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Dr. Hook & The Medicine Show

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Dr. Hook & the Medicine Show is a pop-country rock band formed in Union City, New Jersey in 1968. The original lineup consisted of core members Ray Sawyer and Dennis Locorriere. Bill Francis, John David, and George Cummings were also part of the original band, but their lineup changed quite a bit over the years. Other members include Jance Garfat, Rik Elswit, and Jay David. Sawyer was particularly noticeable due to his trademark cowboy hat and the eyepatch he wore due to a car accident in 1967. The band name is a reference to Captain Hook from Peter Pan; in fact, the original name proposed for the band was "Captain Hook and the Medicine Show".

The band hooked up with composer Shel Silverstein when their manager sent in a demo tape to Ron Haffkine, who was in charge of doing the music for the movie Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me? Silverstein was writing songs for the film, and he and Haffkine both liked the demo enough to get the band to do all the songs for the movie. Haffkine also became their new manager and got the band a record deal. Silverstein composed most of the songs on their first few albums.

"Sylvia's Mother," a ballad from their first album, became a big hit, and "Cover of the Rolling Stone" from the followup album, "Sloppy Seconds" attracted the attention of those who would like their silly stage show and its monologues done as fictional characters. It also got the band on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, although as a caricature rather than a photograph.

The band toured constantly but spent all the money they earned on partying; their fifh album was aptly called "Bankrupt". Eventually they shortened the band's name to "Dr. Hook", and their chart hits became mostly ballads (including "The Ballad of Lucy Jordan").

Sawyer left in 1983, and the band continued to tour for two more years before completely splitting up in 1985. In the 1990s, Sawyer went back on the road as "Dr. Hook featuring Ray Sawyer" after doing a few country records under his own name. Locorriere spent a few years relaxing, and then in 1989 performed a one-man show written by Shel Silverstein, "The Devil and Billy Markham," which made him enthusiastic to be on stage again. Since then he's released a few solo albums and toured, promoting himself as "the voice of Dr. Hook."


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Since then he's released a few solo albums and toured, promoting himself as "the voice of Dr. Hook.". Jimmy Arnold died of lung cancer in Sacramento, California at the age of 72. Locorriere spent a few years relaxing, and then in 1989 performed a one-man show written by Shel Silverstein, "The Devil and Billy Markham," which made him enthusiastic to be on stage again. They were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2003. Hook featuring Ray Sawyer" after doing a few country records under his own name. Their most famous hit was "Moments to Remember" in 1955, and their next best known was "Standin' on the Corner" in 1956. In the 1990s, Sawyer went back on the road as "Dr. Today, a reconsituted group, with original singer Frank Busseri, sings to the nostalgia crowds.

Sawyer left in 1983, and the band continued to tour for two more years before completely splitting up in 1985. In 1953 they made their own first gold record, "Istanbul", which launched them to stardom and kept them busy throughout the 50s and 60s in the USA and Canada. Hook", and their chart hits became mostly ballads (including "The Ballad of Lucy Jordan"). This made them well known. The band toured constantly but spent all the money they earned on partying; their fifh album was aptly called "Bankrupt". Eventually they shortened the band's name to "Dr. One unknown artist Johnnie Ray, became a major hit with "Cry" and "The Little White Cloud that Cried" with the Four Lads behind him. It also got the band on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, although as a caricature rather than a photograph. In 1950 they began to sing in local clubs and soon were noticed by scouts. Recruited to go to New York, they were noticed by Mitch Miller, who asked them to do backup for some of the artists he recorded.

"Sylvia's Mother," a ballad from their first album, became a big hit, and "Cover of the Rolling Stone" from the followup album, "Sloppy Seconds" attracted the attention of those who would like their silly stage show and its monologues done as fictional characters. They originally called themselves The Four Dukes but found out that a Detroit group already used that name, so changed to The Four Lads. Silverstein composed most of the songs on their first few albums. At home, they practiced until they achieved their clean-cut harmonies, whether for spirituals, sacred music, or pop. Haffkine also became their new manager and got the band a record deal. When Maugeri and Perkins left the group to concentrate on their schoolwork, Codarini and Toorish joined with Arnold and Busseri in a new quartet. The band hooked up with composer Shel Silverstein when their manager sent in a demo tape to Ron Haffkine, who was in charge of doing the music for the movie Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me? Silverstein was writing songs for the film, and he and Haffkine both liked the demo enough to get the band to do all the songs for the movie. The group was known variously as The Otnorots (a name taken from the name "Toronto" spelled backwards) and The Jordonaires (not to be confused with a similarly named group, The Jordanaires, that was known for singing background vocals on Elvis Presley's hits).

The band name is a reference to Captain Hook from Peter Pan; in fact, the original name proposed for the band was "Captain Hook and the Medicine Show". Michael's students, Rudi Maugeri and John Perkins, who were later to become founding members of another group, The Crew-Cuts. Sawyer was particularly noticeable due to his trademark cowboy hat and the eyepatch he wore due to a car accident in 1967. Codarini and Toorish had formed a group with two other St. Other members include Jance Garfat, Rik Elswit, and Jay David. "Jimmy" Arnold, (January 4, 1932-June 15, 2004) first tenor; and Frank Busseri, baritone and group manager. Bill Francis, John David, and George Cummings were also part of the original band, but their lineup changed quite a bit over the years. Michael's Cathedral Choir School, where they learned to sing. The founding members were Corrado "Connie" Codarini, bass; John Bernard "Bernie" Toorish (born March 2, 1931), lead; James F.

The original lineup consisted of core members Ray Sawyer and Dennis Locorriere. They grew up together in Toronto, Ontario, and were members of St. Hook & the Medicine Show is a pop-country rock band formed in Union City, New Jersey in 1968. The Four Lads were a singing group. Dr. There's Only One Of You (1958). The Mocking Bird (1952).

The Girl On Page 44 (1959). The Fountain Of Youth (1959). The Bus Stop Song (Paper of Pins) (1956). Skokiaan (1954).

Put A Light In The Window (1957). My Little Angel (1956) (flip side of Standin' on the Corner). I'll Never Know (1956). I Just Don't Know (1957).

Happy Anniversary (1959). Gilly Gilly Ossenfeffer Katzenellen Bogen By The Sea (1954). Enchanted Island (1958). Down By The Riverside (1953).

A House With Love In It (1956). Who Needs You? (1957). Standin' on the Corner (1956). No, Not Much (1956).

Moments to Remember (1955). Istanbul (1953).

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