. For every 100 females there are 91.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 87.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city is $32,216, and the median income for a family is $37,879. Males have a median income of $32,244 versus $26,013 for females. The per capita income for the city is $16,181. 21.3% of the population and 17.4% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 31.6% of those under the age of 18 and 11.0% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line.

Transportation

Milwaukee uses the Interstate Highways for its main transportation. I-94 comes up from Chicago to enter Milwaukee continues to Madison I-43 also enters Milwaukee from the south and continues to Green Bay where it ends. Milwaukee also has many internal freeways as well. Residents may also use the Milwaukee County Transit System to get around the city as well as the county via the bus.

Economy

Although most people associate Milwaukee with beer, today companies like Miller Brewing employ less than one percent of the city's workers. Milwaukee's reputation as a blue collar town is more accurate, however, with 22 percent of the workforce involved in manufacturing — second only to San Jose, CA and far higher than the national average of 16.5%. Service and managerial jobs are the fastest growing segments of the Milwaukee economy, and healthcare makes up 27% of all service jobs in the city.

Milwaukee is headquarters to six Fortune 1000 manufacturers and six Fortune 1000 service companies. Among these are Briggs & Stratton, Harley-Davidson, Johnson Controls, Manpower Inc., Marshall & Ilsley, Northwestern Mutual, Rockwell Automation, Roundy's Supermarkets, Metavante, Kohl's, and Wisconsin Energy. The Milwaukee area ranked number five in the nation when measuring the number of Fortune 500 companies as a share of the population, just behind the number four Minneapolis-St. Paul region. Milwaukee also has a large number of financial service firms, particularly those specializing in mutual funds and transaction processing systems, and a disproportionate number of publishing and printing companies.

Culture and sports

Culture

The Milwaukee Art Museum

Milwaukee's most visually prominent cultural attraction is the Milwaukee Art Museum, especially its new $100 million wing designed by Santiago Calatrava in his first American commission. The museum includes a "brise soleil," a moving sunscreen that quite literally unfolds like the wing of a bird. The Milwaukee Public Museum, Mitchell Park Horticultural Conservatory and Milwaukee County Zoo are also notable public attractions.

Milwaukee is home to the Florentine Opera, the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, the Milwaukee Ballet, Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, Skylight Opera Theatre, First Stage Children's Theater,Milwaukee Youth Theatre, and a number of other arts organizations. Additionally, Milwaukee is home to artistic performance venues such as the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, Pabst Theatre, Riverside Theatre, and Milwaukee Theatre. The Milwaukee Youth Arts Center, a first-of-its-kind Arts-in-education facility, is a national model.

Milwaukee, "A Great Place on a Great Lake" and "Genuine American," has also advertised itself as the "City of Festivals," emphasizing an annual lakefront fair called Summerfest. Listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the largest music festival in the world, Summerfest attracts around 900,000 visitors a year to its twelve stages. Smaller festivals througout the year celebrate the city's German, Native American, African-American, Italian, Irish, Asian, Arab, and Polish heritage.

Due in large part to its brewery history, the city has been called "the nation's watering hole" with more bars per capita than any other large city in the country (one bar for every 1600 people or approximately 375 bars, four bars for every square mile). Along the same lines, the tradition of tailgating (for almost any event, but especially Brewers games), where copious amounts of beer and other potent potables are ceremoniously consumed, is deeply engrained in culture of the city and its residents both young and old.

Although Milwaukee isn't known historically as a club scene music mecca, it does have a vibrant history of rock, blues, punk, ska, industrial music, goth and pop music bands. A range of musicians have called Milwaukee home, including Hildegarde, Woody Herman, Liberace, blues giant Hubert Sumlin, the BoDeans, Violent Femmes, Citizen King, The Gufs, The Promise Ring, Oil Tasters, Die Kruezen, Boy Dirt Car, Shiverhead, among others. Local hip-hop action includes acts like Rusty Ps and Black Elephant. Coo Coo Cal gave Milwaukee a national foothold in the hip-hop market with his hit single "My Projects". Beer City Skateboards is not only a skateboard company, but a punk rock label as well, home to DRI and Millions of Dead Cops. Venues such as Pabst Theater and The Rave bring internationally-known and critically acclaimed acts to Milwaukee every day.

