This page will contain blogs about Illinois, as they become available.

Illinois

State nickname: Land of Lincoln, The Prairie State
Other U.S. States
Capital Springfield
Largest city Chicago
Governor Rod Blagojevich
Official languages English
Area 149,998 kmē (25th)
 - Land 143,968 kmē
 - Water 6,030 kmē (4.0%)
Population (2000)
 - Population 12,419,293 (5th)
 - Density 86.27 /kmē (11th)
Admission into Union
 - Date December 3, 1818
 - Order 21st
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Latitude 36°58'N to 42°30'N
Longitude 87°30'W to 91°30'W
Width 340 km
Length 629 km
Elevation
 - Highest 376 m
 - Mean 182 m
 - Lowest 85 m
Abbreviations
 - USPS IL
 - ISO 3166-2 US-IL
Web site www.illinois.gov

Illinois (pronounced [ˌɪləˈnɔɪ] or occasionally [ˌɪləˈnɔɪz]) constitutes the 21st state of the United States, located in the former Northwest Territory. Its name was given by the state's French explorers after the indigenous Illiniwek people, a consortium of Algonquin tribes that thrived in the area. The word Illiniwek means simply "the people".

The capital of Illinois is Springfield while its largest city is Chicago, along the waterfront of Lake Michigan. Most of the state's population resides in Chicago and its suburbs. The U.S. postal abbreviation for the state is IL.

The USS Illinois was named in honor of this state.

History

Pre-Columbian

Cahokia, the urban center of the pre-Columbian Mississippian culture, was located near present-day Collinsville, Illinois. That civilization vanished circa 1400-1500 for unknown reasons. The next major power in the region was the Illiniwek Confederation, a political alliance among several tribes. The Illiniwek gave Illinois its name. The Illini suffered in the seventeenth century as Iroquois expansion forced them to compete with several tribes for land. The Ilini were replaced in Illinois by the Potawatomi, Miami, Sauk, and other tribes.

European exploration

French explorers Jacques Marquette,S.J. and Louis Joliet explored the Illinois River in 1673. As a result of their exploration, Illinois was part of the French empire until 1763, when it passed to the British. The area was ceded to the new United States in 1783 and became part of the Northwest Territory.

The 1800s

The Illinois-Wabash Company was an early claimant to much of Illinois. The Illinois Territory was created on February 3, 1809. In 1818, Illinois became the 21st U.S. state. Early U.S. settlement began in the south part of the state and quickly spread northward, driving out the native residents. With the 1832 Black Hawk War, the last native tribes were driven out of northern Illinois.

Illinois is known as the "Land of Lincoln" because it is here that the 16th President spent his formative years. Chicago gained prominence as a canal port after 1848, and as a rail hub soon afterward. By 1857, Chicago was Illinois' largest city (see History of Chicago).

The Civil War

During the Civil War, over 250,000 Illinois men served in the Union Army, more than any other northern state except New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio. Beginning with President Lincoln's first call for troops and continuing throughout the war, Illinois mustered 150 infantry regiments (see Illinois in the Civil War), which were numbered from the 7th IL to the 156th IL. Seventeen cavalry regiments were also mustered, as well as two light artillery regiments.

Government

The sample version of the current Illinois license plate introduced in 2001.

The state government of Illinois is modeled after the federal government with adaptations originating from traditions cultivated during the state's frontier era. As codified in the state constitution, there are three branches of government: executive, legislative and judicial. The executive branch is led by the Governor of Illinois. Legislative functions are given to the Illinois General Assembly, comprised of the 118-member Illinois State House of Representatives and the 59-member Illinois State Senate. The judiciary is comprised of the state supreme court, which oversees the lower appelate courts and circuit courts.

Geography

See List of Illinois counties

It is in the north-central U.S. and borders on Lake Michigan. Surrounding states are Wisconsin to the north, Iowa and Missouri to the west, Kentucky to the south, and Indiana to the east. Illinois also borders Michigan, but only via a water boundary in Lake Michigan.

