This page will contain additional articles about Helen Keller, as they become available.

Helen Keller

Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was a deafblind American author, activist and lecturer.

Helen Keller was born in Tuscumbia, Alabama. Her disabilities were caused by a fever in February, 1882 when she was 19 months old. Her loss of ability to communicate at such an early developmental age was very traumatic for her and her family and as a result she became quite unmanageable.

Biography

Childhood

Keller was born at an estate called Ivy Green, on June 27, 1880 to parents Captain Arthur H. Keller and Kate Adams Keller. She was not born blind and deaf, but was actually a typical, healthy infant. It was not until nineteen months later that she came down with an illness that the doctors described as "an acute congestion of the stomach and the brain" - Scarlet Fever. The illness did not last for a particularly long time, but it left her blind, deaf, and unable to speak. By age seven she had invented over sixty different signs that she could use to communicate with her family.

In 1886, her mother Kate Keller was inspired by an account in Charles Dickens' American Notes of the successful education of another deaf/blind child, Laura Bridgman, and travelled to a specialist doctor in Baltimore for advice. He put her in touch with local expert Alexander Graham Bell, who was working with deaf children at the time. Bell advised the couple to contact the Perkins Institute for the Blind, the school where Bridgman had been educated, which was then located in South Boston, Massachusetts. The school delegated teacher and former student Anne Sullivan, herself visually impaired and then only 20 years old, to try to open up Helen's mind. It was the beginning of a 49-year period of working together.

Sullivan demanded and got permission from Helen's father to isolate the girl from the rest of the family in a little house in their garden. Her first task was to instill discipline in the spoiled girl. Helen's big breakthrough in communication came one day when she realized that the motions her teacher was making on her palm, while running cool water over her palm from a pump, symbolized the idea of "water" and nearly exhausted Sullivan demanding the names of all the other familiar objects in her world (including her prized doll).

Anne was able to teach Helen to think intelligibly and to speak, using the Tadoma method: touching the lips of others as they spoke, feeling the vibrations, and spelling of alphabetical characters in the palm of Helen's hand. She also learned to read English, French, German, Greek, and Latin in braille.

Education

In 1888, Helen attended Perkins Institute for the Blind. In 1894, Helen and Anne moved to New York City to attend the Wright-Humason School for the Deaf. In 1898 they returned to Massachusetts and Helen entered The Cambridge School for Young Ladies before gaining admittance, in 1900, to Radcliffe College. In 1904 at the age of 24, Helen graduated from Radcliffe cum laude, becoming the first deaf and blind person to graduate from a college.

Helen Keller, graduation from Radcliffe College, c. 1904

Political activities

With tremendous willpower Helen went on to become a world-famous speaker and author. She made it her own life's mission to fight for the sensorially handicapped in the world. In 1915 she founded Helen Keller International, a non-profit organization for preventing blindness. Helen and Anne Sullivan traveled all over the world to over 39 countries, and made several trips to Japan, becoming a favorite of the Japanese people. Helen Keller met every U.S. President from Grover Cleveland to John F. Kennedy and was friends with many famous figures including Alexander Graham Bell, Charlie Chaplin and Mark Twain.

Helen Keller was a member of the socialist party and actively campaigned and wrote in support of the working classes from 1909 to 1921. She supported Socialist Party candidate Eugene V. Debs in each of his campaigns for the presidency. Her political views were reinforced by visiting workers. In her words, "I have visited sweatshops, factories, crowded slums. If I could not see it, I could smell it."

Newspaper columnists who had praised her courage and intelligence before she came out as a socialist now called attention to her disabilities. The editor of the Brooklyn Eagle wrote that her "mistakes sprung out of the manifest limitations of her development." Keller responded to that editor, referring to having met him before he knew of her political views:

"At that time the compliments he paid me were so generous that I blush to remember them. But now that I have come out for socialism he reminds me and the public that I am blind and deaf and especially liable to error. I must have shrunk in intelligence during the years since I met him...Oh, ridiculous Brooklyn Eagle! Socially blind and deaf, it defends an intolerable system, a system that is the cause of much of the physical blindness and deafness which we are trying to prevent."

Helen Keller also joined the industrial union, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), in 1912 after she felt that parliamentary socialism was "sinking in the political bog." Helen Keller wrote for the IWW between 1916 and 1918. In "Why I Became an IWW" Helen wrote that her motivation for activism came in part due to her concern about blindness and other disabilities:

"I was appointed on a commission to investigate the conditions of the blind. For the first time I, who had thought blindness a misfortune beyond human control, found that too much of it was traceable to wrong industrial conditions, often caused by the selfishness and greed of employers. And the social evil contributed its share. I found that poverty drove women to a life of shame that ended in blindness."