Milwaukee is also home to a vibrant club scene booking regular international DJs such as Richie Hawtin, LTJ Bukem, Mark Farina, Derrick Carter and others. Milwaukee was home to a vibrant rave scene in the early Nineties, especially fostering hardcore techno, thanks to Drop Bass; but the scene moved south to Chicago after reaction by city authorities. Milwaukee was also an epicenter of the breakcore scene in early 2000s with labels like Addict Records and Zod Records.

Sports

It is also home to a number of professional sports teams including:

The Milwaukee Mile auto racing facility, the oldest active auto race track in the United States, is located on the Wisconsin State Fair Grounds in West Allis. The Mile is not far from the Pettit National Ice Center, a U.S. Olympic Team training facility for speed skating.

Previous sports teams to play in Milwaukee have included:

In addition, the Green Bay Packers played a portion of their home schedule in Milwaukee from 1933 through 1994:

The 1939 Championship between the Packers and the New York Giants was played at State Fair Park. The Packers won, 27-0.

To this day, the Packers maintain two separate season ticket plans, reflecting their time in Milwaukee: the Gold package, made up primarily of former Milwaukee season ticket holders, have a three-game package consisting of the annual Midwest Shrine preseason contest plus the second and fifth regular-season home games each year, and the Green package (made up of original Green Bay ticket holders) attend the annual Bishop's Charities preseason game and the remaining six regular-season contests.

Education

Milwaukee maintains Milwaukee Public Schools, the largest school district in Wisconsin. As of 2006, it has an enrolment of 95,600 students and employs 6,100 full-time and substitute teachers in 223 schools.

Colleges and universities

High schools

Media

Newspapers serving Milwaukee include:

Broadcast media:

Airports

Colloquialisms


This page about Milwaukee includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about Milwaukee
News stories about Milwaukee
External links for Milwaukee
Videos for Milwaukee
Wikis about Milwaukee
Discussion Groups about Milwaukee
Blogs about Milwaukee
Images of Milwaukee

Broadcast media:. Some of the improvements that are being worked on are:. Newspapers serving Milwaukee include:. There is a great deal of active research and development into mobile phone technology that is currently underway. As of 2006, it has an enrolment of 95,600 students and employs 6,100 full-time and substitute teachers in 223 schools. Vulnerabilities (such as SMS spoofing) have been found in many current protocols that continue to allow the possibility of eavesdropping or cloning. Milwaukee maintains Milwaukee Public Schools, the largest school district in Wisconsin. Although more recent digital systems (such as GSM) have attempted to address these fundamental issues, security problems continue to persist.

To this day, the Packers maintain two separate season ticket plans, reflecting their time in Milwaukee: the Gold package, made up primarily of former Milwaukee season ticket holders, have a three-game package consisting of the annual Midwest Shrine preseason contest plus the second and fifth regular-season home games each year, and the Green package (made up of original Green Bay ticket holders) attend the annual Bishop's Charities preseason game and the remaining six regular-season contests. Analogue phones could also be listened to on some radio scanners. The Packers won, 27-0. Some problems with these models were "cloning", a variant of identity theft, and "scanning" whereby third parties in the local area could intercept and eaves drop in on calls. The 1939 Championship between the Packers and the New York Giants was played at State Fair Park. Early mobile phones did not have much security designed in. In addition, the Green Bay Packers played a portion of their home schedule in Milwaukee from 1933 through 1994:. Restrictive legislation has been proposed in 40 states in the US, but only New York State has passed such a law.