Illinois has three major geographical divisions. The first is Chicagoland, including the city of Chicago, its suburbs, and the adjoining exurban area into which the metropolis is expanding. This region includes a few counties in Indiana and Wisconsin and streches across much of the Northern Illinois toward the Iowa border, generally along and north of Interstate 80. This region is cosmopolitan, densely populated, industrialized, and settled by a variety of ethnic groups. The city of Chicago is heavily Democratic. While this tendency has historically been balanced by Republican voters in the suburbs, Democrats have significantly increased their suburban support in the past decade.

Southward and westward, the second major division is Central Illinois, an area of rolling hills and flat prairie. Known as the Land of Lincoln, it is characterized by small towns and mid-sized cities. Agriculture, particularly corn and soybeans, figures prominently. Major cities include famously average Peoria, Springfield (the state capital), and Champaign-Urbana (home of the University of Illinois). This region's largely rural character helps to sustain a heavily Republican voting pattern and widespread antipathy toward Chicago.

The third division is Southern Illinois, or Little Egypt, distinguished from the other two by its warmer climate, different mix of crops (including some cotton farming in the past), more rugged unglaciated topography, coal mining, and proximity to the juncture of the Mississippi River and Ohio River. The combination of coal mining and industrialization, especially in the region around Saint Louis, Missouri, has caused the region to lean Democratic politically. This division comprises the area generally along and south of Interstate 70.

McLean County, is the largest county in terms of land area, at 1,184 sq mi. while Cook County is the largest county in terms of population, at 5,327,777. Both figures are as of 2004.

In extreme northwestern Illinois the Driftless Area, a region of unglaciated and therefore comparatively higher and more rugged topography, occupies a small part of the state.

Economy

The 2003 total gross state product for Illinois was $499 billion, placing it 5th in the nation. The per capita income was $32,965.

Illinois' agricultural outputs are corn, soybeans, hogs, cattle, dairy products and wheat. Its industrial outputs are machinery, food processing, electrical equipment, chemical products, publishing, fabricated metal products, transportation equipment, petroleum and coal.

Demographics

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, as of 2003, the population of Illinois was 12,653,544. At the northern edge of the state on Lake Michigan lies Chicago, the nation's third largest city. More than half of the population of Illinois lives in and around Chicago, the leading industrial and transportation center in the region. The rest of the population lives in the smaller cities and on the farms that dot the state's gently rolling plains.

Racially, the state is:

The top 5 ancestry groups in Illinois are German (19.6%), African American (15.1%), Irish (12.2%), Mexican (9.2%), Polish (7.5%).

7.1% of Illinois' population were reported as under 5, 26.1% under 18, and 12.1% were 65 or older. Females made up approximately 51% of the population.

Religion

Unlike the other Midwestern states, Illinois is not overwhelmingly Protestant--only about half of the people profess that faith. Roman Catholics (who are predominant in and around Chicago) account for one-third of the population.

The religious affiliations of the people of Illinois are:

The three largest Protestant denominations in Illinois are: Baptist (15% of total state population), Lutheran (8%), Methodist (8%).

Important cities and towns

Illinois, showing major cities and roads Chicago

See complete listing here...

Counties of Illinois

Education

Illinois State Board of Education

The Illinois State Board of Education or ISBE, autonomous of the governor and the state legislature, administers public education in the state. Local municipalities and their respective school districts operate individual public schools but the ISBE audits performance of public schools with an annual school report card. The ISBE also makes recommendations to state leaders concerning education spending and policies.

There is current debate as to the role of the ISBE and whether or not its autonomous relationship with the governor and the state legislature is appropriate. In 2002, the Office of the Governor proposed the creation of a monolithic statewide department of education to replace the ISBE. However, direct control of the new department would fall under the state governor's jurisdiction. The structure would mimic the system employed by the Hawaii State Department of Education, which has no local school districts. Opponents to the proposal argue that local communities would lose control over what their children would learn in public schools and the means by which those public schools operate.

Primary and secondary schools

Education is compulsory from kindergarten through the twelfth grade in Illinois, commonly but not exclusively divided into three tiers of primary and secondary education: elementary school, middle school or junior high school and high school. District territories are often complex in structure. In some cases, elementary, middle and junior high schools of a single district feed into high schools in another district.