Helen Keller wrote glowingly of the emergence of communism during the Russian Revolution (See ISBN 0684818868). Her contacts with suspected communists were frequently investigated by the FBI.

In 1920 she was one of the founders of the American Civil Liberties Union. In the 1920s, she sent a hundred dollars to the NAACP with a letter of support that appeared in its magazine The Crisis.

In 1925 she addressed a convention of Lions Clubs International giving that organisation a major focus for its service work which still continues today.

Writings

In 1960 her book Light in my Darkness was published in which she advocated the teachings of Emanuel Swedenborg. She also wrote a lengthy autobiography. She wrote a total of eleven books, and authored numerous articles.

Honors

On September 14, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the United States' highest civilian honor.

Alabama honors her, a native daughter, on its state quarter [1].

Later life

Keller devoted much of her later life to raising funds for the American Foundation for the Blind.

Helen Keller died on June 1, 1968 at the age of 87, more than thirty years after the death of Anne Sullivan. She was cremated and her remains were placed in the Chapel of St. Joseph of Arimathea in Washington National Cathedral.

Helen Keller in the arts and popular culture

A silent film, Deliverance, first told Keller's story.

The Miracle Worker, a play about how Helen Keller learned to communicate, was made into a movie three times. The 1962 version of the movie won Academy Awards for Best Actress in a Leading Role for Anne Bancroft who played Sullivan and Best Actress in a Supporting Role for Patty Duke who played Keller.

Another recent movie about Helen Keller's life is The Miracle Continues. This semi-sequel to The Miracle Worker recounts her college years and her early adult life. None of the early movies hint at the social activism that would become the hallmark of Helen's later life, although the Disney version produced in 2000 states in the credits that Helen became an activist for social equality.

The Hindi movie Black released in 2005 was largely based on Keller's story, from her childhood to her graduation.

In the comedy cartoon series South Park Helen Keller's life was shown in a musical.

Her life and achievements are celebrated annually in Tuscumbia, her hometown, in the Helen Keller festival.

In the animated series Family Guy, the final scene from The Miracle Worker was shown in one episode with the characters speaking in binary.


This page about Helen Keller includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about Helen Keller
News stories about Helen Keller
External links for Helen Keller
Videos for Helen Keller
Wikis about Helen Keller
Discussion Groups about Helen Keller
Blogs about Helen Keller
Images of Helen Keller

In the animated series Family Guy, the final scene from The Miracle Worker was shown in one episode with the characters speaking in binary. Madison also appears on the $200 Series EE Savings Bond. Her life and achievements are celebrated annually in Tuscumbia, her hometown, in the Helen Keller festival. There were about twenty different varieties of $5000 bills issued between 1861 and 1946, and all but three had James Madison. In the comedy cartoon series South Park Helen Keller's life was shown in a musical. $5000 bill. The Hindi movie Black released in 2005 was largely based on Keller's story, from her childhood to her graduation. Madison's portrait was on the U.S.

None of the early movies hint at the social activism that would become the hallmark of Helen's later life, although the Disney version produced in 2000 states in the credits that Helen became an activist for social equality. Ralph Randolph Gurley. This semi-sequel to The Miracle Worker recounts her college years and her early adult life. Dr. Another recent movie about Helen Keller's life is The Miracle Continues. By the terms of his will [2], $2000 was bequeathed to the ACS through its agent Rev. The 1962 version of the movie won Academy Awards for Best Actress in a Leading Role for Anne Bancroft who played Sullivan and Best Actress in a Supporting Role for Patty Duke who played Keller. Madison was the first president of the American Colonization Society, which bought passage for free black Americans to the Society's colony in west Africa, Liberia.

The Miracle Worker, a play about how Helen Keller learned to communicate, was made into a movie three times. He died on June 28, 1836 of rheumatism and heart failure. A silent film, Deliverance, first told Keller's story. He was briefly the rector of Jefferson's University of Virginia, but spent most of his days farming. Joseph of Arimathea in Washington National Cathedral. After leaving office, Madison retired to Montpelier, his farm in Virginia. She was cremated and her remains were placed in the Chapel of St. Madison appointed the following Justices to the Supreme Court of the United States:.

