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Dr. Hook & The Medicine Show

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Dr. Hook & the Medicine Show is a pop-country rock band formed in Union City, New Jersey in 1968. The original lineup consisted of core members Ray Sawyer and Dennis Locorriere. Bill Francis, John David, and George Cummings were also part of the original band, but their lineup changed quite a bit over the years. Other members include Jance Garfat, Rik Elswit, and Jay David. Sawyer was particularly noticeable due to his trademark cowboy hat and the eyepatch he wore due to a car accident in 1967. The band name is a reference to Captain Hook from Peter Pan; in fact, the original name proposed for the band was "Captain Hook and the Medicine Show".

The band hooked up with composer Shel Silverstein when their manager sent in a demo tape to Ron Haffkine, who was in charge of doing the music for the movie Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me? Silverstein was writing songs for the film, and he and Haffkine both liked the demo enough to get the band to do all the songs for the movie. Haffkine also became their new manager and got the band a record deal. Silverstein composed most of the songs on their first few albums.

"Sylvia's Mother," a ballad from their first album, became a big hit, and "Cover of the Rolling Stone" from the followup album, "Sloppy Seconds" attracted the attention of those who would like their silly stage show and its monologues done as fictional characters. It also got the band on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, although as a caricature rather than a photograph.

The band toured constantly but spent all the money they earned on partying; their fifh album was aptly called "Bankrupt". Eventually they shortened the band's name to "Dr. Hook", and their chart hits became mostly ballads (including "The Ballad of Lucy Jordan").

Sawyer left in 1983, and the band continued to tour for two more years before completely splitting up in 1985. In the 1990s, Sawyer went back on the road as "Dr. Hook featuring Ray Sawyer" after doing a few country records under his own name. Locorriere spent a few years relaxing, and then in 1989 performed a one-man show written by Shel Silverstein, "The Devil and Billy Markham," which made him enthusiastic to be on stage again. Since then he's released a few solo albums and toured, promoting himself as "the voice of Dr. Hook."


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Since then he's released a few solo albums and toured, promoting himself as "the voice of Dr. Hook.". (*) radio-only single; did not have a music video. Locorriere spent a few years relaxing, and then in 1989 performed a one-man show written by Shel Silverstein, "The Devil and Billy Markham," which made him enthusiastic to be on stage again. Only included here are records Elliott did not write or produce on; singles upon which she did songwriting/production work in addiiton to providing guest vocals are notabed below in the Selected songwriting/production credits section. Hook featuring Ray Sawyer" after doing a few country records under his own name. Although she is not credited, Lil Mo sings guest leads and background vocals on the single, and appears in the video as well. In the 1990s, Sawyer went back on the road as "Dr. (***) Q-Tip appears on the radio version of the “Hot Boyz” remix, but not the video version.

Sawyer left in 1983, and the band continued to tour for two more years before completely splitting up in 1985. (**) "Lick Shots" had no unique music video, but a snippet of the song was included at the end of the "Get Ur Freak On" video; "4 My People" was similarly a "mini-video" at the end of the "Take Away" video. Hook", and their chart hits became mostly ballads (including "The Ballad of Lucy Jordan"). (*) radio-only single; did not have a music video. The band toured constantly but spent all the money they earned on partying; their fifh album was aptly called "Bankrupt". Eventually they shortened the band's name to "Dr. Over a decade after she first began offering songwriting and production services, Missy Elliott is still as widely recognized and respected by her peers as ever. It also got the band on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, although as a caricature rather than a photograph. The same year, Elliott was featured on Wyclef Jean's "Party To Damascus" and Ghostface Killah's "Tush, Tush, Tush" singles, and had a pivitol role in the motion picture Honey, starring Jessica Alba.

"Sylvia's Mother," a ballad from their first album, became a big hit, and "Cover of the Rolling Stone" from the followup album, "Sloppy Seconds" attracted the attention of those who would like their silly stage show and its monologues done as fictional characters. However, neither caught on at pop radio as well as her previous efforts have. Silverstein composed most of the songs on their first few albums. Elliott's newest singles, "Pass The Dutch" and "I'm Really Hot", from her fifth album, This Is Not A Test! (released November 2003), both rose the urban charts. Haffkine also became their new manager and got the band a record deal. In the summer of 2003, Elliott was the featured rapper on Timbaland and Magoo's long-awaited return single, "Cop That Disc"; the song was a modest hit at urban radio. The band hooked up with composer Shel Silverstein when their manager sent in a demo tape to Ron Haffkine, who was in charge of doing the music for the movie Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me? Silverstein was writing songs for the film, and he and Haffkine both liked the demo enough to get the band to do all the songs for the movie. Under Construction also included "Back in the Day (2002 song)", a nostalgic ode to old school hip hop music and fashion that featured Jay-Z and Tweet.