See List of school districts in Illinois for a listing of all school districts, by county.
See List of high schools in Illinois for a partial list of high schools.

Colleges and universities

While many students enter the military or join the workforce directly from high school, students have the option of applying to colleges and universities in Illinois. Notable Illinois institutions of higher education include Loyola University Chicago, Northwestern University, University of Chicago and the several branches of the University of Illinois. Illinois is also home to 49 colleges in the Illinois community college system.

List of colleges and universities

Professional sports teams

People

State symbols

The Cardinal is the state bird of Illinois
This page about Illinois includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about Illinois
News stories about Illinois
External links for Illinois
Videos for Illinois
Wikis about Illinois
Discussion Groups about Illinois
Blogs about Illinois
Images of Illinois

Illinois is also home to 49 colleges in the Illinois community college system. For more on the universities and colleges in Kansas, see the complete list. Notable Illinois institutions of higher education include Loyola University Chicago, Northwestern University, University of Chicago and the several branches of the University of Illinois. The composition of FHSU's enrollment includes 35% non-resident students and 44% off-campus enrollments. PSU also has almost a quarter of enrollment from non-residents. While many students enter the military or join the workforce directly from high school, students have the option of applying to colleges and universities in Illinois. FHSU has the fastest growing enrollment in Kansas with most of it coming from non-resident and off-campus enrollment. In some cases, elementary, middle and junior high schools of a single district feed into high schools in another district. Fort Hays State University (FHSU), Pittsburg State University (PSU), and Emporia State University (ESU) are smaller public universities with total enrollments of 8500, 6537, and 6194, respectively.

District territories are often complex in structure. Wichita State University (WSU) ranks third largest with 14,298 students; about 12% were non-resident students. Education is compulsory from kindergarten through the twelfth grade in Illinois, commonly but not exclusively divided into three tiers of primary and secondary education: elementary school, middle school or junior high school and high school. About 19% were non-resident students. Opponents to the proposal argue that local communities would lose control over what their children would learn in public schools and the means by which those public schools operate. Kansas State University (KSU) has the second largest enrollment, with 23,151 students at its Manhattan and Salina campuses and Veterinary Medical Center. The structure would mimic the system employed by the Hawaii State Department of Education, which has no local school districts. About 31% were non-resident students.

However, direct control of the new department would fall under the state governor's jurisdiction. The total university enrollment, which includes KU Medical Center, was 29,590. In 2002, the Office of the Governor proposed the creation of a monolithic statewide department of education to replace the ISBE. Among the state-funded universities, the University of Kansas (KU) is the largest in terms of enrollment, with 26,980 at its Lawrence campus, KU Edwards Campus in Overland Park, and Public Management Center (formerly the Capitol Complex) in Topeka. There is current debate as to the role of the ISBE and whether or not its autonomous relationship with the governor and the state legislature is appropriate. In Fall 2004 the state’s six public universities reported a combined enrollment of 88,270 students, of which almost a quarter were non-resident students and a tenth were off-campus enrollments. The ISBE also makes recommendations to state leaders concerning education spending and policies. It also authorizes numerous private and out-of-state institutions to operate in the state.

Local municipalities and their respective school districts operate individual public schools but the ISBE audits performance of public schools with an annual school report card. The Kansas Board of Regents governs or supervises thirty-seven public institutions. The Illinois State Board of Education or ISBE, autonomous of the governor and the state legislature, administers public education in the state. Main article: Education in Kansas. See complete listing here... See also: List of cities in Kansas. The three largest Protestant denominations in Illinois are: Baptist (15% of total state population), Lutheran (8%), Methodist (8%). "Rural flight" as it is called has led to offers of free land and tax breaks as enticements to newcomers.

The religious affiliations of the people of Illinois are:. Between 1996 and 2004 almost half a million people, nearly half with college degrees, left the six states. Roman Catholics (who are predominant in and around Chicago) account for one-third of the population. 89% of the total number of cities in those states have fewer than 3000 people; hundreds have fewer than than 1000. Unlike the other Midwestern states, Illinois is not overwhelmingly Protestant--only about half of the people profess that faith. Kansas, as well as five other Mid-West states (Nebraska, Oklahoma, North and South Dakota and Iowa), is feeling the brunt of falling populations. Females made up approximately 51% of the population. The industrial outputs are transportation equipment, commercial and private aircraft, food processing, publishing, chemical products, machinery, apparel, petroleum and mining.