Helen Keller died on June 1, 1968 at the age of 87, more than thirty years after the death of Anne Sullivan.
. Keller devoted much of her later life to raising funds for the American Foundation for the Blind.
. Alabama honors her, a native daughter, on its state quarter [1]. It was Dolley who is largely credited with inventing the role of "First Lady" as political ally to the president. Johnson awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the United States' highest civilian honor. In 1794, Madison married Dolley Payne Todd, who cut as attractive and vivacious a figure as he did a sickly and antisocial one.

On September 14, 1964, President Lyndon B. At 5 feet, 4 inches in height (163 cm) and 100 pounds (45 kg) in weight, Madison was the nation's shortest president and frequently ill. She wrote a total of eleven books, and authored numerous articles. It should be noted that although Madison would support internal improvement schemes only through constitutional amendment, he urged a variety of measures that he felt were "best executed under the national authority," including federal support for roads and canals that would "bind more closely together the various parts of our extended confederacy.". She also wrote a lengthy autobiography. Despite Madison's "last stand," so-called pork-barrel spending would soon become commonplace in the United States. In 1960 her book Light in my Darkness was published in which she advocated the teachings of Emanuel Swedenborg. Madison rejected the view of Congress that the General Welfare Clause justified the bill, stating:.

In 1925 she addressed a convention of Lions Clubs International giving that organisation a major focus for its service work which still continues today. In his last act before leaving office, Madison vetoed a bill for "internal improvements," including roads, bridges, and canals:. In the 1920s, she sent a hundred dollars to the NAACP with a letter of support that appeared in its magazine The Crisis. The major lasting effect for the political face of the country was the end of the Federalist Party, who were considered traitors when they opposed the war. In 1920 she was one of the founders of the American Civil Liberties Union. The Battle of New Orleans, in which Andrew Jackson distinguished himself, was fought 15 days after the treaty was signed — the news not reaching Louisiana in time from Belgium. Her contacts with suspected communists were frequently investigated by the FBI. In 1814, the Treaty of Ghent ended the war.

Helen Keller wrote glowingly of the emergence of communism during the Russian Revolution (See ISBN 0684818868). Neither side was terribly enthusiastic about the war, however: the British had little to gain, and in the United States, New England Federalists threatened secession if the war was not ended. I found that poverty drove women to a life of shame that ended in blindness.". The British also armed American Indians in the West, most notably followers of Tecumseh. And the social evil contributed its share. In the ensuing War of 1812, the British won numerous victories, including a temporary occupation of Washington, D.C., forcing Madison to flee the city. For the first time I, who had thought blindness a misfortune beyond human control, found that too much of it was traceable to wrong industrial conditions, often caused by the selfishness and greed of employers. In 1810, a bill was passed that would break off relations with any nation that would not remove the blockade: France did, and Britain did not.

"I was appointed on a commission to investigate the conditions of the blind. Both countries blockaded the ports of the other, preventing commerce with either. In "Why I Became an IWW" Helen wrote that her motivation for activism came in part due to her concern about blindness and other disabilities:. In the election of 1808, Madison ran for president in his own right, and won, largely on the strength of his abilities in foreign affairs at a time when United Kingdom (Britain) and France were both on the edge of war with the United States. Helen Keller also joined the industrial union, the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), in 1912 after she felt that parliamentary socialism was "sinking in the political bog." Helen Keller wrote for the IWW between 1916 and 1918. In 1797 Madison left Congress; in 1801 he became Jefferson's Secretary of State. I must have shrunk in intelligence during the years since I met him...Oh, ridiculous Brooklyn Eagle! Socially blind and deaf, it defends an intolerable system, a system that is the cause of much of the physical blindness and deafness which we are trying to prevent.". Opposed to the Democratic-Republicans was the Federalist party, whose members followed Hamilton and believed in a strong central government.

But now that I have come out for socialism he reminds me and the public that I am blind and deaf and especially liable to error. Madison was instrumental in the creation of the Democratic-Republican party, whose members supported Jefferson and believed strongly in limiting centralized power. "At that time the compliments he paid me were so generous that I blush to remember them. During Madison's time in Congress, the debate over the power of the federal government versus that of the states led to the formation of the first United States political parties. The editor of the Brooklyn Eagle wrote that her "mistakes sprung out of the manifest limitations of her development." Keller responded to that editor, referring to having met him before he knew of her political views:. One incident that demonstrates this desire is the debate over the Bank of the United States, in which Madison and other followers of Thomas Jefferson denied that the federal government had the power to form its own bank. Newspaper columnists who had praised her courage and intelligence before she came out as a socialist now called attention to her disabilities. The chief characteristic of Madison's time in Congress was his desire to limit the power of the federal government.

