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Gloria Grahame

Gloria Grahame (November 28, 1923 - October 5, 1981) was an American film actress.

Gloria Grahame

Born Gloria Hallward in Los Angeles, California, her mother Jean Grahame was a stage actress and acting teacher who taught Gloria acting during her childhood and adolescence. She was signed to a contact with MGM Studios after Louis B. Mayer saw her performing on Broadway. Changing her name to Gloria Grahame, she made her film debut in Blonde Fever (1944) and scored her most widely praised MGM role as the small town girl Violet, who is saved from a life of shame by George Bailey in It's A Wonderful Life (1946). MGM was not able to develop her potential as a star and her contract was sold to RKO Studios in 1947.

She received an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress nomination for Crossfire (1947), and won the same award for The Bad and the Beautiful (1952). Often regarded as a difficult actress, Grahame's career began to wane after her role in Oklahoma! (1955), although she continued to play supporting roles for the rest of her life in the United States, and also in the United Kingdom, where she resided for many years.

In 1981 Grahame collapsed during a rehearsal for a British stage play, and returned to New York City where she died soon after from cancer. She is interred in Oakwood Memorial Park Cemetery in Chatsworth, California.

Gloria Grahame has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for her contribution to Motion Pictures, at 6522 Hollywood Boulevard.


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Gloria Grahame has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for her contribution to Motion Pictures, at 6522 Hollywood Boulevard. 2002 - Winner - Munich Film Festival - CineMerit Award. She is interred in Oakwood Memorial Park Cemetery in Chatsworth, California. 2001 - Winner - If Awards - Best Actress - Lantana (shared with Kerry Armstrong, Rachel Blake, Daniella Farinacci and Leah Purcell). In 1981 Grahame collapsed during a rehearsal for a British stage play, and returned to New York City where she died soon after from cancer. 1999 - Nominee - Golden Satellite Awards - Best Actress in a TV Film - The Staircase. Often regarded as a difficult actress, Grahame's career began to wane after her role in Oklahoma! (1955), although she continued to play supporting roles for the rest of her life in the United States, and also in the United Kingdom, where she resided for many years. 1997 - Winner - National Society of Film Critics Awards USA - Best Supporting Actress - The Portrait of a Lady.

She received an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress nomination for Crossfire (1947), and won the same award for The Bad and the Beautiful (1952). 1997 - Nominee - Academy Awards - Best Supporting Actress - The Portrait of a Lady. MGM was not able to develop her potential as a star and her contract was sold to RKO Studios in 1947. 1997 - Nominee - Golden Globes - Best Supporting Actress - The Portrait of a Lady. Changing her name to Gloria Grahame, she made her film debut in Blonde Fever (1944) and scored her most widely praised MGM role as the small town girl Violet, who is saved from a life of shame by George Bailey in It's A Wonderful Life (1946). 1996 - Winner - Los Angeles Film Critics Association Awards - Best Supporting Actress - The Portrait of a Lady. Mayer saw her performing on Broadway. 1991 - Winner - Golden Globes - Best Actress in a TV Film - Killing in a Small Town.

She was signed to a contact with MGM Studios after Louis B. 1991 - Nominee - Emmy Awards - Outstanding Lead Actress in A Miniseries/TV Film - Paris Trout. Born Gloria Hallward in Los Angeles, California, her mother Jean Grahame was a stage actress and acting teacher who taught Gloria acting during her childhood and adolescence. 1990 - Winner - Emmy Awards - Outstanding Lead Actress In A Miniseries/TV Film - Killing in a Small Town. Gloria Grahame (November 28, 1923 - October 5, 1981) was an American film actress. 1989 - Nominee - Golden Globes - Best Supporting Actress - The Last Temptation of Christ. 1988 - Winner - Cannes Film Festival - Best Actress - A World Apart (shared with Jodhi May and Linda Mvusi).

1987 - Winner - Cannes Film Festival - Best Actress - Shy People. 1987 - Nominee - BAFTA Awards - Best Supporting Actress - Hannah and Her Sisters. 1970 - Nominee - Laurel Awards - Female New Face - Last Summer. 1967 - Winner - Western Heritage Awards - Fictional Television Drama - The Monroes (shared with cast and crew).

