This page will contain blogs about Illinois, as they become available.

Illinois

State nickname: Land of Lincoln, The Prairie State
Other U.S. States
Capital Springfield
Largest city Chicago
Governor Rod Blagojevich
Official languages English
Area 149,998 km˛ (25th)
 - Land 143,968 km˛
 - Water 6,030 km˛ (4.0%)
Population (2000)
 - Population 12,419,293 (5th)
 - Density 86.27 /km˛ (11th)
Admission into Union
 - Date December 3, 1818
 - Order 21st
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Latitude 36°58'N to 42°30'N
Longitude 87°30'W to 91°30'W
Width 340 km
Length 629 km
Elevation
 - Highest 376 m
 - Mean 182 m
 - Lowest 85 m
Abbreviations
 - USPS IL
 - ISO 3166-2 US-IL
Web site www.illinois.gov

Illinois (pronounced [ˌɪləˈnɔɪ] or occasionally [ˌɪləˈnɔɪz]) constitutes the 21st state of the United States, located in the former Northwest Territory. Its name was given by the state's French explorers after the indigenous Illiniwek people, a consortium of Algonquin tribes that thrived in the area. The word Illiniwek means simply "the people".

The capital of Illinois is Springfield while its largest city is Chicago, along the waterfront of Lake Michigan. Most of the state's population resides in Chicago and its suburbs. The U.S. postal abbreviation for the state is IL.

The USS Illinois was named in honor of this state.

History

Pre-Columbian

Cahokia, the urban center of the pre-Columbian Mississippian culture, was located near present-day Collinsville, Illinois. That civilization vanished circa 1400-1500 for unknown reasons. The next major power in the region was the Illiniwek Confederation, a political alliance among several tribes. The Illiniwek gave Illinois its name. The Illini suffered in the seventeenth century as Iroquois expansion forced them to compete with several tribes for land. The Ilini were replaced in Illinois by the Potawatomi, Miami, Sauk, and other tribes.

European exploration

French explorers Jacques Marquette,S.J. and Louis Joliet explored the Illinois River in 1673. As a result of their exploration, Illinois was part of the French empire until 1763, when it passed to the British. The area was ceded to the new United States in 1783 and became part of the Northwest Territory.

The 1800s

The Illinois-Wabash Company was an early claimant to much of Illinois. The Illinois Territory was created on February 3, 1809. In 1818, Illinois became the 21st U.S. state. Early U.S. settlement began in the south part of the state and quickly spread northward, driving out the native residents. With the 1832 Black Hawk War, the last native tribes were driven out of northern Illinois.

Illinois is known as the "Land of Lincoln" because it is here that the 16th President spent his formative years. Chicago gained prominence as a canal port after 1848, and as a rail hub soon afterward. By 1857, Chicago was Illinois' largest city (see History of Chicago).

The Civil War

During the Civil War, over 250,000 Illinois men served in the Union Army, more than any other northern state except New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio. Beginning with President Lincoln's first call for troops and continuing throughout the war, Illinois mustered 150 infantry regiments (see Illinois in the Civil War), which were numbered from the 7th IL to the 156th IL. Seventeen cavalry regiments were also mustered, as well as two light artillery regiments.

Government

The sample version of the current Illinois license plate introduced in 2001.

The state government of Illinois is modeled after the federal government with adaptations originating from traditions cultivated during the state's frontier era. As codified in the state constitution, there are three branches of government: executive, legislative and judicial. The executive branch is led by the Governor of Illinois. Legislative functions are given to the Illinois General Assembly, comprised of the 118-member Illinois State House of Representatives and the 59-member Illinois State Senate. The judiciary is comprised of the state supreme court, which oversees the lower appelate courts and circuit courts.

Geography

See List of Illinois counties

It is in the north-central U.S. and borders on Lake Michigan. Surrounding states are Wisconsin to the north, Iowa and Missouri to the west, Kentucky to the south, and Indiana to the east. Illinois also borders Michigan, but only via a water boundary in Lake Michigan.