Previous sports teams to play in Milwaukee have included:. Drivers in the Czech Republic, France, and the Netherlands may use cell phones but can be fined if they are involved in crashes while using such a device. Olympic Team training facility for speed skating. Australia, Brazil, Chile, Denmark, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Poland, the Philippines, Romania, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United Arab Emirates prohibit the use of hand-held cell phones while driving. The Mile is not far from the Pettit National Ice Center, a U.S. At least 25 countries restrict or prohibit cell and other wireless technology: Israel, Japan, Portugal and Singapore all prohibit mobile phone use while driving. The Milwaukee Mile auto racing facility, the oldest active auto race track in the United States, is located on the Wisconsin State Fair Grounds in West Allis. Accidents involving a driver being distracted by talking on a mobile phone have begun to be prosecuted as negligence similar to driving while intoxicated.

It is also home to a number of professional sports teams including:. An experiment conducted by the American television show MythBusters concluded that use of mobile phones while driving poses the same risk as someone operating a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. Milwaukee was also an epicenter of the breakcore scene in early 2000s with labels like Addict Records and Zod Records. A study in The New England Journal of Medicine reports that drivers who used mobile phones while driving were four times more likely to crash than those who don't, a rate equal to that for drunken driving at the .01 blood alcohol concentration (BAC) level. Milwaukee was home to a vibrant rave scene in the early Nineties, especially fostering hardcore techno, thanks to Drop Bass; but the scene moved south to Chicago after reaction by city authorities. Several studies have shown that motorists have a much higher risk of collisions and losing control of the vehicle while talking on the mobile telephone simultaneously with driving, even when using "hands-free" systems. Milwaukee is also home to a vibrant club scene booking regular international DJs such as Richie Hawtin, LTJ Bukem, Mark Farina, Derrick Carter and others. Another controversial but more lethal health concern is the correlation with road traffic accidents.

Venues such as Pabst Theater and The Rave bring internationally-known and critically acclaimed acts to Milwaukee every day. [citation needed]. Beer City Skateboards is not only a skateboard company, but a punk rock label as well, home to DRI and Millions of Dead Cops. It is generally thought, however, that RF is incapable of producing any more than heating effects, as it is considered non-ionizing radiation; in other words, it lacks the energy to disrupt molecular bonds such as occurs in genetic mutations. Coo Coo Cal gave Milwaukee a national foothold in the hip-hop market with his hit single "My Projects". (see also electromagnetic radiation hazard). Local hip-hop action includes acts like Rusty Ps and Black Elephant. So far, however, the World Health Organization Task Force on EMF effects on health has no definitive conclusion on the veracity of these allegations.

A range of musicians have called Milwaukee home, including Hildegarde, Woody Herman, Liberace, blues giant Hubert Sumlin, the BoDeans, Violent Femmes, Citizen King, The Gufs, The Promise Ring, Oil Tasters, Die Kruezen, Boy Dirt Car, Shiverhead, among others. Some researchers also report the mobile phone industry has interfered with further research on health risks. Although Milwaukee isn't known historically as a club scene music mecca, it does have a vibrant history of rock, blues, punk, ska, industrial music, goth and pop music bands. More recently a pan-European study provided significant evidence of genetic damage under certain conditions. Along the same lines, the tradition of tailgating (for almost any event, but especially Brewers games), where copious amounts of beer and other potent potables are ceremoniously consumed, is deeply engrained in culture of the city and its residents both young and old. There is a small amount of scientific evidence for an increase in certain types of rare tumors (cancer) in long-time, heavy users. Due in large part to its brewery history, the city has been called "the nation's watering hole" with more bars per capita than any other large city in the country (one bar for every 1600 people or approximately 375 bars, four bars for every square mile). As with many new technologies, concerns have arisen about the effects on health from using a mobile telephone.

Smaller festivals througout the year celebrate the city's German, Native American, African-American, Italian, Irish, Asian, Arab, and Polish heritage. Each network operator has a unique radio frequency band. Listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the largest music festival in the world, Summerfest attracts around 900,000 visitors a year to its twelve stages. Some technologies include AMPS for analog, and TDMA, CDMA, GSM, GPRS, EV-DO, and UMTS for digital communications. Milwaukee, "A Great Place on a Great Lake" and "Genuine American," has also advertised itself as the "City of Festivals," emphasizing an annual lakefront fair called Summerfest. The technology that achieves this depends on the system which the mobile phone operator has adopted. The Milwaukee Youth Arts Center, a first-of-its-kind Arts-in-education facility, is a national model. The dialogue between the handset and the cell site is a stream of digitized audio (except for the first generation analog networks).

