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Icy Tower

Icy Tower is a freeware video game created by Johan Peitz of Free Lunch Design, inspired by Xjump. In the game, the player controls Harold the Homeboy whose goal is to climb the tower as high as he can by jumping up floors, and earn points while doing so.

Gameplay

Overview

The Tower consists of floors in different sizes and is of infinite height. The player's goal is to reach higher and higher floors without falling (i.e. jumping but missing a floor and falling past the bottom of the screen), as well as to keep ahead and above of the ever-faster upward scrolling of the game (explained under 'Scrolling').

Movement

Your character will constantly accelerate as long as it moves. The faster it runs, the higher and longer it will jump. Hitting walls (the sides of the tower) and immediately turning around generally maintains your character's speed.

Scrolling

As the player escalates the tower, it will start to scroll upwards slowly and the player will have to keep up in order to not fall off the screen. This is not so hard in the beginning since the scrolling is very slow, but every 30 seconds, an alarm clock will sound and the scrolling will go slightly faster. There is a clock in the upper left corner of the screen that shows how much time is left until the next speed-up.

Scoring

You will get 10 points for each floor you reach. This alone will not gain you any great scores however. To be really victorious, you will have to make cool jumps, combo-jumps, for which you will be awarded n2 points for every n floors jumped in one combo.

Players either thrive for the highest score they can achieve (by making the biggest combo they can jump), or to reach the highest floor they can.

Rewards

After making a combo-jump, you are given a reward as well as points. The bigger the combo, the greater the reward. As of 1.2, rewards are simply a flashy message along with the following words, spoken after the player has successfully finished a combo.

Floor Types

Every 100 floors, the floor type (the way the floors look) changes. As of version 1.2, there are a total of 10 floor types, type 1 being floors 0-99 and type 10 being floors 900 and above. Version 1.3 features one more floor type (called "chain-floor"), which starts off from floor 1000, and can not be unlocked or seen in lower floors.

Icy Tower features the ability to start the game with a floor type of your choice, but only after you have successfully landed on the actual floor where that particular type begins.

Replays/High Scores

Version 1.2 introduced the ability to save replays of games. This gives the player the ability to provide proof of their highest scores, combos and floors. The offspring of this ability is the global High Score List, which lists the best Icy Tower scores, combos, and floors, and allows internet users to download replays of those events.

Note: You must have Icy Tower installed on your computer to view downloaded replays.

Characters

Version 1.2 introduced the ability to play with custom characters. Icy Tower comes with two default characters: Harold the Homeboy and Disco Dave. Icy Tower also comes with a template character, allowing fans to create their own characters, with their own graphics, sound effects, and background music. Characters can be downloaded from the internet. The Icy Tower resource page or Icy Tower fan page offers some of them.

Mods

A few mods exist for the game. Some of them are graphical mods, and some of them change the gameplay. The following are gameplay mods by RamboBones, which work only for version 1.2:

  • FastFloor - the game goes slightly (~120%) faster
  • ProFloor - the floors are shorter
  • SolidFloor - floors are completely solid, so you can't jump on them from below
  • RamboMod - enables customization of the speed and floor sizes of the game

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The following are gameplay mods by RamboBones, which work only for version 1.2:. These are both only a few seconds slower than the fastest known tool-assisted speedrun, which currently measures at just under 5 minutes. Some of them are graphical mods, and some of them change the gameplay. These claims have been confirmed by Twin Galaxies, and a video is available at the Speed Demos Archive [13]. A few mods exist for the game. The current world record time for this game has been set by Trevor Seguin, Andrew Gardikis, and Carlos Krueger with times of 5 minutes and 9 seconds. The Icy Tower resource page or Icy Tower fan page offers some of them. If a player advanced to a higher world, but then received a Game Over, the player could hold A when pressing Start to select the "1 Player Game" option at the main menu, which would allow for them to return to whatever world they left off at instead of starting the game on the very first level.