Illinois has three major geographical divisions. The first is Chicagoland, including the city of Chicago, its suburbs, and the adjoining exurban area into which the metropolis is expanding. This region includes a few counties in Indiana and Wisconsin and streches across much of the Northern Illinois toward the Iowa border, generally along and north of Interstate 80. This region is cosmopolitan, densely populated, industrialized, and settled by a variety of ethnic groups. The city of Chicago is heavily Democratic. While this tendency has historically been balanced by Republican voters in the suburbs, Democrats have significantly increased their suburban support in the past decade.

Southward and westward, the second major division is Central Illinois, an area of rolling hills and flat prairie. Known as the Land of Lincoln, it is characterized by small towns and mid-sized cities. Agriculture, particularly corn and soybeans, figures prominently. Major cities include famously average Peoria, Springfield (the state capital), and Champaign-Urbana (home of the University of Illinois). This region's largely rural character helps to sustain a heavily Republican voting pattern and widespread antipathy toward Chicago.

The third division is Southern Illinois, or Little Egypt, distinguished from the other two by its warmer climate, different mix of crops (including some cotton farming in the past), more rugged unglaciated topography, coal mining, and proximity to the juncture of the Mississippi River and Ohio River. The combination of coal mining and industrialization, especially in the region around Saint Louis, Missouri, has caused the region to lean Democratic politically. This division comprises the area generally along and south of Interstate 70.

McLean County, is the largest county in terms of land area, at 1,184 sq mi. while Cook County is the largest county in terms of population, at 5,327,777. Both figures are as of 2004.

In extreme northwestern Illinois the Driftless Area, a region of unglaciated and therefore comparatively higher and more rugged topography, occupies a small part of the state.

Economy

The 2003 total gross state product for Illinois was $499 billion, placing it 5th in the nation. The per capita income was $32,965.

Illinois' agricultural outputs are corn, soybeans, hogs, cattle, dairy products and wheat. Its industrial outputs are machinery, food processing, electrical equipment, chemical products, publishing, fabricated metal products, transportation equipment, petroleum and coal.

Demographics

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, as of 2003, the population of Illinois was 12,653,544. At the northern edge of the state on Lake Michigan lies Chicago, the nation's third largest city. More than half of the population of Illinois lives in and around Chicago, the leading industrial and transportation center in the region. The rest of the population lives in the smaller cities and on the farms that dot the state's gently rolling plains.

Racially, the state is:

The top 5 ancestry groups in Illinois are German (19.6%), African American (15.1%), Irish (12.2%), Mexican (9.2%), Polish (7.5%).

7.1% of Illinois' population were reported as under 5, 26.1% under 18, and 12.1% were 65 or older. Females made up approximately 51% of the population.

Religion

Unlike the other Midwestern states, Illinois is not overwhelmingly Protestant--only about half of the people profess that faith. Roman Catholics (who are predominant in and around Chicago) account for one-third of the population.

The religious affiliations of the people of Illinois are:

The three largest Protestant denominations in Illinois are: Baptist (15% of total state population), Lutheran (8%), Methodist (8%).

Important cities and towns

Illinois, showing major cities and roads Chicago

See complete listing here...

Counties of Illinois

Education

Illinois State Board of Education

The Illinois State Board of Education or ISBE, autonomous of the governor and the state legislature, administers public education in the state. Local municipalities and their respective school districts operate individual public schools but the ISBE audits performance of public schools with an annual school report card. The ISBE also makes recommendations to state leaders concerning education spending and policies.

There is current debate as to the role of the ISBE and whether or not its autonomous relationship with the governor and the state legislature is appropriate. In 2002, the Office of the Governor proposed the creation of a monolithic statewide department of education to replace the ISBE. However, direct control of the new department would fall under the state governor's jurisdiction. The structure would mimic the system employed by the Hawaii State Department of Education, which has no local school districts. Opponents to the proposal argue that local communities would lose control over what their children would learn in public schools and the means by which those public schools operate.

