This page will contain external links about Janis Joplin, as they become available.

Janis Joplin

Janis Joplin on the cover of her posthumously-released live album In Concert

Janis Lyn Joplin (January 19, 1943 - October 4, 1970) was an American blues-influenced rock, R&B, and soul singer and occasional songwriter with a distinctive voice. Joplin released four albums as the frontwoman for several bands from 1967 to a posthumous release in 1971.

Joplin was born in Port Arthur, Texas. She grew up listening to blues musicians such as Bessie Smith and Big Mama Thornton and singing in the local choir. Joplin graduated from Jefferson High School in Port Arthur in 1960 and went to college at the University of Texas in Austin, though she never completed a degree. There, she began singing blues and folk music with friends.

Cultivating a rebellious manner that could be viewed as "liberated", Joplin styled herself after the beat poets, left Texas for San Francisco in 1963, lived in North Beach, and worked occasionally as a folk singer. Around this time her drug use began to increase, and she acquired a reputation as a "speed freak" and occasional heroin user. She also used other intoxicants. She was a heavy drinker throughout her career, and her trademark beverage was Southern Comfort.

After a return to Port Arthur to recuperate, she again moved to San Francisco in 1966, where her bluesy vocal style saw her join Big Brother and The Holding Company, a band that was gaining some renown among the nascent hippie community in Haight-Ashbury. The band signed a deal with independent Mainstream Records and recorded an eponymously titled album in 1967. However, the lack of success of their early singles led to the album being withheld until after their subsequent success.

The band's big break came at the Monterey Pop Festival, which included a version of Big Mama Thornton's Ball and Chain and featured a barnstorming vocal by Joplin. (The D.A. Pennebaker documentary Monterey Pop captured Cass Elliott in the crowd silently mouthing "Wow" during part of Joplin's performance.) Their 1968 album Cheap Thrills featured more raw emotional performances and made Joplin's name.

Splitting from Big Brother, she formed a backup group, named the Kozmic Blues Band, which backed her on I Got Dem Ol' Kozmic Blues Again Mama! 1969 (year she played at Woodstock). That group broke up, and Joplin then formed the Full Tilt Boogie Band. The result was the posthumously released Pearl (1971), which featured a hit single in the form of Kris Kristofferson's Me and Bobby McGee and the wry social commentary of Mercedes-Benz, written by beat poet Michael McClure.

Her last public appearance was on The Dick Cavett Show in 1970, where she said that she was going to attend her 10-year high school reunion, although she had formerly said when in high school there she was "laughed out of class, out of school, out of town". She made it there, but it would be one if the last decisions of her life.

Shortly thereafter, Joplin died of an overdose of unusually pure heroin on October 4, 1970 in a Los Angeles, California motel room, at the age of 27. She was cremated in the Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery in Westwood, California, and her ashes were scattered into the Pacific Ocean. The album Pearl was released six weeks after her death. The movie The Rose, with Bette Midler in the lead role, was loosely based on Joplin's life.

She is now remembered best for her powerful, distinctive voice, which was significantly divergent from the soft folk-influenced styles more common at the time, as well as for her lyrical themes of pain and loss.

Samples

  • Download sample of "Try (Just a Little Bit Harder)" from I Got Dem Ol’ Kozmic Blues Again Mama!

This page about Janis Joplin includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about Janis Joplin
News stories about Janis Joplin
External links for Janis Joplin
Videos for Janis Joplin
Wikis about Janis Joplin
Discussion Groups about Janis Joplin
Blogs about Janis Joplin
Images of Janis Joplin

She is now remembered best for her powerful, distinctive voice, which was significantly divergent from the soft folk-influenced styles more common at the time, as well as for her lyrical themes of pain and loss. He also expressed views that could be considered sexist. The movie The Rose, with Bette Midler in the lead role, was loosely based on Joplin's life. Though not part of African culture, it should be noted though that Fela was very liberal when it came to sex, as he potrayed in some of his songs, like Open and Close. The album Pearl was released six weeks after her death. This may have contributed to his ultimate death of complications from AIDS. She was cremated in the Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery in Westwood, California, and her ashes were scattered into the Pacific Ocean. The African culture he believed in also included having many wives (polygamy) and the Kalakuta Republic was formed in part as a polygamist colony.