Characters can be downloaded from the internet. is often recognized as one of the very first "cheat codes", or "easter eggs", in videogames. Icy Tower also comes with a template character, allowing fans to create their own characters, with their own graphics, sound effects, and background music. A very simple and well-known secret code in Super Mario Bros. Icy Tower comes with two default characters: Harold the Homeboy and Disco Dave. Deluxe. Version 1.2 introduced the ability to play with custom characters. This glitch has been fixed in the Super Mario All-Stars remake as well as in Super Mario Bros.

Note: You must have Icy Tower installed on your computer to view downloaded replays.. World 36 in the Japanese Famicom Disk System version of the game is considerably different and has three levels, after which the player is returned to the title screen as though he or she completed the game. The offspring of this ability is the global High Score List, which lists the best Icy Tower scores, combos, and floors, and allows internet users to download replays of those events. Technically speaking, the Minus World is world 36. This gives the player the ability to provide proof of their highest scores, combos and floors. The name was created by a glitch, and since it is not a normal level, the name is literally (nothing)-1, creating the effect of -1. Version 1.2 introduced the ability to save replays of games. The reason for this is because the pipe at the end of the level leads to the very beginning, instead of dry land, and therefore, the level loops, or repeats itself.

Icy Tower features the ability to start the game with a floor type of your choice, but only after you have successfully landed on the actual floor where that particular type begins. Once Minus World is reached, it is impossible to escape, and Mario is destined to die by running out of time (assuming he survives the standard water-level obstacles as well). Version 1.3 features one more floor type (called "chain-floor"), which starts off from floor 1000, and can not be unlocked or seen in lower floors. (Incidently, the second pipe leads to World 5 if reached in time.). As of version 1.2, there are a total of 10 floor types, type 1 being floors 0-99 and type 10 being floors 900 and above. There, the first pipe leads to the Minus World, but only if the game doesn't scroll to show all the pipes; in which case, the pipes revert to their default locations. Every 100 floors, the floor type (the way the floors look) changes. This trick allows Mario to move through the wall to where the level's warp zone is located.

As of 1.2, rewards are simply a flashy message along with the following words, spoken after the player has successfully finished a combo. It is only accessible by performing a certain jumping trick in Level 1-2 at the pipe that leads to the end of the level. The bigger the combo, the greater the reward. It does exist, although it can be difficult to reach. After making a combo-jump, you are given a reward as well as points. Most likely the result of a glitch rather than intentionally created, this level is sometimes claimed to be a myth. Players either thrive for the highest score they can achieve (by making the biggest combo they can jump), or to reach the highest floor they can. Minus World is an infinite water level (with a layout similar to that of Levels 2-2 and 7-2).

To be really victorious, you will have to make cool jumps, combo-jumps, for which you will be awarded n2 points for every n floors jumped in one combo. However, the card's rarity has made using an Action Replay or other device much easier to obtain this item, causing a large jump in the popularity of such devices. This alone will not gain you any great scores however. Players could connect the e-reader to a Game Boy Advance, connect this to a Gamecube with a Game Boy Advance to Nintendo Gamecube Cable, go to the E-reader machine at the post office, and swipe the card, allowing the player to recieve the coveted NES game item in the mail. You will get 10 points for each floor you reach. Animal Crossing-e card and the e-reader device. There is a clock in the upper left corner of the screen that shows how much time is left until the next speed-up. Currently the only known way to unlock the game is either by use of a game modification ("cheating") device, such as an Action Replay, or by the use of a special Super Mario Bros.

This is not so hard in the beginning since the scrolling is very slow, but every 30 seconds, an alarm clock will sound and the scrolling will go slightly faster. Nintendo released an official way of unlocking it in 2004. As the player escalates the tower, it will start to scroll upwards slowly and the player will have to keep up in order to not fall off the screen. is one of the NES games featured in the Gamecube game Animal Crossing. Hitting walls (the sides of the tower) and immediately turning around generally maintains your character's speed. Super Mario Bros. The faster it runs, the higher and longer it will jump. In 2005, Nintendo released this game again for the GBA as part of its 20th Anniversary with a special edition, selling approximately 876,000 units.[12].