Primary and secondary schools

Education is compulsory from kindergarten through the twelfth grade in Illinois, commonly but not exclusively divided into three tiers of primary and secondary education: elementary school, middle school or junior high school and high school. District territories are often complex in structure. In some cases, elementary, middle and junior high schools of a single district feed into high schools in another district.

See List of school districts in Illinois for a listing of all school districts, by county.
See List of high schools in Illinois for a partial list of high schools.

Colleges and universities

While many students enter the military or join the workforce directly from high school, students have the option of applying to colleges and universities in Illinois. Notable Illinois institutions of higher education include Loyola University Chicago, Northwestern University, University of Chicago and the several branches of the University of Illinois. Illinois is also home to 49 colleges in the Illinois community college system.

List of colleges and universities

Professional sports teams

People

State symbols

The Cardinal is the state bird of Illinois
This page about Illinois includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about Illinois
News stories about Illinois
External links for Illinois
Videos for Illinois
Wikis about Illinois
Discussion Groups about Illinois
Blogs about Illinois
Images of Illinois

Illinois is also home to 49 colleges in the Illinois community college system. It is accepted by moderate Baptists who identify with the revival in the United States in the 1700s known as the First Great Awakening. Notable Illinois institutions of higher education include Loyola University Chicago, Northwestern University, University of Chicago and the several branches of the University of Illinois. It is rejected by some liberal Baptists who consider the term to describe a theological position that is too conservative. While many students enter the military or join the workforce directly from high school, students have the option of applying to colleges and universities in Illinois. The label Evangelical is rejected by some fundamentalist Baptists who consider the term to describe a theological position that is not fundamentalist enough. In some cases, elementary, middle and junior high schools of a single district feed into high schools in another district. Other Baptists accept the label, feeling that it does not carry a negative connotation but rather is merely a synonym for a Christian or religious group.

District territories are often complex in structure. Another reason for the rejection of the label is the influence of the Restoration period on Baptist churches, which emphasized a tearing down of denominational barriers. Education is compulsory from kindergarten through the twelfth grade in Illinois, commonly but not exclusively divided into three tiers of primary and secondary education: elementary school, middle school or junior high school and high school. Being a denomination is viewed as having a hierarchy that substitutes for the hierarchy of the Roman Catholic Church. Opponents to the proposal argue that local communities would lose control over what their children would learn in public schools and the means by which those public schools operate. The label denomination is rejected by some because of the local autonomous governance system used by Baptist churches. The structure would mimic the system employed by the Hawaii State Department of Education, which has no local school districts. Other Baptists accept the Protestant label as a demographic concept that describes churches who share similar theologies of sola scriptura, sola fide, the priesthood of all believers and other positions that Luther, Calvin and traditional reformers held in contrast to the Roman Catholic Church in the 1500s.

However, direct control of the new department would fall under the state governor's jurisdiction. They do not feel that they are protesting anything and Landmark Baptists believe they pre-date the Roman Catholic Church. In 2002, the Office of the Governor proposed the creation of a monolithic statewide department of education to replace the ISBE. The name Protestant is rejected by some Baptists because Baptists do not have a direct connection to Luther, Calvin or the Roman Catholic Church. There is current debate as to the role of the ISBE and whether or not its autonomous relationship with the governor and the state legislature is appropriate. Conversely, others accept the label Baptist because they identify with the distinctives they consider to be uniquely Baptist. The ISBE also makes recommendations to state leaders concerning education spending and policies. Those who reject the label Baptist prefer to be labeled as Christians who attend Baptist churches.

Local municipalities and their respective school districts operate individual public schools but the ISBE audits performance of public schools with an annual school report card. Some Baptists object to the application of the labels Protestant, denomination, Evangelical and even Baptist to themselves or their churches, while others accept those labels. The Illinois State Board of Education or ISBE, autonomous of the governor and the state legislature, administers public education in the state. Leon McBeth and many others. See complete listing here... This is the most common view held by modern Bapists, which is found represented in the works of H. The three largest Protestant denominations in Illinois are: Baptist (15% of total state population), Lutheran (8%), Methodist (8%). American Baptists soon followed suit.

