This page will contain blogs about Illinois, as they become available.

Illinois

State nickname: Land of Lincoln, The Prairie State
Other U.S. States
Capital Springfield
Largest city Chicago
Governor Rod Blagojevich
Official languages English
Area 149,998 kmē (25th)
 - Land 143,968 kmē
 - Water 6,030 kmē (4.0%)
Population (2000)
 - Population 12,419,293 (5th)
 - Density 86.27 /kmē (11th)
Admission into Union
 - Date December 3, 1818
 - Order 21st
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Latitude 36°58'N to 42°30'N
Longitude 87°30'W to 91°30'W
Width 340 km
Length 629 km
Elevation
 - Highest 376 m
 - Mean 182 m
 - Lowest 85 m
Abbreviations
 - USPS IL
 - ISO 3166-2 US-IL
Web site www.illinois.gov

Illinois (pronounced [ˌɪləˈnɔɪ] or occasionally [ˌɪləˈnɔɪz]) constitutes the 21st state of the United States, located in the former Northwest Territory. Its name was given by the state's French explorers after the indigenous Illiniwek people, a consortium of Algonquin tribes that thrived in the area. The word Illiniwek means simply "the people".

The capital of Illinois is Springfield while its largest city is Chicago, along the waterfront of Lake Michigan. Most of the state's population resides in Chicago and its suburbs. The U.S. postal abbreviation for the state is IL.

The USS Illinois was named in honor of this state.

History

Pre-Columbian

Cahokia, the urban center of the pre-Columbian Mississippian culture, was located near present-day Collinsville, Illinois. That civilization vanished circa 1400-1500 for unknown reasons. The next major power in the region was the Illiniwek Confederation, a political alliance among several tribes. The Illiniwek gave Illinois its name. The Illini suffered in the seventeenth century as Iroquois expansion forced them to compete with several tribes for land. The Ilini were replaced in Illinois by the Potawatomi, Miami, Sauk, and other tribes.

European exploration

French explorers Jacques Marquette,S.J. and Louis Joliet explored the Illinois River in 1673. As a result of their exploration, Illinois was part of the French empire until 1763, when it passed to the British. The area was ceded to the new United States in 1783 and became part of the Northwest Territory.

The 1800s

The Illinois-Wabash Company was an early claimant to much of Illinois. The Illinois Territory was created on February 3, 1809. In 1818, Illinois became the 21st U.S. state. Early U.S. settlement began in the south part of the state and quickly spread northward, driving out the native residents. With the 1832 Black Hawk War, the last native tribes were driven out of northern Illinois.

Illinois is known as the "Land of Lincoln" because it is here that the 16th President spent his formative years. Chicago gained prominence as a canal port after 1848, and as a rail hub soon afterward. By 1857, Chicago was Illinois' largest city (see History of Chicago).

The Civil War

During the Civil War, over 250,000 Illinois men served in the Union Army, more than any other northern state except New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio. Beginning with President Lincoln's first call for troops and continuing throughout the war, Illinois mustered 150 infantry regiments (see Illinois in the Civil War), which were numbered from the 7th IL to the 156th IL. Seventeen cavalry regiments were also mustered, as well as two light artillery regiments.

Government

The sample version of the current Illinois license plate introduced in 2001.

The state government of Illinois is modeled after the federal government with adaptations originating from traditions cultivated during the state's frontier era. As codified in the state constitution, there are three branches of government: executive, legislative and judicial. The executive branch is led by the Governor of Illinois. Legislative functions are given to the Illinois General Assembly, comprised of the 118-member Illinois State House of Representatives and the 59-member Illinois State Senate. The judiciary is comprised of the state supreme court, which oversees the lower appelate courts and circuit courts.

Geography

See List of Illinois counties

It is in the north-central U.S. and borders on Lake Michigan. Surrounding states are Wisconsin to the north, Iowa and Missouri to the west, Kentucky to the south, and Indiana to the east. Illinois also borders Michigan, but only via a water boundary in Lake Michigan.