Your character will constantly accelerate as long as it moves. Differences between this and the original are that the screen images appear a bit squashed, due to the smaller GBA screen, and the high score is saved to the cartridge. jumping but missing a floor and falling past the bottom of the screen), as well as to keep ahead and above of the ever-faster upward scrolling of the game (explained under 'Scrolling'). Super Mario Bros. was one of the best-selling of these rereleases; according to the NPD Group (which tracks game sales in North America), this rereleased version of Super Mario Bros. was the best-selling Game Boy Advance game in June 2004, and sixth-best-selling game overall.[11]. The player's goal is to reach higher and higher floors without falling (i.e. Unlike previous re-releases, these versions contain no graphical updates; indeed, they are running in emulation. The Tower consists of floors in different sizes and is of infinite height. as part of the Classic NES Series.

. In early 2004, Nintendo rereleased the game on the Game Boy Advance in Japan as part of their Famicom Minis collection and in the U.S. In the game, the player controls Harold the Homeboy whose goal is to climb the tower as high as he can by jumping up floors, and earn points while doing so. However, the game did not feature any upgraded visuals. Icy Tower is a freeware video game created by Johan Peitz of Free Lunch Design, inspired by Xjump. It also was compatible with the Game Boy Printer. RamboMod - enables customization of the speed and floor sizes of the game. 2 (which was released on Super Mario All-Stars as Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels) as an unlockable.

SolidFloor - floors are completely solid, so you can't jump on them from below. It featured simultaneous multiplayer, a Challenge mode and also included the Japanese Super Mario Bros. ProFloor - the floors are shorter. Deluxe. FastFloor - the game goes slightly (~120%) faster. In 1999, Super Mario Bros. was released on the Game Boy Color, under the title Super Mario Bros. A later version of this compilation, sold only as a bundle with the SNES, also includes Super Mario World.

2 (known as Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels in North America and Europe). 2 (known as Super Mario USA in Japan), and the Japanese Super Mario Bros. 3, the North American/European Super Mario Bros. This compilation also includes later Super Mario games, including Super Mario Bros.

Several glitches from the original NES release were also fixed. The version of Super Mario Bros. included in the compilation had improved graphics, redrawn to match the SNES's greater graphical capabilities and a save game feature. In 1993, Nintendo released an enhanced SNES compilation, titled Super Mario All-Stars, of all of the Super Mario games released for the NES and Famicom. This three-game multicart was only included in the "NES Power Set," a bundle including everything in the "Action Set" above, but with the Power Pad and the triple-game cartridge in place of the double-game cartridge.

Later, in December of that year, Nintendo also released a three-game multicart, including Super Mario Bros., Duck Hunt, and World Class Track Meet. This version, first released in North America in November 1988, was only available packed in with the "NES Action Set," a bundle including the NES, two controllers, the Zapper lightgun, and the Super Mario Bros./Duck Hunt double cartridge. While Super Mario Bros. is the best-selling video game of all time, one of the most common versions of the game is actually an alternate version, a multicart including both Super Mario Bros. and Duck Hunt. 2).

Super Mario Bros. Super Mario Bros. The enemies and the mushroom retainers at the end of Bowser's forts are replaced with Japanese music idols, famous recording artists, and DJs, as well as other people related to 'All Night Nippon.' It was published by Fuji TV, the same company that published Doki Doki Panic (which was later remade into Super Mario USA, a.k.a. 2 (Japanese version), and Vs. The game borrows levels from Super Mario Bros., Super Mario Bros.

The game, which was only released in Japan, was a special promotional version that was given away by the Japanese radio station 'All Night Nippon' in raffles in 1986. It was released for the Famicom Disk System. with graphics based upon a radio show, called 'All Night Nippon', that was very popular in Japan in 1986. All Night Nippon Super Mario Bros. is a version of Super Mario Bros.

As with many older arcade games, it isn't clear exactly when this game was released; while the arcade boards themselves are stamped "1985,"[8] the Killer List of Video Games and the MAME game listing list the game as having been released in 1986.[9][10]. Super Mario Bros. much more difficult than the original Super Mario Bros.. 2.) These changes have a net effect of making Vs. (Many of these later, changed stages later appeared in the Japanese Super Mario Bros.