The religious affiliations of the people of Illinois are:. The Particular and General Baptists would disagree over Arminianism and Calvinism until the formation of the Baptist Union of Great Britain in the 1800s under Andrew Fuller and William Carey for the purpose of missions. Roman Catholics (who are predominant in and around Chicago) account for one-third of the population. Both groups had members who sailed to America as pilgrims to avoid religious persecution in England and Europe and who started Baptist churches in the early colonies. Unlike the other Midwestern states, Illinois is not overwhelmingly Protestant--only about half of the people profess that faith. In 1616, Henry Jacob led a group of Puritans in England with a Calvinist theology to form a congregational church that would eventually become the Particular Baptists in 1638 under John Spilsbury. Females made up approximately 51% of the population. In 1609, John Smyth, led a group of separatists to the Netherlands to start the General Baptist church with an Arminian theology.

7.1% of Illinois' population were reported as under 5, 26.1% under 18, and 12.1% were 65 or older. This view suggests that Baptists were originally separatists in the Puritan reaction to perceived corruptions in the Church of England in the 1600s. The top 5 ancestry groups in Illinois are German (19.6%), African American (15.1%), Irish (12.2%), Mexican (9.2%), Polish (7.5%). The works of William Roscoe Estep offer the best presentation of this viewpoint. Racially, the state is:. One of the strongest relationships between the two groups happened when John Smyth's General Baptists attempted but failed to merge with the Mennonites. The rest of the population lives in the smaller cities and on the farms that dot the state's gently rolling plains. It is difficult to say how much influence the Anabaptists had on the actual formation of Baptist churches.

More than half of the population of Illinois lives in and around Chicago, the leading industrial and transportation center in the region. They share many teachings of the early Baptists, such as the believer's baptism and religious freedom and were probably influential in the development of many Baptist characteristics. While their names suggest some connection, some Anabaptists differed from the Baptists on many other issues such as pacifism and the communal sharing of material goods. At the northern edge of the state on Lake Michigan lies Chicago, the nation's third largest city. Anabaptists (Mennonites, Amish, Hutterites) were a group in the 1500s that rejected infant baptism and "rebaptized" members as adults. Census Bureau, as of 2003, the population of Illinois was 12,653,544. Christian offer the best presentation of this viewpoint. According to the U.S. The works of John T.

Its industrial outputs are machinery, food processing, electrical equipment, chemical products, publishing, fabricated metal products, transportation equipment, petroleum and coal. It is also difficult to show historical connections between those groups which were often separated by large gaps in geography and time. Illinois' agricultural outputs are corn, soybeans, hogs, cattle, dairy products and wheat. Several groups considered to be part of this Baptist succession were groups persecuted by the Roman Catholic Church throughout history including Montanists, Novatianists, Donatists, Paulicians, Albigensians, Catharists, Waldenses, and Anabaptists. While some of these groups shared a few theological positions with current Baptists, many held positions that would now be considered heretical by current Baptists. The per capita income was $32,965. Carroll's The Trail of Blood, written in 1931, is commonly presented to defend this origins view. The 2003 total gross state product for Illinois was $499 billion, placing it 5th in the nation. M.

In extreme northwestern Illinois the Driftless Area, a region of unglaciated and therefore comparatively higher and more rugged topography, occupies a small part of the state. J. Both figures are as of 2004. Alexander Campbell of the Restoration Movement was a strong promoter of this idea. while Cook County is the largest county in terms of population, at 5,327,777. It also allows for the view that Baptists predate the Catholic church and is therefore not part of the reformation or the protestant movement. McLean County, is the largest county in terms of land area, at 1,184 sq mi. This succession grants Baptist churches the status of being unstained and separate from what they see as the corruptions of Catholicism and other denominations.