If I could not see it, I could smell it.". Of the first two proposals that were not ratified in 1791, the second one tardily became the 27th Amendment more than 200 years later in 1992. In her words, "I have visited sweatshops, factories, crowded slums. In 1789, he successfully offered a package of twelve proposed amendments to the Constitution, the final ten of which became what is collectively known as the Bill of Rights by December 15, 1791, based upon earlier work by George Mason. Her political views were reinforced by visiting workers. When the Constitution was ratified, Madison was elected to the United States House of Representatives from his home state of Virginia and served from the First Congress through the Fourth Congress, and was a member of the Democratic-Republican Party during his final term in the House. Debs in each of his campaigns for the presidency. In 1801, in his first Inaugural Address, Thomas Jefferson would express a similar sentiment:.

She supported Socialist Party candidate Eugene V. 51:. Helen Keller was a member of the socialist party and actively campaigned and wrote in support of the working classes from 1909 to 1921. His most famous passage comes in No. Kennedy and was friends with many famous figures including Alexander Graham Bell, Charlie Chaplin and Mark Twain. 51. President from Grover Cleveland to John F. 10 and Federalist No.

Helen Keller met every U.S. Madison wrote thirty of the eighty-five essays that comprise the Federalist Papers, including perhaps the two most famous, Federalist No. Helen and Anne Sullivan traveled all over the world to over 39 countries, and made several trips to Japan, becoming a favorite of the Japanese people. Madison's arguments were powerfully influenced by the political thought of Charles de Secondat, Baron de Montesquieu. In 1915 she founded Helen Keller International, a non-profit organization for preventing blindness. To support Constitutional ratification in New York State, Madison put aside his doubts to work with Alexander Hamilton and John Jay to write the Federalist Papers, which are considered the definitive contemporary commentary on the United States Constitution. She made it her own life's mission to fight for the sensorially handicapped in the world. His notes from the Constitutional Convention are the best documentary evidence we have as to the thinking of what Thomas Jefferson (who was in France at the time) called an "assembly of demi-gods.".

With tremendous willpower Helen went on to become a world-famous speaker and author. When the issue arose of how states would be represented in the new Congress, Madison was one of the strongest advocates of state representation depending on population. In 1904 at the age of 24, Helen graduated from Radcliffe cum laude, becoming the first deaf and blind person to graduate from a college. Madison was the best prepared delegate at the Constitutional Convention, and his overall influence at Philadelphia in 1787 has led some historians to call him the "Father of the Constitution." Madison called for a strong central government with a bicameral legislature. In 1898 they returned to Massachusetts and Helen entered The Cambridge School for Young Ladies before gaining admittance, in 1900, to Radcliffe College. In the 1780s, Madison helped convince the political leaders of the time to call for a convention to replace the ineffective Articles of Confederation. In 1894, Helen and Anne moved to New York City to attend the Wright-Humason School for the Deaf. In this capacity he became a prominent figure in Virginia state politics, helping to draft their declaration of religious freedom and persuading Virginia to give their northwestern territories (consisting of most of modern-day Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee) to the Continental Congress.

In 1888, Helen attended Perkins Institute for the Blind. When he regained his health, he became a protegé of Thomas Jefferson. She also learned to read English, French, German, Greek, and Latin in braille. In 1769, he left the plantation to attend Princeton University (it was called the College of New Jersey at the time), finishing its four-year course in two years, but exhausting himself from overwork in the process. Anne was able to teach Helen to think intelligibly and to speak, using the Tadoma method: touching the lips of others as they spoke, feeling the vibrations, and spelling of alphabetical characters in the palm of Helen's hand. (March 27, 1723 – February 27, 1801) and Eleanor Rose "Nellie" Conway (January 9, 1731 – February 11, 1829) were the prosperous owners of the tobacco plantation in Orange County, Virginia where Madison spent most of his childhood years. Helen's big breakthrough in communication came one day when she realized that the motions her teacher was making on her palm, while running cool water over her palm from a pump, symbolized the idea of "water" and nearly exhausted Sullivan demanding the names of all the other familiar objects in her world (including her prized doll). His parents Colonel James Madison, Sr.