Illinois has three major geographical divisions. The first is Chicagoland, including the city of Chicago, its suburbs, and the adjoining exurban area into which the metropolis is expanding. This region includes a few counties in Indiana and Wisconsin and streches across much of the Northern Illinois toward the Iowa border, generally along and north of Interstate 80. This region is cosmopolitan, densely populated, industrialized, and settled by a variety of ethnic groups. The city of Chicago is heavily Democratic. While this tendency has historically been balanced by Republican voters in the suburbs, Democrats have significantly increased their suburban support in the past decade.

Southward and westward, the second major division is Central Illinois, an area of rolling hills and flat prairie. Known as the Land of Lincoln, it is characterized by small towns and mid-sized cities. Agriculture, particularly corn and soybeans, figures prominently. Major cities include famously average Peoria, Springfield (the state capital), and Champaign-Urbana (home of the University of Illinois). This region's largely rural character helps to sustain a heavily Republican voting pattern and widespread antipathy toward Chicago.

The third division is Southern Illinois, or Little Egypt, distinguished from the other two by its warmer climate, different mix of crops (including some cotton farming in the past), more rugged unglaciated topography, coal mining, and proximity to the juncture of the Mississippi River and Ohio River. The combination of coal mining and industrialization, especially in the region around Saint Louis, Missouri, has caused the region to lean Democratic politically. This division comprises the area generally along and south of Interstate 70.

McLean County, is the largest county in terms of land area, at 1,184 sq mi. while Cook County is the largest county in terms of population, at 5,327,777. Both figures are as of 2004.

In extreme northwestern Illinois the Driftless Area, a region of unglaciated and therefore comparatively higher and more rugged topography, occupies a small part of the state.

Economy

The 2003 total gross state product for Illinois was $499 billion, placing it 5th in the nation. The per capita income was $32,965.

Illinois' agricultural outputs are corn, soybeans, hogs, cattle, dairy products and wheat. Its industrial outputs are machinery, food processing, electrical equipment, chemical products, publishing, fabricated metal products, transportation equipment, petroleum and coal.

Demographics

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, as of 2003, the population of Illinois was 12,653,544. At the northern edge of the state on Lake Michigan lies Chicago, the nation's third largest city. More than half of the population of Illinois lives in and around Chicago, the leading industrial and transportation center in the region. The rest of the population lives in the smaller cities and on the farms that dot the state's gently rolling plains.

Racially, the state is:

The top 5 ancestry groups in Illinois are German (19.6%), African American (15.1%), Irish (12.2%), Mexican (9.2%), Polish (7.5%).

7.1% of Illinois' population were reported as under 5, 26.1% under 18, and 12.1% were 65 or older. Females made up approximately 51% of the population.

Religion

Unlike the other Midwestern states, Illinois is not overwhelmingly Protestant--only about half of the people profess that faith. Roman Catholics (who are predominant in and around Chicago) account for one-third of the population.

The religious affiliations of the people of Illinois are:

The three largest Protestant denominations in Illinois are: Baptist (15% of total state population), Lutheran (8%), Methodist (8%).

Important cities and towns

Illinois, showing major cities and roads Chicago

See complete listing here...

Counties of Illinois

Education

Illinois State Board of Education

The Illinois State Board of Education or ISBE, autonomous of the governor and the state legislature, administers public education in the state. Local municipalities and their respective school districts operate individual public schools but the ISBE audits performance of public schools with an annual school report card. The ISBE also makes recommendations to state leaders concerning education spending and policies.

There is current debate as to the role of the ISBE and whether or not its autonomous relationship with the governor and the state legislature is appropriate. In 2002, the Office of the Governor proposed the creation of a monolithic statewide department of education to replace the ISBE. However, direct control of the new department would fall under the state governor's jurisdiction. The structure would mimic the system employed by the Hawaii State Department of Education, which has no local school districts. Opponents to the proposal argue that local communities would lose control over what their children would learn in public schools and the means by which those public schools operate.

Primary and secondary schools

Education is compulsory from kindergarten through the twelfth grade in Illinois, commonly but not exclusively divided into three tiers of primary and secondary education: elementary school, middle school or junior high school and high school. District territories are often complex in structure. In some cases, elementary, middle and junior high schools of a single district feed into high schools in another district.

See List of school districts in Illinois for a listing of all school districts, by county.
See List of high schools in Illinois for a partial list of high schools.