This division comprises the area generally along and south of Interstate 70. This view is theologically based on Matthew 16:18 , "...and upon this rock I will build my church; and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it." and a rejection of Catholicism as part of the historical origins of Baptists. The combination of coal mining and industrialization, especially in the region around Saint Louis, Missouri, has caused the region to lean Democratic politically. Proponents believe that Baptist traditions have been passed down through a succession of visible congregations of Christians that were Baptist in doctrine and practice, but not necessarily in name. The third division is Southern Illinois, or Little Egypt, distinguished from the other two by its warmer climate, different mix of crops (including some cotton farming in the past), more rugged unglaciated topography, coal mining, and proximity to the juncture of the Mississippi River and Ohio River. Landmarkism is the belief that Baptist churches and traditions have preceded the Catholic Church and have been around since the time of John the Baptist and Christ. This region's largely rural character helps to sustain a heavily Republican voting pattern and widespread antipathy toward Chicago. There are several views about the origins of Baptists within the Baptist church.

Major cities include famously average Peoria, Springfield (the state capital), and Champaign-Urbana (home of the University of Illinois). These churches can seat thousands at once and can have sports fields, gyms, cafes, book stores and libraries. Agriculture, particularly corn and soybeans, figures prominently. Though most Baptist churches are small, a significant percentage of megachurches are Baptist. Known as the Land of Lincoln, it is characterized by small towns and mid-sized cities. Many church buildings are equipped with round receptacles on the rear of the pews for depositing the empty glasses after the service. Southward and westward, the second major division is Central Illinois, an area of rolling hills and flat prairie. The grape juice is typically served in small glasses, though some churches use one cup for the entire congregation.

While this tendency has historically been balanced by Republican voters in the suburbs, Democrats have significantly increased their suburban support in the past decade. It is usually served by the pastor to the deacons, and by the deacons to the congregation. The city of Chicago is heavily Democratic. The bread used in the service may be cubes of normal white bread, unleavened bread, wafers or small crackers. This region is cosmopolitan, densely populated, industrialized, and settled by a variety of ethnic groups. This is patterned after the Last Supper, which was a celebration of the Passover. This region includes a few counties in Indiana and Wisconsin and streches across much of the Northern Illinois toward the Iowa border, generally along and north of Interstate 80. Those who profess belief in Christ as their Savior are invited to partakeš of the symbolic body and blood of Jesus, portrayed by bread and "wine" (which may be grape wine, but is more often non-alcoholic grape juice).

The first is Chicagoland, including the city of Chicago, its suburbs, and the adjoining exurban area into which the metropolis is expanding. The communion portion takes place at the end of the normal service. Illinois has three major geographical divisions. Communion services are typically held once a month on Sunday mornings, but may be held weekly, quarterly or annually. Illinois also borders Michigan, but only via a water boundary in Lake Michigan. Other common features in a Baptist church service include the collection of offering, the serving of symbolic communion and a period of announcements. and borders on Lake Michigan. Surrounding states are Wisconsin to the north, Iowa and Missouri to the west, Kentucky to the south, and Indiana to the east. Some conservative Baptists oppose the use of drums and/or electric guitar in their service because those two instruments are associated with rock music which is considered sinful or Satanic to them.

It is in the north-central U.S. Some conservative Baptists will only sing hymns which usually includes songs written between the 1700s and the 1950s and are often played with an organ. See List of Illinois counties. The choice in music style is often correlated to the age of the members with older congregations preferring hymns while younger congregations prefer contemporary music. The judiciary is comprised of the state supreme court, which oversees the lower appelate courts and circuit courts. Musical style varies between hymns and Contemporary Christian music with many churches choosing a blend of the two. Legislative functions are given to the Illinois General Assembly, comprised of the 118-member Illinois State House of Representatives and the 59-member Illinois State Senate. The sermon is often surrounded by periods of musical worship lead by a song leader, choir or band.