7.1% of Illinois' population were reported as under 5, 26.1% under 18, and 12.1% were 65 or older. The agricultural outputs of the state are cattle, wheat, sorghum, soybeans, hogs and corn. The top 5 ancestry groups in Illinois are German (19.6%), African American (15.1%), Irish (12.2%), Mexican (9.2%), Polish (7.5%). Its per-capita income was $29,438. Racially, the state is:. The 2003 total gross state product of Kansas was $93 billion. The rest of the population lives in the smaller cities and on the farms that dot the state's gently rolling plains. See also: KDOT road condition information (http://www.kanroad.org).

More than half of the population of Illinois lives in and around Chicago, the leading industrial and transportation center in the region. In January 2004, the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT) announced the new Kansas 511 traveler information service.[3] (http://www.ksdot.org/offtransinfo/News04/511_Release.htm) By calling 511, callers will get access to information about road conditions, construction, closures, detours and weather conditions for the state highway system. Weather and road condition information is updated every 15 minutes. At the northern edge of the state on Lake Michigan lies Chicago, the nation's third largest city. Other bypasses are I-235 around Wichita and I-470 around Topeka. Census Bureau, as of 2003, the population of Illinois was 12,653,544. I-435 and I-635 serve a dual purpose as connections between the major routes and bypasses around the Kansas City metropolitan area. According to the U.S. I-335 and portions of I-35 and I-70 make up the Kansas Turnpike.

Its industrial outputs are machinery, food processing, electrical equipment, chemical products, publishing, fabricated metal products, transportation equipment, petroleum and coal. I-335, a northeast/southwest route, connects I-70 at Topeka to I-35 at Emporia. Illinois' agricultural outputs are corn, soybeans, hogs, cattle, dairy products and wheat. I-135, a north/south route, connects I-70 at Salina to I-35 at Wichita. The per capita income was $32,965. Spur routes serve as connections between the two major routes. The 2003 total gross state product for Illinois was $499 billion, placing it 5th in the nation. I-35 is a major north/south route connecting to Des Moines, Iowa, in the north and Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, in the south. Cities along this route (from north to south) include Kansas City (and its suburbs), Ottawa, Emporia, El Dorado and Wichita.

In extreme northwestern Illinois the Driftless Area, a region of unglaciated and therefore comparatively higher and more rugged topography, occupies a small part of the state. Cities along this route (from east to west) include Kansas City, Lawrence, Topeka, Junction City, Salina, Hays, and Colby. Both figures are as of 2004. Louis, Missouri, in the east and Denver, Colorado, in the west. while Cook County is the largest county in terms of population, at 5,327,777. I-70 is a major east/west route connecting to St. McLean County, is the largest county in terms of land area, at 1,184 sq mi. The state is served by two interstate highways with six spur routes.

This division comprises the area generally along and south of Interstate 70. Other important rivers are the Saline and Solomon, tributaries of the Smoky Hill River; the Big Blue, Delaware, and Wakarusa, which flow into the Kansas River; and the Marais des Cygnes, a tributary of the Missouri River. The combination of coal mining and industrialization, especially in the region around Saint Louis, Missouri, has caused the region to lean Democratic politically. It forms, with its tributaries, the Little Arkansas, Walnut, Cow Creek, Cimarron, Verdigris (which is the lowest point in Kansas at 680 feet), and the Neosho, the southern drainage system of the state. The third division is Southern Illinois, or Little Egypt, distinguished from the other two by its warmer climate, different mix of crops (including some cotton farming in the past), more rugged unglaciated topography, coal mining, and proximity to the juncture of the Mississippi River and Ohio River. The Arkansas River, rising in Colorado, flows with a tortuous course, for nearly 500 miles, across three-fourths of the state. This region's largely rural character helps to sustain a heavily Republican voting pattern and widespread antipathy toward Chicago. The Kansas River, formed by the junction of the Smoky Hill and Republican rivers, joins the Missouri at Kansas City, after a course of 150 miles across the state.