Colleges and universities

While many students enter the military or join the workforce directly from high school, students have the option of applying to colleges and universities in Illinois. Notable Illinois institutions of higher education include Loyola University Chicago, Northwestern University, University of Chicago and the several branches of the University of Illinois. Illinois is also home to 49 colleges in the Illinois community college system.

List of colleges and universities

Professional sports teams

People

State symbols

The Cardinal is the state bird of Illinois
This page about Illinois includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about Illinois
News stories about Illinois
External links for Illinois
Videos for Illinois
Wikis about Illinois
Discussion Groups about Illinois
Blogs about Illinois
Images of Illinois

Illinois is also home to 49 colleges in the Illinois community college system. In Canada, the largest Presbyterian Church is the Presbyterian Church in Canada; in 1925, about seventy percent of which, merged with the Methodist Church, Canada, and the Congregational Union of Canada to form the United Church of Canada. Notable Illinois institutions of higher education include Loyola University Chicago, Northwestern University, University of Chicago and the several branches of the University of Illinois. Other Presbyterian bodies in the United States include the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA), the Orthodox Presbyterian Church (OPC), the Evangelical Presbyterian Church (EPC (http://www.epc.org)), the Reformed Presbyterian Church, the Bible Presbyterian Church (BPC), the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church (ARP Synod), the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and the Reformed Presbyterian Church in the United States (RPCUS). While many students enter the military or join the workforce directly from high school, students have the option of applying to colleges and universities in Illinois. The largest Presbyterian denomination in the United States is the Presbyterian Church (USA) (PCUSA). In some cases, elementary, middle and junior high schools of a single district feed into high schools in another district. In North America, because of past doctrinal differences, Presbyterian churches often overlap, with congregations of many different Presbyterian groups in any one city.

District territories are often complex in structure. Even before the Presbyterians left Scotland there were divisions in the larger Presbyterian family. Education is compulsory from kindergarten through the twelfth grade in Illinois, commonly but not exclusively divided into three tiers of primary and secondary education: elementary school, middle school or junior high school and high school. However, most Presbyterians generally exhibit their faith in action as well as words, including generosity, hospitality, and the constant pursuit of social justice and reform as well as proclaiming the gospel of Christ. Opponents to the proposal argue that local communities would lose control over what their children would learn in public schools and the means by which those public schools operate. References to the adoption of Calvin's theology of predestination and the typical member's predisposition to conduct themselves "decently and in order" have earned them the moniker of the "frozen chosen". The structure would mimic the system employed by the Hawaii State Department of Education, which has no local school districts. Presbyterians place great importance upon education and continuous study of the scriptures, theological writings, and understanding and interpretation of church doctrine embodied in several statements of faith and catechisms formally adopted by various branches of the church.

However, direct control of the new department would fall under the state governor's jurisdiction. The Church of Scotland has now abolished the Synod. In 2002, the Office of the Governor proposed the creation of a monolithic statewide department of education to replace the ISBE. This congregation / presbytery / synod / general assembly schema is based on the historical structure of the larger Presbyterian churches, like the Church of Scotland; some of the smaller bodies, like the Presbyterian Church in America or the Presbyterian Church in Ireland skip one of the steps between congregation and General Assembly, and usually the step skipped is the Synod. There is current debate as to the role of the ISBE and whether or not its autonomous relationship with the governor and the state legislature is appropriate. The Presbytery sends representatives to a broader regional assembly, generally known as the General Assembly, although an intermediate level of a synod sometimes exists. The ISBE also makes recommendations to state leaders concerning education spending and policies. These are composed of ministers and elders from each of the constituent congregations.

Local municipalities and their respective school districts operate individual public schools but the ISBE audits performance of public schools with an annual school report card. Above the Kirk Sessions exist Presbyteries, which have area responsibilities. The Illinois State Board of Education or ISBE, autonomous of the governor and the state legislature, administers public education in the state. A congregation issues a call for the minister's service, but this call must be ratified by the Presbytery. See complete listing here... Ministers are called by individual congregations. The three largest Protestant denominations in Illinois are: Baptist (15% of total state population), Lutheran (8%), Methodist (8%). Teaching elders (ministers) have responsibility for teaching, worship and performing sacraments.