The executive branch is led by the Governor of Illinois. They range in style from expository sermons that focus on one biblical passage and interpret its meaning, to topical sermons which address an issue of concern and investigate several biblical passages related to that topic. As codified in the state constitution, there are three branches of government: executive, legislative and judicial. Sermons can range in time from about 30 minutes to several hours. The state government of Illinois is modeled after the federal government with adaptations originating from traditions cultivated during the state's frontier era. The focus of Baptist church services is the sermon. Seventeen cavalry regiments were also mustered, as well as two light artillery regiments. The two groups share similar theology, even sharing a bible college.

Beginning with President Lincoln's first call for troops and continuing throughout the war, Illinois mustered 150 infantry regiments (see Illinois in the Civil War), which were numbered from the 7th IL to the 156th IL. In Australia, the Baptist Union is very close to the Campbell-Stone Church of Christ. During the Civil War, over 250,000 Illinois men served in the Union Army, more than any other northern state except New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio. The Pacifism of the Anabaptists and the Quakers is not an ideal held by most Baptists. The Baptist Peace Fellowship of North America was organized in 1984 to promote peace, justice, and non-violence, but it does not speak for all Baptists that accept the ideal of pacifism. By 1857, Chicago was Illinois' largest city (see History of Chicago). While the general flavor of any denomination changes from city to city, this aspect of Baptist churches is much more prominent than in most Episcopal, Lutheran and Presbyterian churches. Chicago gained prominence as a canal port after 1848, and as a rail hub soon afterward. Baptists share certain emphases with other groups such as evangelism and missions.

Illinois is known as the "Land of Lincoln" because it is here that the 16th President spent his formative years. Baptists generally believe in the literal Second Coming of Christ at which time God will sit in judgment and divide humanity between the saved and the lost (the Great White Throne judgment Book of Revelation 20:11) and Christ will sit in judgment of the believers (the Judgment Seat of Christ Second Epistle to the Corinthians 5:10), rewarding them for things done while alive. Amillennialism, dispensationalism, and historic premillennialism stand as the main eschatological views of Baptists, with views such as postmillennialism and preterism receiving only scant support. With the 1832 Black Hawk War, the last native tribes were driven out of northern Illinois. Because of the congregational style of church governance on doctrine, doctrine on the following issues often varies greatly between one Baptist church and another. settlement began in the south part of the state and quickly spread northward, driving out the native residents. The theology holds that Christ died on the cross to give humans the promise of everlasting life, but that this requires that each individual accept Christ into his life and ask for forgiveness. Nevertheless, the Baptist view of soteriology runs the gamut from Calvinism to Arminianism. Early U.S. Baptist theology teaches that humans have been contaminated by the sin of Adam and Eve's rebellion against God and that for this sin we are condemned to damnation.

state. Baptists have a strong emphasis on the concept of salvation. In 1818, Illinois became the 21st U.S. Justification by faith or sola fide states that it is by faith alone that we receive salvation and not through any works of our own. The Illinois Territory was created on February 3, 1809. The Baptist position of the priesthood of believers is one column that upholds their belief in religious liberty. The Illinois-Wabash Company was an early claimant to much of Illinois. This doctrine is based on the passage found in 1 Peter 2:9 and was popularized by Martin Luther during the Protestant Reformation and John Wycliff's Lollards before Luther.

The area was ceded to the new United States in 1783 and became part of the Northwest Territory. Priesthood of all believers states that every Christian has direct access to God and the truths found in the Bible without the help of an aristocracy or hierachy of priests. As a result of their exploration, Illinois was part of the French empire until 1763, when it passed to the British. One work which is commonly read by Baptists is the allegory Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyan. and Louis Joliet explored the Illinois River in 1673. Even though it is only the Bible that is authoritative, Baptists also cite other works as illustrative of doctrine. French explorers Jacques Marquette,S.J. However, because of the variety allowed under congregational governance, many Baptist churches are neither literalist nor fundamentalist, although most do believe in biblical inerrancy.