The band name is a reference to Captain Hook from Peter Pan; in fact, the original name proposed for the band was "Captain Hook and the Medicine Show". As the "Work It" video had done during 2002, "Gossip Folks" became one of the most-played music videos on MTV, MTV2, MTV Jams, and BET in 2003, and was also extremely successful on VH1 and VH1 Soul. Sawyer was particularly noticeable due to his trademark cowboy hat and the eyepatch he wore due to a car accident in 1967. Elliott's fourth album, 2002's Under Construction (see 2002 in music), included "Work It", arguably Elliott's biggest hit to date, and the successful duet with Ludacris, "Gossip Folks," which let Elliott's critics know what she thought of what they had to say about her, namely her amazingly rapid weight loss that had taken place during 2002. Other members include Jance Garfat, Rik Elswit, and Jay David. The single was a Top Ten hit, thanks partially to Elliott's songwriting and guest rap, and also Timbaland's funky production. Bill Francis, John David, and George Cummings were also part of the original band, but their lineup changed quite a bit over the years. Tweet's own debut single, "Oops (Oh My)", was written by Elliott and relased through Goldmind in February 2002.

The original lineup consisted of core members Ray Sawyer and Dennis Locorriere. The remix performed just as successfully as the original and was the version which was heard both in the Tomb Raider movie that year and on its soundtrack. Hook & the Medicine Show is a pop-country rock band formed in Union City, New Jersey in 1968. For "Get Ur Freak On", an usual remix was also released, which combined scat-singing from Nelly Furtado with Elliott's original rapping. Dr. That album produced the massive singles, "One Minute Man," featuring Ludacris, Trina, and Jay-Z and "Get Ur Freak On," as well as the less successful single "Take Away," which featured soulful melodies from Ginuwine and a returning Tweet, and whose video was made into a loving tribute for their late friend, Aaliyah. So Addictive in (2001, see 2001 in music).

Elliott next released Miss E.. Da Real World (1999, see 1999 in music) included the singles "All N My Grill," a collaboration with Nicole and Big Boi (from OutKast); "Hot Boyz;" and "She's A Bitch". Elliott's second album was just as successful as the first. The same year, Elliott produced and contributed background vocals and some rhymes to former Spice Girl, Mel B's, debut single, "I Want You Back".

In 1998, Elliott continued her successful music career by writing and producing Total's single "Trippin'", as well as working with several others in the hip-hop and R&B communities. 1997 also saw Elliott perform on Lil Kim's girl-power anthem, a hit remix of her song, "Not Tonite". The song's remix also featured Da Brat, Angie Martinez, and Left Eye, in addition to Kim and Elliott; and the five women performed it at the 1997 MTV Video Music Awards show. The critical acceptance of Supa Dupa Fly was mixed, though generally positive; many critics commented that the album tracks, some of which sampled Elliott/ Mosley hits such as "Can We" and "One in a Million", were far inferior to the singles. Other singles included "Beep Me 911," which featured 702, Timbaland, and Magoo; "Hit 'Em Wit Da Hee," featuring rapper Mocha and Timbaland; and "Sock It 2 Me," a decent-sized hit which featured rhymes from Da Brat and a cameos by her and Lil Kim in the Mega Man-inspired music video.

Her debut album, released in mid-1997, was Supa Dupa Fly, which included "The Rain (Supa Dupa Fly)", a blockbuster hit that established Elliott as a major force in popular music. Timbaland was again recruited as her production partner, a role he would hold for every Elliott solo release. She instead signed a deal with Elektra Records in 1996 to create her own imprint, Goldmind, for which she would record as a solo artist. Elliott also appeared as a guest rapper and background vocalist on MC Lyte's 1996 single "Cold Rock A Party", produced by Sean "Puffy" Combs, who hoped to sign her to Bad Boy Records.

Elliott and Timbaland would continue to work together for other artists, and later created hits for artists such as Total ("What About Us"), Nicole Wray ("Make it Hot"), and Destiny's Child ("Get On the Bus"), and one final hit for Aaliyah before her 2001 death ("I Care 4 U"). One in a Million went double-platinum and made stars out of the production duo. Elliott also contributing background vocals and/or guest raps to nearly all of the tracks she and Timbaland worked on. Elliott and Timbaland wrote and produced nine tracks for Aaliyah's second album, One In A Million (1996), among them the hit singles "If Your Girl Only Knew", "One in a Million", "Hot Like Fire", and "4-Page Letter".

Among these acts were SWV ("Can We?") and 702 ("Steelo" and its remix), but the most notable of them was Aaliyah. After leaving Swing Mob, Elliott and Timbaland began working together as an independent songwriting/production team, and the two of them crafted hit singles for a number of artists between 1995 to 1997. By 1995, Swing Mob had folded and many of its members dispersed; Elliott, Timbaland, Magoo, Ginuwine, and Playa remained together, and would collaborate on each others' records for the rest of the decade. Timbaland and DeVante produced a Sista LP, 4 All the Sistas Around the World, which was completed in 1994, but shelved and never released.