Additionally, Milwaukee is home to artistic performance venues such as the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts, Pabst Theatre, Riverside Theatre, and Milwaukee Theatre. The switch in turn connects the call to another subscriber of the same wireless service provider or to the public telephone network, which includes the networks of other wireless carriers. Milwaukee is home to the Florentine Opera, the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, the Milwaukee Ballet, Milwaukee Repertory Theatre, Skylight Opera Theatre, First Stage Children's Theater,Milwaukee Youth Theatre, and a number of other arts organizations. Cell sites have relatively low-power (often only one or two Watts) radio transmitters which broadcast their presence and relay communications between the mobile handsets and the switch. The Milwaukee Public Museum, Mitchell Park Horticultural Conservatory and Milwaukee County Zoo are also notable public attractions. As the user moves around the network, the mobile device will "hand off" to new cell sites. The museum includes a "brise soleil," a moving sunscreen that quite literally unfolds like the wing of a bird. The handset constantly listens for the strongest signal being received from the surrounding base stations.

Milwaukee's most visually prominent cultural attraction is the Milwaukee Art Museum, especially its new $100 million wing designed by Santiago Calatrava in his first American commission. When the cellular phone or data device is turned on, it registers with the mobile telephone exchange ("switch") with its unique identifiers, and will then be alerted by the mobile switch when there is an incoming telephone call. Milwaukee also has a large number of financial service firms, particularly those specializing in mutual funds and transaction processing systems, and a disproportionate number of publishing and printing companies. The phones have a low-power transceiver that transmits voice and data to the nearest cell sites, usually .5 to 10 miles away. Paul region. However, all of them communicate through electromagnetic radio waves with a cell site/base station, the antennas of which are usually mounted on a tower, pole, or building. The Milwaukee area ranked number five in the nation when measuring the number of Fortune 500 companies as a share of the population, just behind the number four Minneapolis-St. Mobile phones and the network they operate under vary significantly from provider to provider, and even from nation to nation.

Among these are Briggs & Stratton, Harley-Davidson, Johnson Controls, Manpower Inc., Marshall & Ilsley, Northwestern Mutual, Rockwell Automation, Roundy's Supermarkets, Metavante, Kohl's, and Wisconsin Energy. Mobile phones often have features beyond sending text messages and make voice calls—including Internet browsing, music (MP3) playback, personal organizers, e-mail, built-in cameras and camcorders, ringtones, games, radio, Push To Talk (PTT), infrared and bluetooth connectivity, call registers, and ability to watch streaming video or download video for later viewing. Milwaukee is headquarters to six Fortune 1000 manufacturers and six Fortune 1000 service companies. In the event of an emergency, disaster response crews can locate trapped or injured people using the signals from their mobile phones; an interactive menu accessible through the phone's Internet browser notifies the company if the user is safe or in distress. Service and managerial jobs are the fastest growing segments of the Milwaukee economy, and healthcare makes up 27% of all service jobs in the city. In Japan, cellular phone companies provide immediate notification of earthquakes and other natural disasters to their customers free of charge. Milwaukee's reputation as a blue collar town is more accurate, however, with 22 percent of the workforce involved in manufacturing — second only to San Jose, CA and far higher than the national average of 16.5%. Stories like the London Bombings, the Indian Ocean Tsunami and Hurricane Katrina have been reported on by cameraphone users on news sites like NowPublic and photosharing sites like Flickr.