The Ilini were replaced in Illinois by the Potawatomi, Miami, Sauk, and other tribes. Biblical inerrancy is also a common position held by Baptists in addition to literal interpretations of the bible and fundamentalist theologies. The Illini suffered in the seventeenth century as Iroquois expansion forced them to compete with several tribes for land. Each person is responsible before God for his or her own understanding of the bible and is encouraged to work out their own salvation with fear and trembling. The Illiniwek gave Illinois its name. Any view that cannot be directly tied to a scriptural reference is generally considered to be based on human traditions rather than God's leading. The next major power in the region was the Illiniwek Confederation, a political alliance among several tribes. Authority of the Scriptures or sola scriptura states that the Bible is the only authoritative source of God's truth in contrast to the role of Apostolic tradition in the Roman Catholic Church.

That civilization vanished circa 1400-1500 for unknown reasons. states, Southern Baptists form a majority of the population and have successfully banned alcohol sales, and prevented the legalization of certain kinds of gambling. Cahokia, the urban center of the pre-Columbian Mississippian culture, was located near present-day Collinsville, Illinois. In parts of some southern U.S. The USS Illinois was named in honor of this state. Currently in the United States, Baptist (particularly Southern Baptist) involvement in politics often involves controversies concerning gambling, alcohol, abortion, homosexual marriage as well as the teaching of evolution and state-sanctioned public prayer in public high schools. postal abbreviation for the state is IL. Support of Seperation of Church and State does not imply a retreat from the political realm and Baptists do not generally eschew involvement in the political process.

The U.S. Today, though, some prominant Southern Baptist leaders believe that the government, at some level, should favor Christianity in certain contexts. Most of the state's population resides in Chicago and its suburbs. Anabaptists and Quakers also share a strong history in the development of separation of church and state. The capital of Illinois is Springfield while its largest city is Chicago, along the waterfront of Lake Michigan. Baptists were influential in the formation of the first civil government based on the separation of church and state in what is now Rhode Island. The word Illiniwek means simply "the people". That same year, Thomas Helwys wrote that the King of England could "comaund what of man he will, and wee are to obey it," but concerning the church -- "with this Kingdom, our lord the King hath nothing to do." In 1614, Leonard Busher wrote what is believed to be the earliest Baptist treatise dealing exclusively with the subject of religious liberty.

Its name was given by the state's French explorers after the indigenous Illiniwek people, a consortium of Algonquin tribes that thrived in the area. In 1612 John Smyth wrote, "the magistrate is not by virtue of his office to meddle with religion, or matters of conscience". Illinois (pronounced [ˌɪləˈnɔɪ] or occasionally [ˌɪləˈnɔɪz]) constitutes the 21st state of the United States, located in the former Northwest Territory. Baptists who were imprisoned or died for their beliefs have played an important role in the historical struggle for freedom of religion and separation of church and state in England, the United States, and other countries. State tree: White oak (Quercus alba). Main article: Baptists in the history of separation of church and state. State snack: Popcorn. In addition, there are sometimes very strong disputes even within conventions, which are often divided between Christian fundamentalists and moderates.

State song: "Illinois". There are hundreds of Baptist conventions and many Baptist churches do not fall into any of them. State slogan: "Land of Lincoln". The second largest is the National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc., which is also America's second largest predominantly African-American denomination. State prairie grass: Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii). The largest of these in the United States is the Southern Baptist Convention. State motto: "State sovereignty, national union". In a manner typical of other congregationalists, many cooperative associations of Baptists have arisen.

State mineral: Fluorite. Administration, leadership and doctrine are decided democratically by the lay members of each individual church, which accounts for the variation of beliefs from one Baptist church to another. State insect: Monarch butterfly. Baptist churches are not under the direct administrative control of any other body, such as a national council, or a leader such as a bishop or pope. State fossil: Tully Monster (Tullimonstrum gregarium). Congregationalist church governance gives autonomy to individual local churches in areas of policy, polity and doctrine. State flower: Purple violet (Viola sororia). Some Baptists do not hold the concept of an "Age of Accountability".