Shortly thereafter, Joplin died of an overdose of unusually pure heroin on October 4, 1970 in a Los Angeles, California motel room, at the age of 27. He was also a social commentator, and criticized his fellow Africans (especially the upper class) for betraying traditional African culture. She made it there, but it would be one if the last decisions of her life. He was a fierce supporter of human rights, and many of his songs are direct attacks against dictatorships, specifically the militaristic governments of Nigeria in the 1970s and 1980s. Her last public appearance was on The Dick Cavett Show in 1970, where she said that she was going to attend her 10-year high school reunion, although she had formerly said when in high school there she was "laughed out of class, out of school, out of town". He was also a supporter of Pan-Africanism and socialism, and called for a united, democratic African republic. The result was the posthumously released Pearl (1971), which featured a hit single in the form of Kris Kristofferson's Me and Bobby McGee and the wry social commentary of Mercedes-Benz, written by beat poet Michael McClure. The American Black Power movement influenced Fela's political views.

That group broke up, and Joplin then formed the Full Tilt Boogie Band. Fela was known for his showmanship, and his concerts were often quite outlandish and wild. Splitting from Big Brother, she formed a backup group, named the Kozmic Blues Band, which backed her on I Got Dem Ol' Kozmic Blues Again Mama! 1969 (year she played at Woodstock). Fela refused to perform songs again after he had already recorded them, which also hindered his popularity outside Africa. (The D.A. Pennebaker documentary Monterey Pop captured Cass Elliott in the crowd silently mouthing "Wow" during part of Joplin's performance.) Their 1968 album Cheap Thrills featured more raw emotional performances and made Joplin's name. Fela's main instruments were the saxophone and the keyboards but he also played the trumpet, horn, guitar and made the occasional drum solo. The band's big break came at the Monterey Pop Festival, which included a version of Big Mama Thornton's Ball and Chain and featured a barnstorming vocal by Joplin. His songs were mostly sung in Nigerian pidgin English, although he did also perform a few songs in the Yoruba language.

However, the lack of success of their early singles led to the album being withheld until after their subsequent success. This was one of many reasons that his music never reached a substantial degree of popularity outside of Africa. The band signed a deal with independent Mainstream Records and recorded an eponymously titled album in 1967. Fela's songs were almost always over ten minutes in length, some reaching the twenty or even thirty minute marks. After a return to Port Arthur to recuperate, she again moved to San Francisco in 1966, where her bluesy vocal style saw her join Big Brother and The Holding Company, a band that was gaining some renown among the nascent hippie community in Haight-Ashbury. This is a common technique in African and African-influenced musical styles, and can be seen in funk and hip-hop. She was a heavy drinker throughout her career, and her trademark beverage was Southern Comfort. The "endless groove" was also used, in which a base rhythm of drums, muted guitar, and bass guitar are repeated throughout the song.

She also used other intoxicants. Therefore it was characterized by having African style percussion, vocals, and musical structure, along with jazzy horn sections. Around this time her drug use began to increase, and she acquired a reputation as a "speed freak" and occasional heroin user. The musical style performed by Fela Kuti was called Afrobeat, which was essentially a fusion of jazz and West African highlife. Cultivating a rebellious manner that could be viewed as "liberated", Joplin styled herself after the beat poets, left Texas for San Francisco in 1963, lived in North Beach, and worked occasionally as a folk singer. Later, it was revealed that he succumbed to AIDS-related heart failure. There, she began singing blues and folk music with friends. It was announced that he died on August 2, 1997 in Lagos, Nigeria.

Joplin graduated from Jefferson High School in Port Arthur in 1960 and went to college at the University of Texas in Austin, though she never completed a degree. This led to rumors that he was suffering from an illness that he was refusing treatment for. She grew up listening to blues musicians such as Bessie Smith and Big Mama Thornton and singing in the local choir. His album output slowed in the 1990s, and eventually he stopped releasing albums altogether. Joplin was born in Port Arthur, Texas. Once again, Fela continued to release albums with Egypt 80, made a number of successful tours of the United States and Europe and also continued to be politically active. Joplin released four albums as the frontwoman for several bands from 1967 to a posthumous release in 1971. On Fela's release he divorced his twelve remaining wives.

Janis Lyn Joplin (January 19, 1943 - October 4, 1970) was an American blues-influenced rock, R&B, and soul singer and occasional songwriter with a distinctive voice. After twenty months, the regime changed once again and Fela was released from prison. Download sample of "Try (Just a Little Bit Harder)" from I Got Dem Ol’ Kozmic Blues Again Mama!. In 1983 he again ran for President but was again attacked by police, who threw him in prison on a dubious charge of currency smuggling. At this time, Fela created a new band called "Egypt 80" and continued to record albums and tour the country. In 1979 he put himself forward for President in Nigeria's first elections for more than a decade but his candidature was refused.