Her first task was to instill discipline in the spoiled girl. Madison was born in King George County, Virginia. Sullivan demanded and got permission from Helen's father to isolate the girl from the rest of the family in a little house in their garden. . It was the beginning of a 49-year period of working together. He was co-author, with John Jay and Alexander Hamilton, of the Federalist Papers, and is traditionally regarded as the Father of the United States Constitution. The school delegated teacher and former student Anne Sullivan, herself visually impaired and then only 20 years old, to try to open up Helen's mind. James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was the fourth (1809–1817) President of the United States.

Bell advised the couple to contact the Perkins Institute for the Blind, the school where Bridgman had been educated, which was then located in South Boston, Massachusetts. James Madison: Writings by James Madison (1999, ISBN 1883011663). He put her in touch with local expert Alexander Graham Bell, who was working with deaf children at the time. Presidential religious affiliations. In 1886, her mother Kate Keller was inspired by an account in Charles Dickens' American Notes of the successful education of another deaf/blind child, Laura Bridgman, and travelled to a specialist doctor in Baltimore for advice. List of U.S. By age seven she had invented over sixty different signs that she could use to communicate with her family. List of places named for James Madison.

The illness did not last for a particularly long time, but it left her blind, deaf, and unable to speak. presidential election, 1812. It was not until nineteen months later that she came down with an illness that the doctors described as "an acute congestion of the stomach and the brain" - Scarlet Fever. U.S. She was not born blind and deaf, but was actually a typical, healthy infant. presidential election, 1808. Keller and Kate Adams Keller. U.S.

Keller was born at an estate called Ivy Green, on June 27, 1880 to parents Captain Arthur H. In our Governments, the real power lies in the majority of the Community, and the invasion of private rights is chiefly to be apprehended, not from the acts of Government contrary to the sense of its constituents, but from acts in which the Government is the mere instrument of the major number of the constituents." —Letter to Thomas Jefferson, October 17, 1788. . "Wherever the real power in a Government lies, there is the danger of oppression. Her loss of ability to communicate at such an early developmental age was very traumatic for her and her family and as a result she became quite unmanageable. The danger of silent accumulations and encroachments by ecclesiastical bodies has not sufficiently engaged attention in the U.S." —being outvoted in the bill to establish the office of Congressional Chaplain, from the "Detached Memoranda,". Her disabilities were caused by a fever in February, 1882 when she was 19 months old. The establishment of the chaplainship in Congress is a palpable violation of equal rights as well as of Constitutional principles.

Helen Keller was born in Tuscumbia, Alabama. "Besides the danger of a direct mixture of religion and civil government, there is an evil which ought to be guarded against in the indefinite accumulation of property from the capacity of holding it in perpetuity by ecclesiastical corporations. Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was a deafblind American author, activist and lecturer. Throughout all Europe, the armies kept up under the pretext of defending, have enslaved the people." —Constitutional Convention June 29, 1787. Among the Romans it was a standing maxim to excite a war, whenever a revolt was apprehended. foreign danger, have been always the instruments of tyranny at home.

The means of defence agst. "A standing military force, with an overgrown Executive will not long be safe companions to liberty. "I cannot undertake to lay my finger on that article of the Constitution which granted a right to Congress of expending, on objects of benevolence, the money of their constituents." —1794 (Pertaining to Congress' appropriation $15,000 for relief of French refugees). Charity is no part of the legislative duty of the government.".

It is not like the state governments, whose powers are more general. "...[T]he government of the United States is a definite government, confined to specified objects. That this Assembly doth explicitly and peremptorily declare, that it views the powers of the federal government, as resulting from the compact, to which the states are parties; as limited by the plain sense and intention of the instrument constituting the compact; as no further valid than they are authorized by the grants enumerated in that compact; and that in case of deliberate, palpable, and dangerous exercise of other powers, not granted by the said compact, the states who are parties thereto, have the right, and are in duty bound, to interpose for arresting the progress of the evil, and for maintaining within their respective limits, the authorities, rights and liberties appertaining to them.". "Resolved, That the General Assembly of Virginia, doth unequivocally express a firm resolution to maintain and defend the Constitution of the United States, and the Constitution of this State, against every aggression either foreign or domestic ..

Indiana – December 11, 1816. Louisiana – April 30, 1812. Joseph Story — 1812. Gabriel Duvall — 1811.

09-16-14 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php PAD File Directory Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Display all your websites in one place HereIam.tv Celebrity Homepages Charity Directory Google+ Directory Move your favorite Unsigned Artist to the Top of the List