The religious affiliations of the people of Illinois are:. Sometimes the practicalities of buildings and finance in the congregation are delegated to a distinct group (known variosly as a 'Board' or 'Deacons' Court'. Roman Catholics (who are predominant in and around Chicago) account for one-third of the population. Teaching and ruling elders, sitting as a 'Kirk Session', (commonly refered to as simply 'session') are responsible for the discipline, the nurture and the mission of the local congregation. Unlike the other Midwestern states, Illinois is not overwhelmingly Protestant--only about half of the people profess that faith. Presbyterian government is based on Elders. Females made up approximately 51% of the population. While these conservative Presbyterians are not in the majority, their numbers are significant.

7.1% of Illinois' population were reported as under 5, 26.1% under 18, and 12.1% were 65 or older. Because of this diversity of belief, more conservative Presbyterians are likely to attend the smaller denominations that have chosen to split from a larger body. The top 5 ancestry groups in Illinois are German (19.6%), African American (15.1%), Irish (12.2%), Mexican (9.2%), Polish (7.5%). Those groups that adhere to the document most strictly are typified by baptism of the infant children of believers, the exclusive use of Psalms (modified for metrical singing), singing unaccompanied by instruments, a common communion cup, only men are eligible for ordination to any church office, and a fully Calvinist doctrine of salvation. Racially, the state is:. These splits have been caused by disagreement concerning the degree to which those ordained to church office should be required to agree with the Calvinist Westminster Confession of Faith, which historically serves as the main constitutional document of Presbyterian churches. The rest of the population lives in the smaller cities and on the farms that dot the state's gently rolling plains. Many of the branches of Presbyterianism are remnants of previous splits from larger groups.

More than half of the population of Illinois lives in and around Chicago, the leading industrial and transportation center in the region. The origins of the Presbyterian churches were in Calvinism, which is no longer emphasized in some of the contemporary branches. At the northern edge of the state on Lake Michigan lies Chicago, the nation's third largest city. Presbyterians distinguish themselves from other denominations by both doctrine and institutional organization, or as they prefer to call it 'church order'. Census Bureau, as of 2003, the population of Illinois was 12,653,544. Main article: Presbyterian church governance. According to the U.S. Because of an emphasis on equal education for all people, Presbyterians have 'planted' and encouraged schools across the US as the country grew and the missionaries were sent out to the people.

Its industrial outputs are machinery, food processing, electrical equipment, chemical products, publishing, fabricated metal products, transportation equipment, petroleum and coal. The Presbyterian church in England and Wales is the United Reformed Church, whilst the tradition also influenced the Methodist church, established in 1736. Illinois' agricultural outputs are corn, soybeans, hogs, cattle, dairy products and wheat. All three, very diverse branches of Presbyterianism, as well as independents, and some Dutch, German, and French Reformed denominations, combined in America to form what would eventually become the Presbyterian Church USA (1705). The per capita income was $32,965. Presbyterians, as well as Roman Catholics in Ulster and the rest of Ireland suffered under the discriminatory Penal Laws until they were revoked in the early 19th century. The 2003 total gross state product for Illinois was $499 billion, placing it 5th in the nation. The Presbytery of Ulster was formed separately from the established church, in 1642.

In extreme northwestern Illinois the Driftless Area, a region of unglaciated and therefore comparatively higher and more rugged topography, occupies a small part of the state. In Ireland, Presbyterianism was established by Scottish immigrants and missionaries to Ulster. Both figures are as of 2004. The re-establishment of the monarchy in 1660 brought the re-establishment of episcopalian government in England (and in Scotland for a short time); but the Presbyterian church in England continued in non-conformity, outside of the established church. while Cook County is the largest county in terms of population, at 5,327,777. In 1647, by an act of the Long Parliament under the control of Puritans, the Church of England embraced Presbyterianism . McLean County, is the largest county in terms of land area, at 1,184 sq mi. In Ireland the Presbyterian Church was formed from the Church of Scotland and later became The Presbyterian Church In Ireland.In England, Presbyterianism was established in secret in 1572, toward the end of the reign of Elizabeth I of England.