Although most people associate Milwaukee with beer, today companies like Miller Brewing employ less than one percent of the city's workers. Cameraphones and videophones that can capture video and take photographs are increasingly being used to cover breaking news. Residents may also use the Milwaukee County Transit System to get around the city as well as the county via the bus. Mobile phone use on aircraft is also prohibited, but due to concerns of possible interference with aircraft radio communications. Milwaukee also has many internal freeways as well. Many rail companies, particularly those providing long distance services, offer a "quiet car" where phone use is prohibited, much like the designated non-smoking cars in the past. I-94 comes up from Chicago to enter Milwaukee continues to Madison I-43 also enters Milwaukee from the south and continues to Green Bay where it ends. It has become common practice for places like bookshops, libraries, movie theatres, and houses of worship to post signs prohibiting the use of mobile phones, sometimes even installing jamming equipment to prevent them.

Milwaukee uses the Interstate Highways for its main transportation. Users often speak at increased volume, with little regard for other people nearby. Out of the total population, 31.6% of those under the age of 18 and 11.0% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line. Mobile phone etiquette has become an important issue with mobiles ringing at funerals, weddings, movies, and plays. 21.3% of the population and 17.4% of families are below the poverty line. The sale of commercial ringtones exceeded $2.5 billion in 2004 [1]. The per capita income for the city is $16,181. This has emerged as its own industry.

Males have a median income of $32,244 versus $26,013 for females. The mobile phone itself has also become a totemic and fashion object, with users decorating, customizing, and accessorizing their mobile phones to reflect their personality. The median income for a household in the city is $32,216, and the median income for a family is $37,879. Cellular phones in Japan, offering Internet capabilities such as NTT DoCoMo's i-mode, offer text messaging via standard e-mail. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 87.2 males. Many phones even offer Instant Messenger services to increase the simplicity and ease of texting on phones. For every 100 females there are 91.6 males. The commercial market in SMS's is growing.

The median age is 31 years. Many people keep in touch using SMS, and a whole culture of "texting" has developed from this. In the city the population is spread out with 28.6% under the age of 18, 12.2% from 18 to 24, 30.2% from 25 to 44, 18.1% from 45 to 64, and 10.9% who are 65 years of age or older. With high levels of mobile telephone penetration, a mobile culture has evolved, where the phone becomes a key social tool, and people rely on their mobile phone addressbook to keep in touch with their friends. The average household size is 2.50 and the average family size is 3.25. In some developing countries, where there is little existing fixed-line infrastructure, the mobile phone has become widespread. 33.5% of all households are made up of individuals and 9.5% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. It is not uncommon for young adults to simply own a mobile phone instead of a land-line for their residence.

There are 232,188 households out of which 30.5% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.2% are married couples living together, 21.1% have a female householder with no husband present, and 41.8% are non-families. In many countries, mobile phones now outnumber land-line telephones, with most adults and many children now owning mobile phones. 12.00% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race. In less than twenty years, mobile phones have gone from being rare and expensive pieces of equipment used by businesses to a pervasive low-cost personal item. The racial makeup of the city is 49.98% White, 37.34% African American, 0.87% Native American, 2.94% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 6.10% from other races, and 2.71% from two or more races. In other countries, such as the United States, Japan, and South Korea, legislation does not require any particular standard, and GSM coexists with other standards, such as CDMA. There are 249,225 housing units at an average density of 1,001.7/km² (2,594.4 per square mile). All European nations and some Asian nations legislated it as their sole standard.

The population density is 2,399.5/km² (6,214.3 per square mile). This is due to the equipment manufacturers working to meet one of a few standards, particularly the GSM standard which was designed for Europe-wide interoperability. As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there are 596,974 people, 232,188 households, and 135,133 families residing in the city. The mobile phone has become ubiquitous because of the interoperability of mobile phones across different networks and countries. Other large population groups include Polish (12.7%), Irish (10%), English (5.1%), Italian (4.4%), French (3.9%), and Hispanic origin totaled 6.3%. The availability of Prepaid or pay as you go services, where the subscriber does not have to commit to a long term contract, has helped fuel this growth. In the 2000 census, over a third (38 percent) of Milwaukeeans reported that they were of German descent. At present India and China have the largest growth rates of cellular subscribers in the world.

