This page will contain news stories about Dr. Hook, as they become available.

Dr. Hook & The Medicine Show

(Redirected from Dr. Hook)

Dr. Hook & the Medicine Show is a pop-country rock band formed in Union City, New Jersey in 1968. The original lineup consisted of core members Ray Sawyer and Dennis Locorriere. Bill Francis, John David, and George Cummings were also part of the original band, but their lineup changed quite a bit over the years. Other members include Jance Garfat, Rik Elswit, and Jay David. Sawyer was particularly noticeable due to his trademark cowboy hat and the eyepatch he wore due to a car accident in 1967. The band name is a reference to Captain Hook from Peter Pan; in fact, the original name proposed for the band was "Captain Hook and the Medicine Show".

The band hooked up with composer Shel Silverstein when their manager sent in a demo tape to Ron Haffkine, who was in charge of doing the music for the movie Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me? Silverstein was writing songs for the film, and he and Haffkine both liked the demo enough to get the band to do all the songs for the movie. Haffkine also became their new manager and got the band a record deal. Silverstein composed most of the songs on their first few albums.

"Sylvia's Mother," a ballad from their first album, became a big hit, and "Cover of the Rolling Stone" from the followup album, "Sloppy Seconds" attracted the attention of those who would like their silly stage show and its monologues done as fictional characters. It also got the band on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, although as a caricature rather than a photograph.

The band toured constantly but spent all the money they earned on partying; their fifh album was aptly called "Bankrupt". Eventually they shortened the band's name to "Dr. Hook", and their chart hits became mostly ballads (including "The Ballad of Lucy Jordan").

Sawyer left in 1983, and the band continued to tour for two more years before completely splitting up in 1985. In the 1990s, Sawyer went back on the road as "Dr. Hook featuring Ray Sawyer" after doing a few country records under his own name. Locorriere spent a few years relaxing, and then in 1989 performed a one-man show written by Shel Silverstein, "The Devil and Billy Markham," which made him enthusiastic to be on stage again. Since then he's released a few solo albums and toured, promoting himself as "the voice of Dr. Hook."


This page about Dr. Hook includes information from a Wikipedia article.
Additional articles about Dr. Hook
News stories about Dr. Hook
External links for Dr. Hook
Videos for Dr. Hook
Wikis about Dr. Hook
Discussion Groups about Dr. Hook
Blogs about Dr. Hook
Images of Dr. Hook

Since then he's released a few solo albums and toured, promoting himself as "the voice of Dr. Hook.". Band leaders Mick Fleetwood and John McVie are the only original members still with the group. Locorriere spent a few years relaxing, and then in 1989 performed a one-man show written by Shel Silverstein, "The Devil and Billy Markham," which made him enthusiastic to be on stage again. The album debuted at #3 on the Billboard 200 and a well-attended arena tour lasted through 2004. Hook featuring Ray Sawyer" after doing a few country records under his own name. In 2003 McVie left the band permanently to focus on her solo career, leaving Buckingham and Nicks to handle the vocals for the band's latest album, Say You Will. In the 1990s, Sawyer went back on the road as "Dr. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inducted Fleetwood Mac in 1998.

Sawyer left in 1983, and the band continued to tour for two more years before completely splitting up in 1985. This would be the final time the 1970s incarnation would perform with Christine McVie. Hook", and their chart hits became mostly ballads (including "The Ballad of Lucy Jordan"). A hugely successful stadium tour followed the MTV premiere of The Dance which kept the reunited Mac on the road throughout much of 1997. The band toured constantly but spent all the money they earned on partying; their fifh album was aptly called "Bankrupt". Eventually they shortened the band's name to "Dr. The second time was for a live concert in Los Angeles which resulted in the 1997 album The Dance. It also got the band on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, although as a caricature rather than a photograph. The first time was for the inauguration of President Bill Clinton, who had made Fleetwood Mac's Don't Stop his campaign song.

"Sylvia's Mother," a ballad from their first album, became a big hit, and "Cover of the Rolling Stone" from the followup album, "Sloppy Seconds" attracted the attention of those who would like their silly stage show and its monologues done as fictional characters. The Buckingham/Nicks/McVie(s)/Fleetwood lineup would reunite from time to time in the 1990s. Silverstein composed most of the songs on their first few albums. Unfortunately, Behind The Mask failed to make gold, and it is often seen by music critics as a low point for the band in the absence of Lindsey Buckingham. Haffkine also became their new manager and got the band a record deal. Fleetwood Mac added guitarists Billy Burnette and Rick Vito and recorded more albums through the late 1980s and early 1990s, beginning with Behind The Mask, in which the group went for an edgier sound (as evidenced by the Nicks-composed single "Love Is Dangerous"). The band hooked up with composer Shel Silverstein when their manager sent in a demo tape to Ron Haffkine, who was in charge of doing the music for the movie Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me? Silverstein was writing songs for the film, and he and Haffkine both liked the demo enough to get the band to do all the songs for the movie. They would record one more album (Tango In The Night, 1987, which featured McVie's "Little Lies" and "Welcome To The Room, Sara", Nicks' sequel to Tusk's earlier track "Sara") before Buckingham officially quit the band.