Elliott contributed songwriting duties, both credited and uncredited, to the final two Jodeci albums: 1993's Diary of a Mad Band and 1995's The Show, The After Party, The Hotel. All 20-plus members of the Swing Mob, among them future stars such as Ginuwine, Playa, and Tweet, all lived in a single two-story house in New York, and were often at work on material both for Jodeci and for their own projects. Elliott took along with her Mosley, whom DeVante re-christened Timbaland, and their friend Melvin "Magoo" Barcliff. In short order, Sista moved to New York City, now signed to Elektra Records through DeVante's Swing Mob imprint.

In 1991, Sista caught the attention of Jodeci member/producer DeVante Swing by performing Jodeci songs acapella for him backstage after one of his group's concerts. She recruited her neighborhood friend Timothy "DJ TImmy Tim" Mosley as the group's producer, and began making demo tracks. In the late-1980s, Elliott, LaShawn Shellman, Chonita Coleman, and Radiah Scott formed an R&B group called Sista, for which Elloitt served as a singer and songwriter. In addition, she has recieved recognition as one of the most successful songwriters of the modern music era, having crafted a number of hit records for artists such as Aaliyah, 702, Total, Nicole Wray, and Tweet, often with production partner and childhood friend Timbaland.

Elliott is the first female hip hop superstar, known for a long series of hits including "The Rain", "She's A Bitch", "Get Ur Freak On", and "Work It". Formerly known as Missy "Misdemeanor" Elliott, Elliott dropped the "Misdemeanor" part of her name in 2003 and now goes by simply "Missy Elliott". Missy Elliott (born Melissa Arnette Elliott on July 1, 1971 in Portsmouth, Virginia) is an African_American singer, rapper, songwriter, and record producer. 2004: "1, 2, Step" by Ciara (also guested).

2003: ”(My Love is Like) Wo” by Mya. 2003: ”So Gone” by Monica (also guested). 2002: "Oops! (Oh My!)" by Tweet (also guested). 2002: ”I Care 4 U” by Aaliyah.

2001: "Bootylicious [Rockwilder Remix]" by Destiny's Child (also guested). 2001: ”Lady Marmalade” by Mya, Pink, Christina Aguilera, and Lil Kim. 2000: ”Take That” by Torrey Carter (also guested). 1999: "Heartbreaker [Remix]" by Mariah Carey featuring Da Brat (also guested).

(also guested). 1998: "I Want You Back" by Mel B. 1998: "Make It Hot" by Nicole Wray (also guested). 1998: "Trippin'" by Total (also guested).

1997: ”What About Us?” by Total. 1997: ”I’ll Do Anything/I’m Sorry” by Ginuwine. 1997: "Can We" by SWV (also guested). 1996: ”One in a Million” by Aaliyah.

1996: ”If Your Girl Only Knew” by Aaliyah. 1996: ”Steelo” by 702 (also guested). 2004: "Car Wash" by Christina Aguilera. 2003: "Tush, Tush, Tush" by Ghostface Killah.

2003: "Party To Damascus" by Wyclef Jean;. 2003: "Cop That Disc" by Timbaland & Magoo. 2003: "American Life" [remix] by Madonna *. 2002: "Son Of A Gun" [Original Flyte Time Remix] by Janet Jackson.

1997: "Not Tonite (Ladies Night)" [remix] with Lil' Kim, Da Brat, Angie Martinez, and Left Eye. 1997: "Can We" by SWV. 1996: "Cold Rock A Party" by MC Lyte. 2004: "I'm Really Hot".

2003: "Pass The Dutch". 2003: "Pussycat" *. 2003: "Work It" [remix] (featuring 50 Cent). 2002: "Gossip Folks" (featuring Ludacris).

2002: "Work It". 2002: "4 My People" (club single) **. 2001: "Take Away" (featuring Ginuwine and Tweet). 2001: "Lick Shots"**.

2001: "One Minute Man" [remix] (featuring Jay-Z) *. 2001: "One Minute Man" (featuring Ludacris and Trina). 2001: "Get Ur Freak On" [remix] (featuring Nelly Furtado) *. 2001: "Get Ur Freak On".

2000: "Hot Boyz" [remix] (featuring Nas, Eve, and Q-Tip)***. 1999: "All N My Grill" (featuring Nicole Wray and Big Boi of OutKast). 1999: "She's A Bitch". 1998: "Hit 'Em Wit Da Hee" (featuring Timbaland & Mocha).

1998: "Beep Me 911" (featuring 702 and Magoo). 1997: "Sock It 2 Me" (featuring Da Brat). 1997: "The Rain (Supa Dupa Fly)". 2003: This Is Not A Test!.

2002: Under Construction. 2001: Miss E...So Addictive. 1999: Da Real World. 1997: Supa Dupa Fly.

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