The 1982 event, also known as Cold Sunday, featured temperatures as low as -40°F (-40°C) in some of the suburbs as little as 10 miles (16km) to the north of Milwaukee, although the city itself did not approach such cold temperatures. In most of Europe, wealthier parts of Asia and Latin America, Australia, Canada and the United States, mobile phones are now widely used, with the majority of the adult, teenage, and even child population owning one. The coldest temperature ever experienced by the city was -26°F (-32°C) on both January 17, 1982 and February 4, 1996. Due to their low establishment costs and rapid deployment, mobile phone networks have since spread rapidly throughout the world, outstripping the growth of fixed telephony. Milwaukee's all-time record high temperature is 105°F (41°C) set on July 17, 1995. Radio phones have a long and varied history that stretches back to the 1950s, with hand-held cellular radio devices being available since 1983. Also, the relative humidity in the summer is far higher than that of comparable cities at the same latitude, meaning that it feels hotter than it really is. .

Milwaukee's proximity to Lake Michigan causes a convection current to form mid-afternoon, resulting in the so-called lake effect, causing the temperatures to be warmer in the winter, and cooler in the summer ("cooler by the lake" is practically boilerplate language for local meteorologists during the summer). Mobile phones are also distinct from cordless telephones, which generally operate only within a limited range of a specific base station. It is crossed by Interstate 43 and Interstate 94, which come together downtown at the Marquette Interchange. There are also specialist communication systems related to, but distinct from mobile phones, such as satellite phones and Professional Mobile Radio. Milwaukee lies along the shores and bluffs of Lake Michigan at the confluence of three rivers: the Menomonee, the Kinnickinnic and the Milwaukee. Some of the world's largest mobile phone manufacturers include Alcatel, Audiovox, Fujitsu, Kyocera (formerly the handset division of Qualcomm), LG, Motorola, NEC, Nokia, Panasonic (Matsushita Electric), Philips, Sagem, Samsung, Sanyo, Sharp, Siemens, SK Teletech, Sony Ericsson, and Toshiba. The total area is 0.88% water. In addition to the standard voice function of a telephone, a mobile phone can support many additional services such as SMS for text messaging, packet switching for access to the Internet, and MMS for sending and receiving photos and video.

248.8 km² (96.1 square miles) of it is land and 2.2 km² (0.9 mi²) of it is water. The mobile phone communicates via a cellular network of base stations, or cell sites, which are in turn linked to the conventional telephone network. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 251.0 km² (96.9 square miles). Most current mobile phones connect instead to the network using a wireless radio wave transmission technology. While the city still faces a shrinking population[1], it continues to make plans for increasing its future revitalization through various projects. A mobile phone or cell phone is an electronic telecommunications device with the same basic capability as a conventional fixed-line telephone, but which is also entirely portable and is not required to be connected with a wire to the telephone network. Starting in the late 1960s, however, like many cities in the Great Lakes "rust belt," Milwaukee saw its population start to decline due to various factors, ranging from the loss of blue collar jobs to the phenomenon of "white flight." However, in recent years, the city began to make strides in improving its economy, neighborhoods, and image, resulting in the revitalization of neighborhoods such as the Third Ward, east side,and more recently, Bay View, along with attracting new businesses to its downtown area. The GPS technology already available in some phones, while coupled with the camera phone, may also allow users in the future to not only take a picture, but snap the exact location and angle at which the picture was taken.

This helped make Milwaukee one of the 15 largest cities in the nation, and by the mid-1960s, its population reached nearly 750,000. This would likely lead to maps and help finding where you are going, and supports social efforts, such as locating friends or group members nearby, and identifying some strangers. states. In the future, GPS positioning may be coupled with accelerometer positioning, for covering underground or indoor positioning. From the late 19th century until the 1950s, Milwaukee, like many northern industrial cities, saw tremendous growth from immigrants from Germany, Hungary, Poland and other central European nations, as well as the northward migration of African-Americans from southern U.S. There are several cell phones that can perform GPS positioning. The liberal tradition of these peoples led to decades of socialist government in Milwaukee during the twentieth century. But it is likely that the bandwidth to communicate the video, and receive a processed model will exist.