The band name is a reference to Captain Hook from Peter Pan; in fact, the original name proposed for the band was "Captain Hook and the Medicine Show". The band would release further albums, including the quirky double album Tusk in 1979 (which spawned three hit singles, Nicks' seven-minute opus "Sara" [cut to three-and-a-half minutes for the first CD version release--it has since been restored for CD reissue], McVie's "Never Forget", and Buckingham's title track), a live album (Live, 1980) and the more conventional Mirage (which included Buckingham's "Hold Me" and Nicks' "Gypsy") before going on a hiatus, allowing for the solo careers of Buckingham, Nicks, and Christine McVie. Sawyer was particularly noticeable due to his trademark cowboy hat and the eyepatch he wore due to a car accident in 1967. It spawned more hit singles than its predecessor, including Buckingham's "Go Your Own Way", Nicks' "Dreams", "Gold Dust Woman" and "The Chain" (the latter song credited to the entire group, but actually composed by Nicks), and McVie's "You Make Loving Fun" & "Don't Stop" (the group's signature song that usually closed their live concerts). Other members include Jance Garfat, Rik Elswit, and Jay David. It became the best selling album of its time, selling over 18 million copies worldwide. The RIAA certified Rumours as a diamond album. Bill Francis, John David, and George Cummings were also part of the original band, but their lineup changed quite a bit over the years. The resulting concept album was Rumours in 1977, in which the band laid bare the emotional turmoil of the time.

The original lineup consisted of core members Ray Sawyer and Dennis Locorriere. Huge additional pressures were placed on the band to release a followup album, which, when combined with the newly found wealth, led to large amounts of drug and alcohol consumption. Hook & the Medicine Show is a pop-country rock band formed in Union City, New Jersey in 1968. But in 1976, with the success of the band also came the end of John and Christine McVie's marriage, as well as Buckingham and Nicks' longtime romantic relationship. Dr. Among the hit singles from this album included McVie's "Over My Head" & "Say You Love Me", and Nicks' "Rhiannon (Will You Ever Win)". The album proved to be a breakthrough for the band and thus became a huge hit, and the group was catapulted into stardom.

In 1975, the new lineup released the eponymous Fleetwood Mac. Buckingham agreed, on the condition that his musical partner and girlfriend Stevie Nicks also be invited to the band. Having heard guitarist Lindsey Buckingham's skills, he asked Buckingham to join the band. To show Mick Fleetwood his mixing skills, Keith Olsen played a track for Fleetwood titled "Frozen Love", which he had mixed for Buckingham Nicks (Album Title: Buckingham Nicks PD 5058, Released in September 1973).

In late 1974, Bob Welch left the band, and Mick Fleetwood was left to fill the vacancy. Some of Fleetwood Mac's early hits in the Welch era include "Sentimental Lady" (from 1972's Bare Trees), which Welch himself remade during his solo career in 1977, and the stirring "Hypnotized" (from 1973's Mystery To Me). When American guitarist Bob Welch joined them, the band adopted more of a southern California country rock sound, still tempered by the blues influence of the British members. Fleetwood Mac went through many personnel changes, losing multiple lead guitarists (including Peter Green) and gaining blues singer Christine McVie (John McVie's wife).

hit). Early singles included "Oh, Well", "Albatross", and "Black Magic Woman" (which was re-recorded by Santana and became a U.S. Fleetwood Mac would release a series of straightforward blues albums which did moderately well in the United Kingdom. They were then joined by Jeremy Spencer.

The group began as Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac in 1968 by guitarist Peter Green, drummer Mick Fleetwood, and bassist John McVie, after the three left (or were fired from) John Mayall's Bluesbreakers.
Fleetwood Mac is a rock group led by Mick Fleetwood and John McVie (whose names partially form the group's name), who had their biggest hits in the 1970s. Say You Will (Warner, 2003). The Very Best of Fleetwood Mac (Warner, 2002).

The Dance (Reprise, 1998). Time (Warner, 1995). 25 Years - The Chain (Warner, 1992). Behind the Mask (Reprise, 1990).

Greatest Hits (Reprise, 1988). Tango in the Night (Reprise, 1987). Mirage (Reprise, 1982). Live (Reprise, 1980).

Tusk (Reprise, 1979). Rumours (Reprise, 1977). Fleetwood Mac (Reprise, 1975). Heroes are Hard To Find (Reprise, 1974).

Penguin (Reprise, 1973). Mystery To Me (Reprise, 1973). Bare Trees (Reprise, 1972). Future Games (Reprise, 1971).

Kiln House (Reprise, 1970). Then Play On (Reprise, 1969). English Rose (Epic, 1969). Wonderful (Epic, 1968).

Mr. Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac (Blue Horizon, 1968).

07-30-14 FTPPro Support FTPPro looks and feels just like Windows Explorer Contact FTPPro FTPPro Help Topics FTPPro Terms Of Use ftppro.com/1stzip.php ftppro.com/zip ftppro.com/browse2000.php PAD File Directory Business Search Directory Real Estate Database FunWebsites.org PressArchive.net WebExposure.us Display all your websites in one place HereIam.tv Celebrity Homepages Charity Directory Google+ Directory Move your favorite Unsigned Artist to the Top of the List Bet Real Money Heads-Up Against Other Users