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John Bunny

John Bunny, born September 21, 1863 in New York City, United States – died April 26, 1915 in Brooklyn, New York, was the first comic star of the American silent film era.

John Bunny

John Bunny attended High School in Brooklyn and worked as a grocery clerk before joining a small minstrel show touring the East Coast. He went on to jobs as stage manager for various stock companies and performed in vaudeville before being drawn to the fledgling motion picture business. By 1910, Bunny was working at Vitagraph Studios where the happy-go-lucky, rotund man quickly became an international star of silent film comedies.

John Bunny had only been acting in films for five years when he passed away from Bright's disease and was interred in the Cemetery of the Evergreens in Brooklyn, New York. Because silent film had no language barrier, Bunny's popularity was such that his death was front-page news in Europe as well as the United States.

Following his passing, advances in technology and in stunts brought great new comedic stars to silent film that relegated John Bunny to the status of an almost completely-forgotten actor. However, John Bunny was eventually honored for his contribution to the motion picture industry with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1715 Vine Street in Hollywood.


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However, John Bunny was eventually honored for his contribution to the motion picture industry with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1715 Vine Street in Hollywood. The paperback adds a chapter about the reaction of fans at book signings. He is currently writing another book, Make Love the Bruce Campbell Way, a humorous look at relationships, and books about relationships. Following his passing, advances in technology and in stunts brought great new comedic stars to silent film that relegated John Bunny to the status of an almost completely-forgotten actor. Campbell's autobiography, If Chins Could Kill: Confessions of a B Movie Actor (Campbell has a mad big chin) traces his career as an actor in low-budget movies and television. Because silent film had no language barrier, Bunny's popularity was such that his death was front-page news in Europe as well as the United States. While he starred in The Adventures of Brisco County, Jr. and Jack of All Trades, he is better known for his supporting role as the recurring character Autolycus on the fantasy series Hercules: The Legendary Journeys and Xena: Warrior Princess. He also directed a number of episodes of Hercules and Xena.. John Bunny had only been acting in films for five years when he passed away from Bright's disease and was interred in the Cemetery of the Evergreens in Brooklyn, New York. Outside of film, Bruce Campbell has appeared in a number of television series.

By 1910, Bunny was working at Vitagraph Studios where the happy-go-lucky, rotund man quickly became an international star of silent film comedies. He is generally described as a "B-movie star," often appearing in films that go straight to video or cable TV. He went on to jobs as stage manager for various stock companies and performed in vaudeville before being drawn to the fledgling motion picture business. He has also had several small parts in the movies of Joel and Ethan Coen (Joel was an editor on The Evil Dead). John Bunny attended High School in Brooklyn and worked as a grocery clerk before joining a small minstrel show touring the East Coast. Bruce Campbell stayed on behind the scenes, credited as "additional voice recording," and appears in the film's final shot. John Bunny, born September 21, 1863 in New York City, United States – died April 26, 1915 in Brooklyn, New York, was the first comic star of the American silent film era. He was supposed to star in Darkman but the studio reportedly insisted on Liam Neeson.

Bruce Campbell has appeared in many of Sam Raimi's films outside of the Evil Dead series, usually in small roles. Four years later the movie became a cult hit in England, leading to American success and two sequels. A few years and at least fifty movies later, they got together with other family and friends and began work on The Evil Dead. Bruce was the star of the movie as well as working behind the camera, receiving a "co-executive producer" credit; Sam Raimi was the director. After meeting Sam Raimi in high school the two became good friends and started making movies together.

Bruce Campbell began acting as a teenager and soon began making small Super 8 movies with friends. His friends have been known to say that his head shots are the best in the industry, and that he is one of the greatest reverse actors in the business. Campbell is best known for his starring role as Ash in the Evil Dead trilogy of horror/slapstick movies. Bruce Campbell (born June 22, 1958, Royal Oak, Michigan) is an American actor.

The X-Files (season 6, episode 7: Terms of Endearment). Homicide: Life on the Street. Ellen. Jack of All Trades.

Xena: Warrior Princess. Hercules: The Legendary Journeys. The Adventures of Brisco County, Jr.. Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman.

Evil Dead (1982). Crimewave (1985). Evil Dead 2: Dead by Dawn (1987). Army of Darkness (1993).

The Hudsucker Proxy (1994). Congo (1995). Escape From L.A. (1996). The Majestic (2001).

Spider-Man (2002). Bubba Ho-Tep (2002). Spider-Man 2 (2004). Bubba Nosferatu (forthcoming).

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