He formed his own political party, which he called "Movement of the People". Despite the massive setbacks, Fela was determined to come back. The second was at the Berlin Festival after which most of Fela's musicians deserted him, due to rumors that Fela was planning to use the entirety of the proceeds to fund his presidential campaign. The year was also marked by two notorious concerts, the first in Accra in which riots broke out during the song Zombie which led to Fela being banned from entering Ghana.

In 1978 Fela married twenty seven women, many of whom were his dancers and singers to mark the anniversary of the attack on the Kalakuta Republic. Fela and his band then took residence in Crossroads Hotel as the Shrine had been destroyed along with his commune. Fela's response to the attack was to deliver his mother's coffin to an army barrack and write two songs, Coffin for Head of State and Unknown Soldier referencing the official inquiry which claimed the commune had been destroyed by an unknown soldier. Fela claimed that he would have been killed if it were not for the intervention of a commanding officer as he was being beaten.

The Kalakuta Republic was burned, and Fela's studio, instruments, and master tapes were destroyed. Fela was severely beaten, and his elderly mother was thrown from a window, causing fatal injuries. In one raid, one thousand soldiers attacked the commune. The record was a smash hit with the people and infuriated the government, setting off vicious attacks against the Kalakuta Republic.

In 1977 Fela and Africa 70 released the hit album Zombie, a scathing attack on Nigerian soldiers which used the "zombie" metaphor to describe the methods of the Nigerian military. He then recounted this tale in his release Expensive Shit. Fela enlisted the help of his prison mates and gave the police someone else's feces, and Fela was freed. In response, the police took him into custody and waited to examine his feces.

He became wise to this and swallowed the joint. In 1974 the police arrived with a search warrant and a cannabis joint, which they had intended to plant on Fela. However, it was also very unpopular with the ruling government, and raids on the Kalakuta Republic were frequent. Fela's music became very popular among the Nigerian public.

The recordings continued, and the music became more politically motivated. Fela also changed his middle name to "Anikulapo" (meaning "he who carries death in his pouch"), stating that his original middle name of Ransome was a slave name. Fela set up a nightclub in the Empire Hotel in which he performed in regularly first named the Afro-Spot and then the Shrine. He then formed the Kalakuta Republic, a commune, a recording studio and a home for many connected to the band which he later declared independent from the Nigerian state.

Fela and his band, renamed "Africa 70", then returned to Nigeria. The band then performed a quick recording session in Los Angeles, which would later be released as "The '69 Los Angeles Sessions". Soon, the Immigration and Naturalization Service were tipped off by a promoter that Fela and his band were in the US without work permits. While there, Fela discovered the black power movement through Sandra Isodere a friend of the Black Panther Party, which would heavily influence his music and political views and renamed the band "Nigeria 70".

In 1963 Fela moved back to Nigeria, re-formed Koola Lobitos and trained as a radio producer for Nigerian Broadcasting. In 1969 Fela took the band to the United States. In 1961 Fela married his first wife Remi with whom he would have three children (Femi, Yeni and Sola). The style was a fusion of American jazz with West African highlife. While there, he formed the band Koola Lobitos, playing a style of music Fela called Afrobeat.

His parents sent him to London in 1958 with the intention of having him study medicine, but he decided to study music instead at the Trinity College of Music. His mother, Funmilayo, was a feminist active in the anti-colonial movement and his father Israel was the first president of the Nigerian Union Of Teachers. Fela Kuti was born in Abeokuta, Nigeria to a middle-class family. Olufela Olusegen Oludotun Ransome-Kuti, October 15, 1938 - August 2, 1997), or simply "Fela", was a Nigerian multi-instrumentalist musician and composer, pioneer of Afrobeat music, human rights activist and political maverick.

Fela Anikulapo Kuti (b. Fela Live! Fela Anikulapo-Kuti and the Egypt 80 Band 1981, Recorded Live At Glastonbury, England. Fela In Concert 1981. Stephane tchal-Gadjieff & Jean Jacques Flori, Music Is The Weapon 1982, reissued in 2002 by Universal.

Tejumola Olaniyan, Arrest the Music! Fela and his rebel art and politics, Indiana University Press, 2004. Various, Black President: The Art & Legacy of Fela Anikulapo Kuti, edited by Trevor Schoonmaker, 2003. Various, Fela: From West Africa to West Broadway, edited by Trevor Schoonmaker, 2003. Sola Olorunyomi, Afrobeat: Fela and the Imagined Continent, Africa World Press, 2002.

Mabinuori Kayode Idowu, Fela, le combattant, Bordeaux (France), Le Castor Astral, 2002. Veal, Fela: The Life of an African Musical Icon, Philadelphia, Temple University Press, 1997. Michael E.

04-27-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Google+ Directory