This division comprises the area generally along and south of Interstate 70. The existing Church of Scotland was thus reformed along Presbyterian lines. The combination of coal mining and industrialization, especially in the region around Saint Louis, Missouri, has caused the region to lean Democratic politically. In Scotland, John Knox (1505-1572), who had studied under Calvin in Geneva, returned to Scotland and led the Parliament of Scotland to embrace the Reformation in 1560. The third division is Southern Illinois, or Little Egypt, distinguished from the other two by its warmer climate, different mix of crops (including some cotton farming in the past), more rugged unglaciated topography, coal mining, and proximity to the juncture of the Mississippi River and Ohio River. In England, Scotland and Ireland, the Reformed churches that adopted a presbyterian instead of episcopalian government, became known naturally enough, as the Presbyterian Church. This region's largely rural character helps to sustain a heavily Republican voting pattern and widespread antipathy toward Chicago. These denominations derive their name from the Greek word presbyteros, which means "elder." Presbyterian church governance is common to the Protestant churches that were most closely modelled after the Reformation in Switzerland.

Major cities include famously average Peoria, Springfield (the state capital), and Champaign-Urbana (home of the University of Illinois). Besides national distinctions, Presbyterians also have divided from one another for doctrinal reasons, especially in the wake of the Enlightenment. Agriculture, particularly corn and soybeans, figures prominently. There are many separate Presbyterian Churches in different nations around the world. Known as the Land of Lincoln, it is characterized by small towns and mid-sized cities. Presbyterianism traces its institutional roots back to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. Southward and westward, the second major division is Central Illinois, an area of rolling hills and flat prairie. Presbyterianism is a form of church government, practiced by many (although not all) of those Protestant churches (known as Reformed churches), which historically subscribed to the teachings of John Calvin.

While this tendency has historically been balanced by Republican voters in the suburbs, Democrats have significantly increased their suburban support in the past decade. John Witherspoon, only clergyman to sign the Declaration of Independence. The city of Chicago is heavily Democratic. The Rev. This region is cosmopolitan, densely populated, industrialized, and settled by a variety of ethnic groups. Woodrow Wilson, 28th President. This region includes a few counties in Indiana and Wisconsin and streches across much of the Northern Illinois toward the Iowa border, generally along and north of Interstate 80. Christine Todd Whitman, former governor of New Jersey.

The first is Chicagoland, including the city of Chicago, its suburbs, and the adjoining exurban area into which the metropolis is expanding. Vice-President under Hayes. Illinois has three major geographical divisions. Wheeler, U.S. Illinois also borders Michigan, but only via a water boundary in Lake Michigan. William A. and borders on Lake Michigan. Surrounding states are Wisconsin to the north, Iowa and Missouri to the west, Kentucky to the south, and Indiana to the east. Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield, Princeton Seminary professor.

It is in the north-central U.S. Roosevelt. See List of Illinois counties. Vice-President under F.D. The judiciary is comprised of the state supreme court, which oversees the lower appelate courts and circuit courts. Wallace, U.S. Legislative functions are given to the Illinois General Assembly, comprised of the 118-member Illinois State House of Representatives and the 59-member Illinois State Senate. Henry A.

The executive branch is led by the Governor of Illinois. Mark Twain, American author. As codified in the state constitution, there are three branches of government: executive, legislative and judicial. Vice-President under Monroe. The state government of Illinois is modeled after the federal government with adaptations originating from traditions cultivated during the state's frontier era. Tompkins, U.S. Seventeen cavalry regiments were also mustered, as well as two light artillery regiments. Daniel D.

Beginning with President Lincoln's first call for troops and continuing throughout the war, Illinois mustered 150 infantry regiments (see Illinois in the Civil War), which were numbered from the 7th IL to the 156th IL. Norman Thomas runs for President as the Socialist Party candidate in 1928. During the Civil War, over 250,000 Illinois men served in the Union Army, more than any other northern state except New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio. Jimmy Stewart, actor. By 1857, Chicago was Illinois' largest city (see History of Chicago). Fred Rogers, also known as the famous Mister Rogers, was an ordained Presbyterian Minister up until his death. Chicago gained prominence as a canal port after 1848, and as a rail hub soon afterward. The Rev.

Illinois is known as the "Land of Lincoln" because it is here that the 16th President spent his formative years. Condoleezza Rice, Secretary of State (2005- ). With the 1832 Black Hawk War, the last native tribes were driven out of northern Illinois. President. settlement began in the south part of the state and quickly spread northward, driving out the native residents. Ronald Reagan, 40th U.S. Early U.S. President (converted from Presbyterianism to Methodism).

state. James Knox Polk, 11th U.S. In 1818, Illinois became the 21st U.S. Norman Maclean, author and academic. The Illinois Territory was created on February 3, 1809. Stonewall Jackson, General in the Confederate Army. The Illinois-Wabash Company was an early claimant to much of Illinois. President.

