This page will contain news stories about John Bunny, as they become available.

John Bunny

John Bunny, born September 21, 1863 in New York City, United States – died April 26, 1915 in Brooklyn, New York, was the first comic star of the American silent film era.

John Bunny

John Bunny attended High School in Brooklyn and worked as a grocery clerk before joining a small minstrel show touring the East Coast. He went on to jobs as stage manager for various stock companies and performed in vaudeville before being drawn to the fledgling motion picture business. By 1910, Bunny was working at Vitagraph Studios where the happy-go-lucky, rotund man quickly became an international star of silent film comedies.

John Bunny had only been acting in films for five years when he passed away from Bright's disease and was interred in the Cemetery of the Evergreens in Brooklyn, New York. Because silent film had no language barrier, Bunny's popularity was such that his death was front-page news in Europe as well as the United States.

Following his passing, advances in technology and in stunts brought great new comedic stars to silent film that relegated John Bunny to the status of an almost completely-forgotten actor. However, John Bunny was eventually honored for his contribution to the motion picture industry with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1715 Vine Street in Hollywood.


This page about John Bunny includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about John Bunny
News stories about John Bunny
External links for John Bunny
Videos for John Bunny
Wikis about John Bunny
Discussion Groups about John Bunny
Blogs about John Bunny
Images of John Bunny

However, John Bunny was eventually honored for his contribution to the motion picture industry with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1715 Vine Street in Hollywood. He did make several appearances on Broadway, in television (The Sid Caesar Show, 1963-1964) and in the movies, most notably in Mel Brooks's Silent Movie in 1976 and as Coach Calhoun in 1978's Grease, but even though he continues to work, he has never recaptured the stature he had in the Golden Age of Television. Following his passing, advances in technology and in stunts brought great new comedic stars to silent film that relegated John Bunny to the status of an almost completely-forgotten actor. In his autobiography he confesses that he turned to alcohol and drugs to overcome the insecurity of having a successful career unravel. Because silent film had no language barrier, Bunny's popularity was such that his death was front-page news in Europe as well as the United States. Caesar's life took a turn when his show Sid Caesar Invites You was cancelled in 1958. John Bunny had only been acting in films for five years when he passed away from Bright's disease and was interred in the Cemetery of the Evergreens in Brooklyn, New York. Many prominent writers got their start writing the skits, including Mel Brooks, Neil Simon, Woody Allen, Mel Tolkin, and Larry Gelbart.

By 1910, Bunny was working at Vitagraph Studios where the happy-go-lucky, rotund man quickly became an international star of silent film comedies. These shows, particularly Your Show of Shows, brought together some of the greatest comic talent of the day, including Imogene Coca, Carl Reiner, and Howard Morris. He went on to jobs as stage manager for various stock companies and performed in vaudeville before being drawn to the fledgling motion picture business. Over the next few years he hosted such hits as Your Show of Shows (1950-1954), Caesar's Hour (1954-1957) and Sid Caesar Invites You (1958). John Bunny attended High School in Brooklyn and worked as a grocery clerk before joining a small minstrel show touring the East Coast. Television was a natural medium for Caesar. John Bunny, born September 21, 1863 in New York City, United States – died April 26, 1915 in Brooklyn, New York, was the first comic star of the American silent film era. By 1949 he entered the new medium of television, hosting The Admiral Broadway Review.

This took him to Los Angeles, where he got a part in two films, Tars and Spars, based on a wartime comedy routine he did, and The Guilt of Janet Ames. Caesar served in the Coast Guard during World War II, organizing entertainment for the enlisted men. While he earned a reputation as a talented musician in the "Borscht Belt" in the Catskills, he also began performing comedy sketches, and became a sensation. After graduating high school, he planned on a career in music, playing the saxophone.

From them Sid learned to mimic many of the accents that he would use throughout his career. Caesar was born in Yonkers, where his father ran a lunch counter where immigrant workers would gather. Sid Caesar (born Isaac Sidney Caesar on September 8, 1922) is an Emmy-winning comic actor and writer, best known as the leading man on the 1950s television sketch comedy series Your Show of Shows.

03-31-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Google+ Directory