In what one hopes will not be her last hurrah as a film actress, she gave an unforgettable performance as Madame Merle in Jane Campion's 1996 adaptation of the Henry James novel "The Portrait of a Lady" - earning an Oscar nomination and winning the Best Supporting Actress award from the National Society of Film Critics. But as an actress in her forties, she was once more forced into smaller independent films and television work. In 1990 she won an Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Special for her harrowing turn as real-life murderer Candy Morrison in "A Killing in a Small Town". For her role in the 1988 Bette Midler sudser "Beaches", she injected collagen into her lips - an act that drew a ridiculous amount on negative media coverage.

In mid-decade, she followed the commercial success of "Hannah and Her Sisters" with unprecedented back-to-back wins for Best Actress at the Cannes Film Festival and Scorsese's long-awaited but fatally controversial "The Last Temptation of Christ". Her performance as Glynnis Yeager in Philip Kaufman's 1983 film of "The Right Stuff" marked the true beginning of her career renaissance. Yet even in such uninspiring material, Hershey found the means of a giving committed, affecting performance - sufficiently impressing Michael Douglas to have him later fight to have her cast as his estranged wife in "Falling Down". She would still need to pay dues in unglamorous vehicles like 1981's exploitation shocker "The Entity", where she played a woman repeatedly raped by an unseen supernatural force.

The road back to industry acceptance would not be short or smooth. But her excellent work in Richard Rush's 1980 critical favorite "The Stunt Man" - her first big screen appearance in four years - served as a reminder to Hollywood that there was still a notably beautiful and talented actress in their midst. However, the hippie label soon became a career impediment and by the late 1970s she was reduced to appearing in made-for-TV embarrassments like "Flood!" and "Sunshine Christmas". In characteristically free-spirited fashion, they would later recreate their love scene in a hay-filled boxcar for a Playboy magazine pictorial.

Hershey's co-star in "Boxcar Bertha" was once again David Carradine. Adapting that book into a film would become a 16 year labor of love for Scorsese, who would eventually cast Hershey as Mary Magdalene - though not before making her audition, to prove that she had earned it. This image helped secure her the starring role in the 1972 Roger Corman production "Boxcar Bertha", which was being directed on the cheap by a fresh-out-of-film-school talent named Martin Scorsese. During filming, Hershey gave Scorsese a copy of her favorite book - Nikos Kazantzakis's "The Last Temptation of Christ". Her 1970 film "The Baby Maker" explored the idea of surrogate motherhood many years before it became a mainstream reproductive option and cemented her image as a free-spirited hippie.

Hershey felt a sense of personal responsibility for its death and went by the name of Barbara Seagull for several years in the early 1970s as a tribute to the creature. During the filming of a scene for "Last Summer", a seagull was killed. Hershey's powerful performance as a manipulative queen bee made a large impression on Woody Allen, who would later foster her mid-80s career revival by casting her in his greatest commercial success "Hannah and Her Sisters". The film received an X rating for an unflinching rape scene and earned a Best Supporting Actress nomination for co-star Cathy Burns.

Later that year came the shocking drama "Last Summer", based on the novel by Evan Hunter (better known for his police procedurals written under the pseudonym Ed McBain) and directed by future "Mommy Dearest" helmsman Frank Perry. (He later chose the name Tom for himself.). They became a romantic couple and a prominent symbol of the Hollywood counterculture - famously naming their child Free. This was followed by the 1969 Glenn Ford western "Heaven With A Gun", where one of her co-stars was future "Kung Fu" star David Carradine.

Her feature film debut was in the 1968 comedy "With Six You Get Eggroll" - which also marked Doris Day's final screen appearance. She found working on "The Monroes" to be such a dispiriting experience that she wrote pseudonymous letters to the producers asking that the show be cancelled. Her debut was guest starring in three episodes of Gidget in 1965, which she followed up with roles in the television series The Monroes (1966). She attended Hollywood High School and quickly found her vocation.

One of America's most accomplished actresses, Barbara Hershey was born Barbara Herzstein on February 5, 1948 in Hollywood, California where her father was a professional gambler. 5 February 1948) known for her many film roles. Barbara Hershey is an American actress (b.

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