Major cities include famously average Peoria, Springfield (the state capital), and Champaign-Urbana (home of the University of Illinois). The Missouri River forms nearly 75 miles of the state's northeastern boundary. Agriculture, particularly corn and soybeans, figures prominently. (Mount Sunflower is the highest point.) The rivers flow through bottomlands, varying from ž to 6 miles in width, and bounded by bluffs, rising 50 to 300 feet. Known as the Land of Lincoln, it is characterized by small towns and mid-sized cities. Its altitude above the sea ranges from 750 feet at the mouth of the Kansas River to 4000 feet on the western border. Southward and westward, the second major division is Central Illinois, an area of rolling hills and flat prairie. The state, lying in the great central plain of the United States, has a generally flat or undulating surface.

While this tendency has historically been balanced by Republican voters in the suburbs, Democrats have significantly increased their suburban support in the past decade. Kansas is one of the six states located on the Frontier Strip. The city of Chicago is heavily Democratic. The state is divided up into 105 counties with 628 cities. This region is cosmopolitan, densely populated, industrialized, and settled by a variety of ethnic groups. The geographic center of the 48 contiguous states is located in Smith County near Lebanon, Kansas, and the geographic center of Kansas is located in Barton County. This region includes a few counties in Indiana and Wisconsin and streches across much of the Northern Illinois toward the Iowa border, generally along and north of Interstate 80. This spot is used as the central reference point for all maps produced by the government.

The first is Chicagoland, including the city of Chicago, its suburbs, and the adjoining exurban area into which the metropolis is expanding. It is located equidistant from the Pacific and the Atlantic Ocean. The geographic center of North America is located in Osborne County. Illinois has three major geographical divisions. Kansas is bordered by Nebraska on the north, Missouri on the east, Oklahoma on the south, and Colorado on the west. Illinois also borders Michigan, but only via a water boundary in Lake Michigan. See also: List of Governors of Kansas; U.S. Congressional Delegations from Kansas. and borders on Lake Michigan. Surrounding states are Wisconsin to the north, Iowa and Missouri to the west, Kentucky to the south, and Indiana to the east. In 2005 voters accepted a constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage, and the Kansas State Board of Education resumed hearings to determine if evolution should once again be removed from state science standards.

It is in the north-central U.S. The decade brought new restrictions on abortion, the defeat of prominent Democrats, including Dan Glickman, and the Kansas State Board of Education's infamous 1999 decision to eliminate the theory of evolution from the state teaching standards, a decision that was later reversed. See List of Illinois counties. Since the early 1990s, Kansas has grown more socially conservative. The judiciary is comprised of the state supreme court, which oversees the lower appelate courts and circuit courts. Board of Education of Topeka banned racially segregated schools throughout the U.S. Legislative functions are given to the Illinois General Assembly, comprised of the 118-member Illinois State House of Representatives and the 59-member Illinois State Senate. Brown vs.

The executive branch is led by the Governor of Illinois. Kansas was first among the states to ban the concept of separate but equal schools. As codified in the state constitution, there are three branches of government: executive, legislative and judicial. Kansas schools both public and private continue to have some of the highest standards in the nation. The state government of Illinois is modeled after the federal government with adaptations originating from traditions cultivated during the state's frontier era. The council-manager government was adopted by many larger Kansas cities in the years following World War I while many American cities were being run by political machines or organized crime. Seventeen cavalry regiments were also mustered, as well as two light artillery regiments. Kansas had a reputation as a progressive state with many firsts in legislative initiatives—it was the first state to institute a system of workers compensation (1910).

Beginning with President Lincoln's first call for troops and continuing throughout the war, Illinois mustered 150 infantry regiments (see Illinois in the Civil War), which were numbered from the 7th IL to the 156th IL. Moore is the only Democrat in the delegation; all others are Republicans. During the Civil War, over 250,000 Illinois men served in the Union Army, more than any other northern state except New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio. The state's current delegation to the United States Congress includes Senators Sam Brownback and Pat Roberts and Representatives Jerry Moran (District 1), Jim Ryun (District 2), Dennis Moore (District 3), and Todd Tiahrt (District 4). By 1857, Chicago was Illinois' largest city (see History of Chicago). Their current term will end in January of 2007, and they are able to run for re-election in 2006. Chicago gained prominence as a canal port after 1848, and as a rail hub soon afterward. Both are elected on the same ticket to a maximum of two consecutive 4-year terms.