The area was ceded to the new United States in 1783 and became part of the Northwest Territory. Andrew Jackson, 7th U.S. As a result of their exploration, Illinois was part of the French empire until 1763, when it passed to the British. Charles Hodge, seminary professor. and Louis Joliet explored the Illinois River in 1673. Hodge, seminary professor. French explorers Jacques Marquette,S.J. A.

The Ilini were replaced in Illinois by the Potawatomi, Miami, Sauk, and other tribes. A. The Illini suffered in the seventeenth century as Iroquois expansion forced them to compete with several tribes for land. President. The Illiniwek gave Illinois its name. Benjamin Harrison, 23rd U.S. The next major power in the region was the Illiniwek Confederation, a political alliance among several tribes. Katherine Harris, Florida Secretary of State during the 2000 election crisis and current congresswoman (R).

That civilization vanished circa 1400-1500 for unknown reasons. John Glenn, Astronaut, United States Senator. Cahokia, the urban center of the pre-Columbian Mississippian culture, was located near present-day Collinsville, Illinois. Mel Watt, Congressman from North Carolina and Chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus. The USS Illinois was named in honor of this state. Jay Rockefeller, junior United States Senator from West Virginia. postal abbreviation for the state is IL. Lamar Alexander, junior United States Senator from Tennessee.

The U.S. Bill Frist, current Senate Majority Leader. Most of the state's population resides in Chicago and its suburbs. Eisenhower, 34th President. The capital of Illinois is Springfield while its largest city is Chicago, along the waterfront of Lake Michigan. Dwight D. The word Illiniwek means simply "the people". Secretary of State in the Eisenhower Administration.

Its name was given by the state's French explorers after the indigenous Illiniwek people, a consortium of Algonquin tribes that thrived in the area. John Foster Dulles, U.S. Illinois (pronounced [ˌɪləˈnɔɪ] or occasionally [ˌɪləˈnɔɪz]) constitutes the 21st state of the United States, located in the former Northwest Territory. Brian DePalma, film director; raised as a Presbyterian. State tree: White oak (Quercus alba). President. State snack: Popcorn. Grover Cleveland, 22nd and 24th U.S.

State song: "Illinois". Vice-President under Adams and Jackson. State slogan: "Land of Lincoln". Calhoun, U.S. State prairie grass: Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii). John C. State motto: "State sovereignty, national union". Aaron Burr, co-founder of Princeton University.

State mineral: Fluorite. The Rev. State insect: Monarch butterfly. Vice-President under Jefferson. State fossil: Tully Monster (Tullimonstrum gregarium). Aaron Burr, U.S. State flower: Purple violet (Viola sororia). Frederick Buechner, author of fantasy novels and non-fiction religious books.

State fish: Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). President. State dance: Square dance. James Buchanan, 15th U.S. State capital: Springfield. Presidential nominee for the Democratic Party. State bird: Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis). William Jennings Bryan of the famous Scopes "Monkey Trial" in Tennessee 1925 and three times U.S.

State animal: White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Vice-President under Buchanan. Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President, is buried in Springfield, Illinois. Breckinridge, U.S. Ronald Reagan, the 40th President, was born in Tampico, Illinois. John C. Non-Religious – 8%. Representative; conservative Republican from Texas.

Other Religions – 3%. Dick Armey, U.S. Other Christian – 1%. Roman Catholic – 33%. Protestant – 51%.

1.9% mixed race. 0.2% American Indian. 3.4% Asian. 12.3% Hispanic.

15.1% Black. 67.8% White Non-Hispanic. The Junior United States Senator is Barack Obama (Democrat). Durbin (Democrat).

The Senior United States Senator is Richard J. The Treasurer of Illinois is Judy Baar Topinka (Republican). The Secretary of State of Illinois is Jesse White (Democrat). The Lieutenant Governor of Illinois is Pat Quinn (Democrat).

The Governor of Illinois is Rod Blagojevich (Democrat).

04-26-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Google+ Directory