This page will contain wikis about Dr. Hook, as they become available.

Dr. Hook & The Medicine Show

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Dr. Hook & the Medicine Show is a pop-country rock band formed in Union City, New Jersey in 1968. The original lineup consisted of core members Ray Sawyer and Dennis Locorriere. Bill Francis, John David, and George Cummings were also part of the original band, but their lineup changed quite a bit over the years. Other members include Jance Garfat, Rik Elswit, and Jay David. Sawyer was particularly noticeable due to his trademark cowboy hat and the eyepatch he wore due to a car accident in 1967. The band name is a reference to Captain Hook from Peter Pan; in fact, the original name proposed for the band was "Captain Hook and the Medicine Show".

The band hooked up with composer Shel Silverstein when their manager sent in a demo tape to Ron Haffkine, who was in charge of doing the music for the movie Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me? Silverstein was writing songs for the film, and he and Haffkine both liked the demo enough to get the band to do all the songs for the movie. Haffkine also became their new manager and got the band a record deal. Silverstein composed most of the songs on their first few albums.

"Sylvia's Mother," a ballad from their first album, became a big hit, and "Cover of the Rolling Stone" from the followup album, "Sloppy Seconds" attracted the attention of those who would like their silly stage show and its monologues done as fictional characters. It also got the band on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, although as a caricature rather than a photograph.

The band toured constantly but spent all the money they earned on partying; their fifh album was aptly called "Bankrupt". Eventually they shortened the band's name to "Dr. Hook", and their chart hits became mostly ballads (including "The Ballad of Lucy Jordan").

Sawyer left in 1983, and the band continued to tour for two more years before completely splitting up in 1985. In the 1990s, Sawyer went back on the road as "Dr. Hook featuring Ray Sawyer" after doing a few country records under his own name. Locorriere spent a few years relaxing, and then in 1989 performed a one-man show written by Shel Silverstein, "The Devil and Billy Markham," which made him enthusiastic to be on stage again. Since then he's released a few solo albums and toured, promoting himself as "the voice of Dr. Hook."


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Since then he's released a few solo albums and toured, promoting himself as "the voice of Dr. Hook.". She can be featured on the hit single with rapper Twista titled "Hope" on the Coach Carter soundtrack. Locorriere spent a few years relaxing, and then in 1989 performed a one-man show written by Shel Silverstein, "The Devil and Billy Markham," which made him enthusiastic to be on stage again. Now signed to Capitol Records after her tenure with Bad Boy ended in 2003, she will release her fourth album, The First Lady this spring. Hook featuring Ray Sawyer" after doing a few country records under his own name. They later were granted misdemeanors and paid for their crime. In the 1990s, Sawyer went back on the road as "Dr. In 2004, Evans and her husband got into trouble when the couple was arrested for having marijuana in their car.

Sawyer left in 1983, and the band continued to tour for two more years before completely splitting up in 1985. The video was a remix of the song, which featured extra raps from Missy Elliott, in addition to Loon, and garnered substantial MTV2 play throughout the summer of 2002. Hook", and their chart hits became mostly ballads (including "The Ballad of Lucy Jordan"). "Burnin' Up", the album's third single, featured Bad Boy rapper Loon and was successful on urban radio, despite failing to make the pop charts. The band toured constantly but spent all the money they earned on partying; their fifh album was aptly called "Bankrupt". Eventually they shortened the band's name to "Dr. The next single, a tender ballad called "I Love You", was released in early 2002 and achieved moderate pop success--a first for a Faith Evans single. It also got the band on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, although as a caricature rather than a photograph. In late 2001, Evans released her third album, which spawned the successful urban single "You Gets No Love".

"Sylvia's Mother," a ballad from their first album, became a big hit, and "Cover of the Rolling Stone" from the followup album, "Sloppy Seconds" attracted the attention of those who would like their silly stage show and its monologues done as fictional characters. The same year, she was featured on Carl Thomas' single, "Can't Believe". Silverstein composed most of the songs on their first few albums. members Ja Rule, Vita, and Cadillac Tah. Haffkine also became their new manager and got the band a record deal. In early 2001, Evans released "Good Life", a single from the Fast And The Furious soundtrack, which featured rap from Murder Inc. The band hooked up with composer Shel Silverstein when their manager sent in a demo tape to Ron Haffkine, who was in charge of doing the music for the movie Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me? Silverstein was writing songs for the film, and he and Haffkine both liked the demo enough to get the band to do all the songs for the movie. The album's third single, "Never Gonna Let You Go", was less successful.

The band name is a reference to Captain Hook from Peter Pan; in fact, the original name proposed for the band was "Captain Hook and the Medicine Show". Diddy, both of which failed to catch on with mainstream radio despite performing substantially at urban radio. Sawyer was particularly noticeable due to his trademark cowboy hat and the eyepatch he wore due to a car accident in 1967. It produced the singles "Love Like This" and "All Night Long", featuring P. Other members include Jance Garfat, Rik Elswit, and Jay David. Evans' sophomore album, Keep The Faith, was released in 1999. Bill Francis, John David, and George Cummings were also part of the original band, but their lineup changed quite a bit over the years. Although Evans had had previous urban successes, this song was the first that mainstream America heard of her.

The original lineup consisted of core members Ray Sawyer and Dennis Locorriere. Diddy in recording "I'll Be Missing You", a touching song which sampled The Police's "Every Breath You Take" and acted as a fitting tribute to the late Notorious B.I.G. Hook & the Medicine Show is a pop-country rock band formed in Union City, New Jersey in 1968. After her husband's murder in early 1997, Evans joined 112 and P. Dr. The album also contained a duet with Blige on a cover of Rose Royce's disco hit, "Love Don't Live Here Anymore". Its singles, "Soon As I Get Home", "You Used To Love Me", "Come Over", and "Ain't Nobody" became smashes at urban radio that year and into 1996.

With Diddy's full concentration on Evans, the First Lady of Bad Boy's debut album, Faith Evans was released in early 1995. Diddy started to spend more time working on Faith's upcoming album than work with Blige at the time who was visibly upset over what she saw as a disrespect on Diddy's part, she parted from Diddy in 1995 but would be present on Faith's first album writing several singles for her as Faith had done on Blige's 1994 album, My Life. (who was one of Diddy's closet friends) slowly became closer, P. As Evans and B.I.G.

Blige and Aaliyah, Evans sang the chorus on the popular remix of B.I.G.'s single "One More Chance". Along with other premier female soul singers at the time, Mary J. Diddy's successful Bad Boy record label. Faith Evans was considered an R&B superstar for much of the early and mid '90s, as part of P.

She is most often remembered for being the widow of the late rapper, Notorious B.I.G. Faith Evans (born June 10, 1973) is an R&B singer from Newark, New Jersey, who achieved fame in the early 1990s.

07-30-15 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/browse2000.php Business Search Directory Real Estate Database WebExposure.us Google+ Directory Dan Schmidt is a keyboardist, composer, songwriter, and producer.