The stages are different, however; the first stages are subtly different, with small differences like the omission of 1-up mushrooms or other hidden items, but later stages are changed entirely. Dualsystem), is based loosely on Super Mario Bros., and has identical gameplay. Unisystem (and its variant, the Nintendo Vs. This game, one of several games made for Nintendo's NES-based arcade cabinet, the Nintendo Vs.

Super Mario Bros., is nearly a separate game in its own right. The first of these alternate versions, Vs. As one of Nintendo's most popular games, Super Mario Bros. has been rereleased and remade numerous times, ranging from an arcade version released at approximately the same time as the original NES release, to its inclusion as an unlockable game in in the GameCube game Animal Crossing. While many bands have sampled the Super Mario Bros. soundtrack or otherwise recorded songs inspired by the game and its soundtrack, a Super Mario Bros.-inspired single by Japanese band The Tongari Kids, titled "B-Dash", reached as high as sixth place on the Japanese music charts.[7].

The soundtrack, composed by long-time Nintendo composer Koji Kondo, is often sampled. There are three direct sequels to this game on the NES platform:. The game's popularity eventually led to dozens of sequels and spinoffs. Mario himself became more recognizable among American children than Mickey Mouse[6].

The success of Super Mario Bros. led Nintendo to choose Mario to be its mascot and eventually resulted in several TV series and a movie. In February 2006, Electronic Gaming Monthly named Super Mario Bros. number one on its list of the 200 Greatest Games of Their Time. (Indeed, Commander Keen began life as a PC port of Super Mario Bros.) It has also been critically acclaimed in retrospect; IGN named it #1 on their top 100 video games list twice (both in 2003 [4] and 2005 [5]), and it is one of only two games (along with Elite) to receive a 10/10 score in their "retro reviews" retrospective series. Super Mario Bros. is often cited as the inspiration for many game designers; an example is the inspiration for the designers at id Software when they developed Commander Keen.

3 is often cited as the best selling non-packaged game of all time. Super Mario Bros. Super Mario Bros. was most often packaged with the console (usually in a dual cartridge with the shooting game Duck Hunt), just as Tetris was packaged with the Game Boy. It has been estimated that this game, next to Tetris, is the bestselling game of all time.[3] Although the game was popular enough on its own, mass distribution is attributable to the popularity of the NES itself.

The game sold approximately 40 million copies worldwide, which still stands as a Guinness World Record. In addition, some of the elevator-style lifts are about 60% their original size. After beating the game, the player is given the option to start the game again in "'Hard' Mode," where all Goombas are replaced by Buzzy Beetles (Koopa Troopa-like enemies who cannot be killed by fireballs), and all enemies walk faster. The third and sixth worlds take place at night, and all other worlds take place during the day.

Bowser may be defeated in one of two ways; either by touching the axe at the edge of the bridge (thereby dropping Bowser into the lava), or, as Fiery Mario, throwing fireballs at him to defeat him directly. In the later worlds, Bowser throws hammers as well as occasional fire breaths. At the end of each castle level, Mario fights "Bowser" (who, until the final level, is actually a lesser enemy disguised as Bowser) across a bridge over a pool of lava. Though each world is substantially different, there are basic similarities: typically the first sub-world is a generic above-ground (overworld) level, the second is in an underground dungeon or underwater (or in the overworld with a unique challenge), the third is a series of platforms suspended high in the sky, and the fourth is a fortress or castle.

The game consists of eight worlds with four levels in each. There are no checkpoints in castles (#-4) or in world 8 (8-#). The point where Mario continues depends on how far he ran through the level before dying; either from the very beginning, or at an invisible "checkpoint" halfway through the level. However, if he takes a hit as regular Mario, falls down a pit (regardless of status), or if the time clock runs out, he loses a life, and starts again.

