This page will contain wikis about Jeremy Brett, as they become available.

Jeremy Brett

Jeremy Brett in the role of Sherlock Holmes.

Jeremy Brett (born Peter Jeremy William Huggins) (November 3, 1933 - September 12, 1995) was a British actor.

Brett was born in Berkswell Grange, Warwickshire, England. He was educated at Eton College and trained at the Central School of Speech and Drama. He played many classical roles on stage, including a huge amount of Shakespeare, and made his first film and television appearances in 1955. In 1958, he married the actress, Anna Massey (daughter of Raymond Massey), but they were divorced in 1962. Years later, they would appear together in the BBC's dramatization of Rebecca (1978) -- Brett playing the hero, Max de Winter, and Massey playing the sinister Mrs. Danvers.

In 1976 he married Joan Wilson, but she died in 1985, and he did not remarry.

From the early 1960s onwards, Brett was rarely off British television screens. He played leading roles in many classic serials, notably appearing as D'Artagnan in the 1966 adaptation of The Three Musketeers. Many of his appearances were in comedy roles, but usually with a classic edge (he appeared in several Noel Coward plays). He joked that he was rarely allowed into the 20th century and never into the present day.

Brett's film career was never as distinguished as his stage and small-screen careers. He played Freddie Eynsford-Hill in the 1964 film My Fair Lady, but his singing voice was dubbed. Brett could sing, however, as he proved when he played Danilo in The Merry Widow on television in 1968.

Although he appeared in so many films and was such a familiar face on television, Brett is now best remembered for portraying Sherlock Holmes in a long series of television films (from 1984 to 1994), based on the original stories by Arthur Conan Doyle. After taking on the role, he made few appearances out of character and is considered the Sherlock Holmes of the 1980s and 1990s, as Basil Rathbone had been before him from his 1940s films. He died of heart failure in London.


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He died of heart failure in London. In 2004, Coleman played a supporting role in the controversial computer game Postal 2 by Running With Scissors, Inc. After taking on the role, he made few appearances out of character and is considered the Sherlock Holmes of the 1980s and 1990s, as Basil Rathbone had been before him from his 1940s films. Coleman placed 8th in a field of 135 candidates, receiving 14,242 votes. Although he appeared in so many films and was such a familiar face on television, Brett is now best remembered for portraying Sherlock Holmes in a long series of television films (from 1984 to 1994), based on the original stories by Arthur Conan Doyle. After Arnold Schwarzenegger announced his candidacy, Coleman stated that he would be voting for Schwarzenegger. Brett could sing, however, as he proved when he played Danilo in The Merry Widow on television in 1968. This campaign was coordinated by the free news weekly the East Bay Express.

He played Freddie Eynsford-Hill in the 1964 film My Fair Lady, but his singing voice was dubbed. Coleman was a candidate for governor in the 2003 California recall election. Brett's film career was never as distinguished as his stage and small-screen careers. He was ordered to pay bus driver Tracy Fields $1,665 for hospital bills resulting from a fight, stemming from an attempt by Fields to get Coleman's autograph whilst he shopping for a bulletproof vest in a California mall.[1] (http://www.eonline.com/News/Items/0,1,3385,00.html) Coleman said he felt "threatened by her insistence" and punched her in the head. He joked that he was rarely allowed into the 20th century and never into the present day. Coleman appeared in court on November 2, 2000, charged with assault. Many of his appearances were in comedy roles, but usually with a classic edge (he appeared in several Noel Coward plays). As with Knight Rider, Rubik's Cube, Care Bears and other artifacts from the early 1980s, Coleman's popularity coincided with the childhood of a particularly productive demographic of internet users, and he is, as of 2004, a minor cult figure.

He played leading roles in many classic serials, notably appearing as D'Artagnan in the 1966 adaptation of The Three Musketeers. He occasionally appears in cameo roles, most of which refer to his earlier acting career. From the early 1960s onwards, Brett was rarely off British television screens. In 2001 he was employed as a shopping mall security guard in the Los Angeles area (a video of him trying to stop a vehicle from entering a compound while the driver ridiculed him was a popular Internet meme). In 1976 he married Joan Wilson, but she died in 1985, and he did not remarry. Despite this, Coleman filed for bankruptcy in 1999. Danvers. He briefly owned a video game arcade in Fisherman's Village in Marina del Rey, near Santa Monica, California.

Years later, they would appear together in the BBC's dramatization of Rebecca (1978) -- Brett playing the hero, Max de Winter, and Massey playing the sinister Mrs. Coleman famously sued his own parents over misappropriation of his $3.8 million trust fund, and won a $1,280,000 ruling on February 23, 1993. In 1958, he married the actress, Anna Massey (daughter of Raymond Massey), but they were divorced in 1962. As he grew older, however, he fell from public favour and, after the cancellation of Diff'rent Strokes, his acting career declined sharply; his career path was common to many child stars and other icons of the period, such as Mr T and Henry Winkler. He played many classical roles on stage, including a huge amount of Shakespeare, and made his first film and television appearances in 1955. At the height of his fame on Diff'rent Strokes, Coleman earned $70,000 per episode. He was educated at Eton College and trained at the Central School of Speech and Drama. During the run of the show Coleman was a popular figure, starring in a number of feature films and made-for-TV movies including On the Right Track, and The Kid With the Broken Halo.

Brett was born in Berkswell Grange, Warwickshire, England. Coleman has had two kidney transplants, one in 1973 and one in 1984, and requires constant dialysis. Jeremy Brett (born Peter Jeremy William Huggins) (November 3, 1933 - September 12, 1995) was a British actor. Coleman was born with a congenital kidney defect known as nephritis, which halted his growth at an early age, leading to a notably small stature (4' 8") which became his most distinguishing feature. He was particularly famous for his catch phrase, "Whatchoo talkin' 'bout, Willis?", delivered to his character's older brother Willis Jackson. Born in Zion, Illinois, Coleman is most famous for the role of Arnold Jackson on the Diff'rent Strokes, an American sitcom which ran on NBC from 1978 to 1986.

Gary Coleman (born February 8, 1968) is an American actor. Another popular internet Meme; a photograph of Gary Coleman and David Hasselhoff (http://www.february-7.com/warehouse/knightrider&arnoldjackson.jpg). Coleman on the Internet Movie Database (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0171041/). CNN's take on Coleman's 2003 candidacy for the governorship of California (http://www.cnn.com/2003/ALLPOLITICS/08/06/candidate.coleman/).

When asked by Howard Stern if he has had oral sex, Coleman said: "No! That's not a place for a young woman's face to be.".

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