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Dr. Hook & The Medicine Show

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Dr. Hook & the Medicine Show is a pop-country rock band formed in Union City, New Jersey in 1968. The original lineup consisted of core members Ray Sawyer and Dennis Locorriere. Bill Francis, John David, and George Cummings were also part of the original band, but their lineup changed quite a bit over the years. Other members include Jance Garfat, Rik Elswit, and Jay David. Sawyer was particularly noticeable due to his trademark cowboy hat and the eyepatch he wore due to a car accident in 1967. The band name is a reference to Captain Hook from Peter Pan; in fact, the original name proposed for the band was "Captain Hook and the Medicine Show".

The band hooked up with composer Shel Silverstein when their manager sent in a demo tape to Ron Haffkine, who was in charge of doing the music for the movie Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me? Silverstein was writing songs for the film, and he and Haffkine both liked the demo enough to get the band to do all the songs for the movie. Haffkine also became their new manager and got the band a record deal. Silverstein composed most of the songs on their first few albums.

"Sylvia's Mother," a ballad from their first album, became a big hit, and "Cover of the Rolling Stone" from the followup album, "Sloppy Seconds" attracted the attention of those who would like their silly stage show and its monologues done as fictional characters. It also got the band on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, although as a caricature rather than a photograph.

The band toured constantly but spent all the money they earned on partying; their fifh album was aptly called "Bankrupt". Eventually they shortened the band's name to "Dr. Hook", and their chart hits became mostly ballads (including "The Ballad of Lucy Jordan").

Sawyer left in 1983, and the band continued to tour for two more years before completely splitting up in 1985. In the 1990s, Sawyer went back on the road as "Dr. Hook featuring Ray Sawyer" after doing a few country records under his own name. Locorriere spent a few years relaxing, and then in 1989 performed a one-man show written by Shel Silverstein, "The Devil and Billy Markham," which made him enthusiastic to be on stage again. Since then he's released a few solo albums and toured, promoting himself as "the voice of Dr. Hook."


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Since then he's released a few solo albums and toured, promoting himself as "the voice of Dr. Hook.". Earth Wind & Fire was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000, and into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2003. Locorriere spent a few years relaxing, and then in 1989 performed a one-man show written by Shel Silverstein, "The Devil and Billy Markham," which made him enthusiastic to be on stage again. The albums first single is "Show Me the Way", featuring Raphael Saadiq [1] (http://www.philipbailey.com/). Hook featuring Ray Sawyer" after doing a few country records under his own name. A new album, Illuminated, is scheduled for release in 2005. In the 1990s, Sawyer went back on the road as "Dr. In the summer of 2004, Earth, Wind & Fire signed an exlusive record deal with Sanctuary Urban Records Group, owned by Matthew Knowles, father and manager of pop star Beyoncé.

Sawyer left in 1983, and the band continued to tour for two more years before completely splitting up in 1985. The Promise received good reveiws upon its release, and was first issued in the United States and Japan; it was issued in Europe in early 2004. Hook", and their chart hits became mostly ballads (including "The Ballad of Lucy Jordan"). Maurice White released two new Earth, Wind & Fire albums on his own label, Kalimba Records, in 2002: Live In Rio, a live album from a 1980 tour, and The Promise, the band's first all-new studio album in six years. The band toured constantly but spent all the money they earned on partying; their fifh album was aptly called "Bankrupt". Eventually they shortened the band's name to "Dr. Five years later, Maurice White was diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease. It also got the band on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, although as a caricature rather than a photograph. In 1993, saxonphonist Don Myrick was fatally shot by the Los Angeles Police Department in a case of mistaken identity.

"Sylvia's Mother," a ballad from their first album, became a big hit, and "Cover of the Rolling Stone" from the followup album, "Sloppy Seconds" attracted the attention of those who would like their silly stage show and its monologues done as fictional characters. The band continued to periodically release new albums, including 1990's Heritage and 1993's Millennium in 1993. Silverstein composed most of the songs on their first few albums. A 1987 Earth, Wind & Fire reunion was a mild success, but the band was never able to return to the kind of success they had achieved in the 1970s. Haffkine also became their new manager and got the band a record deal. White disbanded Earth, Wind & Fire in 1983 after Electric Universe was released to poor sales and reviews. The band hooked up with composer Shel Silverstein when their manager sent in a demo tape to Ron Haffkine, who was in charge of doing the music for the movie Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me? Silverstein was writing songs for the film, and he and Haffkine both liked the demo enough to get the band to do all the songs for the movie. Two years later, the band released the critically acclaimed I Am with the mainstream ballad "After The Love Is Gone". After the releases of Faces (1980) and Raise! (1981), which featured the popular single "Let's Groove", the band's success started to wane.

The band name is a reference to Captain Hook from Peter Pan; in fact, the original name proposed for the band was "Captain Hook and the Medicine Show". Earth Wind & Fire released Spirit in 1976; and had hits with singles such as "Getaway" and "Imagine." In 1977, the group released another classic album, All 'N All, featuring songs such as "I Write A Song", "Serpentine Fire", "Love's Holiday", and the pop hit "Fantasy." Not long after its release, producer and songwriter Charles Stepney died of a heart attack. Sawyer was particularly noticeable due to his trademark cowboy hat and the eyepatch he wore due to a car accident in 1967. New studio hits such as "Sing A Song" and "Can't Hide Love" were also included. Other members include Jance Garfat, Rik Elswit, and Jay David. Also in 1975, Earth, Wind & Fire released Gratitude, a live album which featured performances of singles from previous albums such as "Sun Goddess" with jazz legend Ramsey Lewis, "Shining Star", and the quiet storm classic "Reasons". Bill Francis, John David, and George Cummings were also part of the original band, but their lineup changed quite a bit over the years. Though the film was not a success, the song "Shining Star" became a huge mainstream hit and launched the band's career.

The original lineup consisted of core members Ray Sawyer and Dennis Locorriere. Earth, Wind & Fire's true breakthrough, however, came in the form of the soundtrack to That's the Way of the World in 1975. Hook & the Medicine Show is a pop-country rock band formed in Union City, New Jersey in 1968. The Head to the Sky album (1973) was a moderate success, but 1974's Open Our Eyes was a major hit. Dr. At this time, Claves, Lawsm and Bautista left the band, and Andrew Woolfolk, Al McKay, and Johnny Graham were added to the lineup. The new line-up was signed to CBS Records by Clive Davis and released Last Days and Time without much success.

In 1972, White dissolved the line-up (minus himself and brother Verdine White), and added Jessica Cleaves (vocals),Ronnie Laws (flute, saxophone), Larry Dunn (keyboard), Ralph Johnson (percussion) and Philip Bailey (vocals, formerly of Friends & Love). However, neither album was commercially successful. Their self-titled debut album, Earth, Wind & Fire, was released in 1970 to great critical acclaim, as was The Need of Love (1971). White moved his band to Los Angeles, California and changed its name to "Earth, Wind & Fire".

After spending time as a member of the Ramsey Lewis Trio, he formed a band called The Salty Peppers and signed to Capitol Records, releasing a regionally successful single called "La La Time". Bandleader Maurice White began his recording career as a session drummer, working for Chess Records. Led by Maurice White, they are best known for their hits of the 1970s, among them "After the Love is Gone", "Reasons", and "Shining Star". Earth, Wind & Fire is a legendary American funk band, formed in Chicago in 1969.

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