Illinois is known as the "Land of Lincoln" because it is here that the 16th President spent his formative years. Moore. With the 1832 Black Hawk War, the last native tribes were driven out of northern Illinois. The top executives of the state are Governor Kathleen Sebelius and Lieutenant Governor John E. settlement began in the south part of the state and quickly spread northward, driving out the native residents. The state capital is Topeka. Early U.S. Famous sport athletes from Kansas include Barry Sanders, Gale Sayers, Wilt Chamberlain, Jim Ryun, Walter Johnson, Maurice Greene and Lynette Woodard.

state. Kansas was home to President Eisenhower, presidential candidates Bob Dole and Alf Landon, Amelia Earhart, and Carrie Nation. In 1818, Illinois became the 21st U.S. Wild Bill Hickok was a deputy marshal at Fort Riley and a marshal at Hays and Abilene. The Illinois Territory was created on February 3, 1809. On August 21, 1863, William Quantrill led Quantrill's Raid into Lawrence destroying much of the city and killing many people. The Illinois-Wabash Company was an early claimant to much of Illinois. On February 19, 1861 it became the first U.S. state to prohibit all alcoholic beverages.

The area was ceded to the new United States in 1783 and became part of the Northwest Territory. Civil War veterans constructed homesteads in Kansas following the war. As a result of their exploration, Illinois was part of the French empire until 1763, when it passed to the British. Kansas became the 34th state of the Union on January 29, 1861. and Louis Joliet explored the Illinois River in 1673. On March 30, 1855 "Border Ruffians" from Missouri invaded Kansas during the territory's first election and forced the election of a pro-slavery legislature. French explorers Jacques Marquette,S.J. To travellers enroute to Utah, California, or Oregon, Kansas was a waystop and outfitting place.

The Ilini were replaced in Illinois by the Potawatomi, Miami, Sauk, and other tribes. Fort Leavenworth was the first community in the area around 1827. The Illini suffered in the seventeenth century as Iroquois expansion forced them to compete with several tribes for land. territories of Nebraska and Kansas. The Illiniwek gave Illinois its name. The Kansas-Nebraska Act became law on May 30, 1854 and established the U.S. The next major power in the region was the Illiniwek Confederation, a political alliance among several tribes. Kansas then became part of the Missouri Territory until 1821.

That civilization vanished circa 1400-1500 for unknown reasons. Kansas, as part of the Louisiana Purchase, was annexed to the United States in 1803 as unorganized territory. Cahokia, the urban center of the pre-Columbian Mississippian culture, was located near present-day Collinsville, Illinois. Main article: History of Kansas. The USS Illinois was named in honor of this state. postal abbreviation for the state is KS. postal abbreviation for the state is IL. The U.S.

The U.S. Kansas, derived from the Siouan word Kansa meaning "People of the south wind", is a midwestern state in the United States. Most of the state's population resides in Chicago and its suburbs. Many Kansans also support the sports teams of Kansas City, Missouri, including the Kansas City Royals and the Kansas City Chiefs. The capital of Illinois is Springfield while its largest city is Chicago, along the waterfront of Lake Michigan. Kansas City T-Bones, Wichita Wranglers, Wichita Thunder, Topeka Tarantulas, Wichita Wings (defunct). The word Illiniwek means simply "the people". The Boyer Gallery, a collection of animated sculptures made by Paul Boyer is located in Belleville, Kansas.

Its name was given by the state's French explorers after the indigenous Illiniwek people, a consortium of Algonquin tribes that thrived in the area. It is also home to Apollo 13, an SR-71 Blackbird, and many other space artifacts. Illinois (pronounced [ˌɪləˈnɔɪ] or occasionally [ˌɪləˈnɔɪz]) constitutes the 21st state of the United States, located in the former Northwest Territory. The museum features the largest collection of artifacts from the Russian Space Program outside of Moscow. State tree: White oak (Quercus alba). The Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center, located in Hutchinson, Kansas is affiliated with the Smithsonian Institute. State snack: Popcorn. The Horace Greeley museum is located in Tribune, Kansas.

