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Dr. Hook & The Medicine Show

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Dr. Hook & the Medicine Show is a pop-country rock band formed in Union City, New Jersey in 1968. The original lineup consisted of core members Ray Sawyer and Dennis Locorriere. Bill Francis, John David, and George Cummings were also part of the original band, but their lineup changed quite a bit over the years. Other members include Jance Garfat, Rik Elswit, and Jay David. Sawyer was particularly noticeable due to his trademark cowboy hat and the eyepatch he wore due to a car accident in 1967. The band name is a reference to Captain Hook from Peter Pan; in fact, the original name proposed for the band was "Captain Hook and the Medicine Show".

The band hooked up with composer Shel Silverstein when their manager sent in a demo tape to Ron Haffkine, who was in charge of doing the music for the movie Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me? Silverstein was writing songs for the film, and he and Haffkine both liked the demo enough to get the band to do all the songs for the movie. Haffkine also became their new manager and got the band a record deal. Silverstein composed most of the songs on their first few albums.

"Sylvia's Mother," a ballad from their first album, became a big hit, and "Cover of the Rolling Stone" from the followup album, "Sloppy Seconds" attracted the attention of those who would like their silly stage show and its monologues done as fictional characters. It also got the band on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, although as a caricature rather than a photograph.

The band toured constantly but spent all the money they earned on partying; their fifh album was aptly called "Bankrupt". Eventually they shortened the band's name to "Dr. Hook", and their chart hits became mostly ballads (including "The Ballad of Lucy Jordan").

Sawyer left in 1983, and the band continued to tour for two more years before completely splitting up in 1985. In the 1990s, Sawyer went back on the road as "Dr. Hook featuring Ray Sawyer" after doing a few country records under his own name. Locorriere spent a few years relaxing, and then in 1989 performed a one-man show written by Shel Silverstein, "The Devil and Billy Markham," which made him enthusiastic to be on stage again. Since then he's released a few solo albums and toured, promoting himself as "the voice of Dr. Hook."


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Since then he's released a few solo albums and toured, promoting himself as "the voice of Dr. Hook.". Lauren St John, Hardcore Toubadour: The Life and Near Death of Steve Earle, Fourth Estate, 2002 ISBN 1-84115-6116. Locorriere spent a few years relaxing, and then in 1989 performed a one-man show written by Shel Silverstein, "The Devil and Billy Markham," which made him enthusiastic to be on stage again. He is also the subject of a biography:. Hook featuring Ray Sawyer" after doing a few country records under his own name. Steve is the subject of a documentary film entitled Just An American Boy (http://www.popmatters.com/music/reviews/e/earlesteve-justanamericandvd.shtml), directed by Amos Poe. In the 1990s, Sawyer went back on the road as "Dr. In February 2005 he recieved a Grammy Award for best contemporary folk album for the album The Revolution Starts Now.

Sawyer left in 1983, and the band continued to tour for two more years before completely splitting up in 1985. In 2004 he was given a Lifetime Achievement Award for songwriting by the UK's BBC Radio 2. Hook", and their chart hits became mostly ballads (including "The Ballad of Lucy Jordan"). The controversy did however manage to raise Earle's profile in the media and didn't seem to damage his record sales in the slightest. The band toured constantly but spent all the money they earned on partying; their fifh album was aptly called "Bankrupt". Eventually they shortened the band's name to "Dr. Some critics had trouble comprehending that a songwriter is not necessarily the character they're describing and branded Earle a traitor and a Taliban supporter. It also got the band on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, although as a caricature rather than a photograph. In 2002, Earle managed to land himself in trouble by writing a song about John Walker Lindh ("John Walker's Blues" on Jerusalem) written from Lindh's perspective (lyrics (http://www.cowboylyrics.com/lyrics/earle-steve/john-walkers-blues-2206.html)).

"Sylvia's Mother," a ballad from their first album, became a big hit, and "Cover of the Rolling Stone" from the followup album, "Sloppy Seconds" attracted the attention of those who would like their silly stage show and its monologues done as fictional characters. He is also a supporter of and regular participant in the Concerts for a Landmine Free World, benefitting the Vietnam Veterans of America Foundation. Silverstein composed most of the songs on their first few albums. From 1990, Earle also worked to educate the public about, and abolish, the death penalty. Haffkine also became their new manager and got the band a record deal. Steve was named Country Artist of the year for 1986 by Rolling Stone magazine. The band hooked up with composer Shel Silverstein when their manager sent in a demo tape to Ron Haffkine, who was in charge of doing the music for the movie Who Is Harry Kellerman and Why Is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me? Silverstein was writing songs for the film, and he and Haffkine both liked the demo enough to get the band to do all the songs for the movie. It was a critical success and sold over 300,000 copies.

The band name is a reference to Captain Hook from Peter Pan; in fact, the original name proposed for the band was "Captain Hook and the Medicine Show". He had to wait until 1986 before his first album Guitar Town was released. Sawyer was particularly noticeable due to his trademark cowboy hat and the eyepatch he wore due to a car accident in 1967. However, despite his early success in gaining a job as a songwriter it was not until 1981 that he achieved a top ten cut with "When You Fall in Love" recorded by Johnny Lee. Other members include Jance Garfat, Rik Elswit, and Jay David. Steve was one of the backing vocals on Guy's, "Desperados Waiting For A Train" together with Emmylou Harris on Guy's first album Old No 1. Bill Francis, John David, and George Cummings were also part of the original band, but their lineup changed quite a bit over the years. Guy was instrumental in Steve being employed as a songwriter by the Sunburry Dunbar publishing division of RCA.

The original lineup consisted of core members Ray Sawyer and Dennis Locorriere. In 1975 he moved to Nashville where he met and worked with fellow Texans Guy Clark and his wife Susanna Clark. Hook & the Medicine Show is a pop-country rock band formed in Union City, New Jersey in 1968. There he met Townes van Zandt (who became a mentor) and other artists like Jerry Jeff Walker, Lucinda Williams and Nanci Griffith. Dr. He dropped out of school in 8th grade to move to Austin, Texas and learn more about the music business. He was born in Ft. Monroe, Virginia and was the eldest son of an air traffic controller.

Steve Earle (born January 17, 1955) is a country musician who grew up in Schertz, Texas. Revolution Starts Now - 2004. Just An American Boy (live) - 2004. Jerusalem - 2002.

Side Tracks - 2002. Transcendental Blues - 2000. The Mountain - 1999. El Corazon - 1997.

I Feel Alright - 1996. Train A-Comin' - 1995. Shut Up And Die Like An Aviator - 1991. The Hard Way - 1990.

Copperhead Road - 1988. Exit 0 - 1987. Early Tracks - 1987. Guitar Town - 1986.

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