Milwaukee still today has a large German-American population. It is unlikely that cell phones will have the processing power to construct models and textures. German immigrants helped increase the city's population during the 1840s and the following decades. With time, this may develop into full 3D texturing and modeling. Juneau was Milwaukee's first mayor. Image scanning, as seen in existing research [2] [3]. Walker. These methods avoid swamping the network by using traditional broadcasting.

In 1846, Juneau's town combined with two neighboring rival towns to incorporate as the City of Milwaukee: Kilbourntown to the west, which was founded by Byron Kilbourn, and Walker's Point to the south, founded by George H. The delivery of multimedia content including video to mobiles is beginning to become a reality with two main competing standards DMB - Digital Multimedia Broadcasting - and DVB-H - a handset version of the Digital Video Broadcasting standard. Juneau bought out his father-in-law's trading business, and in 1833 he founded a town on the east side of the Milwaukee River. The technology is proving popular and there are now even vending machines that accept this form of payment. In 1818, Frenchman Solomon Juneau settled in the area. By charging up a phone with pre-paid cash credits, it can act as a sophisticated mobile-phone wallet. Milwaukee received its name from the Indian word Millioke which means "The Good Land", or "gathering place by the water." French missionaries and traders passed through the area in the late 1600s and 1700s. The system, pioneered by NTT DoCoMo and SonyEricsson, is called Felica and there are around 10,000 convenience stores where one can now use a phone to pay for goods just by 'swiping' it over a flat reader.

The Milwaukee area was originally inhabited by the Fox, Mascouten, Potawatomi, and Winnebago Indian tribes. New technology in Japan has combined the RFID chip principle into the handset and hooked it up to a network of readers and interfaces. . Directly tapping into the inner ear or the auditory nerve is already technologically feasible and will become practical as surgical methods advance. The city is located in the southeastern portion of the state on the western shore of Lake Michigan. In addition, the implant was only designed to receive signals, not transmit them. The city of Milwaukee is the 22nd largest city in the United States. The implant is currently powered externally, given that no current power source is small enough to fit inside the tooth with it.

The city's population is 592,765 (2005 estimate) with an estimated total of 1,709,926 in the Milwaukee metropolitan area (2005). Sound is transmitted via radio waves from another device (presumably a mobile phone) and received by the implant. Milwaukee is the largest city in the state of Wisconsin, United States and the county of Milwaukee. This device consists of a radio receiver and transducer, which transmits the sound via bone conduction through the jawbone into the ear.
Location of Milwaukee in
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. Speculative improvements in the future may be inspired by an English team led by James Auger and Jimmy Loizeau who in 2002 developed an implant designed to be inserted into a tooth during dental surgery. Some Milwaukeeans use the unique expression "ainahey", short for "ain't it, hey?" to reaffirm something obvious, used in the same way as "of course", and similar to the colloquial "don'chaknow", short for "don't you know?". However, different display technologies, such as OLED displays, e-paper or retinal displays, smarter communication hardware (directional antennae, multi-mode and peer-to-peer phones) may reduce power requirements, while new power technologies such as fuel cells may provide better energy capacity.

It is also common for people to refer to ATMs as a "Tyme Machine," referring to the name of the dominant debit card in Wisconsin. Colour screens and additional functions put increasing demands on the device's power source, and battery developments may not proceed sufficiently fast to compensate. One well known colloquialism common to Milwaukee and the surrounding area, is the word "bubbler," which refers to a drinking fountain. Further improvements in battery life will be required. Timmerman Airport. The new standard (UMA) has been developed for this. Lawrence J. The emergence of integration capabilities with other unlicensed access technologies such as a WiMAX and WLAN, as well as allowing handover between traditional operator networks supporting GSM, CDMA and UMTS to unlicensed mobile networks.

General Mitchell International Airport. Developments in podcast software enables mobile phones to become podcast playback devices through existing channels like MMS Podcast, J2ME Podcast and AMR-NB Podcast. List of Milwaukee area radio stations. Developments in miniaturised hard disks and flash drives to solve the storage space issue are already surfacing, therefore opening a window for phones to become portable music libraries and players similar to the iPod. List of Milwaukee area television stations. Examples of companies that are currently developing this technology are Neomedia (via Paperclick), Mobot and Scanbuy. Vital Source Magazine. Searches can also be personalized to local areas using a GPS system built in to cell phones.