State fish: Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). Children and those who are not mentally or emotionally capable of discerning their sins are not held accountable for their sins and are considered to be in a state of grace. State dance: Square dance. Jesus began to visibly do the work of God at the age of 12 and somewhere around there is the typical "Age of Accountability". State capital: Springfield. This is not a specific age, but rather the age at which God determines that person is accountable for their sins. State bird: Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis). Only a person who has reached an "Age of accountability" is eligible for baptism.

State animal: White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Through Anabaptist influence, Baptists reject the practice of infant baptism or pedobaptism because they believe parents cannot make a decision of salvation for an infant. Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President, is buried in Springfield, Illinois. Some Baptist churches will recognize baptisms performed in other orthodox Christian churches that were not performed on infants. Ronald Reagan, the 40th President, was born in Tampico, Illinois. A few Baptist churches allow for baptism by sprinkling as an alternative mode for the disabled or elderly. Non-Religious – 8%. Recognition of other modes of baptism by other Baptists and Christian groups vary from one church to another.

Other Religions – 3%. This mode is also preferred for its parallel imagery to the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus. Other Christian – 1%. Baptists emphasize baptism by full immersion, the mode used by John the Baptist, which consists of lowering the candidate in water backwards, while a pastor invokes the Trinitarian formula of Matthew 28:19. Roman Catholic – 33%. Most Baptist church used baptism as a criterion for membership. Protestant – 51%. It is also a public identification of that person with Christianity and with that particular local church.

1.9% mixed race. It is an outward expression that is symbolic of the inward cleansing or remission of their sins that has already taken place. 0.2% American Indian. Believer's baptism is an ordinance that plays no role in salvation and is performed after a person professes Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior. 3.4% Asian. This acrostic is used by some Baptist churches as a summary of the distinctives or distinguishing beliefs of Baptists. 12.3% Hispanic. Baptist distinctives are beliefs that are common among Baptist churches, some of which are also shared with many other post-reformational denominations.

15.1% Black. Baptist churches do not have a central governing authority, resulting in a wide range of beliefs from one Baptist church to another. 67.8% White Non-Hispanic. In the late 1990s, there were about 43 million Baptists worldwide with about 33 million in the United States. The Junior United States Senator is Barack Obama (Democrat). A congregational governance system gives autonomy to individual local Baptist churches, which are sometimes associated in organizations such as the Southern Baptist Convention. Durbin (Democrat). Baptists emphasize a believer's baptism by full immersion, which is performed after a profession of faith in Jesus as Lord and Savior.

The Senior United States Senator is Richard J. Baptist churches are part of a Christian movement often regarded as an Evangelical, Protestant denomination. The Treasurer of Illinois is Judy Baar Topinka (Republican). Williams, Roger. The Secretary of State of Illinois is Jesse White (Democrat). Warren, Rick. The Lieutenant Governor of Illinois is Pat Quinn (Democrat). Spurgeon, Charles H.

The Governor of Illinois is Rod Blagojevich (Democrat). Roberson, Lee. Rice, John R. Pawson, David. B.

Meyer, F. King, Martin Luther. Hyles, Jack. Grenz, Stanley.

Graham, Billy. Falwell, Jerry. Douglas, Tommy. Chambers, Oswald.

Carter, Jimmy. Carey, William. Bunyan, John. Eschatology.

homosexuality. the ordination of women. the nature of Law and Gospel. Calvinism/Arminianism.

doctrine of separation. Two offices of the church (Pastor and Deacon). Separation of Church and State. Individual soul liberty.

Two ordinances (Believer's Baptism and Symbolic Communion). Priesthood of all believers. Autonomy of the local church. Biblical authority.

08-01-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/browse2000.php Business Search Directory Real Estate Database WebExposure.us Google+ Directory Dan Schmidt is a keyboardist, composer, songwriter, and producer.