If he takes a hit from an enemy as Super Mario or Fiery Mario, he simply reverts back to regular Mario and the game continues. Mario can be hurt if he touches an enemy. Aiding him in his quest are several power-ups, including the Super Mushroom, which turns Mario into Super Mario, doubling his size; the Fire Flower, which turns Super Mario into Fiery Mario, allowing him to throw fireballs; Starman, which gives him temporary invincibility; and the 1-up Mushroom. Jumping on enough enemies in succession, or kicking a shell into enough enemies in succession (combos), results in double points earned with each enemy killed, eventually earning Mario a 1-up, an extra life and another chance to pass the level.

Mario can then kick these shells into other enemies, which will conveniently dispatch them; but conversely, kicked shells can bounce back off of walls or other vertical obstructions and hit him. Mario's primary attack is simply jumping on top of his enemies, which kills the mushroom traitors, known as Kuribou/Goombas, and sends the turtle soldiers known as Nokonoko/Koopa Troopas into their shells. The ultimate object is to race through the Mushroom Kingdom, evade or eliminate King Koopa/King Bowser's forces, and save the Princess Peach/Princess Toadstool. The player takes the role of Mario, or in the case of a second player, Mario's brother Luigi.

And the background should be a clear, blue sky."[2]. Shigeru Miyamoto described his initial idea for Super Mario Bros. as "a character that bounces around. . Mario, who became Nintendo's mascot, was at one time more recognizable among American children than Mickey Mouse.

The game gave Mario (known as Jumpman in the classic arcade game Donkey Kong), a starring role. It has inspired countless imitators (eventually founding an entire genre) and was one of Shigeru Miyamoto's most influential early successes. Super Mario Bros. is considered by The Guinness Book of World Records as the best-selling video game of all time[1], and was largely responsible for the initial success of the Famicom and Nintendo Entertainment System. Universally considered a classic of the medium, Super Mario Bros. was one of the first side-scrolling platform games of its kind, introducing players to huge, bright, expansive worlds that changed the way video games were created.

Super Mario Bros. is a video game produced by Nintendo in 1985. "Japanese Sales Charts, Week Ending October 2", Gamasutra, October 7, 2005, retrieved November 22, 2005. ^  - Jenkins, David. "ChartSpot: June 2004", Gamespot, August 2, 2004, retrieved November 26, 2005.

^  - Thorsen, Tor. ^  - Screenshots V, Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator website, retrieved November 22, 2005. Super Mario Bros., Killer List of Video Games, retrieved November 22, 2005. ^  - Vs.

Super Mario Bros., Everything2, December 29, 2001, retrieved November 21, 2005. Vs. ^  - passport. "Mario music bounces up the charts," Gamespot, June 7, 2005, retrieved November 26, 2005.

^  - Nllzumi, Hirohiko. Game Over: How Nintendo Zapped an American Industry, Captured Your Dollars, and Enslaved Your Children, Random House, 1991. ^  - Sheff, David. ^  - IGN's Top 100 Games, IGN.com, retrieved November 26, 2005.

^  - IGN's Top 100 Games, IGN.com, May 9, 2003, retrieved November 26, 2005. ^  - Best-Selling Video Games, Guinness World Records, 1999, retrieved November 21, 2005. "Meet Mario's Papa", BusinessWeek online, November 7, 2005, retrieved November 26, 2005. ^  - O'Connell, Patricia.

3. With the exception of the "firesticks" seen in the castles, every enemy in the game went on to reappear in Super Mario Bros. 3 (14), Super Mario 64 (6), Super Mario World (88) and Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island (83). It beat many other Mario titles, including Super Mario Bros.

Topped the list of "The Greatest 200 Games of Our Time" feature in Electronic Gaming Monthly's February 2006 issue, as part of a 200-issue celebration. The so-called "growing Mario" sound was used in a Colecovision game Wallbreaker. 3. Super Mario Bros.

instead of The Lost Levels and later released in Japan as Super Mario USA. 2 — an adaptation of Doki Doki Panic, a Japanese game unrelated to Mario, released in the U.S. Super Mario Bros. This game would later be released worldwide as The Lost Levels on the Super NES cartridge Super Mario All-Stars.

2. Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels — originally released for the Famicom in Japan as Super Mario Bros.

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