UWM Post. This technology can be extended to RFID tags, or even snapped pictures of company logos. The Leader. Phones equipped with barcode reader-enabled cameras will be able to snap photos of barcodes and direct the user to corresponding sites on the Internet. Marquette Tribune. New technologies are being explored that will utilize the Extended Internet and enable mobile phones to treat a barcode as a URL tag. Shepherd Express. However, to support more natural speech recognition and translation, a drastic improvement in the state of technology in these devices is required.

MKE (magazine). Many phones already have rudimentary speech recognition in a form of voice dialing. Milwaukee Magazine. Mobile phones will include various speech technologies as they are being developed. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Examples of companies that are currently developing this technology are Digital Airways with the Kaleido product, e-sim, mobile arsenal, and Qualcomm with UIOne for the BREW environment. Wisconsin Lutheran High School. New solutions are being developed to create new MMI more easily and let manufacturers and operators experiment new concepts.

Washington High School. An important area of evolution relates to the Man Machine Interface. Vincent High School. Currently it is only available in stand-alone devices, such as Ectaco translators. Thomas More. One function that would be useful in phones is a translation function. South Division High School. However, this may be solved using folding e-paper or built-in projectors.

Rufus King High School. For example, ebooks may well become a distinct device, because of conflicting form-factor requirements — ebooks require large screens, while phones need to be smaller. Riverside University High School. One difficulty in adapting mobile phones to new uses is form factor. Reagan College Preparatory. Pulaski High School.

Professional Learning Institute. Pius XI High School. North Division Virtual University High School. New School for Community Service.

Milwaukee School of Languages. Milwaukee School of Entrepreneurship. Milwaukee Lutheran High School. Milwaukee High School of the Arts.

Metropolitan High School. Marquette University High School. Madison University High School. Rufus King International Baccalaureate High School.

Juneau Business High School. John Marshall High School. Hamilton High School. Divine Savior Holy Angels High School.

Custer High School. Bradley (Lynde & Harry) Technology & Trade High School. Bay View High School. Wisconsin Lutheran College.

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Mount Mary College. Milwaukee School of Engineering. Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design.

Milwaukee Area Technical College. Medical College of Wisconsin. Marquette University. Cardinal Stritch University.

Alverno College. Milwaukee County Stadium, 1953-1994. Marquette Stadium, 1952. Wisconsin State Fair Park, 1934-51.

Borchert Field, 1933. Milwaukee Wave United (Outdoor Soccer) 2003 - They only played one season. Milwaukee Rampage (Outdoor Soccer) 1994 - 2002. Milwaukee Mustangs (American football—Arena Football League), played at the Bradley Center from 1994 to 2001.

Milwaukee Does (Basketball—Women's Pro Basketball League), played at MECCA Arena from 1978 to 1980. The Milwaukee Braves won the National League pennant in 1957 and 1958, and won the World Series in 1957. Milwaukee Braves (Baseball—MLB), played at Milwaukee County Stadium from 1953-1965. Louis.

Milwaukee Hawks (Basketball—NBA) played at the Milwaukee Arena from 1951 to 1955 before moving to St. Milwaukee Brewers (Baseball—Minor League Baseball), member of the American Association from 1902 through 1952, played at Borchert Field. Milwaukee Badgers (American football—NFL), played from 1922 to 1926. Cellular Arena.

Milwaukee Wave (Indoor Soccer) playing at the U.S. Milwaukee Admirals (Ice hockey) playing at the Bradley Center. Milwaukee Bucks (Basketball—NBA) playing at the Bradley Center. Milwaukee Brewers (Baseball—MLB) playing at Miller Park.

Average July high/low temperatures: 79°F/62°F (26°C/17°C). Average January high/low temperatures: 26°F/11°F (-3°C/-12°C).

03-31-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Google+ Directory