State song: "Illinois". The National Agriculture Center and Hall of Fame is located in Bonner Springs, Kansas. State slogan: "Land of Lincoln". The National Teachers Hall of Fame is located in Emporia, Kansas. State prairie grass: Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii). The Wizard of Oz Museum in Liberal, Kansas features Dorothy's House, a recreation of the farm house featured in the film The Wizard of Oz. State motto: "State sovereignty, national union". The Boot Hill Museum in Dodge City, Kansas features Old West memorabilia and history.

State mineral: Fluorite. (website (http://www.doleinstitute.org)). State insect: Monarch butterfly. The institute is located in Lawrence, Kansas on the campus of the University of Kansas. State fossil: Tully Monster (Tullimonstrum gregarium). Dole Institute of Politics houses the largest collection of papers for a politician other than a president. State flower: Purple violet (Viola sororia). The Robert J.

State fish: Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus). (website (http://www.lecomptonkansas.com/index.php?doc=consthall.php)). State dance: Square dance. Constitution Hall in Lecompton, Kansas is the location where the Kansas Territorial Government convened and drafted a pro-slavery constitution. State capital: Springfield. The house of Carrie Nation, now a museum, is located in Medicine Lodge, Kansas. State bird: Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis). Abilene, Kansas is also the ending point of the Chisholm Trail where the cattle driven from Texas were rail loaded.

State animal: White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Eisenhower, the Eisenhower Library, and his grave are located in Abilene, Kansas. The Greyhound Hall of Fame is located in Abilene. Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President, is buried in Springfield, Illinois. The boyhood home of Dwight D. Ronald Reagan, the 40th President, was born in Tampico, Illinois. The plant sits on over 9000 acres (36 kmē) of land which was made up of more than 100 farms. Non-Religious – 8%. The Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant in De Soto, Kansas opened in 1942 to manufactor gunpowder and munition propellants for World War II.

Other Religions – 3%. Board of Education was filed, is now a National Historic site in Topeka, Kansas. Other Christian – 1%. Monroe Elementary, the school Linda Brown attended when the historic case Brown v. Roman Catholic – 33%. The John Brown museum is located in Osawatomie, Kansas. Protestant – 51%. The museum features many works of art created by people with no formal training, and it sits only a block or two from the Garden of Eden.

1.9% mixed race. Lucas, Kansas is also home to the Grassroots Art Center [2] (http://home.comcast.net/~ymirymir/index2.htm). 0.2% American Indian. [1] (http://www.missioncreep.com/tilt/dinsmoor.html). 3.4% Asian. Dinsmoor even built his own mausoleum in which you can still see him today in his concrete coffin by paying for the tour. 12.3% Hispanic. One scene has labor being crucified by a doctor, lawyer, banker, and preacher.

15.1% Black. The garden features sculptures of biblical scenes and political messages. 67.8% White Non-Hispanic. Samuel Dinsmoor created the Garden of Eden in Lucas, Kansas in 1905, and opened it up to tourists in 1908. The Junior United States Senator is Barack Obama (Democrat). It is 160 feet tall and weighs 11 million pounds. Durbin (Democrat). Big Brutus, the World's second largest Electric Shovel resides in West Mineral, Kansas.

The Senior United States Senator is Richard J. The disputed World's Largest Ball of Twine created August 15, 1953, in Cawker City, Kansas, is still growing. The Treasurer of Illinois is Judy Baar Topinka (Republican). The Secretary of State of Illinois is Jesse White (Democrat). The Lieutenant Governor of Illinois is Pat Quinn (Democrat).

The Governor of Illinois is Rod Blagojevich (Democrat).

09-01-14 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php PAD File Directory Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Display all your websites in one place HereIam.tv Celebrity Homepages Charity Directory Google+ Directory Move your favorite Unsigned Artist to the Top of the List