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John Bunny

John Bunny, born September 21, 1863 in New York City, United States – died April 26, 1915 in Brooklyn, New York, was the first comic star of the American silent film era.

John Bunny

John Bunny attended High School in Brooklyn and worked as a grocery clerk before joining a small minstrel show touring the East Coast. He went on to jobs as stage manager for various stock companies and performed in vaudeville before being drawn to the fledgling motion picture business. By 1910, Bunny was working at Vitagraph Studios where the happy-go-lucky, rotund man quickly became an international star of silent film comedies.

John Bunny had only been acting in films for five years when he passed away from Bright's disease and was interred in the Cemetery of the Evergreens in Brooklyn, New York. Because silent film had no language barrier, Bunny's popularity was such that his death was front-page news in Europe as well as the United States.

Following his passing, advances in technology and in stunts brought great new comedic stars to silent film that relegated John Bunny to the status of an almost completely-forgotten actor. However, John Bunny was eventually honored for his contribution to the motion picture industry with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1715 Vine Street in Hollywood.


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However, John Bunny was eventually honored for his contribution to the motion picture industry with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1715 Vine Street in Hollywood.
. Following his passing, advances in technology and in stunts brought great new comedic stars to silent film that relegated John Bunny to the status of an almost completely-forgotten actor. Maurice Chevalier's trademark laugh is transcribed as "Onh-onh-onh," according the experts on the topic. Because silent film had no language barrier, Bunny's popularity was such that his death was front-page news in Europe as well as the United States. Maurice Chevalier died on January 1, 1972 and was interred in the Cemetery of Marnes la Coquette, Hauts-de-Seine, France. John Bunny had only been acting in films for five years when he passed away from Bright's disease and was interred in the Cemetery of the Evergreens in Brooklyn, New York. He has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1651 Vine Street.

By 1910, Bunny was working at Vitagraph Studios where the happy-go-lucky, rotund man quickly became an international star of silent film comedies. Chevalier's trademark was a casual straw hat, which he always wore on stage with his tuxedo. He went on to jobs as stage manager for various stock companies and performed in vaudeville before being drawn to the fledgling motion picture business. By the 1950s and 1960s, he rediscovered his popularity with new audiences, appearing in the movie musical, Gigi (1958) with Leslie Caron and several Walt Disney films. John Bunny attended High School in Brooklyn and worked as a grocery clerk before joining a small minstrel show touring the East Coast. He returned to France in 1935, and spent most of World War II in seclusion, though he made brief appearances, on one occasion as part of a prisoner exchange. After the war it was rumored that he had been a collaborator, though these rumours were later disproved. John Bunny, born September 21, 1863 in New York City, United States – died April 26, 1915 in Brooklyn, New York, was the first comic star of the American silent film era. In 1930, Chevalier was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor, for two roles: The Love Parade and The Big Pond.

By 1929 he had recovered and moved to Hollywood, where he landed his first American film role in Innocents of Paris. After the war he became popular in Britain, and began a film career. At this time, he also made his first attempt at a career on Broadway, but this came to a grinding halt when he had to give up performing for several months because of a mental breakdown. During World War I, he entered the armed services, was shot in the back, won the Croix de Guerre and became a prisoner of war. In 1909 he became the partner of the biggest female star in France at the time, Mistinguett at the Folies Bergère: they were eventually to become long-time lovers.

He did, got the part, and the rest is history. He was singing at a cafe for free when a well-known member of the theater saw him and suggested that he try out for a local musical. It was in 1901 that he first began in show business. He was born in Paris, France in 1888 and made his name as a star of musical comedy, appearing in public as a singer and dancer at an early age.

Maurice Chevalier (September 12, 1888 - January 1, 1972) was a French